CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 740

_id f345
authors Mustoe, Julian E. H. and Silva, Neander F.
year 2000
title The Teaching of Knowledge Management Systems in Architecture: a Domain Oriented Approach
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 350-351
summary The teaching of artificial intelligence techniques in architecture has generally adopted a computer science oriented approach. However, most of these teaching experiment have failed to raise enthusiasm on the students or long term interest in the subject. It is argued in this paper that the main cause for this failure is due to the approach adopted. A different approach, that is, an domain oriented one will then be described as a promising teaching strategy.
series SIGRADI
email julian@unb.br, neander@unb.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id d8df
authors Naticchia, Berardo
year 1999
title Physical Knowledge in Patterns: Bayesian Network Models for Preliminary Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 611-619
summary Computer applications in design have pursued two main development directions: analytical modelling and information technology. The former line has produced a large number of tools for reality simulation (i.e. finite element models), the latter is producing an equally large amount of advances in conceptual design support (i.e. artificial intelligence tools). Nevertheless we can trace rare interactions between computation models related to those different approaches. This lack of integration is the main reason of the difficulty of CAAD application to the preliminary stage of design, where logical and quantitative reasoning are closely related in a process that we often call 'qualitative evaluation'. This paper briefly surveys the current development of qualitative physical models applied in design and propose a general approach for modelling physical behaviour by means of Bayesian network we are employing to develop a tutoring and coaching system for natural ventilation preliminary design of halls, called VENTPad. This tool explores the possibility of modelling the causal mechanism that operate in real systems in order to allow a number of integrated logical and quantitative inference about the fluid-dynamic behaviour of an hall. This application could be an interesting connection tool between logical and analytical procedures in preliminary design aiding, able to help students or unskilled architects, both to guide them through the analysis process of numerical data (i.e. obtained with sophisticate Computational Fluid Dynamics software) or experimental data (i.e. obtained with laboratory test models) and to suggest improvements to the design.
keywords Qualitative Physical Modelling, Preliminary Design, Bayesian Networks
series eCAADe
email Naticchia@idau.unian.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 2aec
authors Oxman, Rivka
year 2000
title Design media for the cognitive designer
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 337-346
summary Work on media for design which are responsive to the cognitive processes of the human designer are introduced as a paradigm for research and development. Design media are intended to support the cognitive nature of design and, particularly, the exploitation of design knowledge in computational environments. Basic theoretical assumptions are presented which underlie the development of design media. A central assumption is that designers share common forms of design knowledge which can be formalized, represented, and employed in computational environments. Generic knowledge is proposed as one such seminal form of design knowledge. We then develop a cognitive model which relates to the internal mental representations, strategies and mechanisms of generic design. The paper emphasizes the theoretical foundations of design media. This theoretical discussion is then exemplified through case studies presenting current research for the support of visual cognition in design. We introduce an approach to design schema as a visual form of generic design knowledge. Secondly we present a conceptual framework for the support of schema emergence in visual reasoning in design media. Finally, some implications of schema emergence in design collaboration are presented and discussed.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 2345
authors Park, Hyong-June and Vakalo, Emmanuel-George
year 2000
title An Enchanted Toy Based on Froebel’s Gifts: A computational tool used to teach architectural knowledge to students
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 35-39
summary Assuming that students can require architectural knowledge through direct manipulation of formal objects, this paper introduces a computational toy as a means for teaching knowledge about composition and geometry to students of architecture. The bottom-up approach is employed in the manipulation of the toy. The toy aims at recovering and nourishing the students’ creative spirit and enriching their vocabulary of forms and spaces.
keywords bottom-up approach, formalization, data abstraction, communication, basic transformation functions, syntactic interventions, isolated island of automation, Feedback and error-elimination
series eCAADe
email archphj@umich.edu, egvakalo@umich.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 6dbd
authors Pereira, Gilberto Corso
year 2000
title Hipermídia e Visualização de Informações Urbanas (Hypermedia and Visualization of Urban Information)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 224-226
summary Digital data are the key for the plain utilization of potential already available with geoprocessing technologies. Information that interest urban planners came from several sources and information technologies beside integration and manipulation permit visual investigation of spatial data in diverse aspects, from witch the most evident but not less effective is a map, tool that let us correlate a great variety of qualitative and quantitative data, for organization, interpretation, evaluation, presentation and communication. The work intend to build a urban digital database from Salvador and provide architects, geographers and urban planners a tool to visualize urban information in an easy way. It is structured like a hypermedia atlas using concepts from cartographic modeling. Information is organized in general and specific themes - physical environment, socioeconomic, land use, habitation, infra-structure, etc - that can be visualized alone or coexistent with others themes. Scale of visualization can be various.
