CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 618

_id 22b7
authors Donath, D. and Regenbrecht, H.
year 1999
title Der Bleistift im 21. Jahrhundert. Das architektonische Entwerfen in interaktiven VR Umgebungen. (The pencil in the 21th century. The architectural design process in Virtual Environments)
source IAO Forum Architektur im Informationszeitalter, FhG Stuttgart, 21.-22.4.1999, proceedings, chapter 7, 10 p.
summary In the very young discipline of Virtual Reality Applications only a few reports are available about using this technology for periods longer than in experimental setups. This paper describes experiences made during five years of usage of Virtual Reality (VR) in educational training for architects. About 100 different people were working with our systems during this period. Three programs were developed at Bauhaus University with the aim of teaching architectural students to design in three-dimesional environments. The first program called voxDesign is based on the metaphor of voxels. The second program, planeDesign, uses rectangualar planes to describe room-like situations. An other program vram for the user orientated description of flexible and own interfaces and environments is current under construction, a first verson is presented at the international computer exhibition ěCeBitî in 1999. All programs force the users to design in a 1:1 scale, that means that the design and the feedback actions are coupled in an embodied way. A real walking metaphor is used for navigation. The experiences made by users are explained too.
keywords Virtual Reality, Interaction, Human Computer Interfaces, Digital Media
series other
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2003/02/26 17:58

_id fd35
authors Donath, Dirk
year 1999
title Using Immersive Virtual Reality Systems for Spatial Design in Architecture
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 307-318
summary In the very young discipline of Virtual Reality Applications only a few reports are available about using this technology for periods longer than in experimental setups. This paper describes experiences made during four years of usage of Virtual Reality (VR) in educational training for architects. About 100 different people were working with our systems during this period. Two programs were developed at Bauhaus University with the aim of teaching students in architecture in three-dimensional sketching. An other program for free and own interfaces and environments is currently under construction and will be presented at the international computer fair "CeBit" in 1999. The first program called voxDesign is based on the metaphor of voxels. The second program, planeDesign, uses rectangualar planes to describe room-like situations. All programs force the users to design in a 1:1 scale, which means that the design and the feedback actions are coupled in an embodied way. A real walking metaphor is used for navigation. The experiences made by the students are explained too.
keywords Virtual Reality, Architecture, Design, Design Support Systems, Interaction, Research, Education, Usability, Human Computer Interfaces
series AVOCAAD
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id d5b3
authors Knight, Michael and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Working in Virtual Environments through appropriate Physical Interfaces
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 431-436
summary The work described here is aimed at contributing towards the debate and development relating to the construction of interfaces to explore buildings and their environs through virtual worlds. We describe a particular hardware and software configuration which is derived by the use of low cost games software to create the Virtual Environment. The Physical Interface responds to the work of other researchers, in this area, in particular Shaw (1994) and Vasquez de Velasco & Trigo (1997). Virtual Evironments might have the potential to be "a magical window into other worlds, from molecules to minds" (Rheingold, 1992), but what is the nature of that window? Currently it is often a translucent opening which gives a hazy and distorted (disembodied) view. And many versions of such openings are relatively expensive. We consider ways towards clearing the haze without too much expense, adapting techniques proposed by developers of low cost virtual reality systems (Hollands, 1995) for use in an architectural setting.
