CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 697

_id 63b9
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 2000
title Visualizing and Investigating Architectural Space Using Spherical Panoramic Imaging
source Emerging Technologies and Design: The Intersection of Design and Technology, Proceedings of the 2000 ACSA Technology Conference, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 14-17, 2000
summary This paper reports on the use of immersive spherical imaging techniques to document, visualize and investigate architectural space. This technology can be used in the classrooms and design studios to augment traditional instructional and design investigation tools. As opposed to cylindrical imaging found in the popular QuickTime VR format, spherical imaging provides a 360-degree view in all directions – horizontally and vertically. The ability to capture and display a full sphere can be crucial for many interior architectural spaces. Spherical panoramas can originate from real, synthetic or hybrid source images. In addition to the ability to embed links to web pages or other panoramas, a unique feature of this technology allows the viewer to navigate through a scene as well as pause at any point and view the space in all directions. In addition, the technology allows the user to sketch over the scene in an intelligent manner such that the sketched artifacts rotate correctly when the target view shifts. The software also integrates with collaborative tools to allow synchronous viewing of shared panoramas over the Internet. These features allow for a truly immersive and interactive experience of the space that can be quite useful in a design studio setting. Finally, this paper describes ongoing efforts to integrate this technology with an interactive web-based, databasedriven virtual slide tray system for the storage, sorting, and display of multimedia content.
keywords Spherical Panoramic Imaging
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:55

_id bb5f
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Mohd Fazidin, J.
year 2001
title Creating a City Administration System (CAS) using Virtual Reality in an Immersive Collaborative Environment (ICE)
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 449-453
summary Current problems in administration of a city are found to be decentralized and noninteractive for an effective city management. This usually will result in inconsistencies of decision-making, inefficient services and slow response to a particular action. City administration often spends more money, time and human resource because of these problems. This research demonstrates our research and development of creating a City Administration System (CAS) to solve the problems stated above. The task of the system is to use information, multimedia and graphical technologies to form a database in which the city administrators can monitor, understand and manage an entire city from a central location. The key technology behind the success of the overall system uses virtual reality and immersive collaborative environment (ICE). This system employs emerging computer based real-time interactive technologies that are expected to ensure effective decisionmaking process, improved communication, and collaboration, error reduction, (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2000) between multi disciplinary users and approaches. This multi perspective approach allows planners, engineers, urban designers, architects, local authorities, environmentalists and general public to search, understand, process and anticipate the impact of a particular situation in the new city. It is hoped that the CAS will benefit city administrators to give them a tool that gives them the ability to understand, plan, and manage the business of running the city.
keywords City Administration System (CAS), Virtual Reality, Immersive Collaborative Environment (ICE), Database
series eCAADe
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my, fazidin@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssar0004
id ddssar0004
authors Bignon, J.-C., Halin, G. and Nakapan, W.
year 2000
title Building product information search by images
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Building product information is required during the architectural design and technical design. The common access to the technical information system is the multi-criteria search mode. This search mode is adapted to the situation where an architect has a precise demand of information. But most of the time, the architect looks for ideas and wants to obtain many illustrations of product uses. Therefore, the system has to propose another search mode adapted to the situation where the demand is still fuzzy. Considering that the architect has the capacity to think with image and that an image can generate easily ideas, then a search by images seems to be suitable to the situation where an architect looks for ideas. The web is an inexhaustible resource of images we can exploit to provision an image database on a specific area. The system we propose allows making building product information search with images extracted from the web. This article presents the method used to extract images from web sites of French building product companies and how these images are used in an interactive and progressive image retrieval process.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 9d16
authors Chan, Chiu-Shui
year 2000
title A Virtual Reality Tool to Implement City Building Codes on Capitol View Preservation
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 203-209
summary In urban planning, the urban environment is a very complicated system with many layers of building codes cross-referenced and interacting together to guide urban growth. Especially, if a new urban design is located in a historical area, additional restrictions will be imposed upon regular zoning regulations to maintain the area’s historical characteristics. Often, urban regulations read as text are difficult to understand. A tool that generates adequate urban information and a quick visualization of the design will ease decision-making and enhance urban design processes. The goal of this research project is to develop a virtual reality (VR) tool with high resolution, speedy computation, and a userfriendly environment. This project initiates an interactive visualization tool to enforce city-planning regulations on viewing access to the state capitol building in Des Moines, Iowa. The capitol building houses the Iowa Legislature and is a symbol of state power. Maintaining the view from surrounding areas will preserve the building’s monumental and symbolic meaning. To accomplish this, the City Community Development Department and the Capitol Planning Committee developed a Capitol View Corridor Project, which sets up seven visual corridors to prevent the view toward the capitol from being blocked by any future designs. Because city regulations are not easy for the public and designers to interpret and comprehend, this project intends to develop a VR tool to create a transparent environment for visualizing the city ordinances.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 0898
