CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 728

_id 217b
authors Kolarevic, B. Schmitt, G., Hirschberg, U., Kurmann, D. and Johnson, Brian
year 2000
title An experiment in design collaboration
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 73-81
summary Computer supported communication and collaboration among partners in the building design and construction process are no longer mere possibilities, but, given the will and know-how of the participants, a reality. Team members could work on a building design at any place, simultaneously together (synchronously) or separately (asynchronously), while the latest state of the design would always be available in a shared database. But to be successful, this emerging type of cooperation often requires new design and communication methods. This paper documents an experimental approach to design collaboration, tested in an intensive, one-week long Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions. It briefly describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting process of collaboration, and the lessons learned.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id b088
authors Al-Qawasmi, Jamal
year 2000
title Learning Virtually: A Paradigm Shift in Design Education
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 123-133
summary We still think of architectural design education in terms of a "classroom" paradigm, that is, of an instructor teaching design skills to a class of students in a face-to-face format. However, emerging communication and collaboration technologies have created tremendous new opportunities to distribute students and faculty, while maintaining a close personal contact. This paper discusses and characterizes several aspects of the evolving paradigm of teaching design made possible by the ability to work in shared virtual environments.
series CAADRIA
email qawasmij@yahoo.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 9d10
authors Anders, Peter and Livingstone, Daniel
year 2001
title STARS: Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 350-355
summary Since October 2000 the authors have operated a laboratory, the Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System (STARS), for exploring telepresence in the domestic environment. The authors, an artist and an architect, are conducting a series of experiments to test their hypotheses concerning mixed reality and supportive environments. This paper describes these hypotheses, the purpose and construction of the lab, and preliminary results from the ongoing collaboration.
keywords Mixed Reality, Cybrid, Art, Cyberspace, CAiiA-STAR
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 60e7
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2000
title The Intelligent Sketch: Developing a Conceptual Model for a Digital Design Assistant
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 137-145
summary The computer is a relatively new tool in the practice of Architecture. Since its introduction, there has been a desire amongst designers to use this new tool quite early in the design process. However, contrary to this desire, most Architects today use pen and paper in the very early stages of design to sketch. Architects solve problems by thinking visually. One of the most important tools that the Architect has at his disposal in the design process is the hand sketch. This iterative way of testing ideas and informing the design process with images fundamentally directs and aids the architect’s decision making. It has been said (Schön and Wiggins 1992) that sketching is about the reflective conversation designers have with images and ideas conveyed by the act of drawing. It is highly dependent on feedback. This “conversation” is an area worthy of investigation. Understanding this “conversation” is significant to understanding how we might apply the computer to enhance the designer’s ability to capture, manipulate and reflect on ideas during conceptual design. This paper discusses sketching and its relation to design thinking. It explores the conversations that designers engage in with the media they use. This is done through the explanation of a protocol analysis method. Protocol analysis used in the field of psychology, has been used extensively by Eastman et al (starting in the early 70s) as a method to elicit information about design thinking. In the pilot experiment described in this paper, two persons are used. One plays the role of the “hand” while the other is the “mind”- the two elements that are involved in the design “conversation”. This variation on classical protocol analysis sets out to discover how “intelligent” the hand should be to enhance design by reflection. The paper describes the procedures entailed in the pilot experiment and the resulting data. The paper then concludes by discussing future intentions for research and the far reaching possibilities for use of the computer in architectural studio teaching (as teaching aids) as well as a digital design assistant in conceptual design.
keywords CAAD, Sketching, Protocol Analysis, Design Thinking, Design Education
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id f288
authors Bille, Pia
year 1999
title Integrating GIS and Electronic Networks In Urban Design and Planning
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 722-728
summary In 1998 I undertook an inquiry into the use of information technology in Urban Design and Planning in Danish municipalities and among planning consultants. The aim was to find out who was working with the IT and for what purposes it was used. In education there seems to be barriers to a full integration of the new media, and I wanted to find out if that was also the case in the practise of architects and planners. Surprisingly I discovered that there was a computer on almost every desk, - but there were big differences in the use of the technology. The investigation described here is based on interviews with planners in selected municipalities and with urban planning consultants, and the results have been summarised in a publication.
