CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 81 to 100 of 305

_id 91fd
authors Wu, Jie and Gu, Jingwen
year 1999
title The Computer Media Method of Analysis of Architecture Works
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 97-103
summary The analysis of architecture works is through the design of architecture. It is closely related to the review of architecture and also is the most important method to research into and study architecture. But it hasnÌt been paid enough attention, because of the limitations of the traditional methods. Now with the development of the computer media technology and its wide use, there appears a new methodÛthe computer media analysis method, which has many advantages that the traditional methods havenÌt. In this paper, we discuss the frame, the process and the feature of the new method. And through the analysis of examples we explore the working of this method under the current condition. We hope through the research and the study of this new method, the analysis of architecture works can be used consciously by students, educators, and practitioners to think deeply about, research into, study architecture, and at the same time to creating better designs.
series CAADRIA
email wujieb@online.sh.cn
last changed 2002/09/05 07:23

_id avocaad_2001_17
id avocaad_2001_17
authors Ying-Hsiu Huang, Yu-Tung Liu, Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yi-Ting Cheng, Yu-Chen Chiu
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in design process
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Design media is a fundamental tool, which can incubate concrete ideas from ambiguous concepts. Evolved from freehand sketches, physical models to computerized drafting, modeling (Dave, 2000), animations (Woo, et al., 1999), and virtual reality (Chiu, 1999; Klercker, 1999; Emdanat, 1999), different media are used to communicate to designers or users with different conceptual levels¡@during the design process. Extensively employed in design process, physical models help designers in managing forms and spaces more precisely and more freely (Millon, 1994; Liu, 1996).Computerized drafting, models, animations, and VR have gradually replaced conventional media, freehand sketches and physical models. Diversely used in the design process, computerized media allow designers to handle more divergent levels of space than conventional media do. The rapid emergence of computers in design process has ushered in efforts to the visual impact of this media, particularly (Rahman, 1992). He also emphasized the use of computerized media: modeling and animations. Moreover, based on Rahman's study, Bai and Liu (1998) applied a new design media¡Xvirtual reality, to the design process. In doing so, they proposed an evaluation process to examine the visual impact of this new media in the design process. That same investigation pointed towards the facilitative role of the computerized media in enhancing topical comprehension, concept realization, and development of ideas.Computer technology fosters the growth of emerging media. A new computerized media, scenario scripting (Sasada, 2000; Jozen, 2000), markedly enhances computer animations and, in doing so, positively impacts design processes. For the three latest media, i.e., computerized animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting, the following question arises: What role does visual impact play in different design phases of these media. Moreover, what is the origin of such an impact? Furthermore, what are the similarities and variances of computing techniques, principles of interaction, and practical applications among these computerized media?This study investigates the similarities and variances among computing techniques, interacting principles, and their applications in the above three media. Different computerized media in the design process are also adopted to explore related phenomenon by using these three media in two projects. First, a renewal planning project of the old district of Hsinchu City is inspected, in which animations and scenario scripting are used. Second, the renewal project is compared with a progressive design project for the Hsinchu Digital Museum, as designed by Peter Eisenman. Finally, similarity and variance among these computerized media are discussed.This study also examines the visual impact of these three computerized media in the design process. In computerized animation, although other designers can realize the spatial concept in design, users cannot fully comprehend the concept. On the other hand, other media such as virtual reality and scenario scripting enable users to more directly comprehend what the designer's presentation.Future studies should more closely examine how these three media impact the design process. This study not only provides further insight into the fundamental characteristics of the three computerized media discussed herein, but also enables designers to adopt different media in the design stages. Both designers and users can more fully understand design-related concepts.
series AVOCAAD
email yinghsiu@iaaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ae61
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title CAAD - Integrated with the First Steps into Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 266-272
summary How and when should CAAD be introduced in the curriculum of the School of Architecture? This paper begins with some arguments for starting CAAD education at the very beginning. At the School of Architecture in Lund teachers in the first year courses have tried to integrate CAAD with the introduction to architectural concepts and techniques. Traditionally the first year is divided by several subjects running courses separatly without any contact for coordination. From the academic year 96/97 the teachers of Aplied aestetics, Building Science, Architectural design and CAAD have decided to colaborate as much as possible to make the role of our different fields as clear as possible to the students. Therefore integrating CAAD was a natural step in the academic year 98/99. The computer techniques were taught one step in advance so that the students can practise their understanding of the programs in their tasks in the other subjects. The results were surprisingly good! The students have quickly learned to mix the manual and computer techniques to make expressive and interesting visual presentations of their ideas. Some students with antipaty to computers have overcome this handicap. Some interesting observations are discussed.
