CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 86dc
authors Aouad, G., and Price, A.D.F.
year 1993
title An integrated system to aid the planning of concrete structures: introducing the system
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT1(2), pp.1-14
summary This paper reports on the development at Loughborough University of a CAD-based integrated model to aid the planning of in-situ concrete structures. The system development started after a review of the planning models currently available and after a detailed questionnaire survey undertaken amongst the top UK and US contractors on the current status of planning techniques and information technology. The main aim of this system is to automate the planning process of in-situ concrete structures using data generated by CAD systems. So far, the integration of a CAD system (AutoCAD 10) and a computerized scheduling system (Artemis 2000) has been achieved on a typical IBM-PC. This enables the generation of network plans using AutoCAD which are then automatically transferred to the Artemis system for time and cost analyses.Traditionally, construction planners are faced with many conventional drawings and documents which are used to re-extract information relevant to their planning processes. Such an approach can be very inefficient as it involves data double-handling and is often error prone. In addition, current computerized construction planning applications are little more than the automation of manual formulations of plans. For example, data are fed into the planning system and computations are performed using either CPM (Critical Path Method) or PERT (Programme Evaluation and Review Technique). However, data relating to the planning process such as activity lists, resources requirements and durations are not automatically generated within the system. It would thus seem logical to devise a CAD-based integrated planning model which accepts data in its electronic format and involves some integration of the traditional planning approach. This paper introduces the proposed CAD-based integrated planning model and describes its different components. In addition, it discusses the system functional specifications and summarizes the main benefits and limitations of such a model.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 3642
authors Asojo, Abimbola Oluwatoni
year 2000
title Design Algorithms after Le Corbusier
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 17-24
summary Some views of design are the act as puzzle making, problem solving, evolutionary, and decision-making. All these focus on form generation as constructive, therefore characterizing design as a path-planning problem through a space of possibilities. Design problems consist sets of information divided into initial, intermediate, and goal states. Design in its simplest state consist of a set of operators, sequences (or paths) between initial and goals states. In this paper, I present design algorithms for Le Corbusier because of his distinct compositional techniques particularly for his “White Villas” in which some elements have been identified to recursively occur.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id eef2
authors Ataman, Osman and Wingert, Kate
year 2000
title Developing a Methodology for the Study of Urban Transformation
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 140-142
summary There are certain limitations in studying urban development and transformation by depending solely on traditional media. The investigation of historical urban data, both architectural and site information, is difficult to analyze unless all of the urban elements can be visualized simultaneously. The application of digital media provides a model for reconstructing and analyzing certain architectural elements from the past. This paper describes a research project that focuses on the visualization of the historical development of an urban area. In general, our research is aimed at developing a model and Philadelphia is chosen as a case study. An emphasis is placed on identification, categorization and representation of information in a way that is useful for urban researchers for analysis.
series SIGRADI
email oataman@unix.temple.edu, mwingert@thunder.ocis.temple.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id f73b
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 2000
title Percept vs. Precept: Digital Media & the Creative Process
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 261-264
summary The design of architecture, as well as all of the arts, is a creative act concerned with the expression of ideas through culturally significant and relevant form. In order for the creative act to transcend the authority or dictates of precedents or trends, it must be informed and guided by a process and not a product; one which reveals, but does not dictate, expressive, functional form. The initial impact of digital media on architectural design has been the ability to render the look of a final project or to create shapes that reflect the facility of the tool. Digital media also enables the composition and structure of space and form to be discovered simultaneously and relationally with the phenomena of color and kinetics, to generate and visualize an idea as form, and to represent form as experience. This requires interweaving computing with a creative process in which percept, rather than precept, is the driving force of the investigation. This paper explores the role of ideation, tectonic color and kinetics as an intentional design strategy and formgiver for architecture. The role of the computer is to enable the designer to generate meaningful architecture beyond precepts of image and style. Design as a making in the mind uses our rational and imaginative faculties. Complete freedom is not a necessity for inventiveness. Research on creativity indicates that "constraining options and focusing thought in a specific, rigorous and discerning direction" play an important role. The key is a balance of structured and discursive inquiry that encourages a speculative, free association of ideas. Tim Berners-Lee, one of the creators of the World Wide Web, likened creativity to a weblike process that is nonlinear but also not random; which when placed in an environment rich with information will float ideas so the mind "can jiggle them into an insight." Geoffrey Vickers in his essay, "Rationality and Intuition" described this symbiotic relationship as "...two functions which in practice are never wholly separated but which are, nonetheless, logically distinct as two reciprocating phases in a recurrent process of mental activity." The rational is formative and intuition is generative; both are essential to creativity.
