CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 613

_id 4d95
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Architectural Education: Defining Possibilities
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 7-9
summary Introduction: virtual reality in architecture Virtual Reality (VR) is an emergent computer technology for full 3D-simulations, which has a natural application in the architectural work, due that activity involves the complete definition of buildings prior to its construction. Although the profession has a long tradition and expertise in the use of 2D-plans for the design of buildings, the increasing complexity of projects and social participation requires better media of representation. However, the technological promise of Virtual Reality involves many sophisticated software and hardware developments. It is based on techniques of 3D-modelling currently incorporated in the majority of drawing software used in architecture, and also there are several tools for rendering, animation and panoramic views, which provide visual realism. But other capabilities like interactivity and sense of immersion are still complex, expensive and under research. These require stereoscopic helmets, 3D pointers and trackers with complicated configurations and uncomfortable use. Most advanced installations of Virtual-Reality like CAVEs involve much hardware, building space and restrictions for users. Nevertheless, diverse developers are working in Virtual-Reality user-friendly techniques and there are many initial experiences of architectural walk-throughs showing advantages in the communication and development of designs. Then we may expect an increasing use of Virtual Reality in architecture.
series ACADIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 7674
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitrios
year 1999
title Virtual Environment Design - Defining a New Direction for Architectural Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 403-409
summary This paper considers the design and development of virtual environments (VEs) and the way that it relates to traditional architectural education and practice. The need for practitioners who will contribute to the design of 3D content for multimedia and virtual reality applications is identified. The design of space in a VE is seen as being partly an architectural problem. Therefore, architectural design should play an important role in educating VE designers. Other disciplines, intrinsically related to the issue of VE design, are also identified. Finally, this paper aims at pointing out the need for a new direction within architectural education, which will lead towards a generation of VE architects.
keywords Virtual Environments, Architectural Design, Architectural Education
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 600e
authors Gavin, Lesley
year 1999
title Architecture of the Virtual Place
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 418-423
summary The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London (UCL), set up the first MSc in Virtual Environments in the UK in 1995. The course aims to synthesise and build on research work undertaken in the arts, architecture, computing and biological sciences in exploring the realms of the creation of digital and virtual immersive spaces. The MSc is concerned primarily with equipping students from design backgrounds with the skills, techniques and theories necessary in the production of virtual environments. The course examines both virtual worlds as prototypes for real urban or built form and, over the last few years, has also developed an increasing interest in the the practice of architecture in purely virtual contexts. The MSc course is embedded in the UK government sponsored Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment which is hosted by the Bartlett School of Architecture. This centre involves the UCL departments of architecture, computer science and geography and includes industrial partners from a number of areas concerned with the built environment including architectural practice, surveying and estate management as well as some software companies and the telecoms industry. The first cohort of students graduated in 1997 and predominantly found work in companies working in the new market area of digital media. This paper aims to outline the nature of the course as it stands, examines the new and ever increasing market for designers within digital media and proposes possible future directions for the course.
keywords Virtual Reality, Immersive Spaces, Digital Media, Education
series eCAADe
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
more http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/ve/
last changed 2002/11/22 18:44

_id 687c
authors Kosco, Igor
year 1999
title How the World Became Smaller
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 230-237
summary The world of computers became fruitful and independent before the new millennium started. New technologies and methods are giving us new tools and possibilities every day as well as the challenge how to use them. The advantage of architecture and namely of architects teaching at the universities or schools is remarkable: new techniques reflect the education, research and practice - and what is important - by one person. The links between practice and university from the point of view: how the computer technologies and CAAD influences methods of designing, managing and collaboration are very important in both directions. It grows with the number of students who left university with good computer skills on one side and number of architectural and engineering offices using computers on the other. Networks and Internet enables to exchange data but also experiences. Internet itself is not only a tool for surfing and enjoying or the source of information, but preferably like a powerful tool for collaboration, workgroups, virtual studios or long distance education. This paper describes experiences from research and educational projects between Slovak Technical University, IUG Grenoble, University of Newcastle and others and their influence on architectural education and practice.
keywords Long-Distance Education, Research, Practice
series eCAADe
email kosco@fastu.fa.stuba.sk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 4aa9
authors Roberts, Andrew
year 1999
title Virtual Site Planning
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 442-447
summary This paper looks at the potential for the Virtual Reality to be used as a medium for the development of teaching tools in Architectural and Urban Design Education. It identifies examples and lessons learned from the development of teaching tools in other disciplines. The paper outlines a prototype system developed at Cardiff University to help Town Planning students understand the three dimensional nature of site planning and design. This was developed following difficulties encountered by students in using CAD which was seen as insufficiently intuitive to allow effective use within the short timespan available. The prototype system allows students to access their site through the familiar environment of a Web Browser. A number of 'Standard' house types are available which can be selected and inserted into the design space. Once in the space the houses can be viewed in three dimensions, moved and rotated in order to form any configuration that the students may wish. The system is easily customisable; it need not be limited to uses in urban design, but could be used in many situations where component parts are arranged in space.
keywords Virtual Reality, Teaching, Learning, Site Planning
series eCAADe
email robertsas@cf.ac.uk
more http://ctiweb.cf.ac.uk/Housing/
last changed 2002/11/23 13:44

