CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 738

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 7e01
authors Earl Mark
year 2000
title A Prospectus on Computers Throughout the Design Curriculum
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 77-83
summary Computer aided architectural design has spread throughout architecture schools in the United States as if sown upon the wind. Yet, the proliferation alone may not be a good measure of the computer’s impact on the curriculum or signify the true emergence of a digital design culture. The aura of a relatively new technology may blind us from understanding its actual place in the continuum of design education. The promise of the technology is to completely revolutionize design; however, the reality of change is perhaps rooted in an underlying connection to core design methods. This paper considers a transitional phase within a School reviewing its entire curriculum. Lessons may be found in the Bauhaus educational program at the beginning of the 20 th century and its response to the changing shape of society and industry.
keywords Pedagogy, Computer Based Visualization, Spatial and Data Analysis Methods, Interdisciplinary Computer Based Models
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/05/29 04:45

_id fa1b
authors Haapasalo, H.
year 2000
title Creative computer aided architectural design An internal approach to the design process
source University of Oulu (Finland)
summary This survey can be seen as quite multidisciplinary research. The basis for this study has been inapplicability of different CAD user interfaces in architectural design. The objective of this research is to improve architectural design from the creative problem-solving viewpoint, where the main goal is to intensify architectural design by using information technology. The research is linked to theory of methods, where an internal approach to design process means studying the actions and thinking of architects in the design process. The research approach has been inspired by hermeneutics. The human thinking process is divided into subconscious and conscious thinking. The subconscious plays a crucial role in creative work. The opposite of creative work is systematic work, which attempts to find solutions by means of logical inference. Both creative and systematic problem solving have had periods of predominance in the history of Finnish architecture. The perceptions in the present study indicate that neither method alone can produce optimal results. Logic is one of the tools of creativity, since the analysis and implementation of creative solutions require logical thinking. The creative process cannot be controlled directly, but by creating favourable work conditions for creativity, it can be enhanced. Present user interfaces can make draughting and the creation of alternatives quicker and more effective in the final stages of designing. Only two thirds of the architects use computers in working design, even the CAD system is being acquired in greater number of offices. User interfaces are at present inflexible in sketching. Draughting and sketching are the basic methods of creative work for architects. When working with the mouse, keyboard and screen the natural communication channel is impaired, since there is only a weak connection between the hand and the line being drawn on the screen. There is no direct correspondence between hand movements and the lines that appear on the screen, and the important items cannot be emphasized by, for example, pressing the pencil more heavily than normally. In traditional sketching the pen is a natural extension of the hand, as sketching can sometimes be controlled entirely by the unconscious. Conscious efforts in using the computer shift the attention away from the actual design process. However, some architects have reached a sufficiently high level of skill in the use of computer applications in order to be able to use them effectively in designing without any harmful effect on the creative process. There are several possibilities in developing CAD systems aimed at architectural design, but the practical creative design process has developed during a long period of time, in which case changing it in a short period of time would be very difficult. Although CAD has had, and will have, some evolutionary influences on the design process of architects as an entity, the future CAD user interface should adopt its features from the architect's practical and creative design process, and not vice versa.
keywords Creativity, Systematicism, Sketching
series thesis:PhD
email harri.haapasalo@oulu.fi
more http://herkules.oulu.fi/isbn9514257545/
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 6722
authors Marques, Sandra Oliveira and Goulette, Jean-Pierre
year 2000
title Architecture and Cyberspace: Reciprocal Spatial Contamination (Architecture and Cyberspace: Reciprocal Spatial Contamination)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 81-83
summary Fascinated by the possibility of designing the world, human being has always searched for tools to mediate this process. Cyberspace became one of this tools. Virtual technologies associated to communicational technologies are changing human’s cultural, social, and material context, consequently changing the idea of architecture itself. The decreasing material content of our activities and their increasing perceptual, communicative and cognitive contents are drawing a new framework to our spatial experiences. Objects, spaces, buildings and institutions can now be constructed, navigated, experienced and manipulated across cyberspace. The particular focus in this paper is to discuss the architectural aspects of the Virtual Architectures (VAs) and an initial framework for its design.
