CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 624

_id d2b4
authors Maver, Tom and Petric, Jelena
year 1999
title Media in Mediation: Prospects for Computer Assisted Design Participation
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 138-147
summary One of the most consistent, powerful and philosophical ideas which has run like a silk thread through the short and erratic history of the development of computer aided architectural design is that of user participation in the design decision-making process. It is not an idea with which the architectural profession is particularly comfortable but it is, the authors claim, one which is central to the professional ethic and, therefore, to its ultimate survival.

Design decision-making is, if addressed properly, a hugely, complex multi-variety, multi-person process on which precious little serious research has been focused. In the late 1960's the Design Methods Group in the USA and the Design Research Society in the UK formulated paper-based models of the design process and anticipated, in some regards with un-nerving accuracy, the way in which the application of information technologies would impinge beneficially on the process of design decision-making and, therefore, on the quality of the built environment.

One concept expressed at that time was as follows: (•) the application of computers to the modeling and prediction of the cost and performance behavior of alternative design solutions allows subjective value judgements to be better informed and more explicitly audited, and that (•) such subjective value judgements should be made by those most affected by them, i.e. the future owners and users of buildings. //

This paper is devoted to the critical re-examination of this concept, on the seminal research and development which has kept the notion alive over 30 years, and, most importantly in the context of the theme of ACADIA 1999, how the current advances in multimedia, virtual reality and internet access are not yet making its ubiquitous adoption inevitable: in short, a plea for Media in Mediation.

series ACADIA
email jean.dick@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:51