keywords Urban Planning, Electronic Collaboration, GIS, Data Bases
series eCAADe
email pia.bille@a-aarhus.dk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a136
authors Blaise, J.Y., Dudek, I. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Java collaborative interface for architectural simulations A case study on wooden ceilings of Krakow
source International Conference On Conservation - Krakow 2000, 23-24 November 1998, Krakow, Poland
summary Concern for the architectural and urban preservation problems has been considerably increasing in the past decades, and with it the necessity to investigate the consequences and opportunities opened for the conservation discipline by the development of computer-based systems. Architectural interventions on historical edifices or in preserved urban fabric face conservationists and architects with specific problems related to the handling and exchange of a variety of historical documents and representations. The recent development of information technologies offers opportunities to favour a better access to such data, as well as means to represent architectural hypothesis or design. Developing applications for the Internet also introduces a greater capacity to exchange experiences or ideas and to invest on low-cost collaborative working platforms. In the field of the architectural heritage, our research addresses two problems: historical data and documentation of the edifice, methods of representation (knowledge modelling and visualisation) of the edifice. This research is connected with the ARKIW POLONIUM co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France) and the Institute HAiKZ of Kraków's Faculty of Architecture. The ARKIW programme deals with questions related to the use of information technologies in the recording, protection and studying of the architectural heritage. Case studies are chosen in order to experience and validate a technical platform dedicated to the formalisation and exchange of knowledge related to the architectural heritage (architectural data management, representation and simulation tools, survey methods, ...). A special focus is put on the evolution of the urban fabric and on the simulation of reconstructional hypothesis. Our contribution will introduce current ARKIW internet applications and experiences: The ARPENTEUR architectural survey experiment on Wieża Ratuszowa (a photogrammetrical survey based on an architectural model). A Gothic and Renaissance reconstruction of the Ratusz Krakowski using a commercial modelisation and animation software (MAYA). The SOL on line documentation interface for Kraków's Rynek G_ówny. Internet analytical approach in the presentation of morphological informations about Kraków's Kramy Bogate Rynku Krakowskiego. Object-Orientation approach in the modelling of the architectural corpus. The VALIDEUR and HUBLOT Virtual Reality modellers for the simulation and representation of reconstructional hypothesis and corpus analysis.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 4cc0
authors Bouchlaghem, N., Khosowshahi, F. and White, J.
year 2000
title Virtual reality as a visualisation tool: Benefits and constraints
source CIDAC, Volume 2 Issue 4 November 2000 pp. 216-224
summary The benefits and applications of virtual reality (VR) in the construction industry have been investigated for almost a decade. However, the practical implementation of VR in the construction industry has yet to reach maturity owing to technical constraints. The need for effective information management presents challenges: both transfer of building data to, and organisation of building information within, the virtual environment require consideration. This paper reviews the applications and benefits of VR in the built environment field and reports on a collaboration between Loughborough University and South Bank University to overcome constraints on the use of the overall VR model for whole lifecycle visualisation. The work at each research centre is concerned with an aspect of information management within VR applications for the built environment, and both data transfer and internal data organisation have been investigated. In this paper, similarities and differences between computer-aided design (CAD) and VR packages are first discussed. Three different approaches to the creation of VR models during the design stage are identified and described, with a view to providing sharing understanding across the interdiscipliary groups involved. The suitable organisation of building information within the virtual environment is then further investigated. This work focused on the visualisation of the degradation of a building, through its lifespan, with the view to provide a visual aid for developing an effective and economic project maintenance programme. Finally consideration is given to the potential of emerging standards to facilitate an integrated use of VR. The convergence towards similar data structures in VR and other construction packages may enable visualisation to be better utilised in the overall lifecycle model.
