CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 681 to 700 of 740

_id 3125
authors Peyret, F. Bétaille, D. and Hintzy, G.
year 2000
title High-precision application of GPS in the field of real-time equipment positioning
source Automation in Construction 9 (3) (2000) pp. 299-314
summary In the frame of its research concerning real-time positioning and control of road construction equipment, the Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussées, has carried out in 1996 a study to know more about the actual vertical accuracy that a real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS) sensor could reach, under work site conditions. This study has widely used the dedicated testing facility called SESSYL, built to perform high-accuracy and real-time evaluation tests on positioning systems. It has been performed in collaboration with the French road contractor COLAS and the Ecole Supérieure des Géomètres et Topographes (ESGT). First, there is the proposed adapted geodetic transformation procedure, compatible with the high accuracy requirements. Then, the main results of a special SESSYL tests program are presented, where the impacts of several influencing parameters on the vertical accuracy have been carefully examined. The core part of the paper is the analysis of the typical RTK GPS set of data, from which we have tried to extract two different components: a high-frequency noise, rather easy to filter, and a low-frequency bias. This bias, given its good repeatability, can be modelled and used in prediction to improve in real-time the raw accuracy of the data. As a full-scale validation of our study, a site experiment is finally described, carried out this time on a real piece of equipment (an asphalt paver) during real roadwork.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id baa3
authors Pinet, Céline
year 2000
title Turn Up The Volume, This is Good Music
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 24-26
summary I am listening and getting all revved up. Volume5 presents art, architecture, and construction like parts of a concert. Created by Eyespeak, the site is jam packed with excellent discussions, fun digital images, and the loud, wonderful voices of experts and up and coming talent (www.volume5.com).
series ACADIA
email celine_pinet@westvalley.edu
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id 44be
authors Radford, Antony
year 2000
title Games and learning about form in architecture
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 379-385
summary Metaphors of play and games in the use of digital media in architectural education are described. The essence of 'games' lies in a person's immersion in play subject to rules. The paper argues that embracing these metaphors is an effective means of developing student confidence and abilities in spatial modelling, design composition, and form creation. Some examples are provided.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 2abf
id 2abf
authors Rafi, A
year 2001
title Design creativity in emerging technologies
source In Von, H., Stocker, G. and Schopf, C. (Eds.), Takeover: Who’s doing art of tomorrow (pp. 41-54), New York: SpringerWein.
summary Human creativity works best when there are constraints – pressures to react to, to shape, to suggest. People are generally not very good at making it all up from scratch (Laurel, 1991). Emerging technology particularly virtual reality (VR) Multimedia and Internet is yet to be fully discovered as it allows unprecedented creative talent, ability, skill set, creative thinking, representation, exploration, observation and reference. In an effort to deliver interactive content, designers tend to freely borrow from different fields such as advertising, medicine, game, fine art, commerce, entertainment, edutainment, film-making and architecture (Rafi, Kamarulzaman, Fauzan and Karboulonis, 2000). As a result, content becomes a base that developers transfer the technique of conventional medium design media to the computer. What developers (e.g. artist and technologist) often miss is that to develop the emerging technology content based on the nature of the medium. In this context, the user is the one that will be the best judge to value the effectiveness of the content.

The paper will introduce Global Information Infrastructure (GII) that is currently being developed in the Asian region and discuss its impact on the Information Age society. It will further highlight the ‘natural’ value and characteristics of the emerging technologies in particular Virtual Reality (VR), Multimedia and Internet as a guidance to design an effective, rich and innovative content development. This paper also argues that content designers of the future must not only be both artist and technologist, but artist and technologist that are aware of the re-convergence of art and science and context in which content is being developed. Some of our exploration at the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University will also be demonstrated. It is hoped that this will be the evidence to guide future ‘techno-creative designers’.

keywords design, creativity, content, emerging technologies
series book
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2007/09/13 01:46