authors Chastain, Thomas and Elliott, Ame
year 2000
title Cultivating design competence: online support for beginning design studio
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 83-91
summary A primary lesson of a beginning design studio is the development of a fundamental design competence. This entails acquiring skills of integration, projection, exploration, as well as critical thinking––forming the basis of thinking "like a designer". Plaguing the beginning architectural design student as she develops this competence are three typical problems: a lagging visual intelligence, a linking of originality with creativity, and the belief that design is an act of an individual author instead of a collaborative activity. We believe that computation support for design learning has particular attributes for helping students overcome these problems. These attributes include its inherent qualities for visualization, for explicitness, and for sharing. This paper describes five interactive multi-media exercises exploiting these attributes which were developed to support a beginning design studio. The paper also reports how they have been integrated into the course curriculum.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 9a1e
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo
year 1999
title Stumbling, Backtracking, and Leapfrogging: Two Decades of Introductory Architectural Computing
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 151-158
summary Our collective concept of computing and its relevance to architecture has undergone dramatic shifts in emphasis. A review of popular texts from the past reveals the biases and emphases that were current. In the seventies, architectural computing was generally seen as an elective for data processing specialists. In the early eighties, personal computers and commercial CAD systems were widely adopted. Architectural computing diverged from the "batch" world into the "interactive" world. As personal computing matured, introductory architectural computing courses turned away from a foundation in programming toward instruction in CAD software. By the late eighties, Graphic User Interfaces and windowing operating systems had appeared, leading to a profusion of architecturally relevant applications that needed to be addressed in introductory computing. The introduction of desktop 3D modeling in the early nineties led to increased emphasis upon rendering and animation. The past few years have added new emphases, particularly in the area of network communications, the World Wide Web and Virtual Design Studios. On the horizon are topics of electronic commerce and knowledge markets. This paper reviews these past and current trends and presents an outline for an introductory computing course that is relevant to the year 2000.
keywords Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Computer-Aided Design, Computing Education, Introductory Courses
series eCAADe
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id f91f
authors Elezkurtaj, Tomor and Franck, Georg
year 2000
title Geometry and Topology. A User-Interface to Artificial Evolution in Architectural Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 309-312
summary The paper presents a system that supports architectural floor plan design interactively. The method of problem solving implemented is a combination of an evolutionary strategy (ES) and a genetic algorithm (GA). The problem to be solved consists of fitting a number of rooms (n) into an outline by observing functional requirements. The rooms themselves are specified concerning size, function and preferred proportion. The functional requirements entering the fitness functions are expressed in terms of the proportions of the rooms and the neighbourhood relations between them. The system is designed to deal with one of the core problems of computer supported creativity in architecture. For architecture, form not only, but also function is relevant. Without specifying the function that a piece of architecture is supposed to fulfil, it is hard to support its design by computerised methods of problem solving and optimisation. In architecture, however, function relates to comfort, easiness of use, and aesthetics as well. Since it is extraordinary hard, if not impossible, to operationalise aesthetics, computer aided support of creative architectural design is still in its infancy.
keywords New AI, Genetic Algorithms, Artificial Evolution, creative Architectural Design, Interactive Design, Topology
series eCAADe
email tomor@osiris.iemar.tuwien.ac.at
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 3338
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title DYNAMO - Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line
source Educational Technology and Society, Vol.3, No.2, April 2000 (ISSN 1436-4522), pp. 86-95
summary This paper describes the current status of DYNAMO, a web-based design assistant for students and professional designers in the field of architecture. The tool can be considered a Case-Based Design (CBD) system in so far that it was inspired by the view of cognition underlying CBD. The paper points out how DYNAMO incorporates this view, and at the same time extrapolates it beyond the individual. In this way, the tool attempts to embrace and profit from several kinds of interaction that are crucial for the development and renewal of design knowledge. This should result in a design tool that both feels cognitively comfortable to (student-) designers, and offers them a platform for exchanging knowledge and insights with colleagues in different contexts and at different levels of experience. In addition, the paper describes the implementation of these theoretical ideas as a working prototype, which has recently been tested by 4th year design students. Finally, DYNAMO is situated in the context of other comparable tools that have been or are being developed in the field of architectural design.