keywords Virtual Reality, Information Management, Data Exchange, 3D Modelling, 4D Visualisation
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id b037
authors Brusasco, P.L., Caneparo, L., Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A., Novembri, G. and Zorgno, Anna Maria
year 2000
title Computer Supported Design Studio
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 393-408
summary The paper presents the ongoing experimentation of a Computer Supported Design Studio (CSDS). CSDS is part of our continuing effort to integrate computers and networks in the design studio. We recognise three corner stones to CSDS: memory, process and collaboration. They offer a framework for the interpretation of the pedagogical aspects of the teaching of architectural design in relation to the innovations produced by information and communication technologies. The theme of the 1998 CSDS is a railway station in Turin, Italy, to be incorporated in a reorganised rail transport system. The choice of this theme emphasises the realistic simulation aspects of the studio, where technical problems need to be interpreted from an architectural point of view.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 8802
authors Burry, Mark, Dawson, Tony and Woodbury, Robert
year 1999
title Learning about Architecture with the Computer, and Learning about the Computer in Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 374-382
summary Most students commencing their university studies in architecture must confront and master two new modes of thought. The first, widely known as reflection-in-action, is a continuous cycle of self-criticism and creation that produces both learning and improved work. The second, which we call here design making, is a process which considers building construction as an integral part of architectural designing. Beginning students in Australia tend to do neither very well; their largely analytic secondary education leaves the majority ill-prepared for these new forms of learning and working. Computers have both complicated and offered opportunities to improve this situation. An increasing number of entering students have significant computing skill, yet university architecture programs do little in developing such skill into sound and extensible knowledge. Computing offers new ways to engage both reflection-in-action and design making. The collaboration between two Schools in Australia described in detail here pools computer-based learning resources to provide a wider scope for the education in each institution, which we capture in the phrase: Learn to use computers in architecture (not use computers to learn architecture). The two shared learning resources are Form Making Games (Adelaide University), aimed at reflection-in-action and The Construction Primer (Deakin University and Victoria University of Wellington), aimed at design making. Through contributing to and customising the resources themselves, students learn how designing and computing relate. This paper outlines the collaborative project in detail and locates the initiative at a time when the computer seems to have become less self-consciously assimilated within the wider architectural program.
keywords Reflection-In-Action, Design Making, Customising Computers
series eCAADe
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id db71
authors Chien, S.-F. and Shih, S.-G.
year 2000
title A Web Environment to Support User Participation in the Development of Apartment Buildings
source Special Focus Symposium on WWW as the Framework for Collaboration, InterSymp 2000, July 31-August 5, Baden-Baden, Germany, pp. 225-231
summary In Taiwan, apartments are sold before ever been built. Apartment buyers can customize their units until the construction takes place. This customization process has become a very unique form of user participation in the development of apartment buildings in Taiwan. However, in all customizations, large amount of information has to be documented and exchanged between related agencies for each apartment unit. For an apartment building that contains over 40 units, managing the information can be a daunting task. We are developing a web environment to support the customization process and enable efficient management and timely exchanges of information. The environment provides three levels of design interaction to encourage user participation in a controlled customization process. This paper describes the framework of this web environment, illustrates its functionality through a running prototype, and discusses technical issues encountered during its implementation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 8161
authors Clayton, Mark J.
year 2000
title Design Desk Critiques: Digital or Face-to-Face?
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 41-44
summary Internet tools are becoming a legitimate option for conducting design discussions in a global market, but architects are uncertain of how these tools may affect the discussions. The desk critique is an important kind of design discussion in both education and professional practice. This research is employing empirical methods to compare desk critiques. The independent variable in the study is the collaboration medium, which may be either a face-to-face environment or the Internet collaboration software. Pairs of student and instructor participate in sessions with each medium, and their interaction is recorded on videotape. The videotape content is transcribed into sequences of coded events to permit quantitative analysis. Although the research is incomplete, the preliminary results suggest that for some participants and under some circumstances the digital desk critiques are superior to the face-to-face desk critiques. The results of the research may lead to improved methods of conducting design discussion using the Internet.
series SIGRADI
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 38f3
authors Craig and Zimring
year 2000
title Supporting collaborative design groups as design communities
source Design Studies, Vol. 21, no. 2, March
summary This paper explores computer support for unstructured collaboration. A web-based online environment used in conjunction with a graduate-level architectural studio was investigated, with special attention given to patterns of online behavior and the perceptions of those who used the environment. It was assumed that asynchronous collaborative environments like the one studied naturally alleviate certain problems like evaluation apprehension and production-blocking, but do not on their own motivate contributions to a group in an unstructured setting. It was hypothesized that open participation hinges on the development of a sense of community, which itself depends partially on environmental factors intrinsic to the support environment. The environment studied failed to promote open interaction and did not appear to sustain a strong sense of community. Environmental factors thought to have played a role include page structuring, page-naming conventions, and the spatial clustering of textbased exchanges.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ec4d
authors Croser, J.
