CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 626

_id ga0009
id ga0009
authors Lewis, Matthew
year 2000
title Aesthetic Evolutionary Design with Data Flow Networks
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary For a little over a decade, software has been created which allows for the design of visual content by aesthetic evolutionary design (AED) [3]. The great majority of these AED systems involve custom software intended for breeding entities within one fairly narrow problem domain, e.g., certain classes of buildings, cars, images, etc. [5]. Only a very few generic AED systems have been attempted, and extending them to a new design problem domain can require a significant amount of custom software development [6][8]. High end computer graphics software packages have in recent years become sufficiently robust to allow for flexible specification and construction of high level procedural models. These packages also provide extensibility, allowing for the creation of new software tools. One component of these systems which enables rapid development of new generative models and tools is the visual data flow network [1][2][7]. One of the first CG packages to employ this paradigm was Houdini. A system constructed within Houdini which allows for very fast generic specification of evolvable parametric prototypes is described [4]. The real-time nature of the software, when combined with the interlocking data networks, allows not only for vertical ancestor/child populations within the design space to be explored, but also allows for fast "horizontal" exploration of the potential population surface. Several example problem domains will be presented and discussed. References: [1] Alias | Wavefront. Maya. 2000, http://www.aliaswavefront.com [2] Avid. SOFTIMAGE. 2000, http://www.softimage.com [3] Bentley, Peter J. Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufmann, 1999. [4] Lewis, Matthew. "Metavolve Home Page". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/AED/Metavolve/ [5] Lewis, Matthew. "Visual Aesthetic Evolutionary Design Links". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/aed.html [6] Rowley, Timothy. "A Toolkit for Visual Genetic Programming". Technical Report GCG-74, The Geometry Center, University of Minnesota, 1994. [7] Side Effects Software. Houdini. 2000, http://www.sidefx.com [8] Todd, Stephen and William Latham. "The Mutation and Growth of Art by Computers" in Evolutionary Design by Computers, Peter Bentley ed., pp. 221-250, Chapter 9, Morgan Kaufmann, 1999.    
series other
email mlewis@cgrg.ohio-state.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 7ccd
authors Augenbroe, Godfried and Eastman, Chuck
year 1999
title Computers in Building: Proceedings of the CAADfutures '99 Conference
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, 398 p.
summary This is the eight CAADfutures Conference. Each of these bi-annual conferences identifies the state of the art in computer application in architecture. Together, the series provides a good record of the evolving state of research in this area over the last fourteen years. Early conferences, for example, addressed project work, either for real construction or done in academic studios, that approached the teaching or use of CAD tools in innovative ways. By the early 1990s, such project-based examples of CAD use disappeared from the conferences, as this area was no longer considered a research contribution. Computer-based design has become a basic way of doing business. This conference is marked by a similar evolutionary change. More papers were submitted about Web- based applications than about any other area. Rather than having multiple sessions on Web-based applications and communications, we instead came to the conclusion that the Web now is an integral part of digital computing, as are CAD applications. Using the conference as a sample, Web-based projects have been integrated into most research areas. This does not mean that the application of the Web is not a research area, but rather that the Web itself is an integral tool in almost all areas of CAAD research.
series CAAD Futures
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 2fc7
authors Forber, U. and Russell, P.
year 1999
title Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Virtual Design Studio Design Studio
source Proceedings of the 17th Annual EAAE Annual Conference, Plymouth UK
summary Drastic changes in technology and economics currently impact common working structures. Moreover, a fundamental move of western societies from industrial and service oriented societies to information oriented societies can be observed. Like others, the AEC industry is also exposed to the challenge of these fundamental changes, not only regarding an ever growing stock of information on building components and materials, but also because of new methods of collaboration to be applied by all participants. As a result, integrating domain specific knowledge into the design process and conversely, conveying design intentions to domain experts, is meaningful in a constantly growing scale. Utilising advanced technology, a twofold approach in research and education, undertaken at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib), University of Karlsruhe, is the basis of efforts to create and develop integrating methods of collaboration into the design and planning process. In addition, the integration of AEC practitioners (investors, users, designers, engineers) in the education process provides both drastic changes in the fields of design and construction education of students and a promising approach for life long learning. The focus of this paper is to present the current state of work and to report on experiences gathered during several Virtual Design Studios (VDS) in which multi-disciplinary participants from various Universities and backgrounds were involved. Platforms for the activities are World Wide Web based applications as well as animations, VR, CAD and video conferencing.