_id 430a
authors Rheingold, H.
year 2000
title The Virtual Community
source MIT Press
summary Cyberculture authority Howard Rheingold was the first to write about online communities in this style that is part-travelogue and part-anthropological guide. This groundbreaking classic explores the entire virtual community, beginning with a selective but probing look at the author's original online home, The Well. Rheingold relates plenty of anecdotes that demonstrate the upsides of online life, such as how he was able to get information on removing a tick from his child before his doctor could respond to his phone call. But the bulk of the material relates to how individuals interact online much as they do in a face-to-face community. Rheingold speaks to how both friendships and enmities are formed online and how people come together to support each other through misfortune. He gives the example of how computer-moderated communication enabled members of one Well community to send vital medical aid to a friend hospitalized halfway around the world. Rheingold goes on to show how communities can form by various electronic communication methods, using the conferencing system of The Well as one example. He also examines how people interact through mailing lists, live chat, and the fantasy cyberenvironments of online role-playing games. In the process, he questions what kind of relationships can really be formed in a medium where people can change their apparent identity at will. This book questions whether a distinction between "virtual" communities and "real-life" communities is entirely valid. The Virtual Community argues that real relationships happen and real communities develop when people communicate upon virtual common ground. Rheingold also shares his far-reaching knowledge of how technology effects our social constructs. If you are involved in an online community, here is your cultural heritage.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id f4a2
authors Roberts, J.C.
year 2000
title Display models: ways to classify visual representations
source CIDAC, Volume 2 Issue 4 November 2000, pp. 242-250
summary Visualisations are generated of diverse data and use many different techniques and visual methods. It is often beneficial to evaluate what is being visualised and how the visualisation is made up. Such an analysis may aid the developer to understand what 'tools' are available and help the user to reference and compare different realisations. Display models specifically classify the data by what type of output can be created. We review many 'display oriented models' and discuss important aspects of these methods and ideas. In presenting these models, we encourage their use. In particular, we focus on the symbolic reference model of Jacques Bertin. He used this model to describe images and 2D visualisations. We translate Bertin's scheme into algebraic form such as a method to decribe visualisations.
keywords Display Models, Visualisation Reference Models, Bertin's Semiology
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id b8fe
authors Rodgers, P.A., Green, G. and McGown, A.
year 2000
title Using concept sketches to track design progress
source Design Studies 21 (5), pp. 451-464
summary Sketching is one of the most important activities in the design and development of new products. Designers produce sketches, from concept design ideas through to highly detailed representations of product artifacts, product sub-assemblies and so on, to communicate with themselves and with others. To this end, the focus of this paper is the description of a study of student designers at work in the early stages of design, with particular emphasis on the visible sketching component of the design process. The study has been carried out to firstly investigate the sketching activity and secondly to explore methods or techniques which might improve the efficiency of this activity. In particular, the paper describes a technique, based upon three types of operation, namely lateral transformations, vertical transformations and duplication, that occur between designer's sketches. These transformations can be used to help track the designer's thinking mode which, it is envisaged, will increase the efficiency of the sketching activity.
series journal paper
email p.rodgers@napier.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id sigradi2009_806
id sigradi2009_806
authors Sánchez Cavazos, Maria Estela
year 2009
title Modernismo, fundamento del Diseño Digital [Modernism, fundament of the Digital Design]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary In this paper, the results of various investigations realized in the UAA and UANL have been gathered, since the year 2000, where the practice of architectonic design has been studied with and without computer, with the purpose of preparing students and teachers about the way of learning to do architectonic design with the new digital technologies. To explain the transformations that the architectonic Design has suffered with the use of the computer, a summarized table has been realized to show the roll that Modernism plays in the transition period between traditional and digital design.
keywords Modernism; Digital Design; Architectonic design; Computer Assisted Design; International Style
series SIGRADI
email mesanche@correo.uaa.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id ee52
authors Tang, M.-X., Frazer, J.H. and Liu, H.
year 2000
title Design Concept Learning Using Inductive Learning Techniques in an Integrated Design Support System
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 201-213
summary Design and learning are closely related activities. Conceptual design is characterized by the uncertainties of the issues related to the design problem, design requirements, design constraints, and design solutions. Organizing design information to define an area of design problem within which these issues are gradually structured involves an inductive learning process. This paper tackles this learning process during conceptual design by utilizing inductive learning and concept formation techniques. The paper presents the architecture and the implementation of a Design Concept Learning System (DCLS) within a multi-agent architecture. It then reports on how the DCLS can be applied to conceptual design tasks in different domains.
series CAADRIA
email sdfrazer@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id sigradi2009_1158
id sigradi2009_1158
authors Tiani, André
year 2009
title O Uso do Computador no Ensino de Projeto de Arquitetura: Análise Crítica da Produção dos Seminários SIGraDi e Projetar [The Use of Computer in Teaching Design Architecture: critical analysis of the production of Seminars SIGraDI and PROJETAR ]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This work, tied with the research line Education of Architecture, has as objective to reflect on the use of the computer in the education of architecture design in Brazil from the literature review of articles related to the subject published by Brazilian authors in the annals of the seminars SIGraDI and PROJETAR, in the period from 2000 to 2006. The analysis focuses on two issues: (a) the theoretical foundations and practices related to the processes and ways of rapprochement between the computer and the teaching of design, (b) the use of terminology and concepts related to the theme,
keywords Ensino-aprendizagem; Projeto de Arquitetura; Projeto Auxiliado por Computador; SIGraDI; PROJETAR
series SIGRADI
email andretiani@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id 9834
authors Tibaut, A., Kaucic, B. and Rebolj, D.
year 2000
title Design visualisation using product data technology
source CIDAC, Volume 2 Issue 4 November 2000, pp. 251-258
summary Because of its monolitic nature, visualisation software, integrated with legacy engineering applications, contains every possible feature one might use, whether or not a user really wants them. With the advent of distributed objects and interpreted platform-independent languages such as Java and VRML, it is possible to develop cross-platform portable visualisation software and components that work in plug and play manner. Adopting these advances, rapid visualisation can considerably simplify the job of maintaining the lifecycle activities of a product. This paper aims to introduce new levels of support to engineers throughout the integrated product life cycle process by dealing with issues such as rapid platform independent visualisation and product data technology. The paper demonstrates the visualisation of product models using roads as an example.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 10ba
authors Tournay, Bruno
year 1999
title The Software Beats the Hardware
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 74-79
summary The paper is based on ongoing reflections concerning the importance of information technology in architecture. Such reflections are necessary to develop research concerning the use of information technology in architectural design, so as to shift the focus from purely technological development to an actual field of research. The result of these reflections to date suggests that research into the significance of information technology in architecture must go via sociological research on the subject, since information technology has become a social factor. The central element in such research will be to identify and specify how the virtual world which is developing can be articulated in relation to the physical world. One of the ways of doing this is to use metaphors.
keywords 3D City modeling
series eCAADe
email kaed@image.dk
last changed 2001/06/04 14:13