series SIGRADI
email sandra.marques@toulouse.archi.fr, jean-pierre.goulette@toulouse.archi.fr
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 01c0
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 2000
title Modelling for Virtual Reality in Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 209-213
summary CAAD systems are using object modelling methods for building databases to make information available. Object data must then be made useful for many different purposes in the design process. Even if the capacity of the computer will allow an almost unlimited amount of information to be transformed, the eye does not make the transformations in the same “simple” mathematical way. Trained architects have to involve in an inventive process of finding ways to “harmonize” this new medium with the human eye and the architect’s professional experience. This paper will be an interimistic report from a surveying course. During the spring semester 2000 the CAAD division of TU-Lund is giving a course “Modelling for VR in Architecture”. The students are practising architects with experience from using object modelling CAAD. The aims are to survey different ways to use available hard- and software to create VR-models of pieces of architecture and evaluate them in desktop and CAVE environments. The architect is to do as much preparation work as possible with his CAAD program and only the final adjustments with the special VR tool.
keywords CAAD, VR, Modelling, Spatial Experience
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 6559
authors Barrionuevo, Luis F. and Borsetti, Ricardo
year 2001
title LA POTENCIALIDAD ESPACIAL DE LOS "SPIROLATERALS" EN LA ARQUITECTURA (The Spacial Potential of the "Spirolaterals" in Architecture)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 74-76
summary “Spirolaterals” (Odds, 1973) are mathematical entities created by drawing a set of lines, the first at a unit length, then each additional line increasing by a value of certain longitude while turning a constant or variable direction. (Krawczyk, 2000) The objective of this work is to propose the use of spirolaterals as a geometric support to produce preliminary alternatives for architectural layouts. A computation program is implemented to demonstrate the automatic production of spatial spirolaterals: spirospace, and images of results are exposed.
series SIGRADI
email lbarrio87@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 4e7c
authors Shih, N. J. and Tsai, Y. T.
year 2000
title A Photogrammetry and Perception Study of Chernikhov Fantasy No. 32 and 38
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 461-470
summary This research investigated the object composition in Chernikhov's 101 Architectural Fantasies through computer-aided visualization, for the purpose of interpreting the relationships between architectural components. In contrast to traditional simulation analysis, this research applied photogrammetry to investigate the orthogonal and parallel ambiguity of 3D objects in 2D drawings by calculating the position of matching geometries. This test took Fantasy no. 38 and 32 as examples to confirm their spatial relationship. 60 architectural students were asked to conduct 3 tests. The algorithmic approach (photogrammetry calculation) was referenced by a cognitive approach (the perception survey) as a comparison base. Photogrammetry test proved that the relation between objects was usually oriented by personal spatial experiences that did control the deduction process of an observer. Perception survey showed that orthogonal assumption existed in the interpretation process of an object's position. It turned out that a testee would still consider two linear objects intersected in orthogonal angle within a tolerance of 15 degree or parallel position between 4 and -16 degree. The finding showed that the interpretation of paper architecture drawings not only was given by the author, but tended to be re-interpreted by an observer. The interpretation process, just like modeling and rendering process, should be a two-way process that facilitates a study oriented either from 2D images or 3D models.
series CAADRIA
email shihnj@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id ddssar0029
id ddssar0029
authors Vries, B. de, Jessurun, J. and Engeli, M.