series SIGRADI
email corso@ufba.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id e22f
authors Petric, Jelena
year 2000
title Time for a Reality Check
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 317-320
summary In this current era it is the information technologies that has set the stage for the drama of human life to be acted out. The information revolution has created global links on a scale unparalleled in human history. With exciting explorations into virtuality (the current buzz word) our life experiences, dreams and ambitions will be mapped into cyber-space and our "real" reality will become indistinguishable from our virtual reality. We are on the verge of experiencing a complete sensory immersion in this man-made cyber-dream. We will be able to enter virtual space that has as much richness and tangible quality as the world from which it sprang.
series eCAADe
email abacus@strath.ac.uk, j.petric@strath.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 6b25
authors Pini, E.L., Abades, I.S. and Paolucci, A.L.
year 2000
title El Modelo Digital en los Primeros Años de la Enseñanza de la Arquitectura (The Digital Model in the First Years of the Architectural Education)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 336-338
summary We will analyze a pedagogic exercise that joined together both the Informatics and Morphology Courses, required in the second year of Architecture School. The objective of the analysis is to explore the possibilities of the computer as a tool for design, and also to contribute some ideas for planning, curriculum development, and the necessary training to introduce the use of computer graphics in the Architecture School. We based our analysis on some preliminary hypotheses: (1) Students must learn to use digital models with a certain degree of simultaneity with learning design and the other techniques used to develop models. (2) Professors of Design, Representation, and Morphology are main actors in this learning process; they do not have to become experts in informatics, but have some understanding of the topic. (3) Many universities and professional associations are offering students and professionals courses based in the use of programs, instead of addressing their real needs.
series SIGRADI
email edulupi@arqa.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id 7321
authors Potier, S., Maltret, J.L. and Zoller, J.
year 2000
title Computer graphics: assistance for archaelogical hypotheses
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 117-128
summary This paper is a contribution to the domain of computer tools for architectural and archeological restitution of ancient buildings. We describe an application of these tools to the modeling of the 14th century AD. Thermae of Constantin in Arles, south of France. It was a diploma project in School of Architecture of Marseille-Luminy, and took place in a context defined in the European ARELATE project. The general objective of this project is to emphasize the archeological and architectural heritage of the city of Arles; it aims, in particular, to equip the museum of ancient Arles with a computer tool enabling the storage and consultation of archaeological archives, the communication of information and exchange by specialized networks, and the creation of a virtual museum allowing a redescription of the monuments and a "virtual" visit of ancient Arles. Our approach involves a multidisciplinary approach, calling on architecture, archeology and computer science. The archeologist's work is to collect information and interpret it; this is the starting point of the architect's work who, using these elements, suggests an architectural reconstruction. This synthesis contains the functioning analysis of the structure and building. The potential provided by the computer as a tool (in this case, the POV-Ray software) with access to several three-dimensional visualizations, according to hypotheses formulated by the architect and archaeologists, necessitates the use of evolutive models which, thanks to the parametrization of dimensions of a building and its elements, can be adapted to all the changes desired by the architect. The specific contribution of POV-Ray in architectural reconstruction of thermae finds its expression in four forms of this modeling program, which correspond to the objectives set by the architect in agreement with archeologists: (a) The parametrization of dimensions, which contributes significantly in simplifying the reintervention process of the architectural data base; (b) Hierarchy and links between variables, allowing "grouped" modifications of modelized elements in order to preserve the consistency of the architectural building's morphology; (c) The levels of modeling (with or without facing, for example), which admit of the exploration of all structural and architectural trails (relationship form/function); and, (d) The "model-type", facilitating the setting up of hypotheses by simple scaling and transformation of these models (e.g., roofing models) on an already modelled structure. The methodological validation of this modeling software's particular use in architectural formulation of hypotheses shows that the software is the principal graphical medium of discussion between architect and archaeologist, thus confirming the hypotheses formulated at the beginning of this project.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 13f7
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed K.