_id 473d
authors Maver, Tom and Petric, Jelena
year 1999
title Virtual Heritage: Is There a Future for the Past?
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 482-487
summary This paper attempts an overview of the contribution which emerging information technologies - viz CAD, Multimedia, Virtual Reality and the Internet - can make to the presentation, understanding and preservation of the rich architectural heritage which exists (pro-term) in almost every cultural context. In the UK, the growing interest in sites such as Stonehenge has, through the threat of greater physical presence, increasingly kept the public at bay - a curious paradox which Virtual Reality (VR) has the potential to address. Virtual Reality (-an overly used and underly understood term-) is an information technology which can provide a convincing experience of environments which: i) exist, but are too remote, costly or hazardous, to visit. ii) don't yet exist but are planned, such as architectural designs or urban plans. iii) never will exist, other than in the imagination. iv) existed in the past and are now threatened or already lost. // This paper has its focus on the latter category, i.e. what is now becoming known as Virtual Heritage (VH), but it puts VH in the context of the broader spectrum of simulated experiences of past, present and future environments of cultural significance. The paper draws largely on the work of ABACUS, the Architecture and Building Aids Computer Unit, Strathclyde. The examples of the application of IT to VH include: i) a virtual reality experience of Historic Scotland's premier historical site: Skara Brae, the most complete neolithic settlement in Northern Europe. ii) a multimedia CD-ROM featuring some 50 of the most wonderful interiors of Glasgow's architectural treasures. iii) a computer based archive of rare and normally inaccessible 17C and 18C drawings of Scottish buildings from three seminal sources. iv) a massive 3-D model of Glasgow (some 10,000 buildings located on the hilly terrain of the city), which is now accessible on the Internet. // The paper concludes with conjectures based on the examples given of how emerging information technologies can help secure a future for the past.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 6b7d
authors Mishima, Yoshitaka and Szalapaj, Peter
year 1999
title ADMIRE: an Architectural Design Multimedia Interaction Resource for Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 201-209
summary This paper describes the development of a multimedia system called ADMIRE (an Architectural Design Multimedia Interaction Resource for Education), which enables undergraduate students to understand how to analyse existing buildings dynamically, as well as to develop their own initial architectural design theories. The system contains architectural information in the form of fully rendered models, conceptual illustrations created with a range of CAD software, and multimedia presentations showing various design theoretic analyses. Buildings are described with CAD generated images, and architects with profiles and theories. In addition to rendered designs, there are also conceptual models of each building in the system. Conceptual models are simplified forms of original designs in order to support an analytical understanding of buildings according to various analyses, such as structure, light, circulation, unit to whole, geometry, etc. Each conceptual model constitutes a different analysis of each building. The ADMIRE system links each piece of information to another, so that students can explore architecture and learn about it in a dynamic way. This system demonstrates a new way of learning about architectural analysis through dynamic multimedia computer interaction.
keywords Dynamic Multimedia System, Analytical Models, Interactive Pedagogical Resource
series eCAADe
email ARP95YM@sheffield.ac.uk, p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 68a8
authors Novitski, B. J. and Mitchell, William
year 1999
title Rendering Real and Imagined Buildings: The Art of Computer Modeling
source Rockport Publishers
summary Rendering Real and Imagined Buildings explores the world of buildings that were, that could have been or that are yet to be. Advances in architectural rendering programs on the computer can allow architects to explore unbuilt architecture, test structures, discover details, and see in 3-D what cannot be shown on paper. The book presents 27 buildings from an ancient temple to a house by Frank Lloyd Wright to an airport for the future.
series other
email novitski@architectureweek.com
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id f8b5
authors Oswald, Daniel and Pittioni, Gernot
year 1999
title AVOCAAD Exercises Facility Management Training on the web A Facility Management Survey Relevance for the Architects Business
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 81-87
summary Facilities Management (FM) can't be seen as a subject with a specific area of knowledge with exactly defined borders relative to other subjects. Analysing the economic aspects of FM leads to the realisation that building management is experiencing a process of increasing specialisation and professionalism. It is possible to define FM from a variety of different points of origin. One possible approach views FM as an integral solution for the administration of buildings, their commercial activities, and technical maintenance from an economic perspective, during the whole life of a building. FM covers all strategies in order to efficiently provide, adequately operate and adapt buildings, their contents and systems to changing organisational demands. The current practice of limited analysis of specific administrative aspects, e.g. maintenance, is replaced by consideration of all factors that affect costs. Since all costs can be directly traced to space, the perfect procedure requires that FM is practised during the *hole living-cycle, starting with the definition of the program of construction until the day of conversion or demolition. Through successful FM, the real estate can contribute decisively to the improvement of productivity and the quality of life.
series AVOCAAD
email pittioni@pittioni.de
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 5bc7
authors Prestinenza, Luigi
year 1999
title Hyperarchitecture: Spaces in the Electronic Age
source Birkhauser