year 2000
title Development of an intuitive 3D sketching tool
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary 3D sketching is a confusing description of an architectural design means. It is confusing, or even worse apparently wrong, because traditional sketching is inherently a two dimensional activity. Though the final stages of design are currently well support by CAD packages, almost every architect prefers paper and pencil for the early sketching phases. The challenge is to develop a (computer supported) design tool that is as direct and intuitive as paper and pencil. The computer enables us to directly map our spatial mental model into 3D rendered images. As such a new kind of design means is created which is best indicated as an intuitive 3D sketching tool. Within the VR-DIS research programme of the Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology a tool named DDDoolz has been developed as an experimental 3D sketching tool. This paper will report on the preliminary phase in which several input devices such as mouse, bird and voice were tested. For this purpose simple prototype applications were implemented. Building upon these experiences a functional brief was defined for the sketching tool. The system design will be elaborated in this paper using OO schema techniques. Because of its limited yet powerful functionality, a comprehensive system description can be presented. The application has been used in a first years CAD course. Students’ experiences will be discussed demonstrating the strengths and weaknesses of DDDoolz. In conclusion, a list of improvements will be presented and the future directions are indicated that will be followed in regard of the continuing research on design and decision support tools.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2f1a
authors Dabney, M.K., Wright, J.C. and Sanders, D.H.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality and the Future of Publishing Archaeological Excavations: the multimedia publication of the prehistoric settlement on Tsoungiza at Ancient Nemea
source New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art
summary The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project is a study of settlement and land use in a regional valley system in Greece extending from the Upper Paleolithic until the present. Active field research was conducted by four teams between 1981 and 1990. The first component was a regional archaeological survey. Second, and closely related to the first, was a social anthropological study of modern settlement and land use. Next was a team assigned to excavate the succession of prehistoric settlements of Ancient Nemea on Tsoungiza. Last, historical ecologists, a palynologist, and a geologist formed the environmental component of the research. As a result of advances in electronic publishing, plans for the final publication of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project have evolved. Complete publication of the excavation of the prehistoric settlements of Ancient Nemea on Tsoungiza will appear in an interactive multimedia format on CD/DVD in Fall 2000. This project is planned to be the first electronic publication of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. We have chosen to publish in electronic format because it will meet the needs and interests of a wider audience, including avocational archaeologists, advanced high school and college students, graduate students, and professional archaeologists. The multimedia format on CD/DVD will permit the inclusion of text, databases, color and black-and-white images, two and three-dimensional graphics, and videos. This publication is being developed in cooperation with Learning Sites, Inc., which specializes in interactive three-dimensional reconstructions of ancient worlds http://www.learningsites.com. The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project is particularly well prepared for the shift towards electronic publishing because the project's field records were designed for and entered in computer databases from the inception of the project. Attention to recording precise locational information for all excavated objects enables us to place reconstructions of objects in their reconstructed architectural settings. Three-dimensional images of architectural remains and associated features will appear both as excavated and as reconstructed. Viewers will be able to navigate these images through the use of virtual reality. Viewers will also be able to reference all original drawings, photographs, and descriptions of the reconstructed architecture and objects. In this way a large audience will be able to view architectural remains, artifacts, and information that are otherwise inaccessible.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ga0015
id ga0015
authors Daru, R., Vreedenburgh, E. and Scha, R.