year 1999
title Evaluation as a Key Tool to Bridge CAAD and Architecture Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 279-285
summary This paper reports on the findings of a study carried out at Glasgow University which proposes a framework for the evaluation of architecture curriculum once integrated with CAAD. This study investigated the evaluation of CAAD teaching methods (CTM) and the effectiveness of CAAD integration (CI) and explored CAAD employment suitability in the design studio, and what influences does it have on the design process tuition using the Kirkpatrick model as a vehicle. The related CAAD evaluation variables investigated were: CAAD Tutor, Course Materials & Contents, Class Environment, Use of Media, Delivery Methodologies, Administrative Briefs, and Overall Effectiveness of CAAD event. Several other variables investigated were the levels of students' performance, attitudes, knowledge, new-stand, creativity and skills. The paper covered briefly some of the findings of the case studies acquired over two years at MSA; both observations and questionnaire surveys were used as methods of data collection. Evaluation deficiency postulates the weaknesses of CAAD in architecture schools. Evaluation of CAAD tuition should be a fundamental approach to address CAAD integration efficiency and problems, to achieve effectiveness and productivity amongst architecture schools.
keywords Evaluation, Integration, Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@index.com.jo
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 3888
authors Reffat, Rabee M.
year 2000
title Computational Situated Learning in Designing - Application to Architectural Shape Semantics
source The University of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture
summary Learning the situatedness (applicability conditions), of design knowledge recognised from design compositions is the central tenet of the research presented in this thesis. This thesis develops and implements a computational system of situated learning and investigates its utility in designing. Situated learning is based on the concept that "knowledge is contextually situated and is fundamentally influenced by its situation". In this sense learning is tuned to the situations within which "what you do when you do matters". Designing cannot be predicted and the results of designing are not based on actions independent of what is being designed or independent of when, where and how it was designed. Designers' actions are situation dependent (situated), such that designers work actively with the design environment within the specific conditions of the situation where neither the goal state nor the solution space is completely predetermined. In designing, design solutions are fluid and emergent entities generated by dynamic and situated activities instead of fixed design plans. Since it is not possible in advance to know what knowledge to use in relation to any situation we need to learn knowledge in relation to its situation, i.e. learn the applicability conditions of knowledge. This leads towards the notion of the situation as having the potential role of guiding the use of knowledge.

Situated Learning in Designing (SLiDe) is developed and implemented within the domain of architectural shape composition (in the form of floor plans), to construct the situatedness of shape semantics. An architectural shape semantic is a set of characteristics with a semantic meaning based on a particular view of a shape such as reflection symmetry, adjacency, rotation and linearity. Each shape semantic has preconditions without which it cannot be recognised. Such preconditions indicate nothing about the situation within which this shape semantic was recognised. The situatedness or the applicability conditions of a shape semantic is viewed as, the interdependent relationships between this shape semantic as the design knowledge in focus, and other shape semantics across the observations of a design composition. While designing, various shape semantics and relationships among them emerge in different representations of a design composition. Multiple representations of a design composition by re-interpretation have been proposed to serve as a platform for SLiDe. Multiple representations provide the opportunity for different shape semantics and relationships among them to be found from a single design composition. This is important if these relationships are to be used later because it is not known in advance which of the possible relationships could be constructed are likely to be useful. Hence, multiple representations provide a platform for different situations to be encountered. A symbolic representation of shape and shape semantics is used in which the infinite maximal lines form the representative primitives of the shape.

SLiDe is concerned with learning the applicability conditions (situatedness), of shape semantics locating them in relation to situations within which they were recognised (situation dependent), and updating the situatedness of shape semantics in response to new observations of the design composition. SLiDe consists of three primary modules: Generator, Recogniser and Incremental Situator. The Generator is used by the designer to develop a set of multiple representations of a design composition. This set of representations forms the initial design environment of SLiDe. The Recogniser detects shape semantics in each representation and produces a set of observations, each of which is comprised of a group of shape semantics recognised at each corresponding representation. The Incremental Situator module consists of two sub-modules, Situator and Restructuring Situator, and utilises an unsupervised incremental clustering mechanism not affected by concept drift. The Situator module locates recognised shape semantics in relation to their situations by finding regularities of relationships among them across observations of a design composition and clustering them into situational categories organised in a hierarchical tree structure. Such relationships change over time due to the changes taken place in the design environment whenever further representations are developed using the Generator module and new observations are constructed by the Recogniser module. The Restructuring Situator module updates previously learned situational categories and restructures the hierarchical tree accordingly in response to new observations.

