CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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References

Hits 21 to 40 of 731

_id ebb4
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2000
title Digital architectural visualization
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 347-360
summary The democratization of computer technologies is changing architectural visualization in two significant ways. The first is that the availability of digital media promotes wider and intensive application of computer visualization. The second concerns the extension of architectural design to visualization in information systems. The transition from analogue to digital visualization relates to fundamental questions ranging from the role of geometric representations in architecture and the relationships between analysis and visualization to the structure of abstraction. In addition, it requires technology and knowledge transfer also from areas other than computer science. The integration of such transfers suggests a flexible, modular approach that contradicts the holistic, integral principles of computer-aided architectural design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 3760
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2000
title Recognition and Indexing of Architectural Features in Floor Plans on the Internet
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 357-366
summary The Internet promises a worldwide information system, capable of uniting different sources and types of original, up-to-date and directly usable information. Among the main components of this system are retrieval mechanisms characterized by high precision and recall, as well as by supportive relevance feedback. The textual versions of these retrieval mechanisms have been available for some time and have achieved a certain degree of efficiency and sophistication. Image retrieval lags behind, despite the recent advances in content-based retrieval. In architecture this is largely due to the lack of integration of domain knowledge and known formalisms. Indexing and retrieval of architectural floor plans can rely on existing generative systems such as shape grammars and rectangular arrangements. By reversing generative systems in purpose we derive compact descriptions that describe completely a floor plan and make explicit all relevant features rather than a small number of features. The main limitation of reversed generative systems is that they apply to specific classes of designs. Unification in indexing and retrieval can only take place at the level of basic primitives, i.e. spaces and building elements. In both vector and pixel images of architectural floor plans this can be achieved by a universal recognition system that identifies salient local features to produce a basic spatial representation.
series CAADRIA
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id 6cc5
authors Kowaltowski, D.C.C.K., Da Silva, V.G., Gouveia, A.P.S., Pina. G., Ruschel, R.C., Filho, F.B. and Fávero, E.
year 2000
title Ensino de Projeto com Inserção da Informática Aplicada: O curso de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da UNICAMP (Design Teaching with the Introduction of Applied Computing: The Architecture and Urbanism course at UNICAMP)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 352-354
summary This paper discusses the formal educational base of the Architecture course of the State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, which opened in 1999. Applied computing, thoerical content and technical aspects of design are principal educational elements of the course. The paper will show and discuss the structure of building up knowledge for design activities through drafting, applied computing and theory and practical design disciplines present in the course.
series SIGRADI
email doris@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id ddssar0017
id ddssar0017
authors Leeuwen, Jos van and Vries, Bauke de
year 2000
title Capturing design knowledge in formal concept definitions
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary For support of creativity in architectural design, design systems must be provided with information models that are flexible enough to follow the dynamic way of designers in handling early design information. This paper discusses a framework for information modelling using Features that answers this need. One of the characteristics of the framework is that designers can define the formalisation of their own design concepts into types of Features. The definition of these Feature Types can be done in different manners; three scenarios for this procedure are presented and discussed.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 00d5
authors Liou, ShuennRen and Chyn, TaRen
year 2000
title Constructing Geometric Regularity underlying Building Facades
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 313-315
summary Geometric regularity constitutes a basis for designers to initiate the formulation of building shapes and urban forms. For example, Le Corbusier considers the regulating line "an inevitable element of architecture" and uses it as a "means" for understanding and creating good designs. Thomas Beeby argues that the acquisition of knowledge on geometric construction plays a crucial role in the education of architecture design. This paper illustrates a computational approach to constructing the regularity of architectural geometry. The formal structure underlying a single façade and continuous façades are examined.
keywords Geometric Regularity, Building Facades, Cluster Analysis, CAAD
series eCAADe
email shuenn@mail.thu.edu.tw
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id a25e
authors Loy, Hollis A.