year 2001
title GDL Object
source The Architect’s Journal, 14 June 2001, pp. 49-50
summary It is all too common for technology companies to seek a new route to solving the same problem but for the most part the solutions address the effect and not the cause. The good old-fashioned pencil is the perfect example where inventors have sought to design-out the effect of the inherent brittleness of lead. Traditionally different methods of sharpening were suggested and more recently the propelling pencil has reigned king, the lead being supported by the dispensing sleeve thus reducing the likelihood of breakage. Developers convinced by the Single Building Model approach to design development have each embarked on a difficult journey to create an easy to use feature packed application. Unfortunately it seems that the two are not mutually compatible if we are to believe what we see emanating from Technology giants Autodesk in the guise of Architectural Desktop 3. The effect of their development is a feature rich environment but the cost and in this case the cause is a tool which is far from easy to use. However, this is only a small part of a much bigger problem, Interoperability. You see when one designer develops a model with one tool the information is typically locked in that environment. Of course the geometry can be distributed and shared amongst the team for use with their tools but the properties, or as often misquoted, the intelligence is lost along the way. The effect is the technological version of rubble; the cause is the low quality of data-translation available to us. Fortunately there is one company, which is making rapid advancements on the whole issue of collaboration, and data sharing. An old timer (Graphisoft - famous for ArchiCAD) has just donned a smart new suit, set up a new company called GDL Technology and stepped into the ring to do battle, with a difference. The difference is that GDL Technology does not rely on conquering the competition, quite the opposite in fact their success relies upon the continued success of all the major CAD platforms including AutoCAD, MicroStation and ArchiCAD (of course). GDL Technology have created a standard data format for manufacturers called GDL Objects. Product manufacturers such as Velux are now able to develop product libraries using GDL Objects, which can then be placed in a CAD model, or drawing using almost any CAD tool. The product libraries can be stored on the web or on CD giving easy download access to any building industry professional. These objects are created using scripts which makes them tiny for downloading from the web. Each object contains 3 important types of information: · Parametric scale dependant 2d plan symbols · Full 3d geometric data · Manufacturers information such as material, colour and price Whilst manufacturers are racing to GDL Technologies door to sign up, developers and clients are quick to see the benefit too. Porsche are using GDL Objects to manage their brand identity as they build over 300 new showrooms worldwide. Having defined the building style and interior Porsche, in conjunction with the product suppliers, have produced a CD-ROM with all of the selected building components such as cladding, doors, furniture, and finishes. Designing and detailing the various schemes will therefore be as straightforward as using Lego. To ease the process of accessing, sizing and placing the product libraries GDL Technology have developed a product called GDL Object Explorer, a free-standing application which can be placed on the CD with the product libraries. Furthermore, whilst the Object Explorer gives access to the GDL Objects it also enables the user to save the object in one of many file formats including DWG, DGN, DXF, 3DS and even the IAI's IFC. However, if you are an AutoCAD user there is another tool, which has been designed especially for you, it is called the Object Adapter and it works inside of AutoCAD 14 and 2000. The Object Adapter will dynamically convert all GDL Objects to AutoCAD Blocks during placement, which means that they can be controlled with standard AutoCAD commands. Furthermore, each object can be linked to an online document from the manufacturer web site, which is ideal for more extensive product information. Other tools, which have been developed to make the most of the objects, are the Web Plug-in and SalesCAD. The Plug-in enables objects to be dynamically modified and displayed on web pages and Sales CAD is an easy to learn and use design tool for sales teams to explore, develop and cost designs on a Notebook PC whilst sitting in the architects office. All sales quotations are directly extracted from the model and presented in HTML format as a mixture of product images, product descriptions and tables identifying quantities and costs. With full lifecycle information stored in each GDL Object it is no surprise that GDL Technology see their objects as the future for building design. Indeed they are not alone, the IAI have already said that they are going to explore the possibility of associating GDL Objects with their own data sharing format the IFC. So down to the dirty stuff, money and how much it costs? Well, at the risk of sounding like a market trader in Petticoat Lane, "To you guv? Nuffin". That's right as a user of this technology it will cost you nothing! Not a penny, it is gratis, free. The product manufacturer pays for the license to host their libraries on the web or on CD and even then their costs are small costing from as little as 50p for each CD filled with objects. GDL Technology has come up trumps with their GDL Objects. They have developed a new way to solve old problems. If CAD were a pencil then GDL Objects would be ballistic lead, which would never break or loose its point. A much better alternative to the strategy used by many of their competitors who seek to avoid breaking the pencil by persuading the artist not to press down so hard. If you are still reading and you have not already dropped the magazine and run off to find out if your favorite product supplier has already signed up then I suggest you check out the following web sites www.gdlcentral.com and www.gdltechnology.com. If you do not see them there, pick up the phone and ask them why.