Learning the situatedness shape semantics may play a crucial role in designing if designers pursue further some of these shape semantics. This thesis illustrates an approach in which SLiDe can be utilised in designing to explore the shapes in a design composition in various ways; bring designers! attention to potentially hidden features and shape semantics of their designs; and maintain the integrity of the design composition by using the situatedness of shape semantics. The thesis concludes by outlining future directions for this research to learn and update the situatedness of design knowledge within the context of use; considering the role of functional knowledge while learning the situatedness of design knowledge; and developing an autonomous situated agent-based designing system.

series thesis:PhD
email rabee@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/06 09:34

_id e995
authors Reffat, Rabee M., and Gero, John S.
year 2000
title Towards Active Support Systems for Architectural Designing
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 143-147
summary This paper proposes the application of a situated learning approach in designing integrated with a conventional CAD system. The approach is implemented in SLiDe (Situated Learning in Designing) and integrated as SLiDe-CAAD, to provide interactive support in designing exemplified within the composition of architectural shapes. SLiDe-CAAD is proposed to assist in maintaining the integrity of shape semantics or desired design concepts of interest in the design composition. SLiDe-CAAD is introduced to provide a collaboration between the designer and the computer during the process of designing.
keywords CAAD Systems, Active Designing Support, Situatedness.
series eCAADe
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 8246
authors Rios-Castro, Lorena Itzel
year 2000
title Cybrid Tectonics: A Panama Canal Exhibition
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 15-16
summary This article is a summary of a thesis project directed under the supervision of Wassim Jabi and Mehrdad Hadighi] This thesis is based on the premise that space can be created by the interaction of physical and ephemeral elements with the human body. The physical elements create a frame on which the ephemeral rely, but it is the interaction between them that produces a distinct experience of space and place. Extensive and diverse preliminary explorations range from the use of digital media in the design process, video and multimedia as a revolutionary element in 20th century art and light as a way of expression for architectural installations exploring new media. From this body of information it was conceived that certain new media add an important and particular dimension to the traditional physical medium of architecture. This constitutes a controversial and innovative approach to the creation of space and most importantly to the experience of place.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 4aa9
authors Roberts, Andrew
year 1999
title Virtual Site Planning
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 442-447
summary This paper looks at the potential for the Virtual Reality to be used as a medium for the development of teaching tools in Architectural and Urban Design Education. It identifies examples and lessons learned from the development of teaching tools in other disciplines. The paper outlines a prototype system developed at Cardiff University to help Town Planning students understand the three dimensional nature of site planning and design. This was developed following difficulties encountered by students in using CAD which was seen as insufficiently intuitive to allow effective use within the short timespan available. The prototype system allows students to access their site through the familiar environment of a Web Browser. A number of 'Standard' house types are available which can be selected and inserted into the design space. Once in the space the houses can be viewed in three dimensions, moved and rotated in order to form any configuration that the students may wish. The system is easily customisable; it need not be limited to uses in urban design, but could be used in many situations where component parts are arranged in space.
keywords Virtual Reality, Teaching, Learning, Site Planning
series eCAADe
email robertsas@cf.ac.uk
more http://ctiweb.cf.ac.uk/Housing/
last changed 2002/11/23 13:44

_id 1bb0
authors Russell, S. and Norvig, P.
