CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 697

_id f4da
authors Oritsland, Trond Are and Buur, Jacob
year 2000
title Taking the Best from a Company History -- Designing with Interaction Styles New Directions for Design
source Proceedings of DIS'00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000 pp. 27-38
summary In architecture and industrial design, the concept of style plays a major role in education as a way of explaining the historical inheritance and comparing alternative design expressions. In this article we claim that interaction design can benefit greatly from an understanding of the concept of style. It can provide designers with strong visions and a sense of direction in designing new interfaces. In particular we focus on Solid User Interface design, i.e. products with small displays and a limited number of keys, because of the tight coupling between interaction and industrial design. The authors share the concern that interaction designers in enthusiasm with new technologies fail to preserve the qualities of use from products with outdated technologies. This paper attempts to formulate an aesthetics of interaction design and reports on experiments with introducing interaction style thinking in a user centred design practice in industry.
keywords Computing Milieux-Management; Systems Analysis and Design; Information Systems; Interaction Styles; Interaction Design; Solid User Interface
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 9ce0
authors Ozcan, Oguzhan
year 1999
title Education of Interactive Panorama-design in Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 223-229
summary This paper mainly discusses the importance of interactive panorama in design, and its education in the MDes program, which will run at Yildiz Technical University in the year 2000. The first part of the paper summarizes the potentials of current interactive panorama technique, which was "A popular form of the public entertainment" in 19th-century. Then, it compares the real-world experiences with observations in an interactive panorama. This comparison is carried out together with technical aspects i.e. limitations, audio-visual effects, composite techniques, live video input, and conceptual aspects i.e. camera actions, natural phenomenon. The technical discussion in the paper is concentrated on the examples from newly developed tools such as Nodemedia, Electrifier, Wasabi Software, and Skypaint as well as Apple QuickTime VR Authoring Tool. The second part underlines the role of interactive panorama technique in design. In this part, the paper also summarizes how to use the technique at the beginning and, during creation of the design and in its presentation, taking the installation advantages of sound, vision, text and transition effects. The third part concentrates on the interactive panorama design as an individual project, offered in the MDes program. Then it explains how the preliminary courses were planned for this individual project and summarizes the content of the course formulated through the linear and non-linear structures of the media. Finally, considering with the future development of interactive panorama technique, the last part of the paper discusses the possible results of this education method.
keywords Interactive Media, Panoramic Image, Design Education
series eCAADe
email ooczan@yildiz.edu.tr
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ga0006
id ga0006
authors Rinaldo, Kenneth E.
year 2000
title Autopoiesis
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Autopoiesis, is a series of fifteen musical and robotic artificial life sculptures that interact with the public and modify their behaviors based on the both the presence of the participants in the exhibition and the communication between each separate sculpture. Autopoiesis is "self making", a characteristic of all living systems. This characteristic of living systems was defined and refined by Francisco Varella and Humberto Maturana. This series of robotic sculptures talk with each other through a hardwired network and audible telephone tones, which are a musical language for the group. Autopoiesis presents an interactive environment, which is immersive, detailed and able to evolve in real time by utilizing feedback and interaction from audience/participant members. The interactivity engages the viewer/participant who in turn, effects the system's evolution and emergence. This creates a system evolution as well as an overall group sculptural aesthetic.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id b34d
authors Russell, P., Kohler, N., Forgber, U., Koch, V. and Rügemer, J.
