CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 741

_id 7e01
authors Earl Mark
year 2000
title A Prospectus on Computers Throughout the Design Curriculum
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 77-83
summary Computer aided architectural design has spread throughout architecture schools in the United States as if sown upon the wind. Yet, the proliferation alone may not be a good measure of the computer’s impact on the curriculum or signify the true emergence of a digital design culture. The aura of a relatively new technology may blind us from understanding its actual place in the continuum of design education. The promise of the technology is to completely revolutionize design; however, the reality of change is perhaps rooted in an underlying connection to core design methods. This paper considers a transitional phase within a School reviewing its entire curriculum. Lessons may be found in the Bauhaus educational program at the beginning of the 20 th century and its response to the changing shape of society and industry.
keywords Pedagogy, Computer Based Visualization, Spatial and Data Analysis Methods, Interdisciplinary Computer Based Models
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/05/29 04:45

_id ac16
authors Kokosalakis, Jen
year 2000
title Researching Local Architect Preferences of Mode of CPD Learning
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 73-76
summary Curriculum development of a new learning/training package to encourage greater use of computers to architects in NorthWest England will be founded on research to identify what is needed and the most effective way to deliver and disseminate the learning material. Employing the research technique of "Focus Groups" local architects (the consumers) will identify the way they prefer to learn. This approach, emergent background to local CAAD usage and attitudes and early indications of learning mode preference is presented here.
series eCAADe
email j.kokosalakis@livjm.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 1f5c
authors Beesley, Philip and Seebohm, Thomas
year 2000
title Digital Tectonic Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 287-290
summary Digital tectonic design is a fresh approach to architectural design methodology. Tectonics means a focus on assemblies of construction elements. Digital tectonics is an evolving methodology that integrates use of design software with traditional construction methods. We see digital tectonic design as a systematic use of geometric and spatial ordinances, used in combination with details and components directly related to contemporary construction. The current approach will, we hope, lead to an architectural curriculum based on generative form making where the computer can be used to produce systems of forms algorithmically. Digital design has tended to remain abstract, emphasizing visual and spatial arrangements often at the expense of materials and construction. Our pursuit is translation of these methods into more fully realized physical qualities. This method offers a rigorous approach based on close study of geometry and building construction elements. Giving a context for this approach, historical examples employing systematic tectonic design are explored in this paper. The underlying geometric ordinance systems and the highly tuned relationships between the details in these examples offer design vocabularies for use within the studio curriculum. The paper concludes with a detailed example from a recent studio project demonstrating particular qualities developed within the method. The method involves a wide range of scales, relating large-scale gestural and schematic studies to detailed assembly systems. Designing in this way means developing geometric strategies and, in parallel, producing detailed symbols or objects to be inserted. These details are assembled into a variety of arrays and groups. The approach is analogous to computer-aided designŐs tradition of shape grammars in which systems of spatial relationships are used to control the insertion of shapes within a space. Using this approach, a three-dimensional representation of a building is iteratively refined until the final result is an integrated, systematically organized complex of symbols representing physical building components. The resulting complex offers substantial material qualities. Strategies of symbol insertions and hierarchical grouping of elements are familiar in digital design practice. However these strategies are usually used for automated production of preconceived designs. In contrast to thsse normal approaches this presentation focuses on emergent qualities produced directly by means of the complex arrays of symbol insertions. The rhyth
keywords 3D CAD Systems, Design Practice, 3D Design Strategies
series eCAADe
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 1f21
authors Geebelen, Benjamin and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title IDEA-l. Bringing Natural Lighting to the Early Design Stages
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 193-196
summary This paper discusses the use of computers as design tools for natural lighting in the early stages of the architectural design process. It focuses on IDEA-l, a new natural-lighting design tool, currently under development, that is meant to offer the architect/designer a digital equivalent for scale models, artificial sky simulators and heliodons.
series eCAADe
email ben.geebelen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 161c
authors Juroszek, Steven P.
year 1999
title Access, Instruction, Application: Towards a Universal Lab
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 141-150
summary In January 1998, the Montana State University School of Architecture embarked upon an initiative to successfully integrate computer technology into its design curriculum. At that time only a handful of student computers could be found in the design studio. By January 1999 over 95 students have and use computers in their courses. The increase in computer access and use is occurring through a five-phase initiative called the Universal Lab-a school-wide commitment to the full integration of computer technology into all design studios, support courses and architectural electives. The Universal Lab uses the areas of Access, Instruction and Application as the vehicles for appropriate placement and usage of digital concepts within the curriculum. The three-pronged approach allows each instructor to integrate technology using one, two or all three areas with varying degrees of intensity. This paper presents the current status of the Universal Lab-Phase I and Phase II-and describes the effect of this program on student work, course design and faculty instruction.
