CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 366

_id ddssar0005
id ddssar0005
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen and Kvan, Thomas
year 2000
title Design collaboration strategies
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary How can we best use computer technology to facilitate remote design teamwork? From looking at virtual studio collaborations, we propose that multiple solutions exist rather than a single one. In examining both published results and own student projects, we identify the following factors to be considered in finding the best fit between technology and group design: 1) Collaborators’ profiles; 2) Mutual value of produced information; 3) Collaboration structure and 4) Logistical opportunities
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 64be
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen
year 2000
title A Pilot Study of Using Generative Systems in Architectural Design Process
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 135-144
summary This paper presents a pilot study about impacts that a generative system may have on the architectural design process. The study contains two empirical experiments. The generation experiment studies how experienced and novice designers will utilize such a design system. The formulation/generation experiment observes the problem formulation and solution generation behaviors of less experienced designers. Results of these experiments highlight two issues that require further investigations: 1) domain expertise and modes of interaction that concerns the implementation of future generative systems; and 2) learning through interaction that addresses the use of generative systems in education.
series CAADRIA
email schien@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id 36ab
authors Chiu, M.-L., Lin, Y.-T., Tseng, K.-W. and Chen, C.-H.
year 2000
title Museum of Interface. Designing the Virtual Environment
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 471-480
summary A virtual environment (VE) has been designed for functioning as a three-dimensional interface to a repository of images and sounds. This paper attempts to study design interface in VEs. This study first examines the characteristics of VEs. The difference between physical and virtual environments is also studied. The relationship between both is classified as three types, i.e. complement, replacement, or independence. Then it establishes the design interface in VEs, and presents an experimental project, the virtual architecture museum (VAM). Four elements of VEs are highlighted, i.e. wayfinding, linkage, context, and atmosphere. In VAM, the interface is implemented on the web and is integrated with an architectural database. It is found that the appropriateness of design interface can enhance the users' spatial awareness, and consequently facilitate the task of navigation and wayfinding within VEs. The context and atmosphere of VEs can be defined by means of simile or metaphor through the visual or acoustic experience for gaining senses of a place.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw, n7687401@dec4000.cc.ncku.edu.tw, n7687103@dec4000.cc.ncku.edu.tw, n7687405@sparc1.cc.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id 08ea
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo P. (Eds.)
year 2000
title ACADIA 2000: Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture
source Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8 / Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, 284 p.
summary Eternity, time without end, infinity, space without limits and virtuality, perception without constraints; provide the conceptual framework in which ACADIA 2000 is conceived. It is in human nature to fill what is empty and to empty what is full. Today, thanks to the power of computer processing we can also make small what is too big, make big what is too small, make fast what is too slow, make slow what is too fast, make real what does not exist, and make our reality omni-present at global scale. These are capabilities for which we have no precedents. What we make of them is our privilege and responsibility. Information about a building flows past our keyboards and on to other people. Although we, as architects, add to the information, it originated before us and will go beyond our touch in time, space and understanding. A building description acquires a life of its own that may surpass our own lives as it is stored, transferred, transformed, and reused by unknown intellects, both human and artificial, and in unknown processes. Our actions right now have unforeseen effects. Digital media blurs the boundaries of space, time and our perception of reality. ACADIA 2000 explores the theme of time, space and perception in relation to the information and knowledge that describes architecture. Our invitation to those who are finding ways to apply computer processing power in architecture received overwhelming response, generating paper submissions from five continents. A selected group of reviewers recommended the publication of 24 original full papers out of 42 submitted and 13 short papers out of 30 submitted. Forty-two projects were submitted to the Digital Media Exhibit and 12 were accepted for publication. The papers cover subjects in design knowledge, design process, design representation, design communication, and design education. Fundamental and applied research has been carefully articulated, resulting in developments that may have an important impact on the way we practice and teach architecture in the future.