summary In an age dominated by the Internet and electronic media it is becoming increasingly clear that our perception of space is also undergoing a profound transformation. The author takes the reader on a fascinating journey, revealing who has played a part in this transformation. Avant-garde artists, including Boccioni, Duchamp and Kandinsky, the architect Gropius, philosophers such as Wittgenstein and psychoanalysts like Carl Gustav Jung all contributed to this development. Today, our awareness of traditional architectural space is changing; buildings are being rendered transparent, fleeting and intangible, enhanced by virtual potential. The author looks at works by Rem Koolhaas, Jean Nouvel, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, James Wines, Daniel Libeskind, Toyo Ito, which reflect building in an age of virtual realism.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8401
authors Puglisi, Luigi P.
year 1999
title Hyper Architecture. Spaces in the Electronic Age
source Birkhauser Basel. p. 6
summary In an age dominated by the Internet and electronic media it is becoming increasingly clear that our perception of space is also undergoing a profound transformation. The author takes the reader on a fascinating journey, revealing who has played a part in this transformation. Avant-garde artists, including Boccioni, Duchamp and Kandinsky, the architect Gropius, philosophers such as Wittgenstein and psychoanalysts like Carl Gustav Jung all contributed to this development. Today, our awareness of traditional architectural space is changing; buildings are being rendered transparent, fleeting and intangible, enhanced by virtual potential. The author looks at works by Rem Koolhaas, Jean Nouvel, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, James Wines, Daniel Libeskind, Toyo Ito, which reflect building in an age of virtual realism.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id c1b6
authors Ries, R.
year 1999
title Computational Analysis of the Environmental Impact of Building Designs
source Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh
summary Concem for the environmental implications of human activities is becoming increasingly important to society. The concept of current development that does not compromise future generations! abilities to meet their needs is a goal for many communities and individuals (WCED 1987). These concerns require the evaluation and assessment of the potential environmental impact of human activities so that informed choices can be made. Building construction and operation activities are of significant importance in view of a) national and intemational economies, 6) resource consumption, c) human occupancy, and d) environmental impact. For example, in the United States the built environment represents an extensive investment, both as an annual expenditure and as an aggregate investment. In the mid-l980’s, up to 30% of new and remodeled buildings had indoor air quality related complaints. Buildings also consume approximately 35% of the primary energy in the U.S. every year, resulting in the release of 482 million metric tons of carbon in 1993. I Methods developed to assess the environmental impact of buildings and development patterns can and have taken multiple strategies. The most straightforward and simple methods use single factors, such as energy use or the mass of pollutant emissions as indicators of environmental performance. Other methods use categorization and weighting strategies. These gauge the effects of the emissions typically based on research studies and use a weighting or effect formulation to normalize, compare, and group emissions so that a scalar value can be assigned to a single or a set of emissions. These methods do not consider the characteristics of the context where the emissions occur.
series thesis:MSc
email rr43@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 9dfa
authors Ries, R. and Mahdavi, A.
year 1999
title Environmental Life Cycle Assessment in an Integrated CAD Environment: The Ecologue Approach
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 351-363
summary Construction and operation of buildings is a major cause of resource depletion and environmental pollution. Computational performance evaluation tools could support the decision making process in environmentally responsive building design and play an important role in environmental impact assessment, especially when a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach is used. The building domain, however, presents notable challenges to the application of LCA methods. For comprehensive environmental impact analysis to be realized in a computational support tool for the building design domain, such tools must a) have an analysis method that considers the life cycle of building construction, operation, and decommissioning, b) have a representation that is able to accommodate the data and computability requirements of the analysis method and the analysis tool, and c) be seamlessly integrated within a multi-aspect design analysis environment that can provide data on environmentally relevant building operation criteria. This paper reviews the current state of assessment methods and computational support tools for LCA, and their application to building design. Then, the implementation of an application (ECOLOGUE) for comprehensive computational assessment of environmental impact indicators over the building life cycle is presented. The application is a component in a multi-aspect space-based CAD and evaluation environment (SEMPER). The paper describes the use and typical results of ECOLOGUE system via illustrative examples.
keywords Life Cycle Assessment, Integrated Computational Environmental Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email amahdavi@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 68cd
authors Rosenfeld, Y. and Shohet, I.M.
year 1999
title Decision support model for semi-automated selection of renovation alternatives
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 503-510
summary The initiation of a renovation project usually involves a long process of contemplation under conditions of high uncertainty. Large organizations, that own many buildings and other facilities, can greatly benefit from a decision-support model, which can be transformed to a computerized semi-automatic tool. It will aid them develop and execute a reasonable and economical policy of rehabilitating, renovating, remodeling, or rebuilding their facilities. This paper presents a systematic four-module decision support model: (a) Preliminary survey of background conditions; (b) Evaluation and ranking of the facility's physical condition; (c) Generation of viable alternatives for rehabilitation, renovation, or reconstruction; and (d) Quantitative techno-economic comparison among the alternatives, and systematic presentation of recommendations. The paper concludes with a demonstrative example, concerning the renovation of a 25-year-old dining facility, that highlights both the practicality of the model and the benefits from utilizing it.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id c9ed
