CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id avocaad_2001_22
id avocaad_2001_22
authors Jos van Leeuwen, Joran Jessurun
year 2001
title XML for Flexibility an Extensibility of Design Information Models
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The VR-DIS research programme aims at the development of a Virtual Reality – Design Information System. This is a design and decision support system for collaborative design that provides a VR interface for the interaction with both the geometric representation of a design and the non-geometric information concerning the design throughout the design process. The major part of the research programme focuses on early stages of design. The programme is carried out by a large number of researchers from a variety of disciplines in the domain of construction and architecture, including architectural design, building physics, structural design, construction management, etc.Management of design information is at the core of this design and decision support system. Much effort in the development of the system has been and still is dedicated to the underlying theory for information management and its implementation in an Application Programming Interface (API) that the various modules of the system use. The theory is based on a so-called Feature-based modelling approach and is described in the PhD thesis by [first author, 1999] and in [first author et al., 2000a]. This information modelling approach provides three major capabilities: (1) it allows for extensibility of conceptual schemas, which is used to enable a designer to define new typologies to model with; (2) it supports sharing of conceptual schemas, called type-libraries; and (3) it provides a high level of flexibility that offers the designer the opportunity to easily reuse design information and to model information constructs that are not foreseen in any existing typologies. The latter aspect involves the capability to expand information entities in a model with relationships and properties that are not typologically defined but applicable to a particular design situation only; this helps the designer to represent the actual design concepts more accurately.The functional design of the information modelling system is based on a three-layered framework. In the bottom layer, the actual design data is stored in so-called Feature Instances. The middle layer defines the typologies of these instances in so-called Feature Types. The top layer is called the meta-layer because it provides the class definitions for both the Types layer and the Instances layer; both Feature Types and Feature Instances are objects of the classes defined in the top layer. This top layer ensures that types can be defined on the fly and that instances can be created from these types, as well as expanded with non-typological properties and relationships while still conforming to the information structures laid out in the meta-layer.The VR-DIS system consists of a growing number of modules for different kinds of functionality in relation with the design task. These modules access the design information through the API that implements the meta-layer of the framework. This API has previously been implemented using an Object-Oriented Database (OODB), but this implementation had a number of disadvantages. The dependency of the OODB, a commercial software library, was considered the most problematic. Not only are licenses of the OODB library rather expensive, also the fact that this library is not common technology that can easily be shared among a wide range of applications, including existing applications, reduces its suitability for a system with the aforementioned specifications. In addition, the OODB approach required a relatively large effort to implement the desired functionality. It lacked adequate support to generate unique identifications for worldwide information sources that were understandable for human interpretation. This strongly limited the capabilities of the system to share conceptual schemas.The approach that is currently being implemented for the core of the VR-DIS system is based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML). Rather than implementing the meta-layer of the framework into classes of Feature Types and Feature Instances, this level of meta-definitions is provided in a document type definition (DTD). The DTD is complemented with a set of rules that are implemented into a parser API, based on the Document Object Model (DOM). The advantages of the XML approach for the modelling framework are immediate. Type-libraries distributed through Internet are now supported through the mechanisms of namespaces and XLink. The implementation of the API is no longer dependent of a particular database system. This provides much more flexibility in the implementation of the various modules of the VR-DIS system. Being based on the (supposed to become) standard of XML the implementation is much more versatile in its future usage, specifically in a distributed, Internet-based environment.These immediate advantages of the XML approach opened the door to a wide range of applications that are and will be developed on top of the VR-DIS core. Examples of these are the VR-based 3D sketching module [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; the VR-based information-modelling tool that allows the management and manipulation of information models for design in a VR environment [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; and a design-knowledge capturing module that is now under development [first author et al., 2000a and 2000b]. The latter module aims to assist the designer in the recognition and utilisation of existing and new typologies in a design situation. The replacement of the OODB implementation of the API by the XML implementation enables these modules to use distributed Feature databases through Internet, without many changes to their own code, and without the loss of the flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas that are implemented as part of the API. Research in the near future will result in Internet-based applications that support designers in the utilisation of distributed libraries of product-information, design-knowledge, case-bases, etc.The paper roughly follows the outline of the abstract, starting with an introduction to the VR-DIS project, its objectives, and the developed theory of the Feature-modelling framework that forms the core of it. It briefly discusses the necessity of schema evolution, flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas, and how these capabilities have been addressed in the framework. The major part of the paper describes how the previously mentioned aspects of the framework are implemented in the XML-based approach, providing details on the so-called meta-layer, its definition in the DTD, and the parser rules that complement it. The impact of the XML approach on the functionality of the VR-DIS modules and the system as a whole is demonstrated by a discussion of these modules and scenarios of their usage for design tasks. The paper is concluded with an overview of future work on the sharing of Internet-based design information and design knowledge.