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
more www.acadia.org
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 9a1e
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo
year 1999
title Stumbling, Backtracking, and Leapfrogging: Two Decades of Introductory Architectural Computing
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 151-158
summary Our collective concept of computing and its relevance to architecture has undergone dramatic shifts in emphasis. A review of popular texts from the past reveals the biases and emphases that were current. In the seventies, architectural computing was generally seen as an elective for data processing specialists. In the early eighties, personal computers and commercial CAD systems were widely adopted. Architectural computing diverged from the "batch" world into the "interactive" world. As personal computing matured, introductory architectural computing courses turned away from a foundation in programming toward instruction in CAD software. By the late eighties, Graphic User Interfaces and windowing operating systems had appeared, leading to a profusion of architecturally relevant applications that needed to be addressed in introductory computing. The introduction of desktop 3D modeling in the early nineties led to increased emphasis upon rendering and animation. The past few years have added new emphases, particularly in the area of network communications, the World Wide Web and Virtual Design Studios. On the horizon are topics of electronic commerce and knowledge markets. This paper reviews these past and current trends and presents an outline for an introductory computing course that is relevant to the year 2000.
keywords Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Computer-Aided Design, Computing Education, Introductory Courses
series eCAADe
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id cb42
authors Coates, Paul and Schmid, Claudia
year 1999
title Agent Based Modelling
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 652-661
summary This paper describes the work of students in Unit 6 of the Diploma school at the UEL during 1998-9. The unit in association with the MSc has been exploring ways of using the computer to explore the idea of emergent form as a way of generating designs, and a way of focussing the pedagogic process on a new and interesting set of determinants of form.
keywords Agent Based Modelling, Generative Modelling, Emergent Forms
series eCAADe
email p.s.coates@uel.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id diss_cole
id diss_cole
authors Cole, R.J.
year 2000
title The Management and Visualisation of Document Collections Using Formal Concept Analysis
source Griffith University, Australia
summary This thesis proposes a methodology, notation/theory, and software framework for organising documents using formal concept analysis. The documents are organised for the purposes of retrieval and analysis using background information in the form of a taxonomy of terms. An emphasis is placed on the development of a methodology that employs scalable computer programs to assist humans in the process of organisation, retrieval and analysis of document collections.The text retrieval community has also been concerned with the organisation of documents. The work outlined in this thesis makes use of the results of the text retrieval community at its lowest layer. Above this layer formal concept analysis is used as a mechanism to allow users to organise document collections using views determined by small numbers of attributes. These views, also known as scales, can make a mixture of coarse and speci c distinctions between documents, and are either selected or created by the users to make precisely the distinctions between documents that are important to their current tasks.The primary tool for the presentation of the results of formal concept analysis is a line diagram. The e ectiveness of the presentation of information contained in a line diagram is heavily dependent on the quality of the diagram. To support users in arriving at a quality diagram for a newly created view, graph drawing algorithms are adapted to the special case of determining a good layout for a concept lattice. This task is di erent from traditional graph layout problems because lattices exhibit a high degree of structure which should be exploited and made evident in the nal diagram. A new layout algorithm is proposed that combines a layered diagram approach and an additive diagram methodology. This new hybrid algorithm is shown to produce better diagrams than other adapted graph drawing algorithms.
series thesis:PhD
more http://www.kvocentral.com/
last changed 2003/11/28 06:36

_id 98e7
authors Coppola, Carlo
year 1999
title Computers and Creativity in Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 595-602
summary The main purpose of this teaching and research project is to define those principles capable of determining a possible approach to computer-aided design for architecture - not seen as as a mere tool but as a way of supporting decision-making.
keywords Decision-making, Expert Systems, Urban Development, Building Types
series eCAADe
email carlo.coppola@galactica.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id d1a6
authors Corona Martínez, A., Vigo, L. and Folchi, A.
year 2001
title SEMINARIO/TALLER DE INVESTIGACION PROYECTUAL ESTRUCTURA DE TALLER ACTIVO PARA LA ENSEÑANZA E INVESTIGACIÓN PROYECTUAL ARQUITECTÓNICA ASISTIDO POR TÉCNOLOGÍAS DIGITALES (Research Seminar/Workshop on the Structure of Active Design Studios for Training and Research on Computer Aided Design)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 227-228
summary In a previous paper (SiGradi 2000) we presented a design approach based upon the architectural research that regarded digital technologies as a subordinated tool to architectural design. From that starting point and from various research experiences, we have re-oriented certain guidelines and latter developed specific techniques that can be used both for teaching and for the professional practice of architecture. Through the use of paradigmatic and hermeneutic techniques developed ad hoc, architectural projects are developed in a three-stage sequence: a) development of a narrative framework; b) analysis based on object oriented programming thechniques; and c) digital development of the preliminary design. We believe that the positive aspects of the inclusion of these idea-centered techniques to the digital realm unifies and extends the architectural knowledge and strengthens its conception.
