CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 581 to 590 of 590

_id avocaad_2001_17
id avocaad_2001_17
authors Ying-Hsiu Huang, Yu-Tung Liu, Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yi-Ting Cheng, Yu-Chen Chiu
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in design process
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Design media is a fundamental tool, which can incubate concrete ideas from ambiguous concepts. Evolved from freehand sketches, physical models to computerized drafting, modeling (Dave, 2000), animations (Woo, et al., 1999), and virtual reality (Chiu, 1999; Klercker, 1999; Emdanat, 1999), different media are used to communicate to designers or users with different conceptual levels°@during the design process. Extensively employed in design process, physical models help designers in managing forms and spaces more precisely and more freely (Millon, 1994; Liu, 1996).Computerized drafting, models, animations, and VR have gradually replaced conventional media, freehand sketches and physical models. Diversely used in the design process, computerized media allow designers to handle more divergent levels of space than conventional media do. The rapid emergence of computers in design process has ushered in efforts to the visual impact of this media, particularly (Rahman, 1992). He also emphasized the use of computerized media: modeling and animations. Moreover, based on Rahman's study, Bai and Liu (1998) applied a new design media°Xvirtual reality, to the design process. In doing so, they proposed an evaluation process to examine the visual impact of this new media in the design process. That same investigation pointed towards the facilitative role of the computerized media in enhancing topical comprehension, concept realization, and development of ideas.Computer technology fosters the growth of emerging media. A new computerized media, scenario scripting (Sasada, 2000; Jozen, 2000), markedly enhances computer animations and, in doing so, positively impacts design processes. For the three latest media, i.e., computerized animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting, the following question arises: What role does visual impact play in different design phases of these media. Moreover, what is the origin of such an impact? Furthermore, what are the similarities and variances of computing techniques, principles of interaction, and practical applications among these computerized media?This study investigates the similarities and variances among computing techniques, interacting principles, and their applications in the above three media. Different computerized media in the design process are also adopted to explore related phenomenon by using these three media in two projects. First, a renewal planning project of the old district of Hsinchu City is inspected, in which animations and scenario scripting are used. Second, the renewal project is compared with a progressive design project for the Hsinchu Digital Museum, as designed by Peter Eisenman. Finally, similarity and variance among these computerized media are discussed.This study also examines the visual impact of these three computerized media in the design process. In computerized animation, although other designers can realize the spatial concept in design, users cannot fully comprehend the concept. On the other hand, other media such as virtual reality and scenario scripting enable users to more directly comprehend what the designer's presentation.Future studies should more closely examine how these three media impact the design process. This study not only provides further insight into the fundamental characteristics of the three computerized media discussed herein, but also enables designers to adopt different media in the design stages. Both designers and users can more fully understand design-related concepts.
series AVOCAAD
email yinghsiu@iaaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id d43d
authors Yu, Dazhong
year 1999
title Public Participation in Urban Design Based on Information Technology
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 393-402
summary For years, lack of public participation has affected the quality of design and planning. The developing cities constantly face the anti-development sentiments on the part of local residents because of controversial decision of development. Rapid development of information technology provides us with a chance to mend the delay of communication with the public in design procedure. It makes it possible to get the resident's reaction to a new project. Unlike a purely CAD-based environment, computer application to urban design is based on a blend of computer-aided design, spatial information system, and interactive multimedia. It is the combination of geometric, geographic, and annotated information and the need of data integration by collaboration and meanwhile it provides opportunities of participation. Due to the position at the crossover of architecture, landscape architecture, and planning, urban design attempts to control the proceeding in both design improvisations and socio-economic policies. In this proceeding, public participation plays an important role in exchanging opinions with the masses. In the situation of participation in China, we can synthesize some useful methods of public participation in the urban design by means of computer simulation, computer communication, and diverse software and tools, etc.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2002/09/05 07:17