series AVOCAAD
email J.P.v.Leeuwen@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 39cb
authors Kelleners, Richard H.M.C.
year 1999
title Constraints in object-oriented graphics
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary In the area of interactive computer graphics, two important approaches to deal with the complexity of designing and implementing graphics systems are object-oriented programming and constraint-based programming. From literature, it appears that combination of these two has clear advantages but has also proven to be difficult. One of the main problems is that constraint programming infringes the information hiding principle of object-oriented programming. The goal of the research project is to combine these two approaches to benefit from the strengths of both. Two research groups at the Eindhoven University of Technology investigate the use of constraints on graphics objects. At the Architecture department, constraints are applied in a virtual reality design environment. At the Computer Science department, constraints aid in modeling 3D animations. For these two groups, a constraint system for 3D graphical objects was developed. A conceptual model, called CODE (Constraints on Objects via Data flows and Events), is presented that enables integration of constraints and objects by separating the object world from the constraint world. In the design of this model, the main aspect being considered is that the information hiding principle among objects may not be violated. Constraint solvers, however, should have direct access to an object’s internal data structure. Communication between the two worlds is done via a protocol orthogonal to the message passing mechanism of objects, namely, via events and data flows. This protocol ensures that the information hiding principle at the object-oriented programming level is not violated while constraints can directly access “hidden” data. Furthermore, CODE is built up of distinct elements, or entity types, like constraint, solver, event, data flow. This structure enables that several special purpose constraint solvers can be defined and made to cooperate to solve complex constraint problems. A prototype implementation was built to study the feasibility of CODE. Therefore, the implementation should correspond directly to the conceptual model. To this end, every entity (object, constraint, solver) of the conceptual model is represented by a separate process in the language MANIFOLD. The (concurrent) processes communicate by events and data flows. The implementation serves to validate the conceptual model and to demonstrate that it is a viable way of combining constraints and objects. After the feasibility study, the prototype was discarded. The gained experience was used to build an implementation of the conceptual model for the two research groups. This implementation encompassed a constraint system with multiple solvers and constraint types. The constraint system was built as an object-oriented library that can be linked to the applications in the respective research groups. Special constructs were designed to ensure information hiding among application objects while constraints and solvers have direct access to the object data. CODE manages the complexity of object-oriented constraint solving by defining a communication protocol to allow the two paradigms to cooperate. The prototype implementation demonstrates that CODE can be implemented into a working system. Finally, the implementation of an actual application shows that the model is suitable for the development of object-oriented software.
keywords Computer Graphics; Object Oriented Programming; Constraint Programming
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 6810
authors Makkonen, Petri
year 1999
title On multi body systems simulation in product design
source KTH Stockholm
summary The aim of this thesis is to provide a basis for efficient modelling and software use in simulation driven product development. The capabilities of modern commercial computer software for design are analysed experimentally and qualitatively. An integrated simulation model for design of mechanical systems, based on four different "simulation views" is proposed: An integrated CAE (Computer Aided Engineering) model using Solid Geometry (CAD), Finite Element Modelling (FEM), Multi Body Systems Modelling (MBS) and Dynamic System Simulation utilising Block System Modelling tools is presented. A theoretical design process model for simulation driven design based on the theory of product chromosome is introduced. This thesis comprises a summary and six papers. Paper A presents the general framework and a distributed model for simulation based on CAD, FEM, MBS and Block Systems modelling. Paper B outlines a framework to integrate all these models into MBS simulation for performance prediction and optimisation of mechanical systems, using a modular approach. This methodology has been applied to design of industrial robots of parallel robot type. During the development process, from concept design to detail design, models have been refined from kinematic to dynamic and to elastodynamic models, finally including joint backlash. A method for analysing the kinematic Jacobian by using MBS simulation is presented. Motor torque requirements are studied by varying major robot geometry parameters, in dimensionless form for generality. The robot TCP (Tool Center Point) path in time space, predicted from elastodynamic model simulations, has been transformed to the frequency space by Fourier analysis. By comparison of this result with linear (modal) eigen frequency analysis from the elastodynamic MBS model, internal model validation is