_id 53a4
authors Vélez Jahn, Gonzalo
year 1999
title The MUMOVIAR (Museum for Modeling Virtual Architecture) - A Proposal for a Research Theme (The Mumoviar (For Museum Virtual Modeling Architecture) - to for Proposal to Research Theme)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 379-383
summary One of the most interesting areas in the forefront of non-immersive virtual reality (VRML) applications to architecture is the one that concerns the design, construction and exploration of on-line multi-access worlds using the Internet-WWW. However, and despite the great proliferation of earlier single-access models built on VRML, attempts to collect, classify and provide accesibility that type of models has proved almost nil. On the other side, one of the architectural typologies that promises the greatest transformation potential in the virtual architecture area in cyberspace is the one that concerns virtual museums and galleries. This paper seeks to provide a bridge between the two aforementioned approaches by formulating a conceptual basis for the creation of a virtual, on-line, multi-access museum intended to house collections of VRML building models. Such models, initially shown at a conventional model scale, would be accessed by visitors through an interface intended to transport those visitors into the models’ environments, where changes in scale could provide navigation access to interior and exterior view of the building . Accordingly, the museum would act as a sort of "spaceport” toward different routes of exploration. This modelistic cascading seems to offer interesting possibilities as regards future virtual architecture applications.
series SIGRADI
email gvelez@reacciun.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id de8c
authors Martens, Bob
year 1999
title MAKING LIGHT TANGIBLE: SIMULATION OF LIGHT DESIGN WITHIN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 1-6
summary In times where computer-assisted representations dominate the “market” of visual simulation, the major strongholds of simulation in true size in conveying (artificial) light configurations have been observed. Though light cannot be “touched” due to its material absence the human eye reacts extremely sensitively to differing constellations. In matters of seconds differences are perceived and classified. Opening up a rift between the various simulation techniques, however, would not prove wise. The normal procedure still consists of trial positioning of lighting objects on site (i.e.: 1:1 simulation at building site). Regarding the effort this causes attempts as to gaining similar results by means of (partial) computer representations are worth considering. The degree of abstraction, however, might be too significant to make for conclusive decisions. In other words: Can the gap between imagination and translation thereof into reality be bridged? This contribution deals with the experimental implementation of artificial light in the full-scale lab and its possibilities regarding the 1:1 simulation at the Vienna University of Technology, with special attention to the didactic aspects related thereto.
keywords Lighting Design, Full-scale Modeling, Architectural Education, Simulation Dome, Visual Simulation, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2004/05/04 09:28

_id e978
authors [Zupancic] Strojan, Tadeja Z.
year 1999
title CyberUniversity
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 196-200
summary The study of a cyberuniversity derives from an analogy between real urban space and its virtual "substitution". It represents an attempt to balance some views, which seems to be contrary, exclusive, but they are just parts of the same wholeness. Especially the notion of a cyber society is lately considered such an exaggeration, that it is possible to forget the meaning of a real life experience and interactions, which are already threatened. One should contribute to the awarness that is used in such a comparison, it is "just" an analogy, not a real similarity. At the same time it is possible to point out some limitations of a cyberspace and indicate a more realistic view of the meaning of cyber communities. Awarness of the development processes could help to find a balance between reality and virtuality, using cyberfacilities not to destroy us (our identity) but to improve the quality of our (real) life.
keywords University, Cyberuniversity, Space, Cyberspace
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email tadeja.zupancic@guest.arnes.si
last changed 2007/03/04 06:03