keywords Virtual Environments, Games Software
series eCAADe
email mknight@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2002/11/22 17:33

_id ab9c
authors Kvan, Thomas and Kvan, Erik
year 1999
title Is Design Really Social
source International Journal of Virtual Reality, 4:1
summary There are many who will readily agree with Mitchell's assertion that "the most interesting new directions (for computer-aided design) are suggested by the growing convergence of computation and telecommunication. This allows us to treat designing not just as a technical process... but also as a social process." [Mitchell 1995]. The assumption is that design was a social process until users of computer-aided design systems were distracted into treating it as a merely technical process. Most readers will assume that this convergence must and will lead to increased communication between design participants, that better social interaction leads to be better design. The unspoken assumption appears to be that putting the participants into an environment with maximal communication channels will result in design collaboration. The tools provided, therefore, must permit the best communication and the best social interaction. We see a danger here, a pattern being repeated which may lead us into less than useful activities. As with several (popular) architectural design or modelling systems already available, however, computer system implementations all too often are poor imitations manual systems. For example, few in the field will argue with the statement that the storage of data in layers in a computer-aided drafting system is an dispensable approach. Layers derive from manual overlay drafting technology [Stitt 1984] which was regarded as an advanced (manual) production concept at the time many software engineers were specifying CAD software designs. Early implementations of CAD systems (such as RUCAPS, GDS, Computervision) avoided such data organisation, the software engineers recognising that object-based structures are more flexible, permitting greater control of data editing and display. Layer-based systems, however, are easier to implement in software, more familiar to the user and hence easier to explain, initially easier to use but more limiting for an experienced and thoughtful user, leading in the end to a lesser quality in resultant drawings and significant problems in output control (see Richens [1990], pp. 31-40 for a detailed analysis of such features and constraints). Here then we see the design for architectural software faithfully but inappropriately following manual methods. So too is there a danger of assuming that the best social interaction is that done face-to-face, therefore all collaborative design communications environments must mimic face-to-face.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id a234
authors Von Wodtke, M.
year 1999
title Design with digital tools
source Mc Graw Hill.
summary Delivers ready-to-use professional guidance on the tools that are revolutionizing the design professions. Helps you and your design team use the information technology more effectively and also helps you engage your clients online. You get hands-on help with the nuts-and-bolts of finding free information and images quickly, applying templates and applets, gaining access to detail, libraries, and smoothing workflow with management and collaborative tools. On the CD-ROM: * High-speed tools for design stages * Links to online resources * Create in information environments * Master digital modeling & imaging * Apply CAD in drafting and design * Design special effects, multimedia, and presentations * Navigate geographic information systems * Manipulate virtual reality * Create a state-of-the-art design office
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 4b48
authors Dourish, P.
year 1999
title Where the Footprints Lead: Tracking down other roles for social navigation
source Social Navigation of Information Space, eds. A. Munro, K. H. and D Benyon. London: Springer-Verlag, pp 15-34
summary Collaborative Filtering was proposed in the early 1990's as a means of managing access to large information spaces by capturing and exploiting aspects of the experiences of previous users of the same information. Social navigation is a more general form of this style of interaction, and with the widening scope of the Internet as an information provider, systems of this sort have rapidly moved from early research prototypes to deployed services in everyday use. On the other hand, to most of the HCI community, the term social navigation" is largely synonymous with "recommendation systems": systems that match your interests to those of others and, on that basis, provide recommendations about such things as music, books, articles and films that you might enjoy. The challenge for social navigation, as an area of research and development endeavour, is to move beyond this rather limited view of the role of social navigation; and to do this, we must try to take a broader view of both our remit and our opportunities. This chapter will revisit the original motivations, and chart something of the path that recent developments have taken. Based on reflections on the original concerns that motivated research into social navigation, it will explore some new avenues of research. In particular, it will focus on two. The first is social navigation within the framework of "awareness" provisions in collaborative systems generally; and the second is the relationship of social navigation systems to spatial models and the ideas of "space" and "place" in collaborative settings. By exploring these two ideas, two related goals can be achieved. The first is to draw attention to ways in which current research into social navigation can be made relevant to other areas of research endeavour; and the second is to re-motivate the idea of "social navigation" as a fundamental model for collaboration in information-seeking."
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id e719
authors Achten, Henri and Turksma, Arthur
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Early Design: the Design Studio Experiences
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 327-335
summary The Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology started a new kind of design studio teaching. With the use of high-end equipment, students use Virtual Reality from the very start of the design process. Virtual Reality technology up to now was primarily used for giving presentations. We use the same technology in the design process itself by means of reducing the time span in which one gets results in Virtual Reality. The method is based on a very brief cycle of modelling in AutoCAD, assigning materials in 3DStudio Viz, and then making a walkthrough in Virtual Reality in a standard landscape. Due to this cycle, which takes about 15 seconds, the student gets immediate feedback on design decisions which facilitates evaluation of the design in three dimensions much faster than usual. Usually the learning curve of this kind of software is quite steep, but with the use of templates the number of required steps to achieve results is reduced significantly. In this way, the potential of Virtual Reality is not only explored in research projects, but also in education. This paper discusses the general set-up of the design studio and shows how, via short workshops, students acquire knowledge of the cycle in a short time. The paper focuses on the added value of using Virtual Reality technology in this manner: improved spatial reasoning, translation from two-dimensional to three-dimensional representations, and VR feedback on design decisions. It discusses the needs for new design representations in this design environment, and shows how fast feedback in Virtual Reality can improve the spatial design at an early stage of the design process.