series other
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ae38
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 1999
title Integrating Databases, Objects and the World-Wide Web for Collaboration in Architectural Design
source Proceedings of the focus symposium: World Wide Web as Framework for Collaboration in conjunction with the 11th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, The International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research
summary Architectural design requires specialized vertical knowledge that goes beyond the sharing of marks on paper or the multi-casting of video images. This paper briefly surveys the state-ofthe- art in groupware and outlines the need for vertical and integrated support of synchronous and asynchronous design collaboration. The paper also describes a software prototype (WebOutliner) under development that uses a three-tier persistent object-oriented, web-based technology for a richer representation of hierarchical architectural artifacts using Apple’s WebObjects technology. The prototype contributes to earlier work that defined a framework for a shared workspace consisting of Participants, Tasks, Proposals, and Artifacts. These four elements have been found through observation and analysis to be adequate representations of the essential components of collaborative architectural design. These components are also hierarchical which allows users to filter information, copy completed solutions to other parts of the program, analyze and compare design parameters and aggregate hierarchical amounts. Given its object orientation, the represented artifacts have built-in data and methods that allow them to respond to user actions and manage their own sub-artifacts. In addition, the prototype integrates this technology with Java tools for ubiquitous synchronous web-based access. The prototype uses architectural programming (defining the spatial program of a building) and early conceptual design as examples of seamlessly integrated groupware applications.
keywords Computer Supported Collaborative Design, WebObjects, Synchronous and Asynchronous Collaboration, Java Applets, Application Server, Web-based Interface
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:55

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ga0026
id ga0026
authors Ransen, Owen F.
year 2000
title Possible Futures in Computer Art Generation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Years of trying to create an "Image Idea Generator" program have convinced me that the perfect solution would be to have an artificial artistic person, a design slave. This paper describes how I came to that conclusion, realistic alternatives, and briefly, how it could possibly happen. 1. The history of Repligator and Gliftic 1.1 Repligator In 1996 I had the idea of creating an “image idea generator”. I wanted something which would create images out of nothing, but guided by the user. The biggest conceptual problem I had was “out of nothing”. What does that mean? So I put aside that problem and forced the user to give the program a starting image. This program eventually turned into Repligator, commercially described as an “easy to use graphical effects program”, but actually, to my mind, an Image Idea Generator. The first release came out in October 1997. In December 1998 I described Repligator V4 [1] and how I thought it could be developed away from simply being an effects program. In July 1999 Repligator V4 won the Shareware Industry Awards Foundation prize for "Best Graphics Program of 1999". Prize winners are never told why they won, but I am sure that it was because of two things: 1) Easy of use 2) Ease of experimentation "Ease of experimentation" means that Repligator does in fact come up with new graphics ideas. Once you have input your original image you can generate new versions of that image simply by pushing a single key. Repligator is currently at version 6, but, apart from adding many new effects and a few new features, is basically the same program as version 4. Following on from the ideas in [1] I started to develop Gliftic, which is closer to my original thoughts of an image idea generator which "starts from nothing". The Gliftic model of images was that they are composed of three components: 1. Layout or form, for example the outline of a mandala is a form. 2. Color scheme, for example colors selected from autumn leaves from an oak tree. 3. Interpretation, for example Van Gogh would paint a mandala with oak tree colors in a different way to Andy Warhol. There is a Van Gogh interpretation and an Andy Warhol interpretation. Further I wanted to be able to genetically breed images, for example crossing two layouts to produce a child layout. And the same with interpretations and color schemes. If I could achieve this then the program would be very powerful. 