series journal paper
email joec@adrem-dcx.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 0cc1
authors Dave, Bharat and Danahy, John
year 2000
title Virtual study abroad and exchange studio
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 57-71
summary The digital design studio has an area of application where conventional media are incapable of being used; collaboration in learning, design and dialogue with people in places other than where one lives. This distinctive opportunity has lead the authors to explore a form of design brief and virtual design studio (VDS) format not well addressed in the literature. Instead of sharing the same design brief, students in this alternative format design a project in the other students' city and do not collaborate on the same design. Collaboration with other students takes the form of teaching each other about the city and culture served by the design. The authors discovered these studios produce a focus on site context that serves our pedagogical objectives – a blend of architectural, landscape architectural and urban design knowledge. Their students use a range of commercial CAD and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) software common to that used in many VDS experiments reported on in the literature. However, this conventional use of technology is contrasted with a second distinctive characteristic of these studios, the use of custom software tools specifically designed to support synchronous and asynchronous three-dimensional model exchange and linked attribute knowledge. The paper analyzes some of the virtual design studio (VDS) work between the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the University of Toronto, and the University of Melbourne. The authors articulate a framework of VDS dimensions that structures their teaching and research.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 6126
authors De Grassi, M., Giretti A. and Pinese, P.
year 1999
title Knowledge Structures of Episodic Memory in Architectural Design: An Example of Protocol Analysis
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 576-583
summary The Protocol Analysis of the design process is a very recent and very promising research field. It is believed that good application-oriented developments are possible mainly in the tutorial field (ITS). The research conducted up to now has primarily dealt with the study of the design process. On the contrary, we propose an investigation experiment on the knowledge structures relative to the use of the episodic memory in the architectural design. The proposed experiment concerns the monitoring of the cognitive processes utilised by tutors and students in a brief, but yet complete design session. The results have lead to a synthetic model (computational model) of the adopted knowledge structures, and to a complete index system oriented and organised according to semantic fields. The application of the synthetic model to the design process analysis of students and tutors enabled the definition of the different utilisation strategies of episodic memory to be defined. The results obtained will make up the structure of a tutorial program for the architectural design.
keywords Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs), Architectural Design Education, Case Based Reasoning, Protocol Analisys, Design Cognition
series eCAADe
email giretti@idau.unian.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 125a
authors Dikbas, Attila
year 1999
title An Evaluating Model for the Usage of Web-based Information Technology in Computer Aided Architectural Design and Engineering Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 349-352
summary New technologies often reshape expectations, needs and Opportunities so as to develop strategic Plans for the implementation of Information Techniques in education and research. The widespread acceptance of the internet and more specifically the World Wide Web (WWW) has raised the awareness of educators to the potential for online education, virtual classrooms and even virtual universities. With the advent of computer mediated communication, especially the widespread adoption of the web as a publishing medium, educators see the advantages and potential of delivering educational material over the Internet. The Web offers an excellent medium for content delivery with full text, colour graphics support and hyperlinks. The Purpose of this paper is to present a model for the usage of web-based information technology in computer aided architectural design and engineering education. It involves the key features of a full educational system that is capable of offering the teacher and the student flexibility with which to approach their teaching and learning tasks in ways most appropriate to the architectural design and engineering education. Web-based educational system aims at creating quality in on-line educational materials taking collaboration, support, new skills, and, most of all, time. The paper concludes with a discussion of the benefits of such an education system suggesting directions for further work needed to improve the quality of architectural design and engineering education.