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id e719
authors Achten, Henri and Turksma, Arthur
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Early Design: the Design Studio Experiences
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 327-335
summary The Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology started a new kind of design studio teaching. With the use of high-end equipment, students use Virtual Reality from the very start of the design process. Virtual Reality technology up to now was primarily used for giving presentations. We use the same technology in the design process itself by means of reducing the time span in which one gets results in Virtual Reality. The method is based on a very brief cycle of modelling in AutoCAD, assigning materials in 3DStudio Viz, and then making a walkthrough in Virtual Reality in a standard landscape. Due to this cycle, which takes about 15 seconds, the student gets immediate feedback on design decisions which facilitates evaluation of the design in three dimensions much faster than usual. Usually the learning curve of this kind of software is quite steep, but with the use of templates the number of required steps to achieve results is reduced significantly. In this way, the potential of Virtual Reality is not only explored in research projects, but also in education. This paper discusses the general set-up of the design studio and shows how, via short workshops, students acquire knowledge of the cycle in a short time. The paper focuses on the added value of using Virtual Reality technology in this manner: improved spatial reasoning, translation from two-dimensional to three-dimensional representations, and VR feedback on design decisions. It discusses the needs for new design representations in this design environment, and shows how fast feedback in Virtual Reality can improve the spatial design at an early stage of the design process.
series AVOCAAD
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl, A.A.E.Turksma@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 6d88
authors Achten, Henri H. and Van Leeuwen, Jos P.
year 1999
title Feature-Based High Level Design Tools - A Classification
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 275-290
summary The VR-DIS project aims to provide design support in the early design stage using a Virtual Reality environment. The initial brief of the design system is based on an analysis of a design case. The paper describes the process of analysis and extraction of design knowledge and design concepts in terms of Features. It is demonstrated how the analysis has lead to a classification of design concepts. This classification forms one of the main specifications for the VR-based design aid system that is being developed in the VR-DIS programme. The paper concludes by discussing the particular approach used in the case analysis and discusses future work in the VR-DIS research programme.
keywords Features, Feature-Based modelling, Architectural Design, Design Process, Design Support
series CAAD Futures
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.n
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id alqawasmi
id alqawasmi
authors Al-Qawasmi, J., Clayton, M.J., Tassinary, L.G. and Johnson, R..
year 1999
title Observations on Collaborative Design and Multimedia Usage in Virtual Design Studio
source J. Woosely and T. Adair (eds.), Learning virtually: Proceedings of the 6th annual distance education conference, San Antonio, Texas, pp. 1-9
summary The virtual design studio (VDS) points to a new way of practicing and teaching architectural design. As a new phenomenon, little research has been done to evaluate design collaboration and multimedia usage in a distributed workplace like the virtual design studio. Our research provides empirical data on how students actually use multiple media during architectural collaborative design.
series other
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2003/12/06 08:55

_id 2c4a
authors Aroztegui, Carmen
year 1999
title The Architect's Use of the Internet - Study of the Architectural Presentation Possibilities
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 363-368
summary The Internet media is opening new horizons in communication and representation in architecture. However, its use today is superficial, limited, and without creativity. This study will explore theories, methods and examples of how the virtual space of the Internet can be used in its full potential. That means to present ways of observing, understanding, interacting, and communicating the space without precedents in architecture. The existent presentations made by architects in the Internet are in general poor and static. Through the comparative analysis of two presentations of the same architectural space in the Internet and the use of state of the art technology in the Internet, this study will show innovations that will make the exploration of the architectural space more attractive, dynamic and interactive. The main issues will be on one hand, the improvement in the communication of the design through the use of the Internet, and on the other hand, the rise of the standards in the quality of the architectural presentations. This work will project possible implications of the Internet in architecture.
series SIGRADI
email arozteguic@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7436
authors Barría Chateau, H., Muñoz Viveros, C. and Cerda Brintrup, G.
year 1999
title Virtual Tour Through Modern Architecture in Conception
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 475-477
summary This paper describes the development of a project that was selected and sponsoured by the Regional Competition FONDART 1998 (Funds for the Development of Arts of the Regional Secretary of Education) that follows the aim of cultural diffusion. Towards the middle of the 30s, the city of Concepción developed an architecture distinctly colonial, neoclassical and eclectic. An earthquake in 1939 abruptly interrupted this scene, destroying the enterity of its most important buildings. The reconstruction of the city followed the manifestoes of Modern Architecture, consolidating the urban importance of buildings such us the Law Courts, the Railway Station and the Regional Government, that emerged as the new architectural and cultural heritage of the city. The project consisted on the modeling of eleven buildings of the modern architectural heritage, and on the generation of 42 virtual tours through the buildings that were finally edited on a 16' video. This video allows the spectator to make a virtual tour through the original modern heritage of the city, nowadays demolished, altered, and sometimes, even forgotten. This project pretends to widen the ways of comprehension of our cultural identity by using computer modelling and animation as a tool for the conservation of the architectural heritage; and creating a record that can be used as a reference and as an instrument of cultural difussion.
series SIGRADI
email mtrebilc@zeus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id c19d
authors Camara, Antonio S. and Raper, Jonathan (Ed.)
year 1999
title Spatial multimedia and virtual reality
source London: Taylor & Francis
summary The intersection of two disciplines and technologies which have become mature academic research topics in the 1990s was destined to be a dynamic area for collaboration and publication. However, until now no significant book-length treatment of the meeting of GIS and Virtual Reality has been available. This volume puts that situation to rights by bringing these together to cement some common understanding and principles in a potentially highly promising area for technological collaboration and cross-fertilisation. The result is a volume which ranges in subject matter from studies of a Virtual GIS Room to Spatial Agents, and from an Environmental Multimedia System to Computer-Assisted 3D Geographic Education. All the contributors are well-known international scientists, principally from the computational side of GIS. It will be a valuable resource for any GIS researcher or professional looking to understand the leading edge of this fertile field. ------------------------------------------------------------------------
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 9cf4
authors Chan, C., Hill, L. and Cruz-Neira, C.
year 1999
title Is it Possible to Design in Full Scale? A CAD Tool in a Synthetic Environment
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 43-52
summary This project developed a Virtual Architectural Design Tool (VADeT) executed in the C2 Virtual Reality (VR) space. C2 is a synthetic CAVE environment providing a full-scale setting for image projection and perception. Applying this tool for design offers four advantages over other CAD systems. First, it enables navigation performing in full scale to create the sense of immersion and reflection of the seeing-as. Second, it allows the creation, modification, and editing of three-dimensional objects in a virtual space. Third, designs can be modified and viewed simultaneously inside or outside of the generated model to obtain the best design products. Fourth, the entire design process can be recorded and played back. Collectively, this tool serves the purposes of: (1) a three-dimensional sketching tool for manipulating 3-D objects, (2) a design study tool for transparently displaying the design processes, and (3) a design teaching tool to demonstrate the processes by which designers do design. Thus, design in a full-scale representation not only is possible but also is a new and unconventional mode that will heavily influence design thinking.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/09/11 07:39