1.2 Getting to Gliftic Programming has an amazing way of crystalising ideas. If you want to put an idea into practice via a computer program you really have to understand the idea not only globally, but just as importantly, in detail. You have to make hard design decisions, there can be no vagueness, and so implementing what I had decribed above turned out to be a considerable challenge. I soon found out that the hardest thing to do would be the breeding of forms. What are the "genes" of a form? What are the genes of a circle, say, and how do they compare to the genes of the outline of the UK? I wanted the genotype representation (inside the computer program's data) to be directly linked to the phenotype representation (on the computer screen). This seemed to be the best way of making sure that bred-forms would bare some visual relationship to their parents. I also wanted symmetry to be preserved. For example if two symmetrical objects were bred then their children should be symmetrical. I decided to represent shapes as simply closed polygonal shapes, and the "genes" of these shapes were simply the list of points defining the polygon. Thus a circle would have to be represented by a regular polygon of, say, 100 sides. The outline of the UK could easily be represented as a list of points every 10 Kilometers along the coast line. Now for the important question: what do you get when you cross a circle with the outline of the UK? I tried various ways of combining the "genes" (i.e. coordinates) of the shapes, but none of them really ended up producing interesting shapes. And of the methods I used, many of them, applied over several "generations" simply resulted in amorphous blobs, with no distinct family characteristics. Or rather maybe I should say that no single method of breeding shapes gave decent results for all types of images. Figure 1 shows an example of breeding a mandala with 6 regular polygons: Figure 1 Mandala bred with array of regular polygons I did not try out all my ideas, and maybe in the future I will return to the problem, but it was clear to me that it is a non-trivial problem. And if the breeding of shapes is a non-trivial problem, then what about the breeding of interpretations? I abandoned the genetic (breeding) model of generating designs but retained the idea of the three components (form, color scheme, interpretation). 1.3 Gliftic today Gliftic Version 1.0 was released in May 2000. It allows the user to change a form, a color scheme and an interpretation. The user can experiment with combining different components together and can thus home in on an personally pleasing image. Just as in Repligator, pushing the F7 key make the program choose all the options. Unlike Repligator however the user can also easily experiment with the form (only) by pushing F4, the color scheme (only) by pushing F5 and the interpretation (only) by pushing F6. Figures 2, 3 and 4 show some example images created by Gliftic. Figure 2 Mandala interpreted with arabesques   Figure 3 Trellis interpreted with "graphic ivy"   Figure 4 Regular dots interpreted as "sparks" 1.4 Forms in Gliftic V1 Forms are simply collections of graphics primitives (points, lines, ellipses and polygons). The program generates these collections according to the user's instructions. Currently the forms are: Mandala, Regular Polygon, Random Dots, Random Sticks, Random Shapes, Grid Of Polygons, Trellis, Flying Leap, Sticks And Waves, Spoked Wheel, Biological Growth, Chequer Squares, Regular Dots, Single Line, Paisley, Random Circles, Chevrons. 1.5 Color Schemes in Gliftic V1 When combining a form with an interpretation (described later) the program needs to know what colors it can use. The range of colors is called a color scheme. Gliftic has three color scheme types: 1. Random colors: Colors for the various parts of the image are chosen purely at random. 2. Hue Saturation Value (HSV) colors: The user can choose the main hue (e.g. red or yellow), the saturation (purity) of the color scheme and the value (brightness/darkness) . The user also has to choose how much variation is allowed in the color scheme. A wide variation allows the various colors of the final image to depart a long way from the HSV settings. A smaller variation results in the final image using almost a single color. 3. Colors chosen from an image: The user can choose an image (for example a JPG file of a famous painting, or a digital photograph he took while on holiday in Greece) and Gliftic will select colors from that image. Only colors from the selected image will appear in the output image. 1.6 Interpretations in Gliftic V1 Interpretation in Gliftic is best decribed with a few examples. A pure geometric line could be interpreted as: 1) the branch of a tree 2) a long thin arabesque 3) a sequence of disks 4) a chain, 5) a row of diamonds. An pure geometric ellipse could be interpreted as 1) a lake, 2) a planet, 3) an eye. Gliftic V1 has the following interpretations: Standard, Circles, Flying Leap, Graphic Ivy, Diamond Bar, Sparkz, Ess Disk, Ribbons, George Haite, Arabesque, ZigZag. 1.7 Applications of Gliftic Currently Gliftic is mostly used for creating WEB graphics, often backgrounds as it has an option to enable "tiling" of the generated images. There is also a possibility that it will be used in the custom textile business sometime within the next year or two. The real application of Gliftic is that of generating new graphics ideas, and I suspect that, like Repligator, many users will only understand this later. 