keywords Design, Access, Instruction, Application, Integration
series eCAADe
email stevej@montana.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id d64b
authors Kieferle, Joachim B.
year 2000
title Virtual Space - New Tasks for Architects
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 205-208
summary The meaning of architecture is extended due to the new media. As never before, computers help architects to handle huge amounts of information or give them a freedom to handle complex shaped models. However, it is not the shapes, but the space and its qualities they are created in, that imposes a new kind of architecture. This article focuses in an abridged version on some attributes of virtual space, its expanding features for real space and what the chances for architecture might be. But - what is space? Is it something objective? How is it perceived by man? This questions have to be answered first to understand the following hypothesis.
series eCAADe
email kieferle@igp.uni-stuttgart.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id a25e
authors Loy, Hollis A.
year 1999
title Foundation for a Thorough CAAD Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 301-308
summary The birth and development of computing is considered by most as one of the greatest technological achievements of the twentieth century. Since the integration of computers in the built environment, over two decades ago, computing methods developed into efficient designing and calculating tools. In contrast, accelerating advancements in computing technology have created generation gaps amongst architects. There are inexperienced, novice, intermediate and advanced computer-capable architects. If each group was asked to define CAAD, some would still describe it as a computer program for technical draughting. Others may define CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) as a vast array of digital media in CAD, multimedia and DTP, assisting architects in compiling visual presentations. Currently, most architectural schools are capable of instructing most, if not all, facets of CAAD (2D & 3D CAD, model rendering, photo montage, brochure layouts, etc.). However, this knowledge is accumulated at random throughout the course of study. "Computer Graphics for Architects" is the latest educational development in Europe bridging generation gaps with senior architects and serving as an introductory CAAD seminar to beginning architecture students. This book and lecture presents a gallery of recent architectural CAD, multimedia, and DTP presentations practiced in Europe´s second largest architectural firm. The terminology is user-friendly and its content concentrates on responding to the most often posed questions by CAAD beginners relating to: (1) Terminology (2) Appearance (3) Time Consumption (4) Cost Techniques introduced are independent of any platform. The goal is to summarize quickly and effectively the countless possibilities of presentations applicable in architecture practice. "Computer Graphics for Architects" provides a direction for future presentations and motivates students to excel in CAAD.
series eCAADe
email Loy.In.Germany@t-online.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id e806
authors Maver, T.W.
year 1987
title The New Studio: CAD and the Workstation - State of the Art
source Architectural Education and the Information Explosion [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Zurich (Switzerland) 5-7 September 1987.
summary This presentation draws on three main sources: (i) reportage of the ATHENA project at MIT, (ii) the experience of the author as a Professor of CAAD, (iii) the work of the eCAADe on the social impacts of CAAD. // Project ATHENA was introduced to MIT in May 1983 as an experiment in the potential uses of advanced computer technology throughout the University curriculum. By the end of the project a network of about 2000 high performance graphics workstations - supplied mainly by IBM and DEC - will have been installed; about half of MIT's $20 million investment is being devoted to the development of new applications software for teaching across almost all the academic Departments, including Architecture.

series eCAADe
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/17 13:57

_id 65f7
authors Rügemer, Jörg and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Promise and Reality: The impact of the Virtual Design Studio on the Design and Learning Process in the Architectural Education
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 41-44
summary In step with the popular trend of including virtual working methods and tools in the process of teaching, the Virtual Design Studio (VDS) has been developed by the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib), at the University of Karlsruhe over the past three years. Alongside the technical aspects of such a studio, the challenge persisted to incorporate computer based tools into the architectural design and planning process with the goal of enhancing the relationship between all participants. The VDS is being further developed and refined, experiencing regular changes in its organization and teaching methods. With the establishment of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) and the introduction of the Virtual Design Studio into the curriculum of the Institute for Architectural Presentation and CAD (adai), BTU Cottbus, the VDS extended beyond the borders of a single architectural school, aiming towards a wide acceptance and use within architectural education institutions.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Education, Interactive Design Development, Team Processes
series eCAADe
email joerg@ruegemer.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 5f73
authors Yen-wen Cheng, Nancy
year 2000
title Web-based Teamwork in Design Education
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 24-26
summary Web-enhanced collaborations can be used throughout the design curriculum to increase interaction and critical thinking. Several kinds of architectural projects are well suited for Internet sharing: 1) case studies, 2) site analyses and 3) component sharing. Through these projects, students learn to work cooperatively while contributing to class resources and research efforts. Web template pages for the projects set standards for presentation and shape content organization. The visible nature of a class web page highlights early examples and publicizes achievements and difficulties. The collective class effort provides an accessible source for comparison, development of evaluation criteria and identification of exemplars. When students are encouraged to build on each others’ work, they reward strong efforts by their selections. Through careful planning of teamwork organization and technical preparations, Internet exercises can maximize cooperative learning.