keywords Educational Multimedia, Interactive Learning Environments, Online Education
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://ifets.gmd.de/periodical/vol_2_2000/heylighen.html
last changed 2002/11/14 07:40

_id ga0008
id ga0008
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2000
title Redirecting design generation in architecture
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Design generation has been the traditional culmination of computational design theory in architecture. Motivated either by programmatic and functional complexity (as in space allocation) or by the elegance and power of representational analyses (shape grammars, rectangular arrangements), research has produced generative systems capable of producing new designs that satisfied certain conditions or of reproducing exhaustively entire classes (such as all possible Palladian villas), comprising known and plausible new designs. Most generative systems aimed at a complete spatial design (detailing being an unpopular subject), with minimal if any intervention by the human user / designer. The reason for doing so was either to give a demonstration of the elegance, power and completeness of a system or simply that the replacement of the designer with the computer was the fundamental purpose of the system. In other words, the problem was deemed either already resolved by the generative system or too complex for the human designer. The ongoing democratization of the computer stimulates reconsideration of the principles underlying existing design generation in architecture. While the domain analysis upon which most systems are based is insightful and interesting, jumping to a generative conclusion was almost always based on a very sketchy understanding of human creativity and of the computer's role in designing and creativity. Our current perception of such matters suggests a different approach, based on the augmentation of intuitive creative capabilities with computational extensions. The paper proposes that architectural generative design systems can be redirected towards design exploration, including the development of alternatives and variations. Human designers are known to follow inconsistent strategies when confronted with conflicts in their designs. These strategies are not made more consistent by the emerging forms of design analysis. The use of analytical means such as simulation, couple to the necessity of considering a rapidly growing number of aspects, means that the designer is confronted with huge amounts of information that have to be processed and integrated in the design. Generative design exploration that can combine the analysis results in directed and responsive redesigning seems an effective method for the early stages of the design process, as well as for partial (local) problems in later stages. The transformation of generative systems into feedback support and background assistance for the human designer presupposes re-orientation of design generation with respect to the issues of local intelligence and autonomy. Design generation has made extensive use of local intelligence but has always kept it subservient to global schemes that tended to be holistic, rigid or deterministic. The acceptance of local conditions as largely independent structures (local coordinating devices) affords a more flexible attitude that permits not only the emergence of internal conflicts but also the resolution of such conflicts in a transparent manner. The resulting autonomy of local coordinating devices can be expanded to practically all aspects and abstraction levels. The ability to have intelligent behaviour built in components of the design representation, as well as in the spatial and building elements they signify, means that we can create the new, sharper tools required by the complexity resulting from the interpretation of the built environment as a dynamic configuration of co-operating yet autonomous parts that have to be considered independently and in conjunction with each other.   P.S. The content of the paper will be illustrated by a couple of computer programs that demonstrate the princples of local intelligence and autonomy in redesigning. It is possible that these programs could be presented as independent interactive exhibits but it all depends upon the time we can make free for the development of self-sufficient, self-running demonstrations until December.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0005
id ga0005
authors Kubasiewicz, Jan and Jang, DK  
year 2000
title InfoGEOMETRY. Conceptual Prototype for Navigating InfoSPACE
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary InfoGEOMETRY  is the word the authors use to describe the concept of utilizing geometric patterns and dynamic symmetry in graphical user interface design for navigating complex information. This paper refers to a specific collaborative project in which the concept of infoGeometry was first introduced as an alternative tool of information architecture. In their design process, the authors tried to reconcile the visual nature of geometric vocabulary with parametric nature of interface design and dynamic nature of information organization. The project resulted in experimental interactive tools for information search and navigating complex information structures. 2. YOU ARE HERE. A study in interactivity. This paper refers to a studio project in interface design, conducted at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston, where individual designers explored essential concepts in navigating complex structures of information. Taking the notion of You-Are-Here as a point of departure, individual designers explored various definitions and interpretations of the notion's three components: You(We/They, etc)-Are(Will Be/Have Been, etc)-Here(in Time/in Space). Exploring specific instances of parametric design and developing linked, multiple representations for information display resulted in a broad spectrum of contexts associated with navigation. Specific descriptions of individual instances will accompany the final presentation of the project.  