2. The future of Gliftic, 3 possibilties Completing Gliftic V1 gave me the experience to understand what problems and opportunities there will be in future development of the program. Here I divide my many ideas into three oversimplified possibilities, and the real result may be a mix of two or all three of them. 2.1 Continue the current development "linearly" Gliftic could grow simply by the addition of more forms and interpretations. In fact I am sure that initially it will grow like this. However this limits the possibilities to what is inside the program itself. These limits can be mitigated by allowing the user to add forms (as vector files). The user can already add color schemes (as images). The biggest problem with leaving the program in its current state is that there is no easy way to add interpretations. 2.2 Allow the artist to program Gliftic It would be interesting to add a language to Gliftic which allows the user to program his own form generators and interpreters. In this way Gliftic becomes a "platform" for the development of dynamic graphics styles by the artist. The advantage of not having to deal with the complexities of Windows programming could attract the more adventurous artists and designers. The choice of programming language of course needs to take into account the fact that the "programmer" is probably not be an expert computer scientist. I have seen how LISP (an not exactly easy artificial intelligence language) has become very popular among non programming users of AutoCAD. If, to complete a job which you do manually and repeatedly, you can write a LISP macro of only 5 lines, then you may be tempted to learn enough LISP to write those 5 lines. Imagine also the ability to publish (and/or sell) "style generators". An artist could develop a particular interpretation function, it creates images of a given character which others find appealing. The interpretation (which runs inside Gliftic as a routine) could be offered to interior designers (for example) to unify carpets, wallpaper, furniture coverings for single projects. As Adrian Ward [3] says on his WEB site: "Programming is no less an artform than painting is a technical process." Learning a computer language to create a single image is overkill and impractical. Learning a computer language to create your own artistic style which generates an infinite series of images in that style may well be attractive. 2.3 Add an artificial conciousness to Gliftic This is a wild science fiction idea which comes into my head regularly. Gliftic manages to surprise the users with the images it makes, but, currently, is limited by what gets programmed into it or by pure chance. How about adding a real artifical conciousness to the program? Creating an intelligent artificial designer? According to Igor Aleksander [1] conciousness is required for programs (computers) to really become usefully intelligent. Aleksander thinks that "the line has been drawn under the philosophical discussion of conciousness, and the way is open to sound scientific investigation". Without going into the details, and with great over-simplification, there are roughly two sorts of artificial intelligence: 1) Programmed intelligence, where, to all intents and purposes, the programmer is the "intelligence". The program may perform well (but often, in practice, doesn't) and any learning which is done is simply statistical and pre-programmed. There is no way that this type of program could become concious. 2) Neural network intelligence, where the programs are based roughly on a simple model of the brain, and the network learns how to do specific tasks. It is this sort of program which, according to Aleksander, could, in the future, become concious, and thus usefully intelligent. What could the advantages of an artificial artist be? 1) There would be no need for programming. Presumbably the human artist would dialog with the artificial artist, directing its development. 2) The artificial artist could be used as an apprentice, doing the "drudge" work of art, which needs intelligence, but is, anyway, monotonous for the human artist. 3) The human artist imagines "concepts", the artificial artist makes them concrete. 4) An concious artificial artist may come up with ideas of its own. Is this science fiction? Arthur C. Clarke's 1st Law: "If a famous scientist says that something can be done, then he is in all probability correct. If a famous scientist says that something cannot be done, then he is in all probability wrong". Arthur C Clarke's 2nd Law: "Only by trying to go beyond the current limits can you find out what the real limits are." One of Bertrand Russell's 10 commandments: "Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric" 3. References 1. "From Ramon Llull to Image Idea Generation". Ransen, Owen. Proceedings of the 1998 Milan First International Conference on Generative Art. 2. "How To Build A Mind" Aleksander, Igor. Wiedenfeld and Nicolson, 1999 3. "How I Drew One of My Pictures: or, The Authorship of Generative Art" by Adrian Ward and Geof Cox. Proceedings of the 1999 Milan 2nd International Conference on Generative Art.