year 2000
title Architectural Innovation as an evolutionary process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Traditionally in art and architectural history, innovation is treated as a history of ideas of individuals (pioneers), movements and schools. The monograph is in that context one of the most used forms of scientific exercise. History of architecture is then mostly seen as a succession of dominant architectural paradigms imposed by great architectural creators fighting at the beginning against mainstream establishment until they themselves come to be recognised. However, there have been attempts to place architectural innovation and creativity in an evolutionary perspective. Charles Jencks for example, has described the evolution of architectural and art movements according to a diagram inspired by ecological models. Philip Steadman, in his book "The Evolution of Designs. Biological analogy in architecture and the applied arts" (1979), sketches the history of various biological analogies and their impact on architectural theory: the organic, classificatory, anatomical, ecological and Darwinian or evolutionary analogies. This last analogy "explains the design of useful objects and buildings, particularly in primitive society and in the craft tradition, in terms of a sequence of repeated copyings (corresponding to inheritance), with small changes made at each stage ('variations'), which are then subjected to a testing process when the object is put into use ('selection')." However, Steadman has confined his study to a literature survey as the basis of a history of ideas. Since this pioneering work, new developments like Dawkins' concept of memes allow further steps in the field of cultural evolution of architectural innovation. The application of the concept of memes to architectural design has been put forward in a preceding "Generative Art" conference (Daru, 1999), showing its application in a pilot study on the analysis of projects of and by architectural students. This first empirical study is now followed by a study of 'real life' architectural practice. The case taken has a double implication for the evolutionary analogy. It takes a specific architectural innovative concept as a 'meme' and develops the analysis of the trajectory of this meme in the individual context of the designer and at large. At the same time, the architect involved (Eric Vreedenburgh, Archipel Ontwerpers) is knowledgeable about the theory of memetic evolution and is applying a computer tool (called 'Artificial') together with Remko Scha, the authoring computer scientist of the program who collaborates frequently with artists and architects. This case study (the penthouse in Dutch town planning and the application of 'Artificial') shall be discussed in the paper as presented. The theoretical and methodological problems of various models of diffusion of memes shall be discussed and a preliminary model shall be presented as a framework to account for not only Darwinian but also Lamarckian processes, and for individual as well as collective transmission, consumption and creative transformation of memes.
keywords evolutionary design, architectural innovation, memetic diffusion, CAAD, penthouses, Dutch design, creativity, Darwinian and Lamarckian processes
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id f9f7
authors Mullins, Michael
year 1999
title Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 178-185
summary This paper sets out to define aspects of the architectural design process, using historical precedent and architectural theory, and tests the relationship of those aspects to the application of computers in architectural design, particularly in an educational context. The design process sub-sets are defined as: Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting. Historical precedents are uncovered in Classical, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary architecture. The defined categories of the design process are related to current usages of computers in architectural education towards elucidating the strengths and weaknesses of digital media in those areas. Indications of their concurrent usage in digital design will be demonstrated in analysis of design studio programs presented at recent ACADIA conferences. An example of a current design studio programme set at the School of Architecture University of Natal, South Africa in which the above described categories give an underlying structure to the introduction of 3D digital modelling to undergraduates through design process. The definition of this set of design activities may offer a useful method for other educators in assessing existing and future design programs where digital tools are used.
keywords Design-Process, Digital-Media, Design-Programmes
series eCAADe
email madura@iafrica.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id d0aa
authors Colajanni, Benedetto, Concialdi, Salvatore and Pellitteri, Giuseppe
year 1999
title CoCoMa: a Collaborative Constraint Management System for the Collaborative Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 364-369
summary Collaborative Design is a topic of particular current interest. Existing software allows a multiplicity of designers to work on the same project. What the software really allows is accessing to a part of the information of the project and changing it. Sometimes there is a hierarchical distribution of the power of change: some participants can be permitted to operate only on some limited layers of the object representation. In this case the changes they propose are to be accepted by a general manager of the design process. What is lacking in this kind of software is the explicit management on the reciprocal constraints posed by different participants. In this paper, an elementary Collaborative Design System is presented whose main concern is just the management of constraints. Each participant designs the part of the project of his/her concern instantiating objects comprised of geometric description, alphanumeric variables and constraints on both. Constraints can be of two types: absolute or defined by a range of allowed values of the constrained variable. A participant intervening later can accept the constraint, choosing a value in the permitted range, or decide to violate it. In this case the proposed violation is signalled to whom posed it.