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 635f
authors Lee, Alpha W.K. and Iki, Kazuhisa
year 2000
title Use of DHTML for Interactive Assessment of Common Value for Townscape Conceptualization and Realization. Colour Assessment, Case Study of large-Scale Resort Facility in Aso Region, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 89-96
summary With the public's high consciousness of townscape, a new form of Color Planning incorporating Citizen Participation is necessary. This paper proposes the use of Dynamic Hypertext Mark-up Language (DHTML) in a Web-oriented Interactive Townscape Assessment System. This system consists of two parts, the first part includes tools for Analytic Hierarchical Process (AHP), Magnitude Estimation, Semantic Differential (SD) and Color Semantic Differential (Color SD) method, and the second part includes tools for Interactive Color Planning System (ICPS). Interactive Assessment is possible by the inclusion of JavaScript and Cascading Style Sheet (CSS). Efficiency is improved by client-side operations, data-collection using Common Gateway Interface (CGI) and presentation using Tabular Data Control (TDC). A case study of large-scale resort facility in Aso Region, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan is undertaken. The result shows efficiency of the system.
series CAADRIA
email iki@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2002/09/05 07:23

_id 55ca
authors Mase, Jitsuro
year 2000
title Moderato: 3D Sketch CAD with Quick Positioned Working Plane and Texture Modelling
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 269-272
summary The lack of computer systems that can be easily used during the early stages of the architectural design process has been discussed for many years. The usual argument starts with the recognition that hand drawn sketches are an important tool in the early stage of both professional and student design because they can be used to visualise the designer’s ideas quickly and have the flexibility to handle any shape the designer imagines. Research has then mostly focused on using computer based sketch recognition to directly produce three dimensional models from hand drawn sketches. However sketch recognition still has certain problems that require the drawing action of users to be constrained in some way in order to be solved. If sketch recognition is still imperfect, the possibility of directly sketching within digital 3D space should be considered. Some systems allowing user to sketch in digital 3D space have been developed which do not depend on sketch recognition. Although Piranesi does not aim to support sketch design, it does allow the user to paint in the Z-buffer space - an unique idea termed "interactive rendering." SketchVRML tries to generate 3D geometrical data automatically from 2D hand drawn sketches by adding the depth value to the drawn lines according to the strength of line strokes. SketchBoX provides translucent surfaces in digital 3D space which can be glued onto existing objects or arranged anywhere in space. These surfaces have texture map data which can be modified by painting onto the texture. Transparent textures can be painted onto the surfaces to create see-through portions. Moderato also uses this technique to model a polygonÕs shape.
keywords Sketch, Early Stage, Interface, 3D Modelling
series eCAADe
email mase@kure-nct.ac.jp
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 6476
authors Maver, T., Petric, J., Ennis, G. and Lindsay, M.
year 2000
title Visiting The Virtual City
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 135-139
summary In 1999, the city of Glasgow in Scotland, celebrated the honour of being the UK City of Architecture and Design. The same year saw the successful launch, on the Internet, of a fully interactive virtual experience of the city. This paper describes the evolution and functionality of vrglasgow over the last 10 years and anticipates its future development over the next 5 years. Currently the system comprises the VRML topography, the road network and the 3-D geometry of around 10,000 buildings within the city centre. The visitor to the virtual city to navigate and search under a range of headings for items of interest and experience some of Glasgow’s best architecture. Data from a number of information sources are interlinked and made accessible through VRML as well as through the conventional internet modes such as lists, tables and search engines. Consequently, the visitor can explore the city intuitively.
keywords 3D City modeling
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 6b7d
authors Mishima, Yoshitaka and Szalapaj, Peter
year 1999
title ADMIRE: an Architectural Design Multimedia Interaction Resource for Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 201-209
summary This paper describes the development of a multimedia system called ADMIRE (an Architectural Design Multimedia Interaction Resource for Education), which enables undergraduate students to understand how to analyse existing buildings dynamically, as well as to develop their own initial architectural design theories. The system contains architectural information in the form of fully rendered models, conceptual illustrations created with a range of CAD software, and multimedia presentations showing various design theoretic analyses. Buildings are described with CAD generated images, and architects with profiles and theories. In addition to rendered designs, there are also conceptual models of each building in the system. Conceptual models are simplified forms of original designs in order to support an analytical understanding of buildings according to various analyses, such as structure, light, circulation, unit to whole, geometry, etc. Each conceptual model constitutes a different analysis of each building. The ADMIRE system links each piece of information to another, so that students can explore architecture and learn about it in a dynamic way. This system demonstrates a new way of learning about architectural analysis through dynamic multimedia computer interaction.