keywords Curriculum, First Year Studies, Integration, CAAD, Modelling
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id bd21
authors Barría Chateau, H., García Alvarado, R., Lagos Vergara, R. and Parra Márquez, J.C.
year 1999
title Evaluation of Spatial Perception in Virtual Environments
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 145-148
summary The 3D environments created by computers can be used as a powerful simulation tool for architecture, especially with inmersive devices, but it is necessary to know properly their spatial characteristics to use it effectively. It is also important to consider their possibilities in communication networks and their implications in contemporary architecture. For this reason, the goal of this research is to evaluate the perception of virtual architectonic spaces in relation to the perception of real architectonic spaces. This research is based on the comparison of experiences of university students in a real space (Entrance Hall of Faculty of Economy) and in the same space modeled by a computer. The evaluation considers tests with stereoscopic helmets and interactive navigation, making questionnaires to characterize the sensation of dimensions, relationships and time for an specific activity. The measuring of real and virtual spaces are made through references (furniture, textures, etc.) or by proportional relations between height, width and depth, in different patterns. The experience also reveals mental schemes to perceive the dimension of architectonic space and the orientation in a real and virtual environment. Besides, the research allows to relate the different levels of complexity and information with the understanding of real architectonic space and modeled space.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegsasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bbb9
authors Blaise, Jean-Yves and Dudek, Iwona
year 1999
title SOL: Spatial and Historical Web-Based Interface for On Line Architectural Documentation of Krakow's Rynek Gowny
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 700-707
summary Our paper presents recent developments of a co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France), specialised in computer science and the HAiKZ Institute of Krakow's Faculty of Architecture, specialised in architectural heritage and conservation. Before undertaking any action to a listed building or interventions in its neighbourhood, it is vital to gain a clear understanding of the building in question. Numerous heterogeneous data detained by diverse institutions has to be handled. This process can be greatly eased by enhanced classification of the information. The development we present is a multidisciplinary platform independent information tool dedicated to education and research. SOL uses an http protocol centred computer architecture connecting a relational database, a VRML 2.0 representation module and a web search interface. It allows searches and updating of the database through a standard text based interface, a VRML 2.0 graphical module and a thematic interface. SOL is experienced on the urban fabric of the Main Square (Rynek Gówny) in Kraków. The choice of a web-centred development, both in the search and updating interface and in the representation module provides platform independence and distant access to the database, and enables successive contributions of students or researchers.
keywords Web Interface, Database, Architectural Heritage Environment, Information Module, Historical Evolutions
series eCAADe
email jyb@gamsau.archi.fr, idu@gamsau.archi.fr
more http://alberti.gamsau.archi.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c19d
authors Camara, Antonio S. and Raper, Jonathan (Ed.)
year 1999
title Spatial multimedia and virtual reality
source London: Taylor & Francis
summary The intersection of two disciplines and technologies which have become mature academic research topics in the 1990s was destined to be a dynamic area for collaboration and publication. However, until now no significant book-length treatment of the meeting of GIS and Virtual Reality has been available. This volume puts that situation to rights by bringing these together to cement some common understanding and principles in a potentially highly promising area for technological collaboration and cross-fertilisation. The result is a volume which ranges in subject matter from studies of a Virtual GIS Room to Spatial Agents, and from an Environmental Multimedia System to Computer-Assisted 3D Geographic Education. All the contributors are well-known international scientists, principally from the computational side of GIS. It will be a valuable resource for any GIS researcher or professional looking to understand the leading edge of this fertile field. ------------------------------------------------------------------------
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 69f5
authors Chan, C., Maves, J. and Cruz-Neira, C.