year 1999
title Interactive Representation of Architectural Design: The Virtual Design Studio as an Architectural Graphics Laboratory
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 459-465
summary This paper introduces the Virtual Design Studio (VDS), an internet based design studio environment established by ifib. VDS transfers lessons learned through research projects in the field of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) being carried out at ifib into design education. By training for interdisciplinary co-operation within the design process, the students will become better prepared for the flexibility and co-operability required in planning situations. Increasing the communication and co-operation in the planning process can be achieved through the implementation of IT based virtual workspaces. In the design studio setting, this is done through the use of available internet software and technologies. The methodology of the VDS is briefly described including specific assignments intended to focus student investigations into specific areas including the representation of their work using the world wide web. The pedagogical expectations are discussed and anecdotal evidence precedes an general evaluation of the teaching method. The authors postulate that one of the unintended by-products of the studio is the evolution of an effective use of interactivity in the presentation of design concepts, ideas and solutions. A handful of student work is presented to describe the different approaches taken in using the world wide web (WWW) to display project work. A description of the local evolution (VDS specific) of graphical methods and technologies is followed by a comparison with those used in traditional settings. Representation is discussed with focus on the ability of the WWW to replace, augment or corrupt other methods of presentation. The interactive nature of web based presentations induces alterations to the narration of architectural work and can enhance the spatial perception of design space. Space Perception can be enabled through geometrically true VRML representations, the inclusion of auditory sensations, the abstraction of representation through the use of advertising techniques as well as the introduction of non-linear narrative concepts. Examples used by students are shown. A critical assessment of these new representational methods and the place of current new media within the context of architectural representation is discussed.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Architectural Graphics, Teaching
series eCAADe
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 65f7
authors Rügemer, Jörg and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Promise and Reality: The impact of the Virtual Design Studio on the Design and Learning Process in the Architectural Education
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 41-44
summary In step with the popular trend of including virtual working methods and tools in the process of teaching, the Virtual Design Studio (VDS) has been developed by the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib), at the University of Karlsruhe over the past three years. Alongside the technical aspects of such a studio, the challenge persisted to incorporate computer based tools into the architectural design and planning process with the goal of enhancing the relationship between all participants. The VDS is being further developed and refined, experiencing regular changes in its organization and teaching methods. With the establishment of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) and the introduction of the Virtual Design Studio into the curriculum of the Institute for Architectural Presentation and CAD (adai), BTU Cottbus, the VDS extended beyond the borders of a single architectural school, aiming towards a wide acceptance and use within architectural education institutions.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Education, Interactive Design Development, Team Processes
series eCAADe
email joerg@ruegemer.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ca3d
authors Shakarchi, Ali Y.
year 2000
title Tools for Distributed Design Practice
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 89-92
summary During collaboration designers jointly solve problems as well as interact for critical feedback. Today’s heterogeneous, distributed and global market demands of designers collaboration in both synchronous and asynchronous mode. The management and control of such projects is frequently geographical and temporally distributed. Increasingly, efficient communication is becoming a vital component in the design process, whether in managing the project data or controlling the compatibility of different inputs by design team members or minimizing the revision cycles. Paper presents and discuss iSPACE, the mature prototype software application developed to serve different scenarios of communication between the distributed design team members. The iSPACE is web based application that can deliver an interactive environment over low-bandwidth connections. Application of iSPACE in the educational environment is monitored and discussed. Giving the potential of this technology to enhance and to streamline complex tasks associated with the design process, the quality of the design product is changing. The new style of design practice can be now practically further modeled, supported and enhanced.
keywords Design Collaboration, Design Process, i-space, Digital Media
series eCAADe
email ashakarc@arch.ubc.ca
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 3fce
authors Shedroff, Nathan
year 2000
title Information Interaction Design: A Unified Field Theory of Design
source Jacobson, R., (ed.). Information Design pp. 267-293. Cambridge: MIT Press
summary One of the most important skills for almost everyone to have in the next decade and beyond will be those that allow us to create valuable, compelling, and empowering information and experiences for others. To do this, we must learn existing ways of organizing and presenting data and information and develop new ones. Whether our communication tools are traditional print products, electronic products, broadcast programming, interactive experiences, or live performances makes little difference. Nor does it matter if we are employing physical or electronic devices or our own bodies and voices. The process of creating is roughly the same in any medium. The processes involved in solving problems, responding to audiences, and communicating to others are similar enough to consider them identical for the purposes of this paper. These issues apply across all types of media and experiences, because they directly address the phenomena of information overload, information anxiety, media literacy, media immersion, and technological overload-all which need better solutions. The intersection of these issues can be addressed by the process of Information Interaction Design. In other circles, it is called simply Information Design, Information Architecture, or Interaction Design, Instructional Design, or just plain Common Sense. Many people create or engineer interactions, presentations, and experiences for others. Almost all interactions- whether part of a book, a directory, a catalog, a newspaper, or a television program-can be created or addressed by one process. This process can be used to produce every CD-ROM, kiosk, presentation, game, and online service. It can also be used for every dance, music, comedy, or theater performance. While the traditions and technologies may change with every discipline, the process does not.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3f51
authors Streich, B., Oxman, R. and Fritz, O.