keywords Dynamic Multimedia System, Analytical Models, Interactive Pedagogical Resource
series eCAADe
email ARP95YM@sheffield.ac.uk, p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 5222
authors Moloney, Jules
year 1999
title Bike-R: Virtual Reality for the Financially Challenged
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 410-413
summary This paper describes a 'low tech' approach to producing interactive virtual environments for the evaluation of design proposals. The aim was to produce a low cost alternative to such expensive installations as CAVE virtual reality systems. The system utilises a library of pre-rendered animation, video and audio files and hence is not reliant on powerful hardware to produce real time simulation. The participant sits astride a bicycle exercise machine and animation is triggered by the pedal revolution. Navigation is achieved by steering along and around the streets of the animated design. This project builds on the work of Desmond Hii. ( Hii, 1997) The innovations are the bicycle interface and the application to urban scale simulation.
keywords Virtual, Design, Interface, Urban
series eCAADe
email j.moloney@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2002/11/22 17:34

_id ga0010
id ga0010
authors Moroni, A., Zuben, F. Von and Manzolli, J.
year 2000
title ArTbitrariness in Music
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolution is now considered not only powerful enough to bring about the biological entities as complex as humans and conciousness, but also useful in simulation to create algorithms and structures of higher levels of complexity than could easily be built by design. In the context of artistic domains, the process of human-machine interaction is analyzed as a good framework to explore creativity and to produce results that could not be obtained without this interaction. When evolutionary computation and other computational intelligence methodologies are involved, every attempt to improve aesthetic judgement we denote as ArTbitrariness, and is interpreted as an interactive iterative optimization process. ArTbitrariness is also suggested as an effective way to produce art through an efficient manipulation of information and a proper use of computational creativity to increase the complexity of the results without neglecting the aesthetic aspects [Moroni et al., 2000]. Our emphasis will be in an approach to interactive music composition. The problem of computer generation of musical material has received extensive attention and a subclass of the field of algorithmic composition includes those applications which use the computer as something in between an instrument, in which a user "plays" through the application's interface, and a compositional aid, which a user experiments with in order to generate stimulating and varying musical material. This approach was adopted in Vox Populi, a hybrid made up of an instrument and a compositional environment. Differently from other systems found in genetic algorithms or evolutionary computation, in which people have to listen to and judge the musical items, Vox Populi uses the computer and the mouse as real-time music controllers, acting as a new interactive computer-based musical instrument. The interface is designed to be flexible for the user to modify the music being generated. It explores evolutionary computation in the context of algorithmic composition and provides a graphical interface that allows to modify the tonal center and the voice range, changing the evolution of the music by using the mouse[Moroni et al., 1999]. A piece of music consists of several sets of musical material manipulated and exposed to the listener, for example pitches, harmonies, rhythms, timbres, etc. They are composed of a finite number of elements and basically, the aim of a composer is to organize those elements in an esthetic way. Modeling a piece as a dynamic system implies a view in which the composer draws trajectories or orbits using the elements of each set [Manzolli, 1991]. Nonlinear iterative mappings are associated with interface controls. In the next page two examples of nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces are shown.The mappings may give rise to attractors, defined as geometric figures that represent the set of stationary states of a non-linear dynamic system, or simply trajectories to which the system is attracted. The relevance of this approach goes beyond music applications per se. Computer music systems that are built on the basis of a solid theory can be coherently embedded into multimedia environments. The richness and specialty of the music domain are likely to initiate new thinking and ideas, which will have an impact on areas such as knowledge representation and planning, and on the design of visual formalisms and human-computer interfaces in general. Above and bellow, Vox Populi interface is depicted, showing two nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces. References [Manzolli, 1991] J. Manzolli. Harmonic Strange Attractors, CEM BULLETIN, Vol. 2, No. 2, 4 -- 7, 1991. [Moroni et al., 1999] Moroni, J. Manzolli, F. Von Zuben, R. Gudwin. Evolutionary Computation applied to Algorithmic Composition, Proceedings of CEC99 - IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation, Washington D. C., p. 807 -- 811,1999. [Moroni et al., 2000] Moroni, A., Von Zuben, F. and Manzolli, J. ArTbitration, Las Vegas, USA: Proceedings of the 2000 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference Workshop Program – GECCO, 143 -- 145, 2000.
