CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 742

_id ddssar0011
id ddssar0011
authors Hartog, J.P. den, Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P.G.
year 2000
title Possibilities and limitations of CFD simulation for indoor climate analysis
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary With the democratization of information and communication technologies, simulation techniques that used to be computationally expensive and time-consuming are becoming feasible instruments for the analysis of architectural design. Simulation is an indispensable ingredient of the descriptive design approach, which provides the designer with precise and accurate projections of the performance and behavior of a design. The paper describes the application of a particular class of simulation techniques, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to the analysis and evaluation of indoor climate. Using two different CFD systems as representatives of the class, we describe: relevant computational possibilities and limitations of CFD simulation; the accessibility of CFD simulation for architects, especially concerning the handling of simulation variables; the compatibility of CFD representations of built space with similar representations in standard CAD and modeling systems, including possibilities for feedback; The relations between geometric representation and accuracy / precision in CFD simulation. We propose that CFD simulation can become an operational instrument for the designer, provided that CFD simulation does not become a trial and error game trying to master computational techniques. A promising solution to this problem is the use of case based reasoning. A case base of analyzed, evaluated and verified buildings provides a flexible source of information (guidance and examples) for both the CFD simulation and the designer.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id d11a
authors Den Hartog, J. P. and Koutamanis, A.
year 2000
title Teaching design simulation
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 197-200
summary The democratization of information and communication technologies (ICT) has promoted integration of computing in the design studio and of design activities in the CAAD courses. In addition it has also shifted the focus of CAAD courses from technical skills and general theoretical issues to current, specific design issues, such as the relationship between geometric modeling and construction, design communication and design analysis. CAAD courses (especially advanced ones) increasingly attempt to introduce these issues and corresponding advanced ICT in a design context that outlines the possibilities of these technologies and the underlying computational design methodology and bring research closer to teaching. One such issue is design analysis, especially in the early design stages when many fundamental decisions are taken on the basis of incomplete and insecure information. Simulation provides the computational means for projecting building behaviour and performance. The paper describes the application of a specific simulation technique, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), for the analysis of airflow in and around buildings in the context of an advanced CAAD course. In this course students are required to design a multifunctional exposition building. Even though students are unfamiliar with the particular CFD system, as well as with part of the simulation subject matter, they are able to produce descriptions of their designs with effectiveness and efficiency.
keywords Design Analysis, Simulation, CFD, Airflow
series eCAADe
email j.p.denhartog@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id sigradi2007_af103
id sigradi2007_af103
authors Juarez Moara, Santos Franco; Luciana Silva Salgado
year 2007
title Conception and analysis of structural system of membrane in 3DS Max and SAP2000 [Concepção e análise de sistema estrutural de membrana em 3DS Max e SAP2000]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 58-63
summary This paper presents the limitations and the potentialities of the joint job of the programs 3DS MAX and SAP2000 in the conception and analysis of structural system of membrane. The modeling for method of the dependent surfaces of curves NURBS was compared with surfaces defined for mathematical expressions in 3DS MAX; the creative potentialities of the clones, the stacks of modifiers and extension MATH MAX had been collated with the restrictions of project, as well as presented data-exchange procedures for simulation of efforts in SAP2000.