obtained. Paper C presents a study of joint backlash. An impact model for joint clearance, utilised in paper B, has been developed and compared to a simplified spring-damper model. The impact model was found to predict contact loss over a wider range of rotational speed than the spring-damper model. Increased joint bearing stiffness was found to widen the speed region of chaotic behaviour, due to loss of contact, while increased damping will reduce the chaotic range. The impact model was found to have stable under- and overcritical speed ranges, around the loss of contact region. The undercritical limit depends on the gravitational load on the clearance joint. Papers D and E give examples of the distributed simulation model approach proposed in paper A. Paper D presents simulation and optimisation of linear servo drives for a 3-axis gantry robot, using block systems modelling. The specified kinematic behaviour is simulated with multi body modelling, while drive systems and control system are modelled using a block system model for each drive. The block system model has been used for optimisation of the transmission and motor selection. Paper E presents an approach for re-using CAD geometry for multi body modelling of a rock drilling rig boom. Paper F presents synthesis methods for mechanical systems. Joint and part number synthesis is performed using the Grübler and Euler equations. The synthesis is continued by applying the theory of generative grammar, from which the grammatical rules of planar mechanisms have been formulated. An example of topological synthesis of mechanisms utilising this grammar is presented. Finally, dimensional synthesis of the mechanism is carried out by utilising non-linear programming with addition of a penalty function to avoid singularities.
keywords Simulation; Optimisation; Control Systems; Computer Aided Engineering; Multi Body Systems; Finite Element Method; Backslash; Clearance; Industrial Robots; Parallel Robots
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id d8df
authors Naticchia, Berardo
year 1999
title Physical Knowledge in Patterns: Bayesian Network Models for Preliminary Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 611-619
summary Computer applications in design have pursued two main development directions: analytical modelling and information technology. The former line has produced a large number of tools for reality simulation (i.e. finite element models), the latter is producing an equally large amount of advances in conceptual design support (i.e. artificial intelligence tools). Nevertheless we can trace rare interactions between computation models related to those different approaches. This lack of integration is the main reason of the difficulty of CAAD application to the preliminary stage of design, where logical and quantitative reasoning are closely related in a process that we often call 'qualitative evaluation'. This paper briefly surveys the current development of qualitative physical models applied in design and propose a general approach for modelling physical behaviour by means of Bayesian network we are employing to develop a tutoring and coaching system for natural ventilation preliminary design of halls, called VENTPad. This tool explores the possibility of modelling the causal mechanism that operate in real systems in order to allow a number of integrated logical and quantitative inference about the fluid-dynamic behaviour of an hall. This application could be an interesting connection tool between logical and analytical procedures in preliminary design aiding, able to help students or unskilled architects, both to guide them through the analysis process of numerical data (i.e. obtained with sophisticate Computational Fluid Dynamics software) or experimental data (i.e. obtained with laboratory test models) and to suggest improvements to the design.
keywords Qualitative Physical Modelling, Preliminary Design, Bayesian Networks
series eCAADe
email Naticchia@idau.unian.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 0647
authors Rosenberg, D.
year 1999
title Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML
source A Practical Approach. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley
summary Combining some of today's best ideas about customer-driven object-oriented design, Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: A Practical Approach shows you how to use Unified Modeling Language (UML) in the real world, keeping with the author's proprietary software design process. The book begins with the genesis of the author's ICONIX Unified Object Modeling Approach, borrowing ideas and strategies from the "three amigos" who invented UML: Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, and Ivar Jacobson. Throughout this text, the ICONIX method is used to model a stock trading system, with all the relevant UML diagrams, beginning with class definition and use cases. The author's approach to software relies heavily on customer requirements and use case scenarios for which he has a good deal of practical advice. He provides numerous hints for avoiding bogged-down diagrams. After preliminary design, he advocates drilling down into specifics with robustness diagrams, which trace how classes interact with one another. The most detailed design work comes next with sequence diagrams. Subsequent chapters offer tips on project management, implementation, and testing. Throughout this lively and intelligently organized book, the author presents numerous real-world tips (and Top 10 lists) that supply wisdom to his perspective on effective software design.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e679
authors Seichter, H., Donath, D. and Petzold, F.