series other
email artemis@ia.cti.br
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 2a47
authors Mortola, E., Giangrande, A., Mirabelli, P. and Fortuzzi, A.
year 1999
title Interactive Didactic Modules for On-Line Learning via Internet
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 273-278
summary On-line learning can become a very efficient method of teaching in the University of the future. The Students can plan their curricula by selecting the offers of some universities coordinated that meet their specific aims. The communication interchange between student and teacher can be enriched through new forms of interaction via network technology. Laboratories of interactive design, which involve the participation of citizens, can become a good occasion to learn designing linked to the human needs. The architect who is interested in the sustainable development has to consider local needs and interact with users to build a new environment full of local values.
keywords On-Line Learning, Internet, Teaching Modules, Participation, Collaborative Design, Neighbourhood Municipal Laboratories
series eCAADe
email mortola@arch.uniroma3.it
more http://rmac.arch.uniroma3.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 4003
authors Nakakoji, K., Yamamoto, Y., Takada, S. and Reeves, B.
year 2000
title Two-Dimensional Spatial Positioning as a Means for Reflection in Design Design Cases
source Proceedings of DIS'00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000 pp. 145-154
summary In the realm of computer support for design, developers have focused primarily on power and expressiveness that are important in framing a design solution. They assume that design is a series of calculated steps that lead to a clearly specified goal. The problem with this focus is that the resulting tools hinder the very process that is critical in early phases of a design task; the reflection-in-action process [15]. In the early phases, what is required as the most important ingredient for a design tool is the ability to interact in ways that require as little commitment as possible. This aspect is most evident in domains where two dimensions play a role, such as sketching in architecture. Surprisingly, it is equally true in linear domains such as writing. In this paper, we present our approach of using two-dimensional positioning of objects as a means for reflection in the early phases of a design task. Taking writing as an example, the ART (Amplifying Representational Talkback) system uses two dimensional positioning to support the early stages of the writing task. An eye-tracking user study illustrates important issues in the domain of computer support for design.
keywords Information Systems; User/Machine Systems; Cognitive Models; Reflection-In-Action; Two-Dimensional Positioning; Writing Support
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id e995
authors Reffat, Rabee M., and Gero, John S.
year 2000
title Towards Active Support Systems for Architectural Designing
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 143-147
summary This paper proposes the application of a situated learning approach in designing integrated with a conventional CAD system. The approach is implemented in SLiDe (Situated Learning in Designing) and integrated as SLiDe-CAAD, to provide interactive support in designing exemplified within the composition of architectural shapes. SLiDe-CAAD is proposed to assist in maintaining the integrity of shape semantics or desired design concepts of interest in the design composition. SLiDe-CAAD is introduced to provide a collaboration between the designer and the computer during the process of designing.
keywords CAAD Systems, Active Designing Support, Situatedness.
series eCAADe
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 887b
authors SQin, S.F., Wright, D.K. and Jordanov, I.N.
year 2000
title From on-line sketching to 2D and 3D geometry: a system based on fuzzy knowledge
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 32 (14) (2000) pp. 851-866
summary The paper describes the development of a fuzzy knowledge-based prototype system for conceptual design. This real time system is designed to infer user's sketchingintentions, to segment sketched input and generate corresponding geometric primitives: straight lines, circles; arcs, ellipses, elliptical arcs, and B-spline curves. Topologyinformation (connectivity, unitary constraints and pairwise constraints) is received dynamically from 2D sketched input and primitives. From the 2D topology information, amore accurate 2D geometry can be built up by applying a 2D geometric constraint solver. Subsequently, 3D geometry can be received feature by feature incrementally. Eachfeature can be recognised by inference knowledge in terms of matching its 2D primitive configurations and connection relationships. The system accepts not only sketchedinput, working as an automatic design tool, but also accepts user interactive input of both 2D primitives and special positional 3D primitives. This makes it easy and friendlyto use. The system has been tested with a number of sketched inputs of 2D and 3D geometry.
keywords Conceptual Design, Geometric Modelling, Fuzzy Knowledge
series journal paper
email sqin@lboro.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

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