keywords CAE; Membrane; 3DS Max; Math Max; SAP 2000
series SIGRADI
email juarezfranco_arquiteto@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ddssar0016
id ddssar0016
authors Koutamanis, Alexander and Mitossi, Vicky
year 2000
title Grammatical and syntactic properties of CAAD representations for the early design stages
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary CAAD representations for the early design stages have traditionally focused on aspects apparently relating to design creativity, such as flexible, effortless and rich geometric modelling. However, modelling capabilities are generally unconnected to the control and analysis of design constraints that affect the further development of the design. These usually refer to functional and spatial aspects that are only implicit in a CAAD representation of design ‘solids’. Moreover, the stability and reliability of control and analysis rely on the grammatical and syntactic quality of the representation. In particular, (a) the grammatical well-formedness of spatial and building primitives, and (b) the syntactic completeness and unambiguity of spatial relations are essential prerequisites to any meaningful analysis of aspects such as fulfilment of programmatic requirements, indoor climate, lighting or human interaction with the built environment. The paper describes a dual spatial and building element representation implemented on top of a standard drawing system. The representation attempts to minimize input requirements, while at the same time providing feedback on the grammatical and syntactic quality of the design description.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 60e7
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2000
title The Intelligent Sketch: Developing a Conceptual Model for a Digital Design Assistant
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 137-145
summary The computer is a relatively new tool in the practice of Architecture. Since its introduction, there has been a desire amongst designers to use this new tool quite early in the design process. However, contrary to this desire, most Architects today use pen and paper in the very early stages of design to sketch. Architects solve problems by thinking visually. One of the most important tools that the Architect has at his disposal in the design process is the hand sketch. This iterative way of testing ideas and informing the design process with images fundamentally directs and aids the architect’s decision making. It has been said (Schön and Wiggins 1992) that sketching is about the reflective conversation designers have with images and ideas conveyed by the act of drawing. It is highly dependent on feedback. This “conversation” is an area worthy of investigation. Understanding this “conversation” is significant to understanding how we might apply the computer to enhance the designer’s ability to capture, manipulate and reflect on ideas during conceptual design. This paper discusses sketching and its relation to design thinking. It explores the conversations that designers engage in with the media they use. This is done through the explanation of a protocol analysis method. Protocol analysis used in the field of psychology, has been used extensively by Eastman et al (starting in the early 70s) as a method to elicit information about design thinking. In the pilot experiment described in this paper, two persons are used. One plays the role of the “hand” while the other is the “mind”- the two elements that are involved in the design “conversation”. This variation on classical protocol analysis sets out to discover how “intelligent” the hand should be to enhance design by reflection. The paper describes the procedures entailed in the pilot experiment and the resulting data. The paper then concludes by discussing future intentions for research and the far reaching possibilities for use of the computer in architectural studio teaching (as teaching aids) as well as a digital design assistant in conceptual design.
keywords CAAD, Sketching, Protocol Analysis, Design Thinking, Design Education
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id aa7f
authors Bollinger, Elizabeth and Hill, Pamela
year 1993
title Virtual Reality: Technology of the Future or Playground of the Cyberpunk?
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 121-129
summary Jaron Lanier is a major spokesperson of our society's hottest new technology: VR or virtual reality. He expressed his faith in the VR movement in this quote which appears in The User's Guide to the New Edge published by Mondo 2000. In its most technical sense, VR has attracted the attention of politicians in Washington who wonder if yet another technology developed in the United States will find its application across the globe in Asia. In its most human element, an entire "cyberpunk movement" has appealed to young minds everywhere as a seemingly safe form of hallucination. As architecture students, educators, and practitioners around the world are becoming attracted to the possibilities of VR technology as an extension of 3D modeling, visualization, and animation, it is appropriate to consider an overview of virtual reality.

In virtual reality a user encounters a computersimulated environment through the use of a physical interface. The user can interact with the environment to the point of becoming a part of the experience, and the experience becomes reality. Natural and

instinctive body movements are translated by the interface into computer commands. The quest for perfection in this human-computer relationship seems to be the essence of virtual reality technology.

To begin to capture the essence of virtual reality without first-hand experience, it is helpful to understand two important terms: presence and immersion. The sense of presence can be defined as the degree to which the user feels a part of the actual environment. The more reality the experience provides, the more presence it has. Immersion can be defined as the degree of other simulation a virtual reality interface provides for the viewer. A highly immersive system might provide more than just visual stimuli; for example, it may additionally provide simulated sound and motion, and simultaneously prevent distractions from being present.

series ACADIA
email EBollinger@uh.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 40cb
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 2000
title A imagem do espaço numérico (The Numeric Space Image)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 155-159
summary The challenge is to think about the numerical technology and its effects in the processes of production and representation of space. The focus of the analysis is to promote the knowledge about the relation between technique, art and society in the sense to have the elements to think about the future. The question is to think about the new communication that we have in the net, that changes the thinking about production and representation of space in the age of information.. The comprehension between the relation of space and tempo give us possibilities to know about life in space . For every period of history we have a form of space, in the informational era the space is image.