_id 69f5
authors Chan, C., Maves, J. and Cruz-Neira, C.
year 1999
title An Electronic Library for Teaching Architectural History
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 335-344
summary This research project developed an electronic library of significant buildings chosen to represent seven selected periods of Western architectural history: Egyptian (Mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut), Greek (Parthenon), Roman (Pantheon), Romanesque (Speyer Cathedral), Gothic (Notre Dame Cathedral), Renaissance (Tempietto), and Modern (Des Moines Art Center). All buildings were reconstructed in their original or intended forms based on plans, drawings, photographs, and historical texts. Two products were generated by this project: (1) materials to be displayed on the World Wide Web, including rendered still images for perception, movies for a visual guide, and Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) models for user navigation; and (2) virtual reality (VR) models to be displayed in the C2 (an improved version of the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment or CAVE facility). The benefits of these VR models displayed on the Web and in the C2 are their easy accessibility at any time from various geographic locations and the immersive experience that enhances viewersÌ understanding of the effects of spatial proportions on form and of colors on materials.
series CAADRIA
more http://archvr.design.iastate.edu/miller
last changed 2000/01/13 11:23

_id 2690
authors Chiu, Mao-Lin
year 1999
title Design Navigation and Construction Simulation by Virtual Reality
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 31-41
summary This paper depicts the approach of constructing a virtual reality environment for simulating architectural design and construction operations. The virtual environment is established to demonstrate the spatial performance of design and constructability of construction operations. Particularly, the functions such as navigation of construction sites, simulation of construction operations, and evaluation of construction details will be critical to construction operations. The system shell is implemented by JAVA on the web and integrated with VRML for supporting the above functions. The study focuses on the needs for the system integration and interface design. Four modes of human computer interfaces are proposed, including the user, agent, monitor, and immersion modes. Finally, this paper provides demonstration of construction simulation in an office building project to highlight the above discussion. The operations of crane towers and curtain wall installation are also studied in the construction process. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the potential uses and limitation of virtual reality in simulation of the built environment.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2000/01/13 10:04

_id 9a1e
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo
year 1999
title Stumbling, Backtracking, and Leapfrogging: Two Decades of Introductory Architectural Computing
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 151-158
summary Our collective concept of computing and its relevance to architecture has undergone dramatic shifts in emphasis. A review of popular texts from the past reveals the biases and emphases that were current. In the seventies, architectural computing was generally seen as an elective for data processing specialists. In the early eighties, personal computers and commercial CAD systems were widely adopted. Architectural computing diverged from the "batch" world into the "interactive" world. As personal computing matured, introductory architectural computing courses turned away from a foundation in programming toward instruction in CAD software. By the late eighties, Graphic User Interfaces and windowing operating systems had appeared, leading to a profusion of architecturally relevant applications that needed to be addressed in introductory computing. The introduction of desktop 3D modeling in the early nineties led to increased emphasis upon rendering and animation. The past few years have added new emphases, particularly in the area of network communications, the World Wide Web and Virtual Design Studios. On the horizon are topics of electronic commerce and knowledge markets. This paper reviews these past and current trends and presents an outline for an introductory computing course that is relevant to the year 2000.
keywords Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Computer-Aided Design, Computing Education, Introductory Courses
series eCAADe
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

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