keywords Percept, Creativity, Ideation, Tectonic Color, Kinetics
series eCAADe
email architexture@earthlink.net
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a172
authors Brian Jeffrey Palidar
year 2000
title Live and Direct:A Research and Development Facility for Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Applications
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary This thesis proposed a design project focusing on creating a center for the incorporation, assembly, and demonstration of cutting edge research in AI applications. The project s client is an Institute dedicated to developing the platform for general intelligence by assembling current research and technologies into composite prototypes that push the boundaries of artificial beings. This center also proposes an interactive forum in which the general public can experience the results of the research first hand as well as learn about past projects, attend lectures and presentations, and other activities related to this endeavor and its implications to humanity.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 9384
authors Burry, M., Datta, S. and Anson, S.
year 2000
title Introductory Computer Programming as a Means for Extending Spatial and Temporal Understanding
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 129-135
summary Should computer programming be taught within schools of architecture? Incorporating even low-level computer programming within architectural education curricula is a matter of debate but we have found it useful to do so for two reasons: as an introduction or at least a consolidation of the realm of descriptive geometry and in providing an environment for experimenting in morphological time-based change. Mathematics and descriptive geometry formed a significant proportion of architectural education until the end of the 19th century. This proportion has declined in contemporary curricula, possibly at some cost for despite major advances in automated manufacture, Cartesian measurement is still the principal ‘language’ with which to describe building for construction purposes. When computer programming is used as a platform for instruction in logic and spatial representation, the waning interest in mathematics as a basis for spatial description can be readdressed using a left-field approach. Students gain insights into topology, Cartesian space and morphology through programmatic form finding, as opposed to through direct manipulation. In this context, it matters to the architect-programmer how the program operates more than what it does. This paper describes an assignment where students are given a figurative conceptual space comprising the three Cartesian axes with a cube at its centre. Six Phileban solids mark the Cartesian axial limits to the space. Any point in this space represents a hybrid of one, two or three transformations from the central cube towards the various Phileban solids. Students are asked to predict the topological and morphological outcomes of the operations. Through programming, they become aware of morphogenesis and hybridisation. Here we articulate the hypothesis above and report on the outcome from a student group, whose work reveals wider learning opportunities for architecture students in computer programming than conventionally assumed.
series ACADIA
email mark.burry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/15 19:17

_id 1206
authors Cabezas, M., Mariano, C., Mitolo, S. and Oliva, S.
year 1999
title Transformaciones en el Proceso Enseñanza-Aprendizaje de la Geometría Descriptiva con la Apliacación de los Medios Digitales (Transformations in the Teaching/Learning Process of Descriptive Geometry with the Aplplication of Digital Media)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 347-348
summary The insert of the digital technologies in the atmosphere Áulico has left generalizing in a significant way. An example constitutes it the high percentage of students that they manifested general knowledge in the software handling in the introductory course of visual communication, as well as the voluntary presentation of practical works developed with digital means. The necessity of an answer to the requirements that arise of the students sinks to the certainty of a pedagogic compatibility among the matter to try and the teaching attended by the personal computer that would increase the Iconidad and the understanding of a topic of certain complexity like it is the geometry of the space. An educational program designed for the teaching of the Sistema Monge whose general characteristics were presented in the II Ibero-American Seminar of Digital Graph and that it will be applied as experience pilot in the course 2000, it will allow us to respond to the following queries: what place it will be given to the educational program in the formation process in connection with the other pedagogic means.
series SIGRADI
email mariadc@copetel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id b4c4
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A. and Novembri, G.