year 2000
title Computer-Simulated Growth Processes in Urban Planning and Architecture
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 233-237
summary Urban structures, developed and grown over a period of time, are created by processes that, due to the number of influential factors, are not longer comprehensible as a whole. Their development is very complex and depends on a big number of reciprocal factors that even architects or planners sometimes cannot recognize the formal, functional and rational processes of thinking behind it. The involved mechanisms however are particularly obvious in historical urban structures that came to exist over a period of centuries. The planned relationships within these conglomerates are governed by nearly indiscernible rules and show similarities in form and shape to living and non-living forms in nature. They are clearly analogous to fractals or systems with chaotic behavior. In the course of the research project “media experimental design”, financed by the German Research Foundation, algorithms are sought that are able to simulate urban analogous structures digitally. To this effect the main rules of growth processes are researched and extracted. Then, by following these rules, virtual structures are developed and shown by using powerful three-dimensional techniques. The developed mechanisms allow urban planning to be process-oriented, interactive and flexible for permanently changing parameters. With an implemented set of rules the computer is able to create a design and to react to changing situations. In several experimental studies structures were successfully generated which have different forms and qualities depending on their set of rules. For example, structures were programmed which are similar to a big city while other look like a village in hilly landscape. Diverse rules and strategies have been used in order to reduce them to shape specific factors. The rules for growth are administered by a specifically developed databank with sophisticated search mechanisms using the Issue-Concept- Form tool as case-based-reasoning method.
keywords Simulation, Urban Growth-Processes, Virtual Reality
series ACADIA
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 83cb
authors Telea, Alexandru C.
year 2000
title Visualisation and simulation with object-oriented networks
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary Among the existing systems, visual programming environments address best these issues. However, producing interactive simulations and visualisations is still a difficult task. This defines the main research objective of this thesis: The development and implementation of concepts and techniques to combine visualisation, simulation, and application construction in an interactive, easy to use, generic environment. The aim is to produce an environment in which the above mentioned activities can be learnt and carried out easily by a researcher. Working with such an environment should decrease the amount of time usually spent in redesigning existing software elements such as graphics interfaces, existing computational modules, and general infrastructure code. Writing new computational components or importing existing ones should be simple and automatic enough to make using the envisaged system an attractive option for a non programmer expert. Besides this, all proven successful elements of an interactive simulation and visualisation environment should be provided, such as visual programming, graphics user interfaces, direct manipulation, and so on. Finally, a large palette of existing scientific computation, data processing, and visualisation components should be integrated in the proposed system. On one hand, this should prove our claims of openness and easy code integration. On the other hand, this should provide the concrete set of tools needed for building a range of scientific applications and visualisations. This thesis is structured as follows. Chapter 2 defines the context of our work. The scientific research environment is presented and partitioned into the three roles of end user, application designer, and component developer. The interactions between these roles and their specific requirements are described and lead to a more precise formulation of our problem statement. Chapter 3 presents the most used architectures for simulation and visualisation systems: the monolithic system, the application library, and the framework. The advantages and disadvantages of these architectural models are then discussed in relation with our problem statement requirements. The main conclusion drawn is that no single existing architectural model suffices, and that what is needed is a combination of the features present in all three models. Chapter 4 introduces the new architectural model we propose, based on the combination of object-orientation in form of the C++ language and dataflow modelling in the new MC++ language. Chapter 5 presents VISSION, an interactive simulation and visualisation environment constructed on the introduced new architectural model, and shows how the usual tasks of application construction, steering, and visualisation are addressed. In chapter 6, the implementation of VISSION’s architectural model is described in terms of its component parts. Chapter 7 presents the applications of VISSION to numerical simulation, while chapter 8 focuses on its visualisation and graphics applications. Finally, chapter 9 concludes the thesis and outlines possible direction for future research.
keywords Computer Visualisation
series thesis:PhD
email a.c.telea@tue.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 6c0a
authors Tserng, H. Ping, Ran, Bin and Russell, Jeffrey S.