year 1999
title Foundation for a Thorough CAAD Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 301-308
summary The birth and development of computing is considered by most as one of the greatest technological achievements of the twentieth century. Since the integration of computers in the built environment, over two decades ago, computing methods developed into efficient designing and calculating tools. In contrast, accelerating advancements in computing technology have created generation gaps amongst architects. There are inexperienced, novice, intermediate and advanced computer-capable architects. If each group was asked to define CAAD, some would still describe it as a computer program for technical draughting. Others may define CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) as a vast array of digital media in CAD, multimedia and DTP, assisting architects in compiling visual presentations. Currently, most architectural schools are capable of instructing most, if not all, facets of CAAD (2D & 3D CAD, model rendering, photo montage, brochure layouts, etc.). However, this knowledge is accumulated at random throughout the course of study. "Computer Graphics for Architects" is the latest educational development in Europe bridging generation gaps with senior architects and serving as an introductory CAAD seminar to beginning architecture students. This book and lecture presents a gallery of recent architectural CAD, multimedia, and DTP presentations practiced in Europe´s second largest architectural firm. The terminology is user-friendly and its content concentrates on responding to the most often posed questions by CAAD beginners relating to: (1) Terminology (2) Appearance (3) Time Consumption (4) Cost Techniques introduced are independent of any platform. The goal is to summarize quickly and effectively the countless possibilities of presentations applicable in architecture practice. "Computer Graphics for Architects" provides a direction for future presentations and motivates students to excel in CAAD.
series eCAADe
email Loy.In.Germany@t-online.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id e501
authors Maher, M.L., Simoff, S., Gu, N., and Lau, H.K.
year 2000
title Designing Virtual Architecture
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 481-490
summary Virtual architecture as the design of functional virtual places is not well understood. Most virtual places are created by programmers rather than designed a places in the sense that buildings are designed. As a result, we are in the era of vernacular virtual architecture. While current virtual architecture fulfills certain needs of online users, a well-designed virtual place is becoming essential to cope with the growing complexity and demand in virtual worlds. This paper presents a basis for the design of virtual places that draws on our knowledge of architectural design.
series CAADRIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au, simeon@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id ddssar0020
id ddssar0020
authors Mardjono, Fitri
year 2000
title Development of a decision support system for bamboo building design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Bamboo, the fastest growing woody plant, is used as a common building material in bamboo-growing countries and recently also in non-bamboo-growing countries. In spite of this fact, building designers or users of a building have problems using bamboo as a building material since they lack information and guidance in how to use bamboo. This paper proposes a decision support system (DSS) that might be useful for designers when they design a bamboo building. It presents an early-stage design process of bamboo building and the development of a DSS. The architecture of this system is based on the theory of DSS and knowledge of bamboo that should be integrated in the design process of bamboo building. So there are three components: a DSS, design process, and knowledge of bamboo. The process starts with determination of the building system, database construction of bamboo building parts, and the rule for using bamboo in each building part. The process focuses on systematisation of each design stage and integration of the building parts to construct a monolith bamboo building. The purpose of systematisation is to offer designers a means of categorising problem solving during the design process in terms of, for example, assumption, criteria, alternatives, and acceptable solutions.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 8666
authors Martínez, A.C., Vigo, L., Cabral, J., Folchi, A. and Palacio, M.
year 2000
title Seminario/Taller de Investigacón Proyectual:Estructura de taller activo para enseñar a proyectar asistido por la tipología y de software de mercado (Design Research Seminar/Workshop: A Structure of Active Studio for the Teaching of Design Aided by Typology and Commercial Software)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 377-379
summary General outline: Typology has provided architects basic design resources in the past. Repertories have been created by comparing and establishing relations among a multiplicity of examples: these repertories have been used as the basis for new inventions. Research on type establishes the foundations for organized knowledge that can be accumulated, shared, and enriched by successive designs. We are testing our assumption that CAD is a specially adequate tool for the transformation and manipulation of type in the early stages of the design process. Goals: Our Seminar/Studio gives those who take part in it a renewed vision of type as a basic disposition that can be subject to dynamic transformations. The use of CAD will allow the participants to experiment and verify design decisions on the grounds of a systematic use of typological precedents. Methodology: Starting with definite examples of contemporary architecture and the design theory backing the examples selected, the seminar/ studio is developed in eight studio sessions, exploring different dimensions leading to the “parti”. It is meant for experienced designers, both advanced students and graduates. The first experimental seminar of two sessions took place in November 1999. A more developed version is under way in August, 2000.