year 2000
title A framework for an Architectural Collaborative Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 57-60
summary The building industry involves a larger number of disciplines, operators and professionals than other industrial processes. Its peculiarity is that the products (building objects) have a number of parts (building elements) that does not differ much from the number of classes into which building objects can be conceptually subdivided. Another important characteristic is that the building industry produces unique products (de Vries and van Zutphen, 1992). This is not an isolated situation but indeed one that is spreading also in other industrial fields. For example, production niches have proved successful in the automotive and computer industries (Carrara, Fioravanti, & Novembri, 1989). Building design is a complex multi-disciplinary process, which demands a high degree of co-ordination and co-operation among separate teams, each having its own specific knowledge and its own set of specific design tools. Establishing an environment for design tool integration is a prerequisite for network-based distributed work. It was attempted to solve the problem of efficient, user-friendly, and fast information exchange among operators by treating it simply as an exchange of data. But the failure of IGES, CGM, PHIGS confirms that data have different meanings and importance in different contexts. The STandard for Exchange of Product data, ISO 10303 Part 106 BCCM, relating to AEC field (Wix, 1997), seems to be too complex to be applied to professional studios. Moreover its structure is too deep and the conceptual classifications based on it do not allow multi-inheritance (Ekholm, 1996). From now on we shall adopt the BCCM semantic that defines the actor as "a functional participant in building construction"; and we shall define designer as "every member of the class formed by designers" (architects, engineers, town-planners, construction managers, etc.).
keywords Architectural Design Process, Collaborative Design, Knowledge Engineering, Dynamic Object Oriented Programming
series eCAADe
email fioravanti@uniroma1.it
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id e023
authors Charitos, Dimitrios and Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 2000
title Designing for the Spatial Context of 3D Online Communities
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 165-169
summary This paper considers the issue of designing the spatial context within which 3D online communities can function and evolve. Firstly, the current state of 3D on-line communities is taken into account, particularly focusing on the way space is conceptualised, organised and depicted in them. A series of such communities is studied and analysed and an attempt to identify possible spatial design criteria is made. On the basis of this analysis and relevant work on designing space in Virtual Environments (V_s), a series of suggestions on the way that the spatial context of 3D online communities can be designed and developed are made.
keywords 3D City modeling
series eCAADe
email vedesign@otenet.gr, v.bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ga0018
id ga0018
authors Ciao, Quinsan
year 2000
title Hearing Architectural Design: Simulation and Auralization for Generating Better Acoustic Spaces
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper with demonstration is devoted to revealing and establishing the relationship between space and sound through computational acoustic analysis, simulation and electronic synthesis of audible sound. Based on science of acoustics and computing technology, acoustic effect of an architectural 3-D design can be analyzed and the resulted sound in space can be synthesized and predicted accordingly and being heard. Auralization refers to this process of acoustic analysis, sound synthesis and audio presentation of the result in the form of audible sound. Design alternatives can be experimented until satisfactory acoustic effect is achieved. Traditionally, designers rely on some minimum and vague understanding or specialists’ experiences to predict and design for a desirable sound behavior in spaces. Most likely acoustic design and analysis are seen as a luxury remedy only affordable in large-scale theatres and concert halls. The recent available PC based auralization tools brought significance in both in terms of new knowledge towards the science and art of architectural acoustics and the methods and practice in the design process. The examples demonstrated in the presentation will indicate that the auralization technology make it possible for the designers, consultants, end users or potential occupants to examine and evaluate the performance of different designs by hearing it directly before an informed decision can be made. The case studies also illustrated that the auralization is a powerful tool for general public with common building types to uncover everyday acoustic problems that have been constantly harming their well being and would otherwise be undetected.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddssar0006
id ddssar0006
authors Ciftcioglu, Ö., Durmisevic, S. and Sariyildiz, S.
year 2000
title Multi-objective design for space layout topology
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary A novel method to produce space layout topologies for architectural design is described. From the uniformly distributed design solutions in the solution space the corresponding design requirements are computed according to a given norm and metric function. The system is based on graph representation of the layout so that the desired relations between the pairs of nodes are considered to be independent variables of appropriate series of multivariable functions mapping the requirements into the solution space. The system so established is used as a knowledge-base for robust layout design where knowledge base having been established, the layout design requirements are introduced to the system as design constraints and the output is identified in the multidimensional solution space by means of interpolation. Since the smoothness of the interpolation is guaranteed, robust design layout, in the form of node locations, is obtained.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 08ea
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo P. (Eds.)