year 2000
title Interactive path planning for multi-equipment landfill operations
source Automation in Construction 10 (1) (2000) pp. 155-168
summary A methodology and several algorithms for interactive motion planning are developed for multi-equipment landfill operations in an automated landfill system (ALS). A system for establishing ALS is also proposed in the paper. To develop a multi-truck/multi-compactor ALS, the major problems can be classified into three principal categories: (1) navigation system for multiple devices, (2) job-site geometric model, and (3) instantaneous motion planning and control system for equipment in the work site. To solve the problems from the three categories, this paper will present a methodology to simulate the operational processes of landfill vehicles and equipment in pre-planning a landfill project as well as finding efficient and collision-free motion patterns to control autonomous landfill equipment during the construction phase. Furthermore, by linking this system to a global positioning system (GPS), the efficient traffic routing and collision-free path for each piece of equipment can be calculated by using real-time positional data acquisition in a 3-D geometric model of a landfill site.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id bfec
authors Tserng, H.P., Ran, B. and Russell, J.S.
year 2001
title Erratum to ""Interactive path planning for multi-equipment landfill operations"" [Autom. Constr. 10 (2000) 155-168]"
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 541-541
summary A methodology and several algorithms for interactive motion planning are developed for multi-equipment landfill operations in an automated landfill system (ALS). A system for establishing ALS is also proposed in the paper. To develop a multi-truck/multi-compactor ALS, the major problems can he classified into three principal categories: (1) navigation system for multiple devices, (2) job-site geometric model, and (3) instantaneous motion planning and control system for equipment in the work site. To solve the problems from the three categories, this paper will present a methodology to simulate the operational processes of landfill vehicles and equipment in pre-planning a landfill project as well as finding efficient and collision-free motion patterns to control autonomous landfill equipment during the construction phase. Furthermore, by linking this system to a global positioning system (GPS), the efficient traffic routing and collision-free path for each piece of equipment can he calculated by using real-time positional data acquisition in a 3-D geometric model of a landfill site.
keywords Multi-equipment landfill operations; Automated landfill system; Global positioning system
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/06/02 07:33

_id df52
authors Tuncer, Bige and Stouffs, Rudi
year 1999
title Computational Richness in the Representation of Architectural Languages
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 603-610
summary An extensive analysis of an architectural object or body leads to a model composed of abstractions, each reflecting on a different aspect. Though separately described through drawings, diagrams, and texts, these abstractions relate in many ways, most commonly through shared components. An integrated model that recognizes these relationships yields more than only the original abstractions. We present a methodology for achieving such a rich representation and touch upon the tools and techniques necessary to implement this methodology. As an application of this methodology, we describe an interactive educational system for the presentation of architectural analyses.
keywords Architectural Languages, Abstractions, Representational Flexibility, Meta-Language, Presentation
series eCAADe
email tuncer@arch.ethz.ch, stouffs@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id d267
authors Verbeke, J. Provoost, T., Verleye, J., Nys, K., Van Zutphen, R., Achten, H., Turksma, A., Pittioni, G., Asanowicz, A., Jakimowicz A. and Af Klercker, J.
year 1999
title AVOCAAD, The Experience
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 244-251
summary The Leonardo da Vinci project AVOCAAD (Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design) aims at stimulating creative and experimental use of computers in the field of Architecture and Construction by the use of new technologies. For this purpose, a large set of exercises and exercise materials was developed and is now available through an interactive web-site. This allows regular students as well as architects in practice to continuously seek for a more interesting and inspiring use of computers and IC-technology, adding value in their own field of interest and work. The interactive web-site generates a virtual forum for exchange of ideas. The AVOCAAD partners as well as the newly joined partners are currently using and testing the available teaching materials (exercises, foreground and background information) with students. Moreover a small design exercise in the context of the project has been the theme of a workshop held at the AVOCAAD 1999 conference. Students and architects were asked to create a design in a predefined space based on experimental architectural music. This paper intends to report on the experiences we gained in using the interactive web-site, the exercises and also doing the workshop. We will address the pedagogical implications of issues like learning environment, continuous and distance learning, and focus on their impact towards CAAD curricula. Examples and results will illustrate the general framework.