_id 8d5c
authors Wall, S. and Harwin, W.
year 2001
title Interaction of Visual and Haptic Information in Simulated Environments: Texture Perception
source Brewster, S., Smith, R. (eds.) Haptic humancomputer interaction : First International Workshop, Glasgow, UK, August31 - September 1, 2000 : Proceedings. Hong Kong: Springer
summary This paper describes experiments relating to the perception of the roughness of simulated surfaces via the haptic and visual senses. Subjects used a magnitude estimation technique to judge the roughness of "virtual gratings" presented via a PHANToM haptic interface device, and a standard visual display unit. It was shown that under haptic perception, subjects tended to perceive roughness as decreasing with increased grating period, though this relationship was not always statistically significant. Under visual exploration, the exact relationship between spatial period and perceived roughness was less well defined, though linear regressions provided a reliable approximation to individual subjects' estimates.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 1a3d
authors Willey, David
year 1999
title Sketchpad to 2000: From Computer Systems to Digital Environments
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 526-532
summary It can be argued that over the last thirty five years computer aided architectural design (CAAD) has made little impact in terms of aiding design. The paper provides a broadbrush review of the last 35 years of CAAD research and suggests that the SKETCHPAD notion that has dominated CAAD since 1963 is now a flawed concept. Then the discipline was replete with Modernist concepts of optimal solutions, objective design criteria and universal design standards. Now CAD needs to proceed on the basis of the Post Modern ways of thinking and designing opened up by digital techniques - the Internet, multimedia, virtual reality, electronic games, distance learning. Computers facilitate information flow and storage. In the late seventies and eighties the CAAD research community's response to the difficulties it had identified with the construction of integrated digital building models was to attempt to improve the intelligence of the computer systems to better match the understanding of designers. Now it is clear that the future could easily lie with CAAD systems that have almost no intelligence and make no attempt to aid the designer. Communication is much more central to designing than computing.
keywords History, Intelligence, Interface, Sketchpad, Web
series eCAADe
email dwilley@plymouth.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 9fd8
authors Wojtowicz Jerzy and Butelski, Kazimierz
year 1999
title Lessons from Distributed Design Practice
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 482-487
summary Parallel to the expansion of the internet, the acceptance of computerization in architectural practice is clearly evident. This paper signals the emergence of long-distance design collaborations over networks as a pragmatic condition of contemporary design practice, and reports on several successful design projects conceived under these new circumstances. Experiences from these projects were important in formulating both the limits and opportunities derived from the distributed design condition.
keywords Design Collaboration, VDS, Networks
series eCAADe
email jw@architecture.ubc.ca, pabutels@cyf-kr.edu.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id d59a
authors Zarnowiecka, Jadwiga C.
year 1999
title AI and Regional Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 584-588
summary In 1976 Richard Foqué established periods in the development of methods of designing. The first stage (the 50's and early 60's) - automatization of the designing process - properly identified language of description that is understood by a machine is vital. Christopher Alexander publishes 'Pattern Language'. The second stage (late 60's) - the use of the Arts - research techniques as interview, questionnaire, active observation; ergonomic aspects are also taken into consideration. The third stage (starts at the turn of the 60's and 70's) - co-participation of all of the parties involved in the designing process, and especially the user. The designing process becomes more complex but at the same time more intelligible to a non-professional - Alexander's 'Pattern Language' returns. It's been over 20 years now since the publication of this work. In the mid 70's prototypes of integrate building description are created. We are dealing now with the next stage of the designing methods development. Unquestionable progress of computer optimalization of technical and economical solutions has taken place. It's being forecasted that the next stage would be using computer as a simulator of the designing process. This stage may be combined with the development of AI. (Already in 1950 Alan Turing had formulated the theoretical grounds of Artificial Intelligence.) Can the development of the AI have the influence on the creation of present time regional architecture? Hereby I risk a conclusion that the development of AI can contribute to the creation of modern regional architecture.
keywords Design Process, Artificial Intelligence, Regional Architecture
series eCAADe
email zarnow@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 9e61
authors Zarzar, Karina Moraes
year 2000
title The Question of Representing Design Based on Precedents. A Review of the Evolutionary Biological Analogy in the Making of Design Tools
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 411-421
summary This paper is a critical appreciation of the application of the evolutionary analogy in representing the use of precedents in design. It departs from architectural practice and the architects' possible cognitive use of the tools already developed. Pursuing this, two applications of the evolutionary model in design are reviewed. Furthermore, the paper looks into ways the analogy was applied to minimize risks of misapplication and maximize innovation.
series CAADRIA
email K.MoraesZarzar@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id ab35
authors Birn, Jeremy and Maestri, George
year 2000
title Digital Lighting & Rendering
source New Riders Publishing
summary Using computer graphic and 3-D tools to create accurate images is easy; using them to produce beautiful, inviting, memorable images requires more than technical skill. [digital] Lighting & Rendering introduces reasons and techniques for using light, shadow, texture, and composition. The book is not software-specific, but demonstrates techniques that are applicable to almost any 3-D graphics application.
series other
last changed 2003/02/26 17:58