series other
email owen@ransen.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 642a
authors Stacey, Michael
year 1999
title Digital Design and the Architecture of Brookes Stacey Randall
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-9
summary I am an architect who has the experience of using computers. A user and not an expert in digital design, therefore what follows is a foot soldier's report from my practice over the past 10 to 11 years, including the role of computers in our approach to creating architecture. I began my working life tending IBM mainframes for the British Shoe Corporation. The two IBM mainframe computers were state of the art computer technology of the mid 1970's. There were two as one was used, and the other we needed for backup. The developments in computing in terms of size, increase in storage capacity and faster processing speed over the past 30 years, is a technological acceleration which is difficult to visualize. The IBM historian in the UK suggested "that if cars had developed in the same way they would be given away free with corn flakes". A frightening thought as our cities grind under the pressure of increased car ownership. British Shoe Corporation also had a reserve system some sixty miles away and a halon extinguishing system in case of fire - such was the capital and commercial value of the system. We carried out transitional computing for a number of European countries. The CAD was limited - pen potters drawing shoes, drawing them less well than an average A level or high school student! My interest was primarily in art and not computers; my aim to earn enough to tour Europe to see key work 'in the flesh' not just in reproduction.
series ACADIA
email Michael.Stacey@BSR-Architects.com
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 2092
authors Voigt, Andreas and Linzer, Helena
year 1999
title The Digital City
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 438-442
summary Information-transfer and -management, quality of planning, efficiency in decision-finding and public relations make for the continuous challenges in space-related planning. The integration of the "computer" - an essential tool of modern times - throughout the process of urban and regional planning, particularly regarding city development is a present-day challenge. A "Computer Aided City Development" calls for modular structuring taking the specialized requirements of a up-to-date city development into account as well as integrating suited simulation techniques and media effectively in the planning process in line with the respective state of the art. The present research project was aimed at structuring modular fields of application for "Computer Aided City Development" on the basis of the general framework conditions of regional and urban planning and city development. Paying regard to the "ecological-dynamical" city development the pilot project "The Digital City" puts planning modules of "Computer Aided City Development" to use in a selected transection of the urban area of Vienna (area around UNO-City, Wagramer Straße). By means of a digital, three-dimensional work-as-executed model the urban-spatial development possibilities in variants can be subjected to a spatial discussion throughout workshops making interactive use of a high-speed graphic computer. Furthemore, this pilot project was also dedicated to trying new forms of cooperation between science and administration
keywords Computer Graphics in Design and Planning, Urban Design, Urban Planning
series SIGRADI
email voigt@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at, linzer@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id a234
authors Von Wodtke, M.
year 1999
title Design with digital tools
source Mc Graw Hill.
summary Delivers ready-to-use professional guidance on the tools that are revolutionizing the design professions. Helps you and your design team use the information technology more effectively and also helps you engage your clients online. You get hands-on help with the nuts-and-bolts of finding free information and images quickly, applying templates and applets, gaining access to detail, libraries, and smoothing workflow with management and collaborative tools. On the CD-ROM: * High-speed tools for design stages * Links to online resources * Create in information environments * Master digital modeling & imaging * Apply CAD in drafting and design * Design special effects, multimedia, and presentations * Navigate geographic information systems * Manipulate virtual reality * Create a state-of-the-art design office
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ga9921
id ga9921
authors Coates, P.S. and Hazarika, L.
year 1999
title The use of genetic programming for applications in the field of spatial composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Architectural design teaching using computers has been a preoccupation of CECA since 1991. All design tutors provide their students with a set of models and ways to form, and we have explored a set of approaches including cellular automata, genetic programming ,agent based modelling and shape grammars as additional tools with which to explore architectural ( and architectonic) ideas.This paper discusses the use of genetic programming (G.P.) for applications in the field of spatial composition. CECA has been developing the use of Genetic Programming for some time ( see references ) and has covered the evolution of L-Systems production rules( coates 1997, 1999b), and the evolution of generative grammars of form (Coates 1998 1999a). The G.P. was used to generate three-dimensional spatial forms from a set of geometrical structures .The approach uses genetic programming with a Genetic Library (G.Lib) .G.P. provides a way to genetically breed a computer program to solve a problem.G. Lib. enables genetic programming to define potentially useful subroutines dynamically during a run .* Exploring a shape grammar consisting of simple solid primitives and transformations. * Applying a simple fitness function to the solid breeding G.P.* Exploring a shape grammar of composite surface objects. * Developing grammarsfor existing buildings, and creating hybrids. * Exploring the shape grammar of abuilding within a G.P.We will report on new work using a range of different morphologies ( boolean operations, surface operations and grammars of style ) and describe the use of objective functions ( natural selection) and the "eyeball test" ( artificial selection) as ways of controlling and exploring the design spaces thus defined.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ff8b
authors Krawczyk, Robert J.