year 2000
title ACADIA 2000: Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture
source Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8 / Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, 284 p.
summary Eternity, time without end, infinity, space without limits and virtuality, perception without constraints; provide the conceptual framework in which ACADIA 2000 is conceived. It is in human nature to fill what is empty and to empty what is full. Today, thanks to the power of computer processing we can also make small what is too big, make big what is too small, make fast what is too slow, make slow what is too fast, make real what does not exist, and make our reality omni-present at global scale. These are capabilities for which we have no precedents. What we make of them is our privilege and responsibility. Information about a building flows past our keyboards and on to other people. Although we, as architects, add to the information, it originated before us and will go beyond our touch in time, space and understanding. A building description acquires a life of its own that may surpass our own lives as it is stored, transferred, transformed, and reused by unknown intellects, both human and artificial, and in unknown processes. Our actions right now have unforeseen effects. Digital media blurs the boundaries of space, time and our perception of reality. ACADIA 2000 explores the theme of time, space and perception in relation to the information and knowledge that describes architecture. Our invitation to those who are finding ways to apply computer processing power in architecture received overwhelming response, generating paper submissions from five continents. A selected group of reviewers recommended the publication of 24 original full papers out of 42 submitted and 13 short papers out of 30 submitted. Forty-two projects were submitted to the Digital Media Exhibit and 12 were accepted for publication. The papers cover subjects in design knowledge, design process, design representation, design communication, and design education. Fundamental and applied research has been carefully articulated, resulting in developments that may have an important impact on the way we practice and teach architecture in the future.
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
more www.acadia.org
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 93cc
authors Colajanni, B., Pellitteri, G. and Concialdi, S.
year 2000
title Retrieval Tools in Building Case Bases
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 113-116
summary Most of the existing aids to building design rely on data base of cases representing solutions to problems that are thought to happen again at least in a similar way. Crucial for the success of the aid is the retrieval engine. In tour its efficiency depends on the way the cases are encoded. Whichever is this way cases will be represented at different levels of abstraction. The highest level will probably consist in an accessibility and adjacency graph. Another level could be a wire plan of the building. An easily workable representation of a graph is a square matrix. For any given building typology it is possible to write a list of encoded space types. This allows forming matrices that can be compared and their diversity measured. Here we present an algorithm that makes this job. Such an algorithm can be one of the case retrieval tools in the data base. It is likely that the designer has already some idea of the shape he wants for the building he is designing. A comparison between some geometric characteristics of the wire representation of the retrieved case and the corresponding ones of the imagined solution of the design problem can constitute a second test. The matching can be done
keywords Knowledge, Case Bases, Building, Tools
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@unipa.it, pellitt@unipa.it
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id diss_cole
id diss_cole
authors Cole, R.J.
year 2000
title The Management and Visualisation of Document Collections Using Formal Concept Analysis
source Griffith University, Australia
summary This thesis proposes a methodology, notation/theory, and software framework for organising documents using formal concept analysis. The documents are organised for the purposes of retrieval and analysis using background information in the form of a taxonomy of terms. An emphasis is placed on the development of a methodology that employs scalable computer programs to assist humans in the process of organisation, retrieval and analysis of document collections.The text retrieval community has also been concerned with the organisation of documents. The work outlined in this thesis makes use of the results of the text retrieval community at its lowest layer. Above this layer formal concept analysis is used as a mechanism to allow users to organise document collections using views determined by small numbers of attributes. These views, also known as scales, can make a mixture of coarse and speci c distinctions between documents, and are either selected or created by the users to make precisely the distinctions between documents that are important to their current tasks.The primary tool for the presentation of the results of formal concept analysis is a line diagram. The e ectiveness of the presentation of information contained in a line diagram is heavily dependent on the quality of the diagram. To support users in arriving at a quality diagram for a newly created view, graph drawing algorithms are adapted to the special case of determining a good layout for a concept lattice. This task is di erent from traditional graph layout problems because lattices exhibit a high degree of structure which should be exploited and made evident in the nal diagram. A new layout algorithm is proposed that combines a layered diagram approach and an additive diagram methodology. This new hybrid algorithm is shown to produce better diagrams than other adapted graph drawing algorithms.