authors Saito, Elena Keiko
year 1999
title Formal Alternatives Through Ludic Process Applied to Tessellation
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 101-108
summary The digital graphic systems development is evident during the alternative generation process, especially when the component objects are linked to a geometric base by modulation. In this sense, the tiling modular characteristics are used as geometric support which modulation or internal divisions contain material forms (objects in 3D) immaterial forms (spaces in 3D). That is to say that each tiling module can be projected or not in 3D. The way to do this consists of applying it not only as two-dimensional support but also as operational structure by means of operations of pure translation, in 3D. It is applied to architectural themes which systemic parts or components sectors admit repetitions of units (dwelling buildings, schools, offices, hotels, etc.) in plan floor levels and in elevation as well. When programmatic and morphological requirements are solved groups are organized conforming systems in two or three dimensions. In the alternative generation stage it is tried to avoid conditioning and restrictions developing a ludic process of "piling up tiles" simple concepts stimulating creativity for the production of innovating architectonic forms. Creative ideas can arise from the game playing with 3D forms. This paper attempts to show a manner to generate unusual architectural forms that, otherwise, within a traditional design process might not be found. Some architectural examples developed with this ludic procedure are presented.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 0b90
authors Serrentino, Roberto
year 1999
title Modular Architectural Groupings from Escher Periodic Tessellations
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 205-219
summary One of the more interesting design techniques developed by Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher consists in covering the plane with tiles containing patterns that repeats periodically. Modularity within shape grouping is extensively used, expressed by natural figures from the living world, and also from worlds of fantasy. This paper attempts to use Eschers's ideas as a source of inspiration to obtain modular shapes to conform groups with architectural issues. The task is to satisfy design requirements and to get repeatable unitary shapes, whose geometric description is modularly manipulated within area as well as perimeter. This should be done by two procedures: 1. from the components to the whole (from the tiles to the tiling): once the designer has defined a modular constructive unit (solving a particular situation), it is possible to repeat the unit to generate modular groups, knowing that they will fit perfectly among them, without gaps nor overlaps. 2. from the whole to the components (from the tiling to the tiles): defining a tessellation with the particular rules that drives close to the architectural solution, and getting the necessary units from the tiling. There are multiple architectural themes on which this should be performed. School class-rooms, habitation buildings, shopping center sites, hotel rooms, are examples of this statement. Analyzing procedures followed by the artist, particularly those using figures that tessellate the plane periodically, we'll be able to generate tiles with architectural shape by the same way, applying different symmetry rules. Once the rules to generate shapes of tiles are known, we work within area and perimeter to satisfy modularity requirements and to convert the tiling as a geometric precise support for the insertion of architectural objects that follow predetermined dimensional patterns. In order to illustrate these ideas an example of grouping repeatable habitation units is presented.
series AVOCAAD
email rserrentino@arnet.com.ar, rserren@herrera.unt.edu.ar, Labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2cf4
authors Shih, Naai-Jung and Huang, Yen-Shih
year 1999
title An Analysis and Simulation of Curtain Wall Reflection Glare
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 744-750
summary This paper presents a computer-aided visualization on the influence of reflected sunbeams from curtain wall buildings. A survey was made to local buildings and it was discovered that reflected glare is a significant urban problem. Based on survey findings, a simulation was conducted to compare with actual occurrences in order to increase the comprehension of the consequences of window orientation and angles in the design stage. The simulation enabled design evaluation with an inspection above normal eye level and in a broader area, than that which normally could be achieved in a site survey at a pedestrian's or a driver's level. The computer simulation verified the influence of reflection on the urban environment by using a time-based record. In order to provide design solutions, the simulation used a 10x10x10 cube in referencing the horizontal area that would receive reflections. Due to the symmetric shape of the cube, a butterfly shaped boundary of reflection area (BRA) was concluded. BRA is smaller on the summer solstice than on the spring or autumnal equinox. In order to reduce BRA, a passive design approach was applied by tilting or rotating walls to evaluate how the tilted angles or orientation of the façade could affect reflected glare.
keywords Reflection Glare, Visualization
series eCAADe
email shihnj@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id f6d5
authors Song, Y., Clayton, M.J. and Johnson, R.E.
year 1999
title Anticipating Reuse: Documenting Buildings for Operations Using Web Technology
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 54-65
summary This research explores the feasibility of Web technology as a means for delivering building information to better support facility operations. Our research proposes just-in-time (JIT) facility documentation as a pragmatic solution to the limitations of current as-built documents, allowing more effective reuse of building information. Our investigation addresses four issues: 1) what building information is needed for facility operations; 2) how the design and construction team can improve the format for delivering the building information to facility operators; 3) how current Web technology can store and deliver facility information in support of operations; 4) what is the mechanism of documenting building information using the Web technology. //