series AVOCAAD
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl, A.A.E.Turksma@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ga9922
id ga9922
authors Annunziato, M. and Pierucci, P.
year 1999
title The Art of Emergence
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since several years, the term emergence is mentioned in the paradigm of chaos and complexity. Following this approach, complex system constituted by multitude of individual develop global behavioral properties on the base of local chaotic interactions (self-organization). These theories, developed in scientific and philosophical milieus are rapidly spreading as a "way of thinking" in the several fields of cognitive activities. According to this "way of thinking" it is possible revise some fundamental themes as the economic systems, the cultural systems, the scientific paths, the communication nets under a new approach where nothing is pre-determined, but the global evolution is determined by specific mechanisms of interaction and fundamental events (bifurcation). With a jump in scale of the life, also other basic concepts related to the individuals as intelligence, consciousness, psyche can be revised as self-organizing phenomena. Such a conceptual fertility has been the base for the revision of the artistic activities as flexible instruments for the investigation of imaginary worlds, metaphor of related real worlds. In this sense we claim to the artist a role of "researcher". Through the free exploration of new concepts, he can evoke qualities, configurations and hypothesis which have an esthetical and expressive value and in the most significant cases, they can induce nucleation of cultural and scientific bifurcation. Our vision of the art-science relation is of cooperative type instead of the conflict of the past decades. In this paper we describe some of the most significant realized artworks in order to make explicit the concepts and basic themes. One of the fundamental topics is the way to generate and think to the artwork. Our characterization is to see the artwork not as a static finished product, but as an instance or a dynamic sequence of instances of a creative process which continuously evolves. In this sense, the attention is focused on the "generative idea" which constitutes the envelop of the artworks generable by the process. In this approach the role of technology (computers, synthesizers) is fundamental to create the dimension of the generative environment. Another characterizing aspect of our artworks is derived by the previous approach and specifically related to the interactive installations. The classical relation between artist, artwork and observers is viewed as an unidirectional flux of messages from the artist to the observer through the artwork. In our approach artist, artwork and observer are autonomous entities provided with own personality which jointly intervene to determine the creative paths. The artist which generate the environment in not longer the "owner" of the artwork; simply he dialectically bring the generative environment (provided by a certain degree of autonomy) towards cultural and creative "void" spaces (not still discovered). The observers start from these platforms to generate other creative paths, sometimes absolutely unexpected , developing their new dialectical relations with the artwork itself. The results derived by these positions characterize the expressive elements of the artworks (images, sequences and sounds) as the outcomes of emergent behavior or dynamics both in the sense of esthetical shapes emergent from fertile generative environments, either in terms of emergent relations between artist, artwork and observer, either in terms of concepts which emerge by the metaphor of artificial worlds to produce imaginary hypothesis for the real worlds.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id e15c
authors Bartenbach, Christian and Witting, Walter
year 1999
title VDU WORK IN DIFFERENT LIGHTING CONDITIONS
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 7-28
summary In order to avoid the disadvantages of purely subjective methods in a technical evaluation of daylight and artificial light systems, the Bartenbach LichtLabor developed new test methods which can determine objectively and quantitatively the visual or psycho-physiological stress connected with VDU work [1], depending on different lighting conditions. Daylight and artificial lighting systems were tested with these methods and compared by using the performances achieved by the test subjects. Some highly significant differences in performance done under the individual lighting systems became apparent and demonstrated that the visual stress or the physical or physiological fatigue from an ergonomic viewpoint depends largely on the lighting conditions at the workplace. This holds true for daylight systems (glare protection, re-directing lamellae, clear window as a control condition) as well as for purely artificial lighting systems where especially the choice of color temperature of the light and the used control gear (conventional or electronic) determine the resulting performance. Optimized lighting also positively affects the productivity and economicy for the design of workplaces that take the human factor into account.