year 1999
title Virtual Ornaments
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 19
summary A few years ago I began to investigate the concepts of art-to-part and single part custom manufacturing. The original designs had to created on a CAD system either manually or by algorithm and then machine produced without any manual intervention. Rapid prototyping and laser cutting technology were both reviewed and the later selected for possible use. I also had a long time interest in geometric design. At that time one of my CAD classes took some of there window designs, created from a complex series of overlapping circles, arcs, and splines, and had them laser cut. The results were astonishing.
series ACADIA
email krawczyk@iit.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 09:04

_id 2c4a
authors Aroztegui, Carmen
year 1999
title The Architect's Use of the Internet - Study of the Architectural Presentation Possibilities
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 363-368
summary The Internet media is opening new horizons in communication and representation in architecture. However, its use today is superficial, limited, and without creativity. This study will explore theories, methods and examples of how the virtual space of the Internet can be used in its full potential. That means to present ways of observing, understanding, interacting, and communicating the space without precedents in architecture. The existent presentations made by architects in the Internet are in general poor and static. Through the comparative analysis of two presentations of the same architectural space in the Internet and the use of state of the art technology in the Internet, this study will show innovations that will make the exploration of the architectural space more attractive, dynamic and interactive. The main issues will be on one hand, the improvement in the communication of the design through the use of the Internet, and on the other hand, the rise of the standards in the quality of the architectural presentations. This work will project possible implications of the Internet in architecture.
series SIGRADI
email arozteguic@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id f317
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Modeling Architectural Design Objectives in Physically Based Space Planning
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 212-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to have an effect on a physically based space plan, they need to be able to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation, can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series ACADIA
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ga9906
id ga9906
authors Caglioti, Giuseppe
year 1999
title Ambiguity in Art and Science
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Ambiguity can be defined as the coexistence and/or coalescence of two incompatible aspects in the same reality. Ambiguity manifests itself * in pathologic processes occurring in matter, e.g. at the critical state of the solid ¬ ® liquid phase transformation. * during the process of measurement of quantum structures: a process formally very similar to the process of perception. * Systematically, in our mind, during the process of perception - especially during visual perception of paintings or acoustic perception of music.Therefore ambiguity is an intrinsic feature of the process of perception and an intriguing step in the way toward the formation of thought. Ambiguity is continuosly experienced in our mind: every act of perception culminates into the critical state of a dynamic instability of the interiorized image, where the incoherent heap of sensory stimuli merges into coherent visual or auditive thinking. In turn, since perception is essential for life, we should look at ambiguity not so much as to a fastidious travel companion, but rather as to a fixed course toward perception itself, scientific thought and aesthetic emotion: ambiguity is a permanent cultural value.
series other
email Caglioti@polimi.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ffe2
authors Carrar, G., Luna, F. and Rajchman, A.
year 1999
title Cúpulas Telefónicas - Mobiliario Urbano, Diseño Industrial aplicado a una empresa de servicios (Telephone Cupolas - Urban Furniture, Industrial Design Applied to a Company of Services)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 426-409
summary By november 1996, the state telecomunication company called for a national booth design contest. The idea was to use the awarded design shortly as part of the renovation of the public phone service. Gruppo MDM won the design contest and was contracted to do the manufacture technical drawings and a prototype which was tested during 1997. By 1997, an international bid was held, including the awarded project. Gruppo MDM was contracted for the follow up of the manufacture process, including research of suppliers worldwide, materials arriving on time with the quality required, verifying local suppliers with deadlines and quality controlls according to the specifications.
series SIGRADI
email fluna@adinet.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id ad51
authors Chastain, Th., Kalay, Y.E. and Peri, Ch.
year 1999
title Square Peg in a Round Hole or Horseless Carriage? Reflections on the Use of Computing in Architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 4-15
summary We start with two paradigms that have been used to describe the relationship of computation methods and tools to the production of architecture. The first is that of forcing a square peg into a round hole — implying that the use of a tool is mis-directed, or at least poorly fits the processes that have traditionally been part of an architectural design practice. In doing so, the design practice suffers from the use of new technology. The other paradigm describes a state of transformation in relation-ship to new technology as a horseless carriage in which the process is described in obsolete and ‘backward’ terms. The impli-cation is that there is a lack of appreciation for the emerging potentials of technology to change our relationship with the task. The paper demonstrates these two paradigms through the invention of drawings in the 14th century, which helped to define the profession of Architecture. It then goes on to argue that modern computational tools follow the same paradigms, and like draw-ings, stand to bring profound changes to the profession of architecture as we know it.