series SIGRADI
email corona@cvtci.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 0c63
authors Montagu, Arturo, Rodriguez Barros, Diana and Chernobilsky, Lilia B.
year 1999
title Design, Qualitative Analysis and Digital Media: An Experimental Pedagogic Approach to the Cultural Evaluation and Integration of Media
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 127-135
summary Globalization is a multidimensional process which impregnates all the facts and events of our present culture and, as a by-product of this situation, there is a set of complex relationships where "intuitive behavior plus knowledge and information technology" are central issues of the new pedagogic procedures of our times. In this paper we assume by "knowledge" the data obtained from a set of relationships orientated towards the "heuristic approach" from the point of view of "qualitative analysis" concepts (Muhr 91). Our main "provisional hypothesis" is to use this methodology to control the analysis-synthesis process as a continuous procedure during the design stages. One particular aspect of this view is going through the "informatic culture phenomena" which is the base of the present "turning point" of design procedures in most of the architectural and design schools around the world. This paper discusses how "media" is affecting the "design process" regarding three aspects: the conceptual, the instrumental and the representational one. These aspects are affecting also the cultural models and creating new paradigms in the way how new design methodologies combine "heuristics procedures" with the growing set of computer graphics parameters.
keywords Architecture, Design, Qualitative Analysis, Digital Media
series eCAADe
email amontagu@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 6072
authors Orzechowski, M.A., Timmermans, H.J.P. and De Vries, B.
year 2000
title Measuring user satisfaction for design variations through virtual reality
source Timmermans, H.J.P. & Vries, B. de (eds.) Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture - Proceedings of the 5th International Conference, August 22-25 2000, Nijkerk, pp. 278-288
summary Virtual Reality (VR), and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology have become increasingly more common in all disciplines of modern life. These new technologies range from simple software assistants to sophisticated modeling of human behavior. In this research project, we are creating an AI agent environment that helps architects to identify user preferences through a Virtual Reality Interface. At the current stage of development, the research project has resulted in a VR application - MuseV2 that allows users to instantly modify an architectural design. The distinctive feature of this application is that a space is considered as a base for all user modifications and as a connection between all design elements. In this paper we provide some technical information about MuseV2. Presentation of a design through VR allows AI agents to observe user-induced modifications and to gather preference information. In addition to allowing for an individualized design, this information generalized across a sample of users should provide the basis for developing basic designs for particular market segments and predict the market potential of those designs. The system that we envision should not become an automated design tool, but an adviser and viewer for users, who have limited knowledge or no knowledge at all about CAD systems, and architectural design. This tool should help investors to assess preferences for new community housing in order to meet the needs of future inhabitants.
series other
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2345
authors Park, Hyong-June and Vakalo, Emmanuel-George
year 2000
title An Enchanted Toy Based on Froebel’s Gifts: A computational tool used to teach architectural knowledge to students
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 35-39
summary Assuming that students can require architectural knowledge through direct manipulation of formal objects, this paper introduces a computational toy as a means for teaching knowledge about composition and geometry to students of architecture. The bottom-up approach is employed in the manipulation of the toy. The toy aims at recovering and nourishing the students’ creative spirit and enriching their vocabulary of forms and spaces.
keywords bottom-up approach, formalization, data abstraction, communication, basic transformation functions, syntactic interventions, isolated island of automation, Feedback and error-elimination
series eCAADe
email archphj@umich.edu, egvakalo@umich.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 13f7
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed K.