series thesis:PhD
more http://www.kvocentral.com/
last changed 2003/11/28 06:36

_id d1a6
authors Corona Martínez, A., Vigo, L. and Folchi, A.
year 2001
title SEMINARIO/TALLER DE INVESTIGACION PROYECTUAL ESTRUCTURA DE TALLER ACTIVO PARA LA ENSEÑANZA E INVESTIGACIÓN PROYECTUAL ARQUITECTÓNICA ASISTIDO POR TÉCNOLOGÍAS DIGITALES (Research Seminar/Workshop on the Structure of Active Design Studios for Training and Research on Computer Aided Design)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 227-228
summary In a previous paper (SiGradi 2000) we presented a design approach based upon the architectural research that regarded digital technologies as a subordinated tool to architectural design. From that starting point and from various research experiences, we have re-oriented certain guidelines and latter developed specific techniques that can be used both for teaching and for the professional practice of architecture. Through the use of paradigmatic and hermeneutic techniques developed ad hoc, architectural projects are developed in a three-stage sequence: a) development of a narrative framework; b) analysis based on object oriented programming thechniques; and c) digital development of the preliminary design. We believe that the positive aspects of the inclusion of these idea-centered techniques to the digital realm unifies and extends the architectural knowledge and strengthens its conception.
series SIGRADI
email corona@cvtci.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id ga0015
id ga0015
authors Daru, R., Vreedenburgh, E. and Scha, R.
year 2000
title Architectural Innovation as an evolutionary process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Traditionally in art and architectural history, innovation is treated as a history of ideas of individuals (pioneers), movements and schools. The monograph is in that context one of the most used forms of scientific exercise. History of architecture is then mostly seen as a succession of dominant architectural paradigms imposed by great architectural creators fighting at the beginning against mainstream establishment until they themselves come to be recognised. However, there have been attempts to place architectural innovation and creativity in an evolutionary perspective. Charles Jencks for example, has described the evolution of architectural and art movements according to a diagram inspired by ecological models. Philip Steadman, in his book "The Evolution of Designs. Biological analogy in architecture and the applied arts" (1979), sketches the history of various biological analogies and their impact on architectural theory: the organic, classificatory, anatomical, ecological and Darwinian or evolutionary analogies. This last analogy "explains the design of useful objects and buildings, particularly in primitive society and in the craft tradition, in terms of a sequence of repeated copyings (corresponding to inheritance), with small changes made at each stage ('variations'), which are then subjected to a testing process when the object is put into use ('selection')." However, Steadman has confined his study to a literature survey as the basis of a history of ideas. Since this pioneering work, new developments like Dawkins' concept of memes allow further steps in the field of cultural evolution of architectural innovation. The application of the concept of memes to architectural design has been put forward in a preceding "Generative Art" conference (Daru, 1999), showing its application in a pilot study on the analysis of projects of and by architectural students. This first empirical study is now followed by a study of 'real life' architectural practice. The case taken has a double implication for the evolutionary analogy. It takes a specific architectural innovative concept as a 'meme' and develops the analysis of the trajectory of this meme in the individual context of the designer and at large. At the same time, the architect involved (Eric Vreedenburgh, Archipel Ontwerpers) is knowledgeable about the theory of memetic evolution and is applying a computer tool (called 'Artificial') together with Remko Scha, the authoring computer scientist of the program who collaborates frequently with artists and architects. This case study (the penthouse in Dutch town planning and the application of 'Artificial') shall be discussed in the paper as presented. The theoretical and methodological problems of various models of diffusion of memes shall be discussed and a preliminary model shall be presented as a framework to account for not only Darwinian but also Lamarckian processes, and for individual as well as collective transmission, consumption and creative transformation of memes.