keywords VDU, Optimized Lighting, Performance Test, Lighting System, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id 7674
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitrios
year 1999
title Virtual Environment Design - Defining a New Direction for Architectural Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 403-409
summary This paper considers the design and development of virtual environments (VEs) and the way that it relates to traditional architectural education and practice. The need for practitioners who will contribute to the design of 3D content for multimedia and virtual reality applications is identified. The design of space in a VE is seen as being partly an architectural problem. Therefore, architectural design should play an important role in educating VE designers. Other disciplines, intrinsically related to the issue of VE design, are also identified. Finally, this paper aims at pointing out the need for a new direction within architectural education, which will lead towards a generation of VE architects.
keywords Virtual Environments, Architectural Design, Architectural Education
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 48a7
authors Brooks
year 1999
title What's Real About Virtual Reality
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 19, no. 6, Nov/Dec, 27
summary As is usual with infant technologies, the realization of the early dreams for VR and harnessing it to real work has taken longer than the wild hype predicted, but it is now happening. I assess the current state of the art, addressing the perennial questions of technology and applications. By 1994, one could honestly say that VR "almost works." Many workers at many centers could doe quite exciting demos. Nevertheless, the enabling technologies had limitations that seriously impeded building VR systems for any real work except entertainment and vehicle simulators. Some of the worst problems were end-to-end system latencies, low-resolution head-mounted displays, limited tracker range and accuracy, and costs. The technologies have made great strides. Today one can get satisfying VR experiences with commercial off-the-shelf equipment. Moreover, technical advances have been accompanied by dropping costs, so it is both technically and economically feasible to do significant application. VR really works. That is not to say that all the technological problems and limitations have been solved. VR technology today "barely works." Nevertheless, coming over the mountain pass from "almost works" to "barely works" is a major transition for the discipline. I have sought out applications that are now in daily productive use, in order to find out exactly what is real. Separating these from prototype systems and feasibility demos is not always easy. People doing daily production applications have been forthcoming about lessons learned and surprises encountered. As one would expect, the initial production applications are those offering high value over alternate approaches. These applications fall into a few classes. I estimate that there are about a hundred installations in daily productive use worldwide.
series journal paper
email brooks@ai.mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 3017
authors Carson, J. and Clark, A.
year 1999
title Multicast Shared Virtual Worlds Using VRML 97
source Proceedings of VRML 99 Fourth Symposium on the Virtual Reality Modeling language, The Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. New York, pp. 133-140
summary This paper describes a system for authoring and executing shared virtual worlds within existing VRML97 viewers such as Cosmo Player. As VRML97 does not contain any direct support for the construction of virtual worlds containing multiple users extensions are presented to provide support for shared behaviours, avatars and objects that can be manipulated and carried by participants in the world; these extensions are pre-processed into standard VRML97 and Java. A system infrastructure is described which allows worlds to be authored and executed within the context of the World Wide Web and the MBone. CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.2.2 [Computer Communication Networks]: Network Protocols - Applications; C.2.4 [Computer Communication Networks]: Distributed Sys- tems - Distributed Applications; H.5.1 [Information Interfaces and Presentation] Multimedia Information Systems - Artificial, Aug- mented and Virtual Realities; 1.3.2 [Computer Graphics]: Graphics Systems - Distributed/network graphics: 1.3.6 [Computer Graph- ics]: Methodology and Techniques - Interaction Techniques; 1.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three Dimensional Graphics and Realism - Virtual Reality.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 9cf4
authors Chan, C., Hill, L. and Cruz-Neira, C.