keywords Collaborative Design, Design Process, Management System, Participant Designs, Constraints Violation
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@unipa.it, ciesse@neomedia.it, pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 85ab
authors Corrao, Rossella and Fulantelli, Giovanni
year 1999
title Architects in the Information Society: The Role of New Technologies
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 665-671
summary New Technologies (NTs) offer us tools with which to deal with the new challenges that a changing society or workplace presents. In particular, new design strategies and approaches are required by the emerging Information Society, and NTs offer effective solutions to the designers in the different stages of their professional life, and in different working situations. In this paper some meaningful scenarios of the use of the NTs in Architecture and Urban Design are introduced; the scenarios have been selected in order to understand how the role of architects in the Information Society is changing, and what new opportunities NTs offer them. It will be underlined how the telematic networks play an essential role in the activation of virtual studios that are able to compete in an increasingly global market; examples will be given of the use of the Web to support activities related to Urban Planning and Management; it will be shown how the Internet may be used to access strategic resources for education and training, and sustain lifelong learning. The aforesaid considerations derive from a Web-Based Instruction system we have developed to support University students in the definition of projects that can concern either single buildings or whole parts of a city. The system can easily be adopted in the other scenarios introduced.
keywords Architecture, Urban Planning , New Technologies, World Wide Web, Education
series eCAADe
email rcorrao@itdf.pa.cnr.it, fulantelli@itdf.pa.cnr.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 2b39
authors Duarte, Rovenir Bertola
year 2000
title O Uso do Computador no Ensino de Projeto: (por) uma Avaliação (Or Use do Computer nonEnsino de Project: (by) uma Avaliaction)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 361-363
summary The computer approaches to the discipline of project near the fifties, with the idea that all the systems and processes can be object of mathematical simulation. However in the last times, the computers were used more in drawings than in the projects, “CADrafting is uncommon (...) and CADesign is almost nonexistent...” (STEVEN, 1991). At the same time it happened a surprising approach with to architecture schools. It stimulated more methodological approaches, and the subject moved, placing the computer as element transformer. The computers have really been changing the production and generation of documents, but the question is if it has been altering the method or process of elaboration of ideas. After so much search in direction to the computers it is time of thinking what was gotten with them and the problems that accompanies him. The work search to discuss the subjects where the computer influences in the learning and the students’ development.
series SIGRADI
email rovenir@uel.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id ga0021
id ga0021
authors Eacott, John
year 2000
title Generative music composition in practice - a critical evaluation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This critical evaluation will discuss 4 computer based musical works which, for reasons I shall explain, I describe as non-linear or generative. The works have been constructed by me and publicly performed or exhibited during a two year period from October 1998 to October 2000. ‘In the beginning…’ interactive music installation, strangeAttraction, Morley Gallery, London. July 1999 ‘jnrtv’ live generative dance music May 1999 to Dec 2000 ‘jazz’ interactive music installation, another strangeAttraction Morley Gallery, London. July 2000-09-26 ‘the street’ architectural interactive music installation, University of Westminster Oct 2000 Introduction I have always loved the practice of composing, particularly when it means scoring a work to be played by a live ensemble. There is something about taking a fresh sheet of manuscript , ruling the bar lines, adding clefs, key and time signatures and beginning the gradual process of adding notes, one at a time to the score until it is complete that is gratifying and compensates for the enormous effort involved. The process of scoring however is actually one distinct act within the more general task of creating music. Recently, the notion of ‘composing’ has met challenges through an increased interest in non-linear compositional methods. It is actually the presence of Chaotic or uncontrolable elements which add real beauty to music and many if not all of the things we value. If we think of a sunset, waves lapping on the shore, plants, trees a human face and the sound of the human voice, these things are not perfect and more importantly perhaps, they are transient, constantly changing and evolving. Last year and again this year, I have organised an exhibition of interactive , non-linear music installations called 'strangeAttraction'. The title refers to what Edward Lorenz called a ‘strange attractor’ the phenomenon that despite vast degrees of Chaos and uncertainty within a system, there is a degree of predictability, the tendency for chaotic behaviour to ‘attract’ towards a probable set of outcomes. Composition that deals with 'attractors' or probable outcomes rather than specific details which are set in stone is an increasingly intriguing notion.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id f586
authors Gabriel, G. and Maher, M.L.