keywords Web-based Information Technology, Online Education, Virtual Campus, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Engineering Education
series eCAADe
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 9f5b
authors Dokonal, W., Martens, B. and Ploesch, R.
year 2000
title Graz: The Creation of a 3-D City Model for Architectural Education
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 171-175
summary This paper describes experiences with the creation of a 3-D City Model at Graz University of Technology. It presents an innovative approach in establishing a city model with the support of the students in the study fields of Architecture and Surveying. The main goal of this work is directed at the implementation within the framework of architectural education. This contribution presents the concept in detail resp.; also discusses matters concerning the level of detail for different uses of such a 3-D model.
keywords 3D City Modeling, City of Graz, Urban Modeling, Architectural Education, Collaboration
series other
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tuwien.ac.at, ploesch@zid.tu-graz.ac.at
more http://www.digcity.tu-graz.ac.at/
last changed 2001/06/04 12:16

_id 73ca
authors Dokonal, W., Martens, B. and Plösch, R.
year 2000
title Architectural Education: Students Creating a City Model
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 219-221
summary This paper describes experiences with the creation of a 3-D City Model at our University of Technology. It presents an innovative approach in establishing a city model with the support of the students in the study fields of Architecture and Surveying. The main goal of this work is directed at the implementation within the framework of architectural education. This contribution presents the concept in detail. It also discusses matters concerning the level of detail for different uses of such a 3-D model.
keywords Urban Modeling, 3-D Modeling, Architectural Education, Collaboration
series ACADIA
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id ddssar0009
id ddssar0009
authors Findlay, Robert A. and Haugen, S. Lee
year 2000
title From individual inquiry and attention to cohorts to a "collaborative critique": the use of student groups to support individual designers
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary This study explores learning settings and strategies related to design collaboration and critical thinking. To this end, theories of education and of cognitive learning were assembled to describe learning design collaboration. Student perceptions of their learning experiences were then gathered in structured interviews and focus groups, and were analyzed qualitatively for concepts, tendencies, and trends. The study also concerns the effects of collaboration on individual learning. An emphasis of the investigation has been on the context in which a person's mind learns. The activity of learning has been enriched by being in a context in which students can participate in the social construction of knowledge, in this way enhancing the processes of developing knowledge, decision-making, and design. We discovered that a "collaborative critique" evolves during the course of activity of groups of students as they shift from the protective behavior of individual competition, through bargaining away ideas in compromise or subduing differences in consensus building, to critical ideation and the constructive behavior of the "collaborative critique".
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c6db
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2000
title In Case of Architectural Design. Critique and Praise of Case-Based Design in Architecture
source Dissertation - Doct. Toegepaste wetenschappen, KU Leuven, Fac. Toegepaste wetenschappen, Dep. architectuur, stedebouw en ruimtelijke ordening (ISBN 90-5682-248-9)
summary Architects are said to learn design by experience. Learning design by experience is the essence of Case-Based Design (CBD), a sub-domain of Artificial Intelligence. Part I critically explores the CBD approach from an architectural point of view, tracing its origins in the Theory of Dynamic Memory and highlighting its potential for architectural design. Seven CBD systems are analysed, experienced architects and design teachers are interviewed, and an experiment is carried out to examine how cases affect the design performance of architecture students. The results of this exploration show that despite its sound view on how architects acquire (design) knowledge, CBD is limited in important respects: it reduces architectural design to problem solving, is difficult to implement and has to contend with prejudices among the target group. With a view to stretching these limits, part II covers the design, implementation and evaluation of DYNAMO (Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line). This Web-based design tool tailors the CBD approach to the complexity of architectural design by effecting three transformations: extending the concern with design products towards design processes, turning static case bases into dynamic memories and upgrading users from passive case consumers to active case-based designers.
keywords Architectural Design; Case-Based Design
series thesis:PhD
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/12/14 18:29

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