year 2002
title TAP – The Architectural Playground - C++ framework for scalable distributed collaborative architectural virtual environments
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 422-426
summary Architecture is built information (Schmitt, 1999). Architects have the task of restructuring and translating information into buildable designs. The beginning of the design process where the briefing is transformed into an idea is a crucial phase in the design process. It is where the architect makes decisions which influence the rest of the design development process (Vries et al., 1998). It is at this stage where most information is unstructured but has to be integrated into a broad context. This is where TAP is positioned – to support the architect in finding solutions through the creation of spatially structured information sets without impairing thereby the creative development. We want to enrich the inspiration of an architect with a new kind of information design. A further aspect is workflow in a distributed process where the architect’s work becomes one aspect of a decentralised working patterns. The software supports collaborative work with models, sketches and text messages within an uniform surface. The representations of the various media are connected and combined with each other and the user is free to combine them according to his or her needs.
series eCAADe
email hartmut.seichter@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 3d23
authors Sellgren, Ulf
year 1999
title Simulation-driven Design
source KTH Stockholm
summary Efficiency and innovative problem solving are contradictory requirements for product development (PD), and both requirements must be satisfied in companies that strive to remain or to become competitive. Efficiency is strongly related to ”doing things right”, whereas innovative problem solving and creativity is focused on ”doing the right things”. Engineering design, which is a sub-process within PD, can be viewed as problem solving or a decision-making process. New technologies in computer science and new software tools open the way to new approaches for the solution of mechanical problems. Product data management (PDM) technology and tools can enable concurrent engineering (CE) by managing the formal product data, the relations between the individual data objects, and their relation to the PD process. Many engineering activities deal with the relation between behavior and shape. Modern CAD systems are highly productive tools for concept embodiment and detailing. The finite element (FE) method is a general tool used to study the physical behavior of objects with arbitrary shapes. Since a modern CAD technology enables design modification and change, it can support the innovative dimension of engineering as well as the verification of physical properties and behavior. Concepts and detailed solutions have traditionally been evaluated and verified with physical testing. Numerical modeling and simulation is in many cases a far more time efficient method than testing to verify the properties of an artifact. Numerical modeling can also support the innovative dimension of problem solving by enabling parameter studies and observations of real and synthetic behavior. Simulation-driven design is defined as a design process where decisions related to the behavior and performance of the artifact are significantly supported by computer-based product modeling and simulation. A framework for product modeling, that is based on a modern CAD system with fully integrated FE modeling and simulation functionality provides the engineer with tools capable of supporting a number of engineering steps in all life-cycle phases of a product. Such a conceptual framework, that is based on a moderately coupled approach to integrate commercial PDM, CAD, and FE software, is presented. An object model and a supporting modular modeling methodology are also presented. Two industrial cases are used to illustrate the possibilities and some of the opportunities given by simulation-driven design with the presented methodology and framework.
keywords CAE; FE Method; Metamodel; Object Model; PDM; Physical Behavior, System
series thesis:PhD
email ulfs@md.kth.se
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 5f23
authors Vineeta, Pal
year 1999
title Integrated Computational Analysis of the Visual Environment in Buildings
source Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh
summary Despite significant advances in the area of computational support for lighting design, lighting simulation tools have not been sufficiently integrated into the lighting design process. There is a significant body of designers who rely solely on their individual experience and do not use predictive simulation tools. Even when simulation tools are utilized, it is for design verification or presentation rather than for design support. A number of factors are thought to contribute to this lack of integration of simulation tools into the design process: a) Most existing tools rely on the problematic assumption implying the appropriateness of simplified models for the less complex early design and detailed simulation for the more complex later stages of design; b) They do not support an active exploration of design variables to satisfy desired performance criteria; c) They are not integrated with other building performance simulation models. This thesis addresses the above shortcomings by contributing to the field of visual analysis in the following areas, pertaining to the development of active, integrated design and performance simulation environments: - Implementation of a consistent and coherent, physically-based modeling approach, combining radiosity and ray-tracing methods for the simulation of light propagation. - Provision of design support both in terms of evaluation support for interpreting large amounts of computed data with diverse performance indices, and in terms of active design support to explore the relationships between the design variables and performance indices. - Integration of the lighting simulation module within a larger software environment (SEMPER) for the prediction and evaluation of multiple performance indicators (for energy, light, acoustics, etc.) in buildings.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id e719
authors Achten, Henri and Turksma, Arthur
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Early Design: the Design Studio Experiences
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 327-335