year 1999
title An Electronic Library for Teaching Architectural History
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 335-344
summary This research project developed an electronic library of significant buildings chosen to represent seven selected periods of Western architectural history: Egyptian (Mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut), Greek (Parthenon), Roman (Pantheon), Romanesque (Speyer Cathedral), Gothic (Notre Dame Cathedral), Renaissance (Tempietto), and Modern (Des Moines Art Center). All buildings were reconstructed in their original or intended forms based on plans, drawings, photographs, and historical texts. Two products were generated by this project: (1) materials to be displayed on the World Wide Web, including rendered still images for perception, movies for a visual guide, and Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) models for user navigation; and (2) virtual reality (VR) models to be displayed in the C2 (an improved version of the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment or CAVE facility). The benefits of these VR models displayed on the Web and in the C2 are their easy accessibility at any time from various geographic locations and the immersive experience that enhances viewersÌ understanding of the effects of spatial proportions on form and of colors on materials.
series CAADRIA
more http://archvr.design.iastate.edu/miller
last changed 2000/01/13 11:23

_id 4989
authors Clayton, M.J., Teicholz, P., Fischer, M. and Kunz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual components consisting of form, function and behavior
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 351-367
summary Software can produce a product model of a building as a consequence of the designers' actions in drawing and evaluating the design. The actions of the designer include interpreting, predicting and assessing the emerging design and describe the building in terms of forms, functions and behaviors. A software prototype has been implemented that incorporates this understanding of the design process in the field of building design. It employs object-oriented classes to represent forms, functions and behaviors. As a software user draws and interprets the design for multiple evaluation issues, the software creates a unique `virtual component' for each entity. During automated reasoning to evaluate the emerging design, virtual components collect and organize form, function and behavior instances to describe the parts of the building. In comparison to other product models, our approach, which we refer to as a `Virtual Product Model', better accommodates change, provides increased support for the design process and enriches the product representation by including function and behavior.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id maver_096
id maver_096
authors Ennis, Gareth and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Inside the Map - The Glasgow Directory
source Proceedings of 36th Annual Symposium of the British Cartographic Society, Glasgow (UK)
summary The characteristics of the traditional map have remained unchanged for centuries A symbolic representation of reality, the map relies on the user's understanding of scale, orientation, reference and location.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id maver_104
id maver_104
authors Ennis, Gareth and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Inside the Map - The Glasgow Directory
source Proceedings of 36th Annual Symposium of the British Cartographic Society, Glasgow (UK)
summary The characteristics of the traditional map have remained unchanged for centuries A symbolic representation of reality, the map relies on the user's understanding of scale, orientation, reference and location.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:36

_id be33
authors Gero, John S.
year 1999
title Constructive Memory in Design Thinking
source Architectural Science Review 42: 3-5
summary This paper introduces the concept of constructive memory as a framework for the modeling of design thinking. It describes some recent results from empirical studies of designing to show a gap exists between our models of designing and these results. The paper presents constructive memory and its associated concept of situatedness as potential foundations for increasing our understanding of design thinking.
keywords Constructive Memory; Emergence; Situatedness; Models of Designing; Design Theory
series journal paper
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/03/31 06:34

_id sigradi2005_799
id sigradi2005_799
authors Gonzalo, Guillermo E.; Sara L. Ledesma, V.M. Nota, C.F. Martínez, G.I. Quiñones y G. Márquez Vega.
year 2005
title Methodology for the bioclimatic design: computer sustain for election of guidelines and strategies.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 799-805
summary After numerous studies and practical of use, field and laboratory measurements, carried out among the years 1994 and 1999, we arrived to the elaboration and presentation of a methodology for the bioclimatic design and energetically sustainable that already takes two books publications. With the support of more than 600 figures that facilitate the understanding of the concepts explained in the books and 26 computer software and databases, that are attached to the second book, the work is facilitated so that designers of buildings that have not been never in contact with a certain climate, or that they don’t have sufficiently assumed by means of the observation of the particularities of a certain climatic situation, to understand the form in that the climate influence their design, condition or determine the design solutions and averge strategies that will choose when carrying out an architecture work. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email ggonzalo@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 0b68
authors Ibáñez, José Enrique and Santos, Laura
year 1999
title Utilización de un programa didáctico para la formación de desarrolladores, arquitectos, ingenieros y diseñadores (Use of a Didactic Program for the Training of Developers, Architects, Engineers and Designers)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 352-356
summary For those questions of the specialisation, the Informaitc engineers develop applications of digital graphic destined to designers, users that, in general, ignore with the chore of developing applications. Also, most of the designers have to fight with applications that do not contemplate their necessities neither translates their expressive intentions with clarity. This reciprocal discussion may find an adequate solution in interdisciplinary work. The fecundity, and until the possibility, of the internal dialogue of these teams will depend, between other looks, of the quantity of common concepts that they possess. In this sense, we focused our educational task opposite the future engineers. We understand that, at the same time, the actual education of the designer, in whatever of their multiple looks, should contemplate the basic training (not instrumental but if conceptual) in questions related with the code of the applications that they use. This intellectual effort would enable the digital designer to investigate the topics of personalising their user applications (AutoCAD, CorelDraw, etc.). In this ground, we should greet the admission of the languages of visual code (Delphi, Visual [basic], etc.) that they permit a friendlier development of applications. Its goal is qualify them in order to develop applications of digital graphic, providing them concepts of space understanding and visual training for the production of IT applications of digital graphic.