year 1999
title Is it Possible to Design in Full Scale? A CAD Tool in a Synthetic Environment
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 43-52
summary This project developed a Virtual Architectural Design Tool (VADeT) executed in the C2 Virtual Reality (VR) space. C2 is a synthetic CAVE environment providing a full-scale setting for image projection and perception. Applying this tool for design offers four advantages over other CAD systems. First, it enables navigation performing in full scale to create the sense of immersion and reflection of the seeing-as. Second, it allows the creation, modification, and editing of three-dimensional objects in a virtual space. Third, designs can be modified and viewed simultaneously inside or outside of the generated model to obtain the best design products. Fourth, the entire design process can be recorded and played back. Collectively, this tool serves the purposes of: (1) a three-dimensional sketching tool for manipulating 3-D objects, (2) a design study tool for transparently displaying the design processes, and (3) a design teaching tool to demonstrate the processes by which designers do design. Thus, design in a full-scale representation not only is possible but also is a new and unconventional mode that will heavily influence design thinking.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/09/11 07:39

_id 26e4
authors Da Rosa Sampaio, Andrea
year 1999
title Design Thinking Proces and New Paradigms of Graphic Expression (Design Thinking Proces and New Paradigms of Graphic Expression)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 68-73
summary It is undeniable that infotechnology has brought significant changes into architectural representation. Whether these changes has altered design conception proccess or are only media matters, is a discussion concerned with the role of graphic expression in architects designs. Is it just a language, or a design thinking tool, fully engaged with the formal solution? Thus, the investigation of the role of represententional systems in the design thinking proccess and the analysis of their intrinsic relationship will approach traditional methods facing the widespread use of Computer Aided Design. There are polemics about the issue: on the one hand, seductive simulations and a plethora of rendering choices available, on the other hand, impersonal expression, to name a few arguments for and against CAD use. Computers have not replaced the straight reciprocity between the acts of conceiving and drawing, between mind and image, which results in manual sketches, quite effective in embodying a design idea. Yet, we have to admit that manipulating complex forms such as Gehry's Guggenheim Museum quickly would not be feasible before CAD advent. We have been faced with new paradigms challenging the graphic expression of architects and urban designers. Besides the consequences of this new reality to design thinking, a crucial point to be stressed at this discussion is the possibility of achieving a balance between the cherished mind-hand intimacy and the available technological resources.
keywords Traditional Representation, Design Thinking, CAD
series SIGRADI
email asampaio@trip.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 11f2
authors Dalholm, E., Rydberg-Mitchell, B., Davies, R. and Warrén, P.
year 1999
title THE EXPERIENCE OF SPACE IN FULL-SCALE MODELS AND VIRTUAL REALITY
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 67-74
summary Do we experience the size and character of virtual spaces in the same way as real spaces? What impact has the meaning of a space, i.e. furniture and other clues to the use of a space, on our experience of it? This paper describes an experiment where the participants could navigate through a room, first on desktop-VR, then in full-scale VR (in a CAVE) and finally in a full-scale model. In a first phase the room was empty and only defined through walls, windows and doors. Later on furniture was added as well as colors and textures. The experiment was a pilot study and threw light on some questions which we intend to develop in further investigations. It showed that the participants used building components like doors and windows and furniture in the presentation on desktop VR for their estimation of the size of the room. In the CAVE and in the full-scale model the participants' bodies were the measure for their estimations. The experiment also hinted at that color and texture had an impact on the experience of size.
keywords VR, CAVE, Full-scale Modeling, Design Tool, 3D-Modeling, Participatory Design, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email Elisabeth.Dalholm@byggfunk.lth.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id ga9916
id ga9916
authors Elzenga, R. Neal and Pontecorvo, Michael S.