keywords AVOCAAD, CAAD, Creativity, LLL, ODL
series eCAADe
email info@avocaad.org
more http://www.avocaad.org
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 0c0d
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2000
title Computer as an Metaphorisation Machine
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 283-286
summary Digital media is transforming the practice and teaching of design. Information technologies offer not only better production and rendering tools but also the ability to model, manipulate, and understand design in new ways. A new era in CAAD has started. One of the aspects of this situation is the increase in the number of computers in design offices and architectural schools (many of our students have their own computers, which a re often better than the computers we have at our school). We can submit a proposition that the critical point in the creative use of computers is over, and we should think how computers and new media may extend the designer’s perception and imagination.
keywords Creation of a Form, Imagination, Metaphors, Computer Support of Form Searching
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 3f35
authors Bermudez, Julio and King, Kevin
year 2000
title Media interaction and design process: establishing a knowledge base
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 37-56
summary Integrating computers in architectural design means to negotiate between centuries-old analog design methods and the new digital systems of production. Analog systems of architectural production use tracing paper, vellum, graphite and ink, clipboard, clay, balsa wood, plastic, metal, etc. Analog systems have also been termed "handmade", "manual", "material" or "physical". Digital systems of architectural production use scanning, image manipulation, visualization, solid modeling, computer aided drafting, animation, rendering, etc. Digital systems have also been called "electronic", "computer-aided", "virtual", etc. The difficulty lies in the underdeveloped state of the necessary methods, techniques, and theories to relate traditional and new media. Recent investigations on the use of multiple iterations between manual and electronic systems to advance architectural work show promising results. However, these experiments have not been sufficiently codified, cross-referenced and third party tested to conform a reliable knowledge base. This paper addresses this shortcoming by bringing together reported experiences from diverse researchers over the past decade. This summary is informed by more than three years of continuous investigation in the impacts of analog-digital conversations in the design process. The goal is to establish a state-of-the-art common foundation that permits instructors, researchers and practitioners to refer to, utilize, test, criticize and develop. An appendix is included providing support for the paper's arguments.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 5477
authors Donath, D., Kruijff, E., Regenbrecht, H., Hirschberg, U., Johnson, B., Kolarevic, B. and Wojtowicz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Design Studio 1998 - A Place2Wait
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 453-458
summary This article reports on the recent, geographically and temporally distributed, intercollegiate Virtual Design Studio based on the 1998 implementation Phase(x) environment. Students participating in this workshop had to create a place to wait in the form of a folly. This design task was cut in five logical parts, called phases. Every phase had to be finished within a specific timeframe (one day), after which the results would be stored in a common data repository, an online MSQL database environment which holds besides the presentations, consisting of text, 3D models and rendered images, basic project information like the descriptions of the phases and design process visualization tools. This approach to collaborative work is better known as memetic engineering and has successfully been used in several educational programs and past Virtual Design Studios. During the workshop, students made use of a variety of tools, including modeling tools (specifically Sculptor), video-conferencing software and rendering programs. The project distinguishes itself from previous Virtual Design Studios in leaving the design task more open, thereby focusing on the design process itself. From this perspective, this paper represents both a continuation of existing reports about previous Virtual Design Studios and a specific extension by the offered focus. Specific attention will be given at how the different collaborating parties dealt with the data flow and modification, the crux within a successful effort to cooperate on a common design task.