series SIGRADI
email corona@cvtci.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id de43
authors Counsell, J.
year 2000
title The management and visualisation of 3-dimensional models using a spatial database
source CIDAC, Volume 2 Issue 4 November 2000, pp. 225-235
summary Each year, computer-aided architectural design (CAAD) systems in common use are enhanced and gain facilities that ease 3-dimensional (3D) modelling. Consequently, large complex datasets are increasinly common during the creation and management of 3D models of buildings and urban areas. Uses for such models range from the automatic generation of drawings and schedules to virtual reality (VR) and visualisation across the web. Geographic information systems (GISs) are optimised for the management and retrieval of spatial data and may be used to assist both management and visualisation of large 3D datasets using open standards, such as the ISO standard virtual reality modelling langauge (VRML). Experience gained in the use of such systems indicates a need for specific procedures for recording 3D data and creating linkages to other information. It is suggested that these procedures are applicable to a broad range of such models.
keywords VRML, Urban 3-Dimensional Models, GIS Management
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 4915
authors Counsell, J.A. and Marshall, D.J.
year 2000
title Computer Based Quizzes to Test Understanding of Videos on Building Construction and the BEATL Project
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 117-120
summary BEATL (Built Environment Appropriate Technology for Learning) is a research project based on a process of module pairing and collaboration between Built Environment Faculties. It is more about how one can embed technology in pedagogically sound ways than about the technology itself. This paper describes a case study of innovative self-paced diagnostic on-line illustrated Quizzes introduced at the University of the West of England (UWE) last year and now partnered by the University of Westminster (WU). It focuses on the development of the innovation, embedding it in teaching at UWE, its transfer to WU, and the support of “Educational Technology Officers” (ETO) in each. The methodologies used for evaluating the costs and benefits of this innovation are discussed.
keywords Formative Assessment, CAL, Video, BEATL, Embedment
series eCAADe
email john.counsell@uwe.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ed0a
authors Cuberos Mejía, R., Indriago, J.A. and Luengo, E.B.
year 2000
title Nuevos Paradigmas em la Informática Aplicada al Diseño Urbano y Arquitectónico (New Paradigms in the Application of Computing in Urban and Architectural Design)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 123-125
summary The incorporation of computer science in architecture has been happening in an evolutionary process where we can appreciate a transition from single tools of process automation to a hybrid and heterogeneous group of methods that radically are transforming professional labor. This paper describes experiences of authors in three instances of computer science applied to the urban and architectural design developed as well the university academic environment, and in professional consulting. The document not only makes emphasis on the nature and modality of each method, but even describes the philosophical and conceptual impact that each one of them implies in teaching and to making architecture.
series SIGRADI
email rcuberos@luz.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id bdf0
authors Cuberos Mejía, Ricardo and Alvarado, Rodrigo García
year 2000
title El Ejercicio Profesional: Más Allá de la Tridimensionalidad Informática (The Professional Practice: Beyond Computing Tridimensionality)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 104-106
summary This paper proposes a group of strategies for the use of computer tools in modeling and decisions making process, particularly in those typical design projects of habitual professional labor. This design process is illustrated though a model that include promoter-investor’s interests, financial restrictions on a little consulting office, and usual design focuses on local union. These experiences are exemplified though specific projects with public and residential use developed and built in Venezuela and Chile, distant geographically but near in a same know-how of computer assisted architectural design in Latin America.
series SIGRADI
email rcuberos@luz.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 3fd1
authors Cybis Pereira, A.T., Tissiani, G. and Bocianoski, I.