year 1999
title Evaluation as a Key Tool to Bridge CAAD and Architecture Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 279-285
summary This paper reports on the findings of a study carried out at Glasgow University which proposes a framework for the evaluation of architecture curriculum once integrated with CAAD. This study investigated the evaluation of CAAD teaching methods (CTM) and the effectiveness of CAAD integration (CI) and explored CAAD employment suitability in the design studio, and what influences does it have on the design process tuition using the Kirkpatrick model as a vehicle. The related CAAD evaluation variables investigated were: CAAD Tutor, Course Materials & Contents, Class Environment, Use of Media, Delivery Methodologies, Administrative Briefs, and Overall Effectiveness of CAAD event. Several other variables investigated were the levels of students' performance, attitudes, knowledge, new-stand, creativity and skills. The paper covered briefly some of the findings of the case studies acquired over two years at MSA; both observations and questionnaire surveys were used as methods of data collection. Evaluation deficiency postulates the weaknesses of CAAD in architecture schools. Evaluation of CAAD tuition should be a fundamental approach to address CAAD integration efficiency and problems, to achieve effectiveness and productivity amongst architecture schools.
keywords Evaluation, Integration, Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@index.com.jo
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 3888
authors Reffat, Rabee M.
year 2000
title Computational Situated Learning in Designing - Application to Architectural Shape Semantics
source The University of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture
summary Learning the situatedness (applicability conditions), of design knowledge recognised from design compositions is the central tenet of the research presented in this thesis. This thesis develops and implements a computational system of situated learning and investigates its utility in designing. Situated learning is based on the concept that "knowledge is contextually situated and is fundamentally influenced by its situation". In this sense learning is tuned to the situations within which "what you do when you do matters". Designing cannot be predicted and the results of designing are not based on actions independent of what is being designed or independent of when, where and how it was designed. Designers' actions are situation dependent (situated), such that designers work actively with the design environment within the specific conditions of the situation where neither the goal state nor the solution space is completely predetermined. In designing, design solutions are fluid and emergent entities generated by dynamic and situated activities instead of fixed design plans. Since it is not possible in advance to know what knowledge to use in relation to any situation we need to learn knowledge in relation to its situation, i.e. learn the applicability conditions of knowledge. This leads towards the notion of the situation as having the potential role of guiding the use of knowledge.

Situated Learning in Designing (SLiDe) is developed and implemented within the domain of architectural shape composition (in the form of floor plans), to construct the situatedness of shape semantics. An architectural shape semantic is a set of characteristics with a semantic meaning based on a particular view of a shape such as reflection symmetry, adjacency, rotation and linearity. Each shape semantic has preconditions without which it cannot be recognised. Such preconditions indicate nothing about the situation within which this shape semantic was recognised. The situatedness or the applicability conditions of a shape semantic is viewed as, the interdependent relationships between this shape semantic as the design knowledge in focus, and other shape semantics across the observations of a design composition. While designing, various shape semantics and relationships among them emerge in different representations of a design composition. Multiple representations of a design composition by re-interpretation have been proposed to serve as a platform for SLiDe. Multiple representations provide the opportunity for different shape semantics and relationships among them to be found from a single design composition. This is important if these relationships are to be used later because it is not known in advance which of the possible relationships could be constructed are likely to be useful. Hence, multiple representations provide a platform for different situations to be encountered. A symbolic representation of shape and shape semantics is used in which the infinite maximal lines form the representative primitives of the shape.

SLiDe is concerned with learning the applicability conditions (situatedness), of shape semantics locating them in relation to situations within which they were recognised (situation dependent), and updating the situatedness of shape semantics in response to new observations of the design composition. SLiDe consists of three primary modules: Generator, Recogniser and Incremental Situator. The Generator is used by the designer to develop a set of multiple representations of a design composition. This set of representations forms the initial design environment of SLiDe. The Recogniser detects shape semantics in each representation and produces a set of observations, each of which is comprised of a group of shape semantics recognised at each corresponding representation. The Incremental Situator module consists of two sub-modules, Situator and Restructuring Situator, and utilises an unsupervised incremental clustering mechanism not affected by concept drift. The Situator module locates recognised shape semantics in relation to their situations by finding regularities of relationships among them across observations of a design composition and clustering them into situational categories organised in a hierarchical tree structure. Such relationships change over time due to the changes taken place in the design environment whenever further representations are developed using the Generator module and new observations are constructed by the Recogniser module. The Restructuring Situator module updates previously learned situational categories and restructures the hierarchical tree accordingly in response to new observations.