year 1995
title Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach
source Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ
summary Humankind has given itself the scientific name homo sapiens--man the wise--because our mental capacities are so important to our everyday lives and our sense of self. The field of artificial intelligence, or AI, attempts to understand intelligent entities. Thus, one reason to study it is to learn more about ourselves. But unlike philosophy and psychology, which are also concerned with AI strives to build intelligent entities as well as understand them. Another reason to study AI is that these constructed intelligent entities are interesting and useful in their own right. AI has produced many significant and impressive products even at this early stage in its development. Although no one can predict the future in detail, it is clear that computers with human-level intelligence (or better) would have a huge impact on our everyday lives and on the future course of civilization. AI addresses one of the ultimate puzzles. How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain{brain}, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict, and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? How do we go about making something with those properties? These are hard questions, but unlike the search for faster-than-light travel or an antigravity device, the researcher in AI has solid evidence that the quest is possible. All the researcher has to do is look in the mirror to see an example of an intelligent system. AI is one of the newest disciplines. It was formally initiated in 1956, when the name was coined, although at that point work had been under way for about five years. Along with modern genetics, it is regularly cited as the ``field I would most like to be in'' by scientists in other disciplines. A student in physics might reasonably feel that all the good ideas have already been taken by Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and the rest, and that it takes many years of study before one can contribute new ideas. AI, on the other hand, still has openings for a full-time Einstein. The study of intelligence is also one of the oldest disciplines. For over 2000 years, philosophers have tried to understand how seeing, learning, remembering, and reasoning could, or should, be done. The advent of usable computers in the early 1950s turned the learned but armchair speculation concerning these mental faculties into a real experimental and theoretical discipline. Many felt that the new ``Electronic Super-Brains'' had unlimited potential for intelligence. ``Faster Than Einstein'' was a typical headline. But as well as providing a vehicle for creating artificially intelligent entities, the computer provides a tool for testing theories of intelligence, and many theories failed to withstand the test--a case of ``out of the armchair, into the fire.'' AI has turned out to be more difficult than many at first imagined, and modern ideas are much richer, more subtle, and more interesting as a result. AI currently encompasses a huge variety of subfields, from general-purpose areas such as perception and logical reasoning, to specific tasks such as playing chess, proving mathematical theorems, writing poetry{poetry}, and diagnosing diseases. Often, scientists in other fields move gradually into artificial intelligence, where they find the tools and vocabulary to systematize and automate the intellectual tasks on which they have been working all their lives. Similarly, workers in AI can choose to apply their methods to any area of human intellectual endeavor. In this sense, it is truly a universal field.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 4ba2
authors Sariyildiz, Sevil
year 2000
title ICT influence on Spatial Planning, Building and the Built Environment
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 61-63
summary The building sector is entering a new era. Developments in ICT have an impact throughout the entire life cycle of a building and the built environment. Through changes in daily life it will influence; the spatial planning, the urban structure of the future, our cities and the living environment. It shows already its influence in our way of living, our habits. The gap between creative design, which is done by means of advanced modelling software and the building technical aspect of designs, is getting bigger. ICT and Internet technology provide a closer link between the participants in the building process, their activities, knowledge, and information. Collaboration and communication within ICT techniques will be the future of the building. This paper provides a vision on the influences of the future ICT developments in spatial planning, architecture in general and focuses on the influences of the building sector in the above-mentioned fields.
series SIGRADI
email i.s.sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id ddssar0024
id ddssar0024
authors Segers, N.M., Achten, H.H., Timmermans, H.J.P., Vries, B. de
year 2000
title A comparison of computer-aided tools for architectural design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Several computer-aided tools could be used to support a broad area of architectural design. The intention of this paper is to give an overview of possible tools that support the analysis, synthesis, or evaluation processes underlying architectural design. We evaluate these tools and elicit their requirements as tools for computer-aided architectural design. Potential improvements are a broadening of the solution-space of the architect (stimulate inspiration), an increasing speed or ease of generating and evaluating design alternatives, a better accessibility of required information, and verification of the rules and demands of the brief. In developing a tool for the very early design stage, an overview of existing tools, including their potential advantages and drawbacks, that could somehow support these ideas is a necessary stepping-stone.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id eef4
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2000
title Architecture, Speed, and Relativity: On the Ethics of Eternity, Infinity, and Virtuality
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 29-37
summary The main purpose of this essay is to provide a critical framework and raise a debate to understand the spatial and temporal impact of information technologies on architecture. As the world moves from geopolitics to chronopolitics, architecture with its traditional boundaries still vociferously guarded is becoming further marginalized into sectors of mere infrastructure. The essay begins by clarifying the notions of space, time, and speed through a phenomenological interpretation of Minkowskian/ Einsteinian notion of relativistic space-time. Drawing from the cultural critiques offered by Paul Virilio, Marshall McLuhan, and Jacques Ellul, the essay argues that we are at the end of the reign of spacebased institutions and transitioning rapidly into a time-based culture.
keywords Space-time, Virtuality, Critical Theory, Ethics
series ACADIA
email mahesh@architect.org
last changed 2002/08/04 05:13

_id ca3d
authors Shakarchi, Ali Y.