year 2000
title Design de Interfaces para Ambientes Virtuais: como Obter Usabilidade em 3D (Interface Design for Virtual Environments: How to obtain use of 3-D space.)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 313-315
summary The paper presents part of a research developed close to LRV, Laboratory of Virtual Reality of the program of Post-Graduation of the Engineering of production of UFSC. The research aims to answer the approaches for the design of Human-Computer Interfaces, called HCI, for virtual media. Being considered VR the more advanced computer interface technology, at least by the point of view of the interactivity, how come guarantee its usability and at the same time draw graphic interfaces that possess aesthetic and functional value? Besides, in virtual space with or without immersion, how can the design of the interface contribute to stimulate the user’s interactivity with the system in VR? These and other subjects are essential for those who work with interface design for computer systems, and that comes across the need of presenting medias that use virtual reality technology. Through this article a study is presented on the design techniques, the used tools, the recommendations and the necessary requirements of visual communication for HCI for virtual spaces.
series SIGRADI
email pereira@cce.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 2f1a
authors Dabney, M.K., Wright, J.C. and Sanders, D.H.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality and the Future of Publishing Archaeological Excavations: the multimedia publication of the prehistoric settlement on Tsoungiza at Ancient Nemea
source New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art
summary The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project is a study of settlement and land use in a regional valley system in Greece extending from the Upper Paleolithic until the present. Active field research was conducted by four teams between 1981 and 1990. The first component was a regional archaeological survey. Second, and closely related to the first, was a social anthropological study of modern settlement and land use. Next was a team assigned to excavate the succession of prehistoric settlements of Ancient Nemea on Tsoungiza. Last, historical ecologists, a palynologist, and a geologist formed the environmental component of the research. As a result of advances in electronic publishing, plans for the final publication of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project have evolved. Complete publication of the excavation of the prehistoric settlements of Ancient Nemea on Tsoungiza will appear in an interactive multimedia format on CD/DVD in Fall 2000. This project is planned to be the first electronic publication of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. We have chosen to publish in electronic format because it will meet the needs and interests of a wider audience, including avocational archaeologists, advanced high school and college students, graduate students, and professional archaeologists. The multimedia format on CD/DVD will permit the inclusion of text, databases, color and black-and-white images, two and three-dimensional graphics, and videos. This publication is being developed in cooperation with Learning Sites, Inc., which specializes in interactive three-dimensional reconstructions of ancient worlds http://www.learningsites.com. The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project is particularly well prepared for the shift towards electronic publishing because the project's field records were designed for and entered in computer databases from the inception of the project. Attention to recording precise locational information for all excavated objects enables us to place reconstructions of objects in their reconstructed architectural settings. Three-dimensional images of architectural remains and associated features will appear both as excavated and as reconstructed. Viewers will be able to navigate these images through the use of virtual reality. Viewers will also be able to reference all original drawings, photographs, and descriptions of the reconstructed architecture and objects. In this way a large audience will be able to view architectural remains, artifacts, and information that are otherwise inaccessible.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ga0015
id ga0015
authors Daru, R., Vreedenburgh, E. and Scha, R.
year 2000
title Architectural Innovation as an evolutionary process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Traditionally in art and architectural history, innovation is treated as a history of ideas of individuals (pioneers), movements and schools. The monograph is in that context one of the most used forms of scientific exercise. History of architecture is then mostly seen as a succession of dominant architectural paradigms imposed by great architectural creators fighting at the beginning against mainstream establishment until they themselves come to be recognised. However, there have been attempts to place architectural innovation and creativity in an evolutionary perspective. Charles Jencks for example, has described the evolution of architectural and art movements according to a diagram inspired by ecological models. Philip Steadman, in his book "The Evolution of Designs. Biological analogy in architecture and the applied arts" (1979), sketches the history of various biological analogies and their impact on architectural theory: the organic, classificatory, anatomical, ecological and Darwinian or evolutionary analogies. This last analogy "explains the design of useful objects and buildings, particularly in primitive society and in the craft tradition, in terms of a sequence of repeated copyings (corresponding to inheritance), with small changes made at each stage ('variations'), which are then subjected to a testing process when the object is put into use ('selection')." However, Steadman has confined his study to a literature survey as the basis of a history of ideas. Since this pioneering work, new developments like Dawkins' concept of memes allow further steps in the field of cultural evolution of architectural innovation. The application of the concept of memes to architectural design has been put forward in a preceding "Generative Art" conference (Daru, 1999), showing its application in a pilot study on the analysis of projects of and by architectural students. This first empirical study is now followed by a study of 'real life' architectural practice. The case taken has a double implication for the evolutionary analogy. It takes a specific architectural innovative concept as a 'meme' and develops the analysis of the trajectory of this meme in the individual context of the designer and at large. At the same time, the architect involved (Eric Vreedenburgh, Archipel Ontwerpers) is knowledgeable about the theory of memetic evolution and is applying a computer tool (called 'Artificial') together with Remko Scha, the authoring computer scientist of the program who collaborates frequently with artists and architects. This case study (the penthouse in Dutch town planning and the application of 'Artificial') shall be discussed in the paper as presented. The theoretical and methodological problems of various models of diffusion of memes shall be discussed and a preliminary model shall be presented as a framework to account for not only Darwinian but also Lamarckian processes, and for individual as well as collective transmission, consumption and creative transformation of memes.