series SIGRADI
email estdce@ciudad.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id c9db
authors Juhasz, Peter, Kiss, Zsolt and Szoboszlai, Mihaly
year 1999
title Drawing's Dimensions
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 498-502
summary Traditional methods used for 3-dimensional visualisation are rediscovered is many fields. Architects and designers have sought appropriate and useful computer-based techniques that they can describe spatial relation with. This paper considers the significant opportunity that is now available in education to help understanding of 3-dimensional space with stereo-equipment powered by computers.
keywords 3D Visualisation, CAAD, 3-D Modeling, Stereoscopy
series eCAADe
email caadgroup@arch.bme.hu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 473d
authors Maver, Tom and Petric, Jelena
year 1999
title Virtual Heritage: Is There a Future for the Past?
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 482-487
summary This paper attempts an overview of the contribution which emerging information technologies - viz CAD, Multimedia, Virtual Reality and the Internet - can make to the presentation, understanding and preservation of the rich architectural heritage which exists (pro-term) in almost every cultural context. In the UK, the growing interest in sites such as Stonehenge has, through the threat of greater physical presence, increasingly kept the public at bay - a curious paradox which Virtual Reality (VR) has the potential to address. Virtual Reality (-an overly used and underly understood term-) is an information technology which can provide a convincing experience of environments which: i) exist, but are too remote, costly or hazardous, to visit. ii) don't yet exist but are planned, such as architectural designs or urban plans. iii) never will exist, other than in the imagination. iv) existed in the past and are now threatened or already lost. // This paper has its focus on the latter category, i.e. what is now becoming known as Virtual Heritage (VH), but it puts VH in the context of the broader spectrum of simulated experiences of past, present and future environments of cultural significance. The paper draws largely on the work of ABACUS, the Architecture and Building Aids Computer Unit, Strathclyde. The examples of the application of IT to VH include: i) a virtual reality experience of Historic Scotland's premier historical site: Skara Brae, the most complete neolithic settlement in Northern Europe. ii) a multimedia CD-ROM featuring some 50 of the most wonderful interiors of Glasgow's architectural treasures. iii) a computer based archive of rare and normally inaccessible 17C and 18C drawings of Scottish buildings from three seminal sources. iv) a massive 3-D model of Glasgow (some 10,000 buildings located on the hilly terrain of the city), which is now accessible on the Internet. // The paper concludes with conjectures based on the examples given of how emerging information technologies can help secure a future for the past.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 8d64
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 1999
title Top 5 Themes to Promote Architectural Information Technology and Top 5 Obstacles to Decelerate it
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 6-10
summary The objective of this paper is to scan a few interesting themes, features and ideas of current information and communication technology (ICT) to promote their wise use within the fields of architectural practice and architectural education. The core idea is to prepare for the future by understanding the future relevance of the dominating themes. The meaning and significance of the selected and presented common ideas is evaluated to strengthen a realistic future basis for the design discipline. The author finds organizing, structuring and sharing architectural design data with digital tools the most future-relevant ICT-theme, that should be supported with R&D-activities and taught in architectural ICT-education. The obstacles of digitalization to produce negative impacts to architectural profession seem to be of mental nature rather than technical. The human mind, juridical agreements and long-lived design traditions are possibly the most threatening and restrictive obstacles in the future. The selected top 5 methods in evaluating existing trends and features has been used for instance in futures studies as one systematical approach to chart history and current times as informants of the future (Bell, 1996). A pragmatic and personal approach has been used in selecting the themes.