Learning the situatedness shape semantics may play a crucial role in designing if designers pursue further some of these shape semantics. This thesis illustrates an approach in which SLiDe can be utilised in designing to explore the shapes in a design composition in various ways; bring designers! attention to potentially hidden features and shape semantics of their designs; and maintain the integrity of the design composition by using the situatedness of shape semantics. The thesis concludes by outlining future directions for this research to learn and update the situatedness of design knowledge within the context of use; considering the role of functional knowledge while learning the situatedness of design knowledge; and developing an autonomous situated agent-based designing system.

series thesis:PhD
email rabee@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/06 09:34

_id 36dc
authors Reffat, Rabee M. and Gero, John S.
year 1999
title Situatedness: A New Dimension for Learning Systems in Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 252-261
summary In this paper we adopt the approach that designing is a series of situated acts, ie designing cannot be pre-planned to completion. This is based on ideas from situated cognition theory that claims that what people perceive, how they conceive and what they do develop together and are adapted to the environment. For a system to be useful for human designers it must have the ability to associate what is learned to its environment. In order for a system to do that such a system must be able to acquire knowledge of the environment that a design constructs. Therefore, acknowledging the notion of situatedness is of importance to provide a system with such capability and add on a new dimension to existing learning systems in design. We will call such a learning system within the design domain a Situated Learning Design System (SLDS). A SLDS should be able to create its own situational categories from its perceptual experiences and modify them if encountered again to link the learned knowledge to its corresponding situation. We have chosen architectural shapes as the vehicle to demonstrate our ideas and used multiple representations to build a platform for a SLDS to learn from. In this paper the notion of situatedness and its role in both designing and learning is discussed. The overall architecture of a SLDS is introduced and how the potential outcome of such a system will support human designers while designing is discussed.
keywords Designing, Situated Knowledge, Multiple Representations, Situated Learning
series eCAADe
email rabee@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id fe54
authors Regli, W.C. and Cicirello, V.A.
year 2000
title Managing digital libraries for computer-aided design
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 32 (2) (2000) pp. 119-132
summary This paper describes our initial efforts to deploy a digital library to support computer-aided collaborative design. At present, this experimental testbed, The EngineeringDesign Knowledge Repository, is an effort to collect and archive public domain engineering data for use by researchers and engineering professionals. We envision thiseffort expanding to facilitate collaboration and process archival for distributed design and manufacturing teams.CAD knowledge-bases are vital to engineers, who search through vast amounts of corporate legacy data and navigate on-line catalogs to retrieve precisely the rightcomponents for assembly into new products. This research attempts to begin addressing the critical need for improved computational methods for reasoning about complexgeometric and engineering information. In particular, we focus on archival and reuse of design and manufacturing data for mechatronic systems. This paper presents adescription of the research problems, an overview of the initial architecture of the testbed and a description of some of our preliminary results on conceptual design anddesign retrieval.