keywords Collaborative design, Design Process, New Media Usage, Global Networks
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga0027
id ga0027
authors E. Bilotta, P. Pantano and V. Talarico
year 2000
title Music Generation through Cellular Automata
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Cellular automata (CA), like every other dynamical system, can be used to generate music. In fact, starting from any initial state and applying to them simple transition rules, such models are able to produce numerical sequences that can be successively associated to typically musical physical parameters. This approach is interesting because, maintaining fixed the set of rules and varying the initial data, many different, though correlated, numerical sequences can be originated (this recalls the genotype-phenotype dualism). Later on a musification (rendering) process can tie one or more physical parameters typical of music to various mathematical functions: as soon as the generative algorithm produces a numerical sequence this process modifies the physical parameter thus composing a sequence of sounds whose characteristic varies during the course of time. Many so obtained musical sequences can be selected by a genetic algorithm (CA) that promotes their evolution and refinement. The aim of this paper is to illustrate a series of musical pieces generated by CA. In the first part attention is focused on the effects coming from the application of various rendering processes to one dimensional multi state CA; typical behaviours of automata belonging to each of the four families discovered by Wolfram have been studied: CA evolving to a uniform state, CA evolving to a steady cycle, chaotic and complex CA. In order to make this part of the study Musical Dreams, a system for the simulation and musical rendering of one dimensional CA, has been used. In the second phase various CA obtained both by random generation and deriving from those studied in the first part are organised into families and, successively, made evolve through a genetic algorithm. This phase has been accomplished by using Harmony Seeker, a system for the generation of evolutionary music based on GA. The obtained results vary depending on the rendering systems used but, in general, automata belonging to the first family seem more indicated for the production of rhythmical patterns, while elements belonging to the second and fourth family seem to produce better harmonic patterns. Chaotic systems have been seen to produce good results only in presence of simple initial states. Experiments made in the second part have produced good harmonic results starting mainly from CA belonging to the second family.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id cf2007_585
id cf2007_585
authors Fischer, Thomas
year 2007
title Enablement or Restriction? On supporting others in making (sense of things)
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 585-598
summary In this paper I present and reflect upon a five-year investigation of designing digital tools for designing in the area of architectural space grid structures. I understand design as a novelty and knowledge generating conversational process as described by Pask (see Scott 2001) and Glanville (2000). Furthermore, I regard making design tools as a design task in itself, rendering this paper a reflection on designing for designing. This paper gives a report on observations I made during the toolmaking study, and subsequently contextualizes these observations using second-order cybernetic theory. This reflection focuses on different relationships between observers and systems, on conditions under which observers construct knowledge and on limits of supporting others in this activity.
series CAAD Futures
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id a25e
authors Loy, Hollis A.
year 1999
title Foundation for a Thorough CAAD Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 301-308
summary The birth and development of computing is considered by most as one of the greatest technological achievements of the twentieth century. Since the integration of computers in the built environment, over two decades ago, computing methods developed into efficient designing and calculating tools. In contrast, accelerating advancements in computing technology have created generation gaps amongst architects. There are inexperienced, novice, intermediate and advanced computer-capable architects. If each group was asked to define CAAD, some would still describe it as a computer program for technical draughting. Others may define CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) as a vast array of digital media in CAD, multimedia and DTP, assisting architects in compiling visual presentations. Currently, most architectural schools are capable of instructing most, if not all, facets of CAAD (2D & 3D CAD, model rendering, photo montage, brochure layouts, etc.). However, this knowledge is accumulated at random throughout the course of study. "Computer Graphics for Architects" is the latest educational development in Europe bridging generation gaps with senior architects and serving as an introductory CAAD seminar to beginning architecture students. This book and lecture presents a gallery of recent architectural CAD, multimedia, and DTP presentations practiced in Europe´s second largest architectural firm. The terminology is user-friendly and its content concentrates on responding to the most often posed questions by CAAD beginners relating to: (1) Terminology (2) Appearance (3) Time Consumption (4) Cost Techniques introduced are independent of any platform. The goal is to summarize quickly and effectively the countless possibilities of presentations applicable in architecture practice. "Computer Graphics for Architects" provides a direction for future presentations and motivates students to excel in CAAD.
series eCAADe
email Loy.In.Germany@t-online.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id e688
authors Schweikardt, Eric and Gross, Mark D.
year 2000
title Digital clay: deriving digital models from freehand sketches
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 107-115
summary During the initial stages of design, it is not uncommon to find an architect scribbling furiously with a thick pencil. Later in the design process, however, one might not be surprised to encounter the same individual in front of a computer monitor, manipulating three dimensional models in a series of activities that seem completely divorced from their previous efforts. Armed with evidence that sketching is an effective design method for creative individuals, we also recognize that modeling and rendering applications are invaluable design development and presentation tools, and we naturally seek a connection between these methodologies. We therefore present Digital Clay, a working prototype of a sketch recognition program that interprets gestural and abstracted projection drawings and constructs appropriate three dimensional digital models.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

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