keywords Architectural Information and Communication Technology (ICT), ICT-trends, Future Studies, Future Relevance
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email hannu.penttila@hut.fi
last changed 2009/06/04 05:02

_id 206caadria2004
id 206caadria2004
authors Ricardo Sosa and John S. Gero
year 2004
title Diffusion of Design Ideas: Gatekeeping Effects
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 287-302
summary Designers and design managers are interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complexities of creativity and innovation (Langdon and Rothwell 1985). These two phenomena can be seen as complementary dimensions of a differentiation cycle where design plays a key value-adding role that gradually reduces through commoditisation. However, there is a lack of relevant evidence to explain the link between creativity and innovation. Creativity is increasingly considered as occurring in the interaction between the individual generator of an idea and a group of evaluators (Sawyer et al 2003). However, most studies have regarded the generation of a solution -and not its social impact- as the outcome of the creative process (Runco and Pritzker 1999). Accordingly, computational modelling of creativity has been mainly conducted in a social void (Boden 1999).
series CAADRIA
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/05/20 16:46

_id 19a8
authors Schultz, Volkher
year 1999
title A DIDACTIC CONCEPT FOR TRAINING ARCHITECTS AND INTERIOR DECORATORS
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 29-39
summary The 20th year anniversary of the Lichtlabor is used as an opportunity to look back. Two decades in a period of rapid technological development is a long time, during which furnishings pass or fail their trial period. The organizational structure of the Lichtlabor which includes lay-out and appliances has continually expanded since 1977 although the theoretical approach has not changed. Even the ideational structure of the Lichtlabor, without which an organizational structure would be worthless, has proved to be workable and effective as a didactic concept. This concept is based on the interdisciplinary midpoint between a technically (basic) understanding of light – a combination of abstract knowledge and experience gained – and its design-related application.
keywords Lighting Laboratory, Interior Design, Didactic Concept, Visual Comfort, Architectural Space, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:28

_id ga9908
id ga9908
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 1999
title Artistic Process, Cybernetics of Self and the Epistemology of Digital Technology
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary From the viewpoint of Batesonian cybernetics, ‘conscious purpose’ and artistic process are distinct ends of a spectrum of the functioning of self. Artistic activities— by which I mean art, poetry, play, design, etc.— involve processes that are beneath the stratum of consciousness. By definition, consciousness is selective awareness and is linear in execution and limited in its capability to synthesize complex parameters. As Heidegger pointed out, technology is a special form of knowledge (episteme). A machine is a manifestation of such a knowledge. A machine is a result of conscious purpose and is normally task-driven to accomplish a specific purpose(s). The questions this paper raises are to do with the connections between conscious purpose, artistic process and digital technology. One of the central questions of the paper is "if artistic process requires an abandonment or relinquishment of conscious purpose at the time of the generation of the work of art, and if the artistic process is a result of vast number of ‘unconscious’ forces and impulses, then could we say that the computer would ever be able to ‘generate’ or ‘create’ a work of art?" In what capacity and what role would the computer be a part of the generative process of art? Would a computer be able to ‘generate’ and ‘know’ a work of art, which, according to Bateson, requires the abandonment of conscious purpose? The ultimate goal of the paper is to unearth and examine the potential of the computers to be a part of the generative process of what Bateson has called "total self as a cybernetic model". On another plane of discourse, Deleuze and Guattari have added a critical dimension to the discourse of cybernetics and models of human mind and the global computer networks. Their notion of ‘rhizome’ has its roots in Batesonian cybernetics and the cybernetic couplings between the ‘complex systems’ such as human mind, biological and computational systems. Deleuze and Guattari call such systems as human brain and the neural networks as rhizomatic. Given the fact that the computer is the first known cybernetic machine to lay claims to artificial intelligence, the aforementioned questions become even more significant. The paper will explore how, cybernetically, the computer could be ‘coupled’ with ‘self’ and the artistic process — the ultimate expression of human condition. These philosophical and artistic explorations will take place through a series of generative artistic projects (See the figure below for an example) that aim at understanding the couplings and ‘ecology’ of digital technology and the cybernetics of self.
series other
email msenagala@iname.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9... show page 15HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_710760 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002