summary The Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology started a new kind of design studio teaching. With the use of high-end equipment, students use Virtual Reality from the very start of the design process. Virtual Reality technology up to now was primarily used for giving presentations. We use the same technology in the design process itself by means of reducing the time span in which one gets results in Virtual Reality. The method is based on a very brief cycle of modelling in AutoCAD, assigning materials in 3DStudio Viz, and then making a walkthrough in Virtual Reality in a standard landscape. Due to this cycle, which takes about 15 seconds, the student gets immediate feedback on design decisions which facilitates evaluation of the design in three dimensions much faster than usual. Usually the learning curve of this kind of software is quite steep, but with the use of templates the number of required steps to achieve results is reduced significantly. In this way, the potential of Virtual Reality is not only explored in research projects, but also in education. This paper discusses the general set-up of the design studio and shows how, via short workshops, students acquire knowledge of the cycle in a short time. The paper focuses on the added value of using Virtual Reality technology in this manner: improved spatial reasoning, translation from two-dimensional to three-dimensional representations, and VR feedback on design decisions. It discusses the needs for new design representations in this design environment, and shows how fast feedback in Virtual Reality can improve the spatial design at an early stage of the design process.
series AVOCAAD
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl, A.A.E.Turksma@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4d95
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Architectural Education: Defining Possibilities
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 7-9
summary Introduction: virtual reality in architecture Virtual Reality (VR) is an emergent computer technology for full 3D-simulations, which has a natural application in the architectural work, due that activity involves the complete definition of buildings prior to its construction. Although the profession has a long tradition and expertise in the use of 2D-plans for the design of buildings, the increasing complexity of projects and social participation requires better media of representation. However, the technological promise of Virtual Reality involves many sophisticated software and hardware developments. It is based on techniques of 3D-modelling currently incorporated in the majority of drawing software used in architecture, and also there are several tools for rendering, animation and panoramic views, which provide visual realism. But other capabilities like interactivity and sense of immersion are still complex, expensive and under research. These require stereoscopic helmets, 3D pointers and trackers with complicated configurations and uncomfortable use. Most advanced installations of Virtual-Reality like CAVEs involve much hardware, building space and restrictions for users. Nevertheless, diverse developers are working in Virtual-Reality user-friendly techniques and there are many initial experiences of architectural walk-throughs showing advantages in the communication and development of designs. Then we may expect an increasing use of Virtual Reality in architecture.
series ACADIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id becb
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Electronic Extension: Some implications of cyberspace for the practice of architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 276-289
summary This white-paper builds upon previous research to present hybrids of electronic and physical spaces as extensions of current design practice. It poses an hypothetical project - a hybrid of physical and cyberspaces - to be developed through an extrapolation of current architectural practice by fully exploiting new information technologies. The hybrid's attributes not only affect the scope of development but the very activities of the design team and client during - and after - deployment. The entire life cycle of the project is affected by its dual material and media presence. The paper concludes by discussing the effect the hybrid - here called a "cybrid" - on the occupant, and its local and global communities. It reviews the economics, administration, marketing, operation, flexibility, and extension of the project to assess its effects on these scales. The conclusions are provisional owing to the youth of the technologies. However, in laying out these issues, the author hopes to begin a discussion on effects computation will have on our built environment.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id a35a
authors Arponen, Matti
year 2002
title From 2D Base Map To 3D City Model
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, I.17-I.28
summary Since 1997 Helsinki City Survey Division has proceeded in experimenting and in developing the methods for converting and supplementing current digital 2D base maps in the scale 1:500 to a 3D city model. Actually since 1986 project areas have been produced in 3D for city planning and construction projects, but working with the whole map database started in 1997 because of customer demands and competitive 3D projects. 3D map database needs new data modelling and structures, map update processes need new working orders and the draftsmen need to learn a new profession; the 3D modeller. Laser-scanning and digital photogrammetry have been used in collecting 3D information on the map objects. During the years 1999-2000 laser-scanning experiments covering 45 km2 have been carried out utilizing the Swedish TopEye system. Simultaneous digital photography produces material for orto photo mosaics. These have been applied in mapping out dated map features and in vectorizing 3D buildings manually, semi automatically and automatically. In modelling we use TerraScan, TerraPhoto and TerraModeler sw, which are developed in Finland. The 3D city model project is at the same time partially a software development project. An accuracy and feasibility study was also completed and will be shortly presented. The three scales of 3D models are also presented in this paper. Some new 3D products and some usage of 3D city models in practice will be demonstrated in the actual presentation.