year 2000
title Analysis of design communication with and without computer mediation
source Proceedings of Co-designing 2000, pp. 329-337
summary With recent developments in CAD and communication technologies, the way we visualise and communicate design representations is changing. A matter of great interest to architects, practitioners and researchers alike, is how computer technology might affect the way they think and work. The concern is not about the notion of 'support' alone, but about ensuring that computers do not disrupt the design process and collaborative activity already going on (Bannon and Schmidt, 1991). Designing new collaborative tools will then have to be guided by a better understanding of how collaborative work is accomplished and by understanding what resources the collaborators use and what hindrances they encounter in their work (Finholt et al., 1990). Designing, as a more abstract notion, is different than having a business meeting using video conferencing. In design it is more important to 'see' what is being discussed rather than 'watch' the other person(s) involved in the discussion. In other words the data being conveyed might be of more importance than the method with which it is communicated (See Kvan, 1994). Similarly, we believe that by using text instead of audio as a medium for verbal communication, verbal representations can then be recorded alongside graphical representations for later retrieval and use. In this paper we present the results of a study on collaborative design in three different environments: face-to-face (FTF), computer-mediated using video conferencing (CMCD-a), and computer-mediated using "talk by typing" (CMCD-b). The underlying aim is to establish a clearer notion of the collaborative needs of architects using computer-mediation. In turn this has the potential in assisting developers when designing new collaborative tools and in assisting designers when selecting an environment for a collaborative session.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ebb4
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2000
title Digital architectural visualization
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 347-360
summary The democratization of computer technologies is changing architectural visualization in two significant ways. The first is that the availability of digital media promotes wider and intensive application of computer visualization. The second concerns the extension of architectural design to visualization in information systems. The transition from analogue to digital visualization relates to fundamental questions ranging from the role of geometric representations in architecture and the relationships between analysis and visualization to the structure of abstraction. In addition, it requires technology and knowledge transfer also from areas other than computer science. The integration of such transfers suggests a flexible, modular approach that contradicts the holistic, integral principles of computer-aided architectural design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id e2ea
authors Lee, Hwa-Ryong
year 1999
title The Changing Face of Architectural Computing Research
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 11-17
summary This paper examines the existing commercial and on-going research computer applications for architectural design. It investigates their uses, predictions and limitations; and reviews the teleology, technologies and theories exploited for computerising design. Finally, I will discuss two trends in the developments of CAAD, and present the new directions in CAAD research. This study will be based on understanding the computer's roles in designing, and further on establishing a new theoretical paradigm for mediating a computer system.
keywords Historical Context, Theoretical Paradigms
series eCAADe
email hlee@moe.go.kr
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 0995
authors Liapi, Katherine A.
year 2000
title Computer Simulation and Visualization of Geometrically Changing Structures
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 267-271
summary The design of building structures that change shape and form to adapt to different functions or weather conditions requires the application of innovative building technologies, as well as the invention of a new architectural morphology. This morphology is directly related to the kinematic conception of the structure. A computer simulation of the motion of the structure and the display of the structure as an animation of moving parts can identify problems in its initial geometric and kinematic conception. It can also assess the effect of the changing geometry of the structure on space definition, building morphology, and functionality.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 7793
authors Montañez, Darién
year 2001
title TESIS: ARQ.PMA.76/00 (Thesis: ARQ.PMA.76/00)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 13-15
summary Chaos and disorder are adjectives repeated ad nauseam in contemporary discussions on the City of Panama and its architecture. This study intends to find an order in this apparent chaos and chart the development of Panamanian Architecture during the last 25 years. Going beyond the expected list of every important building of the period, we offer a vision of Architecture as a blob generated by these milestones and that envelops them, moving and changing shape with time. This fluctuating form, which is the Architecture of Panama from 1976 to 2000, is generated by using a Style Vs. Time graph, a diagram that allows us to plot each building according to its “style”.
series SIGRADI
email darienm@mac.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

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