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 762b
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Bogdan, Marius
year 1999
title The Front of the Stage of Vitruvius' Roman Theatre - A new Approach of Computer Aided Design that Transforms Geometric Operators to Semantic Operators
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 321-333
summary The driving force of all researches where the systems of computation are used, is the utilization of an intelligent method for the representation of building. The use of computer, in design process, is often limited to technical functions (tekhne), and what one usually calls computer-aided design is often no more than computer-aided drawing. In this research paper we continue a reflection on the architect's work methods, and suggest an approach to design based on the semantic properties of the object (i.e. semantic operators), rather than by geometric operators. We propose a method of computer aid design using procedural models where the initial state of design is vague and undefined. We operate from a paradigm that leads to represent a building by means of parametric functions that, expressed algorithmically, give a procedural model to facilitate the design process. This approach opens new avenues that would permit to add the logos (semantic properties) and lead to a metaphorical representation. By means of procedural models, we show that, from a generic model we can produce a four dimensional model that encapsulate a volumetric model with semantic characteristics. We use a meta-functional language that allows us to model the actions and encapsulate detailed information about various building elements. This descriptive mechanism is extremely powerful. It helps to establish relations between the functions, contributes to a better understanding of the project's aim, and encapsulates the building properties by recalling characteristics of common classes which give rise to a new configuration and a completely original design. The scientific result of this experiment is the understanding and confirmation of the hypothesis that it is possible to encapsulate, by means of computing process, the links between design moves during conceptual and figural decisions and transform the geometric operators in semantic operators.
keywords Architecture, CAD, Function, Modeling, Semantic Operator, Geometric Operator
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 837b
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Using the World Wide Web as a Communication and Presentation Forum for Students of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 61-64
summary Since 1997, the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) has been carrying out upper level design studios under the framework of the Netzentwurf or Net-Studio. The Netzentwurf is categorized as a virtual design studio in that the environment for presentation, criticism and communication is web based. This allows lessons learned from research into Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) to be adapted to the special conditions indigenous to the architectural design studio. Indeed, an aim of the Netzentwurf is the creation and evolution of a design studio planing platform. In the Winter semester 1999-2000, ifib again carried out two Netzentwurf studios. involving approximately 30 students from the Faculty of Architecture, University of Karlsruhe. The projects differed from previous net studios in that both studios encompassed an inter-university character in addition to the established framework of the Netzentwurf. The first project, the re-use of Fort Kleber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, was carried out as part of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) involving over 140 students from various disciplines in six institutions from five universities in France, Switzerland and Germany. The second project, entitled "Future, Inc.", involved the design of an office building for a scenario 20 years hence. This project was carried out in parallel with the Technical University Cottbus using the same methodology and program for two separate building sites.
keywords Virtual Design Studios, Architectural Graphics, Presentation Techniques
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 0eae
authors Gero, J.S. and Kazakov, V.
year 1999
title Using analogy to extend the behaviour state space in creative design
source J.S. Gero and M.L. Maher (Eds.), Computational Models of Creative Design IV, Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, pp. 113-143
summary We propose an exploration model of design based on the extension of the space of design behaviours using analogy. The analogy is drawn on the basis of structure similarity or structure and behaviour similarity between source and target designs. New behaviours are introduced from the source design. This paper describes such a process and discusses its significance for creative design.
keywords Creative Design, Behaviour Analogy
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:15

_id bb42
authors Gero, John S. and Kazakov, Vladimir
year 1999
title An Interpolation/Extrapolation Process For Creative Designing
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 263-274
summary This paper introduces a new computational operation that provides support for creative designing by adaptively exploring design state spaces. This modification is based on the re-interpretation of the crossover operation of genetic algorithms as an interpolation and its generalization to extrapolation. Examples of the results of the application of the process are presented.
keywords Creative design, computational exploration, design combination
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au, kazj@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

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