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id fa1b
authors Haapasalo, H.
year 2000
title Creative computer aided architectural design An internal approach to the design process
source University of Oulu (Finland)
summary This survey can be seen as quite multidisciplinary research. The basis for this study has been inapplicability of different CAD user interfaces in architectural design. The objective of this research is to improve architectural design from the creative problem-solving viewpoint, where the main goal is to intensify architectural design by using information technology. The research is linked to theory of methods, where an internal approach to design process means studying the actions and thinking of architects in the design process. The research approach has been inspired by hermeneutics. The human thinking process is divided into subconscious and conscious thinking. The subconscious plays a crucial role in creative work. The opposite of creative work is systematic work, which attempts to find solutions by means of logical inference. Both creative and systematic problem solving have had periods of predominance in the history of Finnish architecture. The perceptions in the present study indicate that neither method alone can produce optimal results. Logic is one of the tools of creativity, since the analysis and implementation of creative solutions require logical thinking. The creative process cannot be controlled directly, but by creating favourable work conditions for creativity, it can be enhanced. Present user interfaces can make draughting and the creation of alternatives quicker and more effective in the final stages of designing. Only two thirds of the architects use computers in working design, even the CAD system is being acquired in greater number of offices. User interfaces are at present inflexible in sketching. Draughting and sketching are the basic methods of creative work for architects. When working with the mouse, keyboard and screen the natural communication channel is impaired, since there is only a weak connection between the hand and the line being drawn on the screen. There is no direct correspondence between hand movements and the lines that appear on the screen, and the important items cannot be emphasized by, for example, pressing the pencil more heavily than normally. In traditional sketching the pen is a natural extension of the hand, as sketching can sometimes be controlled entirely by the unconscious. Conscious efforts in using the computer shift the attention away from the actual design process. However, some architects have reached a sufficiently high level of skill in the use of computer applications in order to be able to use them effectively in designing without any harmful effect on the creative process. There are several possibilities in developing CAD systems aimed at architectural design, but the practical creative design process has developed during a long period of time, in which case changing it in a short period of time would be very difficult. Although CAD has had, and will have, some evolutionary influences on the design process of architects as an entity, the future CAD user interface should adopt its features from the architect's practical and creative design process, and not vice versa.
keywords Creativity, Systematicism, Sketching
series thesis:PhD
email harri.haapasalo@oulu.fi
more http://herkules.oulu.fi/isbn9514257545/
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddssar0014
id ddssar0014
authors Janssen, P., Frazer, J. and Ming-xi, T.
year 2000
title Evolutionary design systems: a conceptual framework for the creation of generative processes
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary This paper presents an conceptual framework for the construction of generative mapping processes as a basis for creating active design tools in the domain of architecture. Such generative processes are seen as key components within evolutionary systems that manipulate populations of alternative solutions in order to discover previously unexplored possibilities. Solutions are represented in two forms: as highly encoded genotypes referred to as design seeds and as decoded phenotypes referred to as design proposals. The generative process maps the design seed to the design proposal. The discussion of generative processes is in two parts. In the first part it is argued that any generative process that aims to create a wide range of solutions that differ from each other in fundamental ways must focus on a limited subcategory of possible designs. It is proposed that the endeavour to create active design tools demands that the focus be on the designer's highly personalised style, called a design-schema. The second part discusses how to uncover the essence of an architectural design-schema. In particular, it is argued that implicit and familiar aspects of buildings must be scrutinised in order to reveal the knowledge that is essential to capturing and codifying a design-schema. A range of rationalisations and conceptualisations of built form are presented with examples to illustrate possible routes of analysis. Finally, in conclusion, the possibility of discovering universal generators common to many divers generative processes are discussed.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 6b25
authors Pini, E.L., Abades, I.S. and Paolucci, A.L.
year 2000
title El Modelo Digital en los Primeros Años de la Enseñanza de la Arquitectura (The Digital Model in the First Years of the Architectural Education)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 336-338
summary We will analyze a pedagogic exercise that joined together both the Informatics and Morphology Courses, required in the second year of Architecture School. The objective of the analysis is to explore the possibilities of the computer as a tool for design, and also to contribute some ideas for planning, curriculum development, and the necessary training to introduce the use of computer graphics in the Architecture School. We based our analysis on some preliminary hypotheses: (1) Students must learn to use digital models with a certain degree of simultaneity with learning design and the other techniques used to develop models. (2) Professors of Design, Representation, and Morphology are main actors in this learning process; they do not have to become experts in informatics, but have some understanding of the topic. (3) Many universities and professional associations are offering students and professionals courses based in the use of programs, instead of addressing their real needs.