year 2000
title Tools for Distributed Design Practice
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 89-92
summary During collaboration designers jointly solve problems as well as interact for critical feedback. Today’s heterogeneous, distributed and global market demands of designers collaboration in both synchronous and asynchronous mode. The management and control of such projects is frequently geographical and temporally distributed. Increasingly, efficient communication is becoming a vital component in the design process, whether in managing the project data or controlling the compatibility of different inputs by design team members or minimizing the revision cycles. Paper presents and discuss iSPACE, the mature prototype software application developed to serve different scenarios of communication between the distributed design team members. The iSPACE is web based application that can deliver an interactive environment over low-bandwidth connections. Application of iSPACE in the educational environment is monitored and discussed. Giving the potential of this technology to enhance and to streamline complex tasks associated with the design process, the quality of the design product is changing. The new style of design practice can be now practically further modeled, supported and enhanced.
keywords Design Collaboration, Design Process, i-space, Digital Media
series eCAADe
email ashakarc@arch.ubc.ca
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 1e1b
authors Svilanovich Zaldumbide, Paulina A.
year 2000
title Arquitectura Mediatica: De lo temporal a lo espacial de lo colectivo a lo virtual (Architecture of Media: From the Time-Base to the Space-Base, From the Colective to the Virtual)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 84-89
summary The objective of this investigation is to explore in the digital configuration and to discuss its implications, inspirations and applications. This investigation intends a design method to be applied spacely in what we have called the re-interpretation of the space experienciable, to drive the project but well toward the production of “scenarios” able to harbor the unpredictability of the civic eventses, fomenting a such organization that articulates the one among of non physical spaces. As final product five “scenarios“ were created (new experiencial virtual experenciable), using technical film in their methodological development where is recognized in the process their qualities and possible bonds, then in a final stage the inter-relationship among the methodological constants generates and feedback the general proposal: The inductive sequence of the ASSEMBLY (expressed through animations), understanding this last concept like the paradigm of the film development applied in this occasion to the architectural proposal.
series SIGRADI
email psvilanov@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id 83cb
authors Telea, Alexandru C.
year 2000
title Visualisation and simulation with object-oriented networks
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary Among the existing systems, visual programming environments address best these issues. However, producing interactive simulations and visualisations is still a difficult task. This defines the main research objective of this thesis: The development and implementation of concepts and techniques to combine visualisation, simulation, and application construction in an interactive, easy to use, generic environment. The aim is to produce an environment in which the above mentioned activities can be learnt and carried out easily by a researcher. Working with such an environment should decrease the amount of time usually spent in redesigning existing software elements such as graphics interfaces, existing computational modules, and general infrastructure code. Writing new computational components or importing existing ones should be simple and automatic enough to make using the envisaged system an attractive option for a non programmer expert. Besides this, all proven successful elements of an interactive simulation and visualisation environment should be provided, such as visual programming, graphics user interfaces, direct manipulation, and so on. Finally, a large palette of existing scientific computation, data processing, and visualisation components should be integrated in the proposed system. On one hand, this should prove our claims of openness and easy code integration. On the other hand, this should provide the concrete set of tools needed for building a range of scientific applications and visualisations. This thesis is structured as follows. Chapter 2 defines the context of our work. The scientific research environment is presented and partitioned into the three roles of end user, application designer, and component developer. The interactions between these roles and their specific requirements are described and lead to a more precise formulation of our problem statement. Chapter 3 presents the most used architectures for simulation and visualisation systems: the monolithic system, the application library, and the framework. The advantages and disadvantages of these architectural models are then discussed in relation with our problem statement requirements. The main conclusion drawn is that no single existing architectural model suffices, and that what is needed is a combination of the features present in all three models. Chapter 4 introduces the new architectural model we propose, based on the combination of object-orientation in form of the C++ language and dataflow modelling in the new MC++ language. Chapter 5 presents VISSION, an interactive simulation and visualisation environment constructed on the introduced new architectural model, and shows how the usual tasks of application construction, steering, and visualisation are addressed. In chapter 6, the implementation of VISSION’s architectural model is described in terms of its component parts. Chapter 7 presents the applications of VISSION to numerical simulation, while chapter 8 focuses on its visualisation and graphics applications. Finally, chapter 9 concludes the thesis and outlines possible direction for future research.
keywords Computer Visualisation
series thesis:PhD
email a.c.telea@tue.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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