We surveyed literature, interviewed members of design and operations teams and reviewed current initiatives of industry and software vendors to identify problems with current practices. We also surveyed promising Web technologies and conducted experiments to determine how these technologies could help to solve the problems. We constructed a conceptual framework of JIT facility documentation as a solution to current information fragmentation problems. We developed a prototype of the JIT document system to demonstrate a “proof of concept” by using current Web technologies such as Autodesk’s DWF, Microsoft’s Active Server Pages, VB and Java script, and Access database to develop the prototype system. By dynamically composing HTML pages in response to task-specific requests, our prototype enables easy access and integration of a variety of building information to support facility operations.

series ACADIA
email ys-song@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:57

_id 7cb1
authors Stuurstraat, N. and Tolman, F.
year 1999
title A product modeling approach to building knowledge integration
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 269-275
summary Knowledge informatics is still playing only a minor role in the design process of buildings and civil engineering efforts, particularly in the inception stage. The primary reason that most knowledge tools are not well integrated into the process is that most tend to be based on stand alone expert system technology. Improving the re-use of existing knowledge is required to increase industry performance. A solution could be a new generation of integrated knowledge systems. One problem that must be addressed is how to cope with the conflicting requirements of each particular subsystem when each is optimized for its own knowledge domain. No optimum solution exists that is able to simultaneously optimize each subsystem for a total solution. This paper discusses an approach to building knowledge integration that attempts to address these shortcomings through the use of combined product model and meta-knowledge approach.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 8fe9
authors Terzidis, Kostas
year 1999
title Experiments on Morphing Systems
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 149-151
summary This paper presents recent experiments on 3D morphing of buildings. A genealogical tree is created out of cross-morphing buildings showing their children and grandchildren. The resulting children-buildings share characteristics of the formal properties of their parents. There are two methods used here to morph buildings: face-to-face mapping and object-to-object mapping. All morphed buildings are shown as real-time animation. A series of experiments will be presented. Some experiments investigate the implementation of architecture or art theories. For example, how would it look like to morph a Hedjuk building into a Le Corbusier building? How would the resulting child look like in a cubist world? Or how would a building look like as it is extrapolated beyond its target and instead of lines and points it is represented as letters and colors? The computer system that was developed by the author for this paper is called "zhapes" and is a Java-based 3D-experimentation system. It resides at the address http://www.cda.ucla.edu/caad/java/x/formProj2/formB.html where it can be downloaded for explorations.
series SIGRADI
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id 5f23
authors Vineeta, Pal
year 1999
title Integrated Computational Analysis of the Visual Environment in Buildings
source Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh
summary Despite significant advances in the area of computational support for lighting design, lighting simulation tools have not been sufficiently integrated into the lighting design process. There is a significant body of designers who rely solely on their individual experience and do not use predictive simulation tools. Even when simulation tools are utilized, it is for design verification or presentation rather than for design support. A number of factors are thought to contribute to this lack of integration of simulation tools into the design process: a) Most existing tools rely on the problematic assumption implying the appropriateness of simplified models for the less complex early design and detailed simulation for the more complex later stages of design; b) They do not support an active exploration of design variables to satisfy desired performance criteria; c) They are not integrated with other building performance simulation models. This thesis addresses the above shortcomings by contributing to the field of visual analysis in the following areas, pertaining to the development of active, integrated design and performance simulation environments: - Implementation of a consistent and coherent, physically-based modeling approach, combining radiosity and ray-tracing methods for the simulation of light propagation. - Provision of design support both in terms of evaluation support for interpreting large amounts of computed data with diverse performance indices, and in terms of active design support to explore the relationships between the design variables and performance indices. - Integration of the lighting simulation module within a larger software environment (SEMPER) for the prediction and evaluation of multiple performance indicators (for energy, light, acoustics, etc.) in buildings.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id e978
authors [Zupancic] Strojan, Tadeja Z.
year 1999
title CyberUniversity
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 196-200
summary The study of a cyberuniversity derives from an analogy between real urban space and its virtual "substitution". It represents an attempt to balance some views, which seems to be contrary, exclusive, but they are just parts of the same wholeness. Especially the notion of a cyber society is lately considered such an exaggeration, that it is possible to forget the meaning of a real life experience and interactions, which are already threatened. One should contribute to the awarness that is used in such a comparison, it is "just" an analogy, not a real similarity. At the same time it is possible to point out some limitations of a cyberspace and indicate a more realistic view of the meaning of cyber communities. Awarness of the development processes could help to find a balance between reality and virtuality, using cyberfacilities not to destroy us (our identity) but to improve the quality of our (real) life.
keywords University, Cyberuniversity, Space, Cyberspace
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email tadeja.zupancic@guest.arnes.si
last changed 2007/03/04 06:03

_id bacd
authors Abadí Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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