_id b070
authors Yu, W. and Skibniewski, M.J.
year 1999
title Quantitative constructability analysis with a neuro-fuzzy knowledge-based multi-criterion decision support system
source Automation in Construction 8 (5) (1999) pp. 553-565
summary This paper presents a multi-criterion decision model for quantitative constructability analysis based on a neuro-fuzzy knowledge-based system. The traditional constructability definition is modified so that constructability can be quantified, measured, and improved. A multi-layer information aggregation network is proposed to incorporate the manager's subjective preference information. The constructor's technology management policy can be reflected in the constructability evaluation process based on technology implementation preferences. A systematic approach to constructability problem detection and constructability improvement is developed to improve technology performance. Two examples of constructability analyses for alternative concrete formwork technologies are given to demonstrate the functions of the proposed methodology.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 5b5a
authors Yu, W. and Skibniewski, M.J.
year 1999
title A neuro-fuzzy computational approach to constructability knowledge acquisition for construction technology evaluation
source Automation in Construction 8 (5) (1999) pp. 539-552
summary This paper describes a methodology for constructability knowledge acquisition of construction technologies. The methodology combines a neuro-fuzzy network-based approach with genetic algorithms. The combination of fuzzy logic with learning abilities of neural networks and genetic algorithms may allow for automatic acquisition of constructability knowledge from training examples and for providing understandable explanations for the reasoning process. The proposed methodology can provide a mechanism to trace back factors causing unsatisfactory construction performance and the necessary feedback to construction engineers for technology innovation. An application example is provided to demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed methodology.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" — either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface – seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id cf4d
authors Zamanian, M.K. and Pittman, J.H.
year 1999
title A software industry perspective on AEC information models for distributed collaboration
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 237-248
summary This paper focuses on information modeling and computing technologies that are most relevant to the emerging software for the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industry. After a brief introduction to the AEC industry and its present state of computer-based information sharing and collaboration, a set of requirements for AEC information models are identified. Next, a number of key information modeling and standards initiatives for the AEC domain are briefly discussed followed by a review of the emerging object and Internet technologies. The paper will then present our perspective on the challenges and potential directions for using object-based information models in a new generation of AEC software systems intended to offer component-based open architecture for distributed collaboration.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id d39e
authors Holicky, M.
year 1999
title Fuzzy probabilistic optimisation of building performance
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 437-443
summary Fundamental performance criteria between action effects and relevant performance requirements for serviceability, safety, comfort and functionality are analyzed, assuming randomness of the effect action and both randomness and fuzziness of performance requirements. Randomness due to natural variability of basic variables is handled by commonly used probability theory methods, fuzziness due to vague or imprecise definitions of performance requirements is described by basic tools of the recently developed theory of fuzzy sets. Both types of uncertainties are combined in newly defined fuzzy probabilistic measures of building performance, damage function and fuzzy probability of performance failure, which are then analysed and applied similarly as conventional probabilistic quantities. An illustrative example of optimization of vibration constraints for building structures due to occupancy comfort indicates that commonly considered limiting values for acceleration may be uneconomical. However, theoretical models used to describe fuzzy probabilistic properties of performance requirements need to be reexamined using adequate experimental data.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 9757
authors Matalasov, M. and Zavrajine, K.
year 1999
title Some problems of the light and colour factor in Videosimulation
source Simulation of Architectural Space - Color and Light, Methods and Effects [Proceedings of the 4rd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-86005-267-5] Dresden (Germany), 29 September - 1 October 1999, pp. 58-61
summary Daylighting lets to reveal 3D plastic imagination of building and architectural form. Being of the main time for perception of architecture, daylight helps to solve two principal questions: volumetric-spatial and coloristic solution. Experience of the work shows, that modelling in the natural light on the earliest step helps to understand chosen design comparatively and to take essential correction operatively.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id dbd8
authors Peter Kardos
year 1999
title The light and colour significance in urban environment perception
source Simulation of Architectural Space - Color and Light, Methods and Effects [Proceedings of the 4rd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-86005-267-5] Dresden (Germany), 29 September - 1 October 1999, pp. 50-56
summary My contribution deals with light and colour effects in wider dimensions of architecture. It analyses their significance in urban environment perception from the application aspect of progressive tools of its forming and creative completion, i.e. the perceptual homomorphous iconic simulations in laboratory conditions. The work focuses on questions of light and colour perception, showing several principles and phenomena valid in visual perception systems. The structure of the perceived picture is interpreted in its four components: colour, motion, form and spaciousness. Each of the components is shown with relevant biological reactions and their reflections in subjective perception processes. The selected image examples document some manifestations of urbanistic structures and spaces experience transformation in natural and artificial lighting conditions. The emphasis of my contribution lies on some demonstrations from the laboratory experiment in investigating the illumination and colour influence on the architectural design quality, and on examples of alternative methods of visual interpretation on endoscopic modelling simulation outputs. The conclusion of my work formulates some knowledge and statement of objective colour and light modelling simulation assets in architectural design quality.
series EAEA
email kardos@fastu.fa.stuba.sk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

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