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email matti.arponen@hel.fi
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 1071
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Evolution of Computer Aided Design: Three Generations of CAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 94-100
summary This paper describes the three generations of CAD systems. The first generation of (primarily analytical) computer programmes really aided designing. These programmes were the tools for finding a functional solution in different areas of designing, from flat plans to the space organisation of a hospital. One of the shortcomings of these programmes was the lack of graphic interface. With time, however, this kind of interface was developed. As a result of this second generation of CAD systems the computer was transformed into a drafting machine and CAD meant Computer Aided Drafting. The main thesis of this consideration is that only now we have the chance to return to the idea of Computer Aided Design. One of the examples of these trends is the AVOCAAD programme in which Added Value of CAAD is analysed. The development of the third generation of CAD systems will be possible in the near future. Aiding the process of designing will demand the elaboration of new methods of using the computer at the early stages of this process. The computer should be used not for generating variants of functional solutions only but for also for the creation of 3D forms by 3D sketching. For this, the computer should be transformed from a tool into a medium; only then will designing become true Designing in Cyber Space.
keywords Generations of CAAD, Design Process, Creation, Medium
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 6480
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Computer in Creation of Architectural Form
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999,pp. 131-142
summary This paper considers graphic methods of presentation of ideas 'in the creation of architectural forms' and evolution of these methods, determined by the implementations of information technology. Drawings have been the main medium of expression since Leonardo da Vinci to the present-day. Graphic communication has always been treated as a main design tool, both - at the ending stage of design and at the early design stage. Implementation of computers in design doe not change this situation. The entire design process proceeds in a traditional way. While searching for the idea we use hand sketches and, after this, technical drawings are draught on a plotter, which replaces a drawing pen. Using computers at the early design stages encounters serious difficulties. The main thesis of this paper is that hardware and software inadequacy is not the problem, the problem is in the inadequacy of the design methods. This problem is to be reconceived as what a person can do with a program, rather than what is the capacity of a program. Contemporary computer techniques allow us to put an equation mark between the searching for idea, visualisation and its realisation in virtual space. This paper presents Sketching by scanning - an experimental method of using computer hardware and software for stimulating of searching of architectural's form.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8171
authors Ataman, Osman
year 1999
title Facilitating Conceptual Change: Computers, Cognitive Processes and Architecture
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 275-279
summary Computers have gained universal acceptance as tools that designers use. However, computers are often not used to advance the design process but just to make drawings. Many architectural schools still focus on a production orientation which puts the highest value on information management, precise representations and drafting enhancements. Mostly, computer education is limited with button pushing and training manuals. It is the contention of the author that students in Design Studio courses can benefit greatly from computer based educational pedagogy designed to provide them with experiences they currently do not possess. In particular, little time in the computer courses (outside lectures) is spent applying concepts and features of digital tools in design studio environment. In architecture, computers cannot be simply defined as a presentation and production tools. As a cognitive tool, computers provide designers with intelligible and effective representational tools of thought and communication, changes the syntactic structure of design. Consequently, the conceptual structure of computers impacts the conceptual structure of the design project, fosters the analytical processes and facilitates conceptual changes. This paper describes the use of computers in a first year architectural design studio. It attempts to address the importance of developing a design process that is redefined by the use of computing, integrating concept and perception. Furthermore, it describes the theoretical foundations and the underlying cognitive processes that contribute designers' conceptual development.
series SIGRADI
email ataman@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id a8f2
authors Becker, R.