year 1999
title Arties: Meta-Design as Evolving Colonies of Artistic Agents
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Meta-design, the act of designing a system or species of design instead of a design instance, is an important concept in modern design practice and in the generative design paradigm. For meta-design to be a useful tool, the designer must have more formal support for both design species definition/expression and the abstract attributes which the designer is attempting to embody within a design. Arties is an exploration of one possible avenue for supporting meta-design. Arties is an artistic system emphasizing the co-evolution of colonies of Artificial Life design or artistic agents (called arties) and the environment they inhabit. Generative design systems have concentrated on biological genetics metaphors where a population of design instances are evolved directly from a set of ‘parent’ designs in a succession of generations. In Arties, the a-life agent which is evolved, produces the design instance as a byproduct of interacting with its environment. Arties utilize an attraction potential curve as their primary dynamic. They sense the relative attraction of entities in their environment, using multiple sensory channels. Arties then associate an attractiveness score to each entity. This attractiveness score is combined with a 'taste' function built into the artie that is sensitized to that observation channel, entity, and distance by a transfer function. Arties use this attraction to guide decisions and behaviors. A community of arties, with independent evolving attraction criteria can pass collective judgement on each point in an art space. As the Artie moves within this space it modifies the environment in reaction to what it senses. Arties support for Meta-design is in (A) the process of evolving arties, breeding their attraction potential curve parameters using a genetic algorithm and (B) their use of sensory channels to support abstract attributes geometries. Adjustment of these parameters tunes the attraction of the artie along various sensing channels. The multi-agent co-evolution of Arties is one approach to creating a system for supporting meta-design. Arties is part of an on-going exploration of how to support meta-design in computer augmented design systems. Our future work with Arties-like systems will be concerned with applications in areas such as modeling adaptive directives in Architecture, Object Structure Design, spatio-temporal behaviors design (for games and simulations), virtual ambient spaces, and representation and computation of abstract design attributes.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 076e
authors Ennis, G. and Lindsay, M.
year 1999
title VRML Possibilities: The evolution of the Glasgow Model
source Proceedings of International Conference on Virtual Systems and MultiMedia. University of Abertay. Dundee
summary During the 1980's, ABACUS, a research unit at the University of Strathclyde developed an interest in the ability to model and manipulate large geometrical databases of urban topography. Initially, this interest lay solely in the ability to source, capture and store the relevant data. However, once constructed, these models proved genuinely useful to a wide range of users and there was soon a demand for more functionality relating to the manipulation not just of the graphics, but also the range of urban attributes. Although a number of improvements were implemented there were drawbacks to the wide adoption of the software produced. The problems were almost all due to deficiencies in the then current hardware and software system available to the professions, and although this strand of research continued to be pursued, most of the development had to be focused on research applications and deployment. However, the recent advent of the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) standards have rekindled interest in this field since this language enables many of the issues that have proved problematic in the past to be addressed and solved. The potential now exists to provide wide access to large scale urban models. This paper focuses on the application of VRML as applied to the 'Glasgow Model'.
series other
email malcolm@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 79fb
authors Fencott, Clive
year 1999
title Towards a Design Methodology for Virtual Environments
source Virtual Reality Applications Centre, University of Teeside
summary Virtual Reality (VR) is currently the subject of much academic research and virtual environments, particularly in the form of 3D computer games, are the subject of much commercial activity. However, the development process for VEs is not well documented or fully researched. In this paper the available literature relating to VE design is briefly reviewed prior to the presentation of a possible design methodology for VEs. The paper then goes on to discuss the weak points in the methodology and problems with inter-relating the various stages. Finally, future areas of research are identified.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id d931
authors Gabryszewski, Artur B.
year 1999
title Idea of an Intelligent Building - Development Prospects
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 739-743
summary An ever-increasing number of offices as also residential buildings are being realised by designers and investors in accordance with the concept of an intelligent building. Houses of the new generation are being constructed. This is possible thanks to dynamic progress in the development of computer and microprocessor engineering techniques. Putting into reality the idea of the 'intelligent building' will become one of the most interesting assignments of Polish building industry in the rapidly approaching XXI century. The term 'intelligent building' first appeared in the eighties. The idea behind this conception is aspiring to create a friendly, work supporting, effective environment. The revolution in telecommunications and information technology along with change in the standards of office work, have caused computer networks and modem systems of automation and protection, to invade buildings. From the technical point of view, an intelligent building is an object in which all the subsystems co-operate with each other, forming a friendly environment for man. For users of an intelligent building, the most important issue is realisation of the following aims: object management which includes both control of human resources and automation systems in the building and also efficient management of the building space in such a way that the costs of its utilisation are minimised. The possibility of optional installation of modern systems and equipment should be facilitated by the architecture itself. Therefore, the specifics of all the building elements should be taken into account right at the designing stage. The following features characterise an intelligent building: integration of telecommunication systems in the building, central management and supervision system and utilisation of structural cabling as the carrier of signals controlling most of the systems in the building. Presently, there is no building in Poland that could be characterised by the three features mentioned.
keywords High-tech Architecture, Ecology, CAAD
series eCAADe
email zarnow@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

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