series SIGRADI
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:03

_id ae61
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title CAAD - Integrated with the First Steps into Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 266-272
summary How and when should CAAD be introduced in the curriculum of the School of Architecture? This paper begins with some arguments for starting CAAD education at the very beginning. At the School of Architecture in Lund teachers in the first year courses have tried to integrate CAAD with the introduction to architectural concepts and techniques. Traditionally the first year is divided by several subjects running courses separatly without any contact for coordination. From the academic year 96/97 the teachers of Aplied aestetics, Building Science, Architectural design and CAAD have decided to colaborate as much as possible to make the role of our different fields as clear as possible to the students. Therefore integrating CAAD was a natural step in the academic year 98/99. The computer techniques were taught one step in advance so that the students can practise their understanding of the programs in their tasks in the other subjects. The results were surprisingly good! The students have quickly learned to mix the manual and computer techniques to make expressive and interesting visual presentations of their ideas. Some students with antipaty to computers have overcome this handicap. Some interesting observations are discussed.
keywords Curriculum, First Year Studies, Integration, CAAD, Modelling
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 456a
authors Alvarado, R.G., Parra, J.C., Vergara, R.L. and Chateau, H.B.
year 2000
title Architectural References to Virtual Environments Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 151-155
summary Based on a comparison between the perception of digital and real construction, the development of virtual systems and the review of additional sources, this paper states some differences between the design of virtual environments and architectural spaces. Virtual-reality technologies provide advanced capabilities to simulate real situations, and also to create digital worlds not referred to physical places, such as imaginary landscapes or environments devoted to electronic activities, like entertainment, learning or commerce. Some on-line services already use 3D-stages, resembling building halls and domestic objects, and several authors have mentioned virtual modeling as a job opportunity to architects. But it will argue in this paper that the design of those environments should consider their own digital characteristics. Besides, the use of virtual installations on networks impells a convergence with global media, like Internet or TV. Virtual environments can be a 3Devolution of communicational technologies, which have an increasing participation in culture, reaching a closer relationship to contemporary architecture.
keywords Virtual Environments, Spatial Perception, Design Methodology
series eCAADe
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 5cba
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Beyond Y2k: A Look at Acadia's Present and Future
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, p. 10
summary The sky may not be falling, but it sure is getting closer. Where will you when the last three zeros of our millennial odometer click into place? Computer scientists tell us that Y2K will bring the world’s computer infrastructure to its knees. Maybe, maybe not. But it is interesting that Y2K is an issue at all. Speculating on the future is simultaneously a magnifying glass for examining our technologies and a looking glass for what we become through them. "The future" is nothing new. Orwell's vision of totalitarian mass media did come true, if only as Madison Avenue rather than Big Brother. Futureboosters of the '50s were convinced that each garage would house a private airplane by the year 2000. But world citizens of the 60's and 70's feared a nuclear catastrophe that would replace the earth with a smoking crater. Others - perhaps more optimistically -predicted that computers were going to drive all our activities by the year 2000. And, in fact, theymay not be far off... The year 2000 is symbolic marker, a point of reflection and assessment. And - as this date is approaching rapidly - this may be a good time to come to grips with who we are and where we want to be.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 0c0d
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2000
title Computer as an Metaphorisation Machine
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 283-286
summary Digital media is transforming the practice and teaching of design. Information technologies offer not only better production and rendering tools but also the ability to model, manipulate, and understand design in new ways. A new era in CAAD has started. One of the aspects of this situation is the increase in the number of computers in design offices and architectural schools (many of our students have their own computers, which a re often better than the computers we have at our school). We can submit a proposition that the critical point in the creative use of computers is over, and we should think how computers and new media may extend the designer’s perception and imagination.
keywords Creation of a Form, Imagination, Metaphors, Computer Support of Form Searching
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ff1d
authors Barki, José
year 2000
title Representaçăo Digital e Projeto de Arquitetura (Digital Representation and Architectural Design)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 120-122
summary The paper is focused around a critical discussion of the digital representation and the architectural design process. Digital technology is now widely accepted and computers are causing a profound impact in the way reality and artificial objects are described and represented. Computers are now transforming skills, design processes, production processes and organizations. However, the evidence suggests that there are no fundamental changes in the architectural design process. It is acknowledged that the design process in architecture goes through representations and entails two altering phases: one generating tentative possibilities and hypothesis, and another of testing and evaluation. Based on this discussion a new way of using digital technology in architectural conception and design is suggested.