year 1999
title Research and development needs for better implementation of the performance concept in building
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 525-532
summary Gaps in basic knowledge, inadequacies in the procedural infrastructure and lack of working tools, that still prevent a more systematic application of the performance concept throughout the building process, are identified. One of the main conclusions is that, despite the vast knowledge accumulated during the years in the fields of ergonometrics, human needs, human factor engineering, architectural design, structural analysis, building physics, building materials and durability analysis, this knowledge is not applied systematically during the building process. The situation is attributed to lack of tools for some of the decision making phases in the process, and to the lack of a common, preferably computerized, design platform that would ensure a comprehensive and quantitative approach to all the relevant performance attributes, link smoothly between the various phases along the project development, and minimizes bias caused by human experts.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id bfc2
authors Bessone, Miriam and Mantovani, Graciela
year 1999
title Integración del Medio Digital a la Enseñanza del Diseño Arquitectónico. Huellas de un Taller Experimental (Integration of Digital Media in the Teaching of Architectural Design. Tracks of an Experimental Studio)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 289-294
summary This paper presents the searching of new building modes for the knowledge of design in curriculum workshops at Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseno y Urbanismo of the Universidad Nacional del Litoral the proposed “research action” program articulates longitudinally in the three cycles of the career, understanding architecture as metaknowledge within a new paradigm of subjectivity, complexity and multidimensionality. In other words, it is recognized a new scenery tending to modify didactic relations. This experimental field looks for conscientious equilibrium between “written culture/audiovisual culture”, and “analog instruments/digital media”. We focus our interest on the “machine interacting with and for men”, looking for harmonious synthesis through a new way of thinking, to allow “real progress”. For turning this idea into action, we organized an alternative and plural team-work in architecture. We called it “experimental workshop”. In this first level the students worked. On a preliminary plan of a “kindergarden”. They developed a divergent process through the 3D simulations (using the software 3DS MAX v2), scale models and sensible sketches. For conclusions, the paper addresses the characteristics of the pedagogic model used and the results achieved.
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bbb9
authors Blaise, Jean-Yves and Dudek, Iwona
year 1999
title SOL: Spatial and Historical Web-Based Interface for On Line Architectural Documentation of Krakow's Rynek Gowny
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 700-707
summary Our paper presents recent developments of a co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France), specialised in computer science and the HAiKZ Institute of Krakow's Faculty of Architecture, specialised in architectural heritage and conservation. Before undertaking any action to a listed building or interventions in its neighbourhood, it is vital to gain a clear understanding of the building in question. Numerous heterogeneous data detained by diverse institutions has to be handled. This process can be greatly eased by enhanced classification of the information. The development we present is a multidisciplinary platform independent information tool dedicated to education and research. SOL uses an http protocol centred computer architecture connecting a relational database, a VRML 2.0 representation module and a web search interface. It allows searches and updating of the database through a standard text based interface, a VRML 2.0 graphical module and a thematic interface. SOL is experienced on the urban fabric of the Main Square (Rynek Gówny) in Kraków. The choice of a web-centred development, both in the search and updating interface and in the representation module provides platform independence and distant access to the database, and enables successive contributions of students or researchers.
keywords Web Interface, Database, Architectural Heritage Environment, Information Module, Historical Evolutions
series eCAADe
email jyb@gamsau.archi.fr, idu@gamsau.archi.fr
more http://alberti.gamsau.archi.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6ae4
authors Borde, A., Miyamoto, J., Barki, J., and Conde, M.
year 1999
title New Trends In Graphic Representation
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 501-506
summary In terms of graphic representation, architectural & urban study drawings present some fuzziness related to the multiplicity of scales, to the representation of the urban dynamic and to the means of communicating the contents of these studies for different publics, clearly divided among lay and specialists. Since the 16th century there have been certain stimulating propositions to this theme that have had an enormous, often unacknowleged, impact on the perception and construction of the built environment. Recent experiences in Rio, due to the series of urban projects that are being accomplished, is showing that some architecture offices are adopting new graphic trends in drawings conceived for preliminary studies, diagnoses and inventories. Due to the new possibilities offered by graphic computing they are developing, with diferent softwares, a sort of "patchwork” or "collage” and "sampling” technique for morphological analysis and representantion of places and buildings. This use of graphic computing, as an alternative to the usual realistic depictions that attempts to deal with prosaic simulations of an everyday experience, results in a different type of graphic expression that transcend literalism and appealls to the imagination of the general viewer. It is important to highlight that the analysis of these graphic solutions that attempts to turn visible design problems, could result in the development of new graphic tools that will help the creative design process.
keywords Graphic Representation, Architecture, Urbanism
series SIGRADI
email aborde@rio.com.br, jamesm@rio.com.br, zbki@openlink.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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