keywords evolutionary design, architectural innovation, memetic diffusion, CAAD, penthouses, Dutch design, creativity, Darwinian and Lamarckian processes
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 0cc1
authors Dave, Bharat and Danahy, John
year 2000
title Virtual study abroad and exchange studio
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 57-71
summary The digital design studio has an area of application where conventional media are incapable of being used; collaboration in learning, design and dialogue with people in places other than where one lives. This distinctive opportunity has lead the authors to explore a form of design brief and virtual design studio (VDS) format not well addressed in the literature. Instead of sharing the same design brief, students in this alternative format design a project in the other students' city and do not collaborate on the same design. Collaboration with other students takes the form of teaching each other about the city and culture served by the design. The authors discovered these studios produce a focus on site context that serves our pedagogical objectives – a blend of architectural, landscape architectural and urban design knowledge. Their students use a range of commercial CAD and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) software common to that used in many VDS experiments reported on in the literature. However, this conventional use of technology is contrasted with a second distinctive characteristic of these studios, the use of custom software tools specifically designed to support synchronous and asynchronous three-dimensional model exchange and linked attribute knowledge. The paper analyzes some of the virtual design studio (VDS) work between the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the University of Toronto, and the University of Melbourne. The authors articulate a framework of VDS dimensions that structures their teaching and research.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 0cb1
authors Dave, Bharat
year 2000
title Architecture of Digital Imagination
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 297-306
summary Digital technologies extend, displace or substitute entirely new elements into what has been observed so far in the traditional modes of conception, representation and communication of design. This paper examines various characteristics of digital media and representations, their impacts- constraining and liberating- on modes of conception in design, and possible shifts in design expressions and ways of designing. While much effort invested in research to date has relied upon architecture as conceived, taught and communicated in traditional modes, the use of digital technologies changes those very premises. The import of such characterisation for design computation research is to highlight emerging agendas for future investigation.
series CAADRIA
email b.dave@architecture.unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id 9b63
authors De Mesa, A., Quilez, J. and Regot, J.
year 1999
title Sunlight Energy Graphic and Analytic Control in 3D Modelling
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 733-738
summary Linking solar positions with architecture is a traditional idea, but the use of graphical tools to control sunlight in urban surroundings or buildings is relatively recent. A three-dimensional working environment like the computer offers a new dimension to verify the relationships between the sun and the architecture. This paper shows a new way to calculate the incidence of solar energy in architectural environments using computer 3D modelling. The addition of virtual space visualisation to the analytic computation brings a new tool that simplifies the technical study of sunlight. We have developed several programs based upon the three-dimensional construction of the solar vault and the obstructing objects for a defined position. The first one draws the solar vault for a defined range of dates according to latitude, that is the basis of the energetic calculation. The second program computes the obstruction, i.e. the solar regions that are obstructed by any object. Finally, the third one, allow us to define an orientation to compute the energy that arrives to the analysed positioning. The last program returns the result of calculation in several ways: it shows the amount of energy through colours and makes a list of solar hours according to its energy.
keywords Sunlight, Energy, 3D modelling
series eCAADe
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

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