series SIGRADI
email zbki@openlink.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 328d
authors Bassanino, May Nahab and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Computer Generated Architectural Images: A Comparative Study
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 552-556
summary This work is part of a long term research programme (Brown and Horton, 1992; Brown and Nahab, 1996; Bassanino, 1999) in which tests and studies have been carried out on various groups of people to investigate their reaction to, and interpretation of different forms of architectural representation. In the work described here a range of architectural schemes were presented using particular representational techniques and media. An experiment was then undertaken on two different groups; architects and lay people. They were presented with a number of schemes displayed using the various techniques and media. The responses are summarised and some comments are made on the effect of computers on perceiving architecture and on communicating architectural ideas arising from an analysis of the responses.
keywords Subject, Image Type, Presentation Technique, Medium, SD Scales, Factors
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 7da7
authors Benedetti, Cristina and Salvioni, Giulio
year 1999
title The Use of Renewable Resource in Architecture: New Teaching Methodologies
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 751-756
summary The program is organized into four parts. Each is very much connected, both logically and methodologically, so that the unit as a whole consists of a content and method of access that are not divided up. This method is not in a chronological order that simply goes in one direction, rather it allows the user to "refer back", in real time and in different directions. For the simple purpose of explanation, the sections of the program are listed as follows: (-) "Basic information" concerns the basics of bioclimatic and timber architecture. Without this knowledge, the other two sections would be difficult to understand; (-) "Actual buildings throughout the world"; give examples of architectural quality; they concretize the basics of bioclimatic and timber architecture; (-) "Students' Masters Theses", that follow on from the basic information and the learning experience "in the field", and guided by the lecturer, have a critical approach to actual buildings throughout the world. (-) A multimedia data-sheet organized to ensure a clear and straightforward presentation of information about the construction products. It relies on a tab-based navigation interface that gives users access to eight different stacked windows.
keywords Architecture, Multimedia, Timber, Bioclimatic, Classification
series eCAADe
email benedetti@axrma.uniroma1.it
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 3f35
authors Bermudez, Julio and King, Kevin
year 2000
title Media interaction and design process: establishing a knowledge base
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 37-56
summary Integrating computers in architectural design means to negotiate between centuries-old analog design methods and the new digital systems of production. Analog systems of architectural production use tracing paper, vellum, graphite and ink, clipboard, clay, balsa wood, plastic, metal, etc. Analog systems have also been termed "handmade", "manual", "material" or "physical". Digital systems of architectural production use scanning, image manipulation, visualization, solid modeling, computer aided drafting, animation, rendering, etc. Digital systems have also been called "electronic", "computer-aided", "virtual", etc. The difficulty lies in the underdeveloped state of the necessary methods, techniques, and theories to relate traditional and new media. Recent investigations on the use of multiple iterations between manual and electronic systems to advance architectural work show promising results. However, these experiments have not been sufficiently codified, cross-referenced and third party tested to conform a reliable knowledge base. This paper addresses this shortcoming by bringing together reported experiences from diverse researchers over the past decade. This summary is informed by more than three years of continuous investigation in the impacts of analog-digital conversations in the design process. The goal is to establish a state-of-the-art common foundation that permits instructors, researchers and practitioners to refer to, utilize, test, criticize and develop. An appendix is included providing support for the paper's arguments.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 9bc4
authors Bhavnani, S.K. and John, B.E.
year 2000
title The Strategic Use of Complex Computer Systems
source Human-Computer Interaction 15 (2000), 107-137
summary Several studies show that despite experience, many users with basic command knowledge do not progress to an efficient use of complex computer applications. These studies suggest that knowledge of tasks and knowledge of tools are insufficient to lead users to become efficient. To address this problem, we argue that users also need to learn strategies in the intermediate layers of knowledge lying between tasks and tools. These strategies are (a) efficient because they exploit specific powers of computers, (b) difficult to acquire because they are suggested by neither tasks nor tools, and (c) general in nature having wide applicability. The above characteristics are first demonstrated in the context of aggregation strategies that exploit the iterative power of computers.Acognitive analysis of a real-world task reveals that even though such aggregation strategies can have large effects on task time, errors, and on the quality of the final product, they are not often used by even experienced users. We identify other strategies beyond aggregation that can be efficient and useful across computer applications and show how they were used to develop a new approach to training with promising results.We conclude by suggesting that a systematic analysis of strategies in the intermediate layers of knowledge can lead not only to more effective ways to design training but also to more principled approaches to design systems. These advances should lead users to make more efficient use of complex computer systems.
series other
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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