keywords evolutionary design, architectural innovation, memetic diffusion, CAAD, penthouses, Dutch design, creativity, Darwinian and Lamarckian processes
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 74ac
authors De Vries, Bauke
year 2000
title Sketching in 3D
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 277-280
summary Sketching in 3D is a design activity that requires a new approach to user interaction and geometric modeling in an architectural context. DDDoolz is an example of such a system used for mass study and spatial design. This paper describes the basic principles and the students’ experiences in a CAAD course.
series eCAADe
email b.d.Vries@tue.nl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id d11a
authors Den Hartog, J. P. and Koutamanis, A.
year 2000
title Teaching design simulation
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 197-200
summary The democratization of information and communication technologies (ICT) has promoted integration of computing in the design studio and of design activities in the CAAD courses. In addition it has also shifted the focus of CAAD courses from technical skills and general theoretical issues to current, specific design issues, such as the relationship between geometric modeling and construction, design communication and design analysis. CAAD courses (especially advanced ones) increasingly attempt to introduce these issues and corresponding advanced ICT in a design context that outlines the possibilities of these technologies and the underlying computational design methodology and bring research closer to teaching. One such issue is design analysis, especially in the early design stages when many fundamental decisions are taken on the basis of incomplete and insecure information. Simulation provides the computational means for projecting building behaviour and performance. The paper describes the application of a specific simulation technique, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), for the analysis of airflow in and around buildings in the context of an advanced CAAD course. In this course students are required to design a multifunctional exposition building. Even though students are unfamiliar with the particular CFD system, as well as with part of the simulation subject matter, they are able to produce descriptions of their designs with effectiveness and efficiency.
keywords Design Analysis, Simulation, CFD, Airflow
series eCAADe
email j.p.denhartog@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 73ca
authors Dokonal, W., Martens, B. and Plösch, R.
year 2000
title Architectural Education: Students Creating a City Model
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 219-221
summary This paper describes experiences with the creation of a 3-D City Model at our University of Technology. It presents an innovative approach in establishing a city model with the support of the students in the study fields of Architecture and Surveying. The main goal of this work is directed at the implementation within the framework of architectural education. This contribution presents the concept in detail. It also discusses matters concerning the level of detail for different uses of such a 3-D model.
keywords Urban Modeling, 3-D Modeling, Architectural Education, Collaboration
series ACADIA
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id ga0027
id ga0027
authors E. Bilotta, P. Pantano and V. Talarico
year 2000
title Music Generation through Cellular Automata
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Cellular automata (CA), like every other dynamical system, can be used to generate music. In fact, starting from any initial state and applying to them simple transition rules, such models are able to produce numerical sequences that can be successively associated to typically musical physical parameters. This approach is interesting because, maintaining fixed the set of rules and varying the initial data, many different, though correlated, numerical sequences can be originated (this recalls the genotype-phenotype dualism). Later on a musification (rendering) process can tie one or more physical parameters typical of music to various mathematical functions: as soon as the generative algorithm produces a numerical sequence this process modifies the physical parameter thus composing a sequence of sounds whose characteristic varies during the course of time. Many so obtained musical sequences can be selected by a genetic algorithm (CA) that promotes their evolution and refinement. The aim of this paper is to illustrate a series of musical pieces generated by CA. In the first part attention is focused on the effects coming from the application of various rendering processes to one dimensional multi state CA; typical behaviours of automata belonging to each of the four families discovered by Wolfram have been studied: CA evolving to a uniform state, CA evolving to a steady cycle, chaotic and complex CA. In order to make this part of the study Musical Dreams, a system for the simulation and musical rendering of one dimensional CA, has been used. In the second phase various CA obtained both by random generation and deriving from those studied in the first part are organised into families and, successively, made evolve through a genetic algorithm. This phase has been accomplished by using Harmony Seeker, a system for the generation of evolutionary music based on GA. The obtained results vary depending on the rendering systems used but, in general, automata belonging to the first family seem more indicated for the production of rhythmical patterns, while elements belonging to the second and fourth family seem to produce better harmonic patterns. Chaotic systems have been seen to produce good results only in presence of simple initial states. Experiments made in the second part have produced good harmonic results starting mainly from CA belonging to the second family.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

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