keywords Computer-Aided Design, Computer-Aided Engineering, Engineering Knowledge-Bases, Product Data Management, World Wide Web, Network-Enabled,CAD,CAE
series journal paper
email regli@.drexel.edu
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id 988d
authors Russell, Peter and Forgber, Uwe
year 2000
title The E-Talier: Inter-university Networked Design Studios
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 45-50
summary The widespread infiltration of internet based variations of traditional areas of society (e-commerce, e-business, e-mail etc.) will not spare the halls of academia in its propagation. The term courseware is well nigh 20 years old and considerable research and development has been done in bringing network based distributed courses to university consortiums including those in architecture and civil engineering. Indeed, the European Commission has recently approved funding for a 3-year web-based virtual university of architecture and construction technology: the WINDS project led by the University of Ancona. Such attempts to create e-courses are largely an extension of typical courseware where the syllabus is quantified and divided into lessons for use by the students alone or in conjunction with their tutors and professors. This is quite adequate in conveying the base knowledge of the profession. However, the tenants of being an architect or engineer involve the deft use of that unwieldy named and deliciously imprecise tool called "design". Teaching design sooner or later involves the design studio: a pedagogically construed environment of simulation intended to train, not teach the skills of designing. This is fundamentally different from normal courseware. A network based design studio (Etalier) must be able to reflect the nature of learning design. Design studios typically involve specifically chosen design problems, researched supporting information to assist design decisions, focussed discussions, individual consultation and criticism, group criticism, public forums for presentation discussion and criticism as well as a myriad of informal undocumented communication among the students themselves. So too must an Etalier function. Essentially, it must allow collaboration through communication. Traditional barriers to collaboration include language, culture (both national and professional) and distance. Through the internet's capricious growth and the widespread use of English as a second language, the largest hurdle to attaining fruitful collaboration is probably cultural. In the case of an Etalier in a university setting, the cultural difficulties arise from administrative rules, the pedagogical culture of specific universities and issues such as scheduling and accreditation. Previous experiments with virtual design studios have demonstrated the criticality of such issues. The proposed system allows participating members to specify the degree and breadth with which they wish to partake. As opposed to specifying the conditions of membership, we propose to specify the conditions of partnership. Through the basic principal of reciprocity, issues such as accreditation and work load sharing can be mitigated. Further, the establishment of a studio market will allow students, tutors and professors from participating institutions to partake in studio projects of their choosing in accordance with their own constraints, be they related to schedule, expertise, legal or other matters. The paper describes these mechanisms and some possible scenarios for collaboration in the Etalier market.
keywords e-Studio, Virtual Design Studio, Courseware, CSCW
series eCAADe
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, uwe@forgber.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 15e4
authors Sariyildiz, S., Stouffs, R. and Tunçer, B.
year 2000
title Vision on ICT Developments for the Building Sector
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 11-18
summary The building sector is entering a new era. Developments in information and communication technology have an impact throughout the entire life cycle of a building, not only from a process and technical point of view but also from a creative design point of view. As a result of developments of advanced modeling software for architectural design, the gap between what the architect can envision and what the building technician or product architect can materialize is enlarging. Internet technology has already started to provide a closer link between the participants in the building process, their activities, knowledge, and information. Concurrent and collaborative engineering will be the future of building practice in respect to efficiency and quality improvement of this sector. The nature of the building process is complex, not only from a communication point of view, but also from the information of the number of participants, the spatial organization and the infrastructure etc. In the near future, soft computing techniques such as artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms will make contributions to the problem solving aspects of the complex design process. This paper provides an overview of these and other future developments of information and communication technology (ICT) within the building sector.
series ACADIA
email i.s.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 4ba2
authors Sariyildiz, Sevil
year 2000
title ICT influence on Spatial Planning, Building and the Built Environment
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 61-63
summary The building sector is entering a new era. Developments in ICT have an impact throughout the entire life cycle of a building and the built environment. Through changes in daily life it will influence; the spatial planning, the urban structure of the future, our cities and the living environment. It shows already its influence in our way of living, our habits. The gap between creative design, which is done by means of advanced modelling software and the building technical aspect of designs, is getting bigger. ICT and Internet technology provide a closer link between the participants in the building process, their activities, knowledge, and information. Collaboration and communication within ICT techniques will be the future of the building. This paper provides a vision on the influences of the future ICT developments in spatial planning, architecture in general and focuses on the influences of the building sector in the above-mentioned fields.
series SIGRADI
email i.s.sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

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