_id 792a
authors Blaschke, Thomas and Tiede, Dirk
year 2003
title Bridging GIS-based landscape analysis/modelling and 3D-simulation.Is this already 4D?
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Several studies have used remote sensing to map patterns of e.g. deforestation or to analyse the rates of land use change. Thesestudies have proven useful for interpreting the causes of urbanization, deforestation etc. and the impact of such changes on theregion. Monitoring of change (e.g. deforestation or reforestation) is frequently perceived as one of the most important contributionsof remote sensing technology to the study of global ecological and environmental change (Roughgarden et al. 1991). Manyresearchers believe that the integration of remote sensing techniques within analysis of environmental change is essential if ecologistsare to meet the challenges of the future, specifically issues relating to global change; however, in practice, this integration has so farbeen limited (Griffiths & Mather 2000). Considerable difficulties are encountered in linking, on the one hand, the biologies oforganisms and the ecologies of populations to the fluxes of material and energy quantifiable at the level of ecosystems. In this paper,we concentrate on the methodological aspects of the delineation of landscape objects and touch the ecological application onlysuperficially but we elucidate the potential of the proposed methodology for several ecological applications briefly.
series other
email thomas.blaschke@uni-tuebingen.de
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0cb1
authors Dave, Bharat
year 2000
title Architecture of Digital Imagination
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 297-306
summary Digital technologies extend, displace or substitute entirely new elements into what has been observed so far in the traditional modes of conception, representation and communication of design. This paper examines various characteristics of digital media and representations, their impacts- constraining and liberating- on modes of conception in design, and possible shifts in design expressions and ways of designing. While much effort invested in research to date has relied upon architecture as conceived, taught and communicated in traditional modes, the use of digital technologies changes those very premises. The import of such characterisation for design computation research is to highlight emerging agendas for future investigation.
series CAADRIA
email b.dave@architecture.unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

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