series SIGRADI
email edulupi@arqa.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id 5bc1
authors Sampaio Nardelli, Eduardo
year 2000
title O Uso do Computador como Ferramenta de Ensino de Projeto de Arquitetura (The Use of Computers as a Tool for Architectural Design Teaching)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 355-357
summary The focus of this research is to demonstrate the possibilities of the use of computers on teaching Architectural Project. As faculty member at Mackenzie University we relate our experience, where we utilized scale models for the development of proposals, where it was assumed that the media used for expression of the concepts proposed by students interferes on the final result. Facing this assumption, we imagine that a Bricolage Studio could strongly improve the design classes. Considering the operational difficulties of this idea, we suggest that computer could be an alternative if used in the conceptual stage. So, we would have a Digital Bricolage Studio, where students could experience different visualization and simulation resources which stimulate their creative processes. We tried this experience with students of Faculdade de Belas Artes de S.Paulo and concluded that computer resources are also a way to understand and interpretate the spirit of our time.
series SIGRADI
email nardelli@mackenzie.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id ddssar0028
id ddssar0028
authors Uysal, V. Safak and Wilsing, Markus
year 2000
title Embodying architecture, studying dance: movement as means of studying body-space relationship
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Body, even at its most still form, is the most violent against the acclamations of architectural space formulated in terms of a “search for the order in the environment”. It leans against the wall, hits the table, falls over the bed, approaches the window case, shakes and trembles in empty space: in short, it moves; it is alive. However violently, the presence of the human being is the fundamental input for the architectural practice since it is an art of creating spaces to enhance the living conditions of the human being. In recognizing the violent character of the body, we must include not only the real bodily movement, but also the extensions of that movement which we make in imagination. In this study, the authors discuss the possibilities of studying theatrical dance in order to understand the body-space relationship, constructing an analogy to the contact improvisation technique. Use of space in performance is examined on a two dimensional model: one dimension marked by body and space at its extremes, and the other marked by the affirmative and the negative types of interaction. The schema provides one with a general categorization that classifies space as (1) background, (2) motivator, (3) partner in dialogue, (4) mental counterpart. The limitations brought about by the universal approach are mentioned at the end, in order to be approached within the following study.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c51f
authors Voigt, A., Walchhofer, H.P. and Linzer, H.
year 2000
title City Experimental Lab
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 143-146
summary The present contribution deals with the required scale of performances regarding an adequate simulation environment for recent and future challenges of urban development planning based on the concept “City Experimental Lab, CEL”. This paper issues concrete project experience covering the capital city of Upper Austria, Linz. Such CEL could and should act as an “expert system” in the preliminary stages of decision-finding, making available all particulars regarding decisions to the politicians, the planning administration, outside advisors and particularly to the citizens concerned in the suited present-day manner. It could be used for work sessions of planning- or design councils, expert hearings, for the continuous information of citizens on present planning work at the various degrees of concreteness and commitment, etc.. Thus those possibilities are to be enhanced which turn the present city configuration into a virtual experience by integrating visions, utopias and the future developments.
series SIGRADI
email ifor-p@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id eef2
authors Ataman, Osman and Wingert, Kate
year 2000
title Developing a Methodology for the Study of Urban Transformation
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 140-142
summary There are certain limitations in studying urban development and transformation by depending solely on traditional media. The investigation of historical urban data, both architectural and site information, is difficult to analyze unless all of the urban elements can be visualized simultaneously. The application of digital media provides a model for reconstructing and analyzing certain architectural elements from the past. This paper describes a research project that focuses on the visualization of the historical development of an urban area. In general, our research is aimed at developing a model and Philadelphia is chosen as a case study. An emphasis is placed on identification, categorization and representation of information in a way that is useful for urban researchers for analysis.
series SIGRADI
email oataman@unix.temple.edu, mwingert@thunder.ocis.temple.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id a136
authors Blaise, J.Y., Dudek, I. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Java collaborative interface for architectural simulations A case study on wooden ceilings of Krakow
source International Conference On Conservation - Krakow 2000, 23-24 November 1998, Krakow, Poland
summary Concern for the architectural and urban preservation problems has been considerably increasing in the past decades, and with it the necessity to investigate the consequences and opportunities opened for the conservation discipline by the development of computer-based systems. Architectural interventions on historical edifices or in preserved urban fabric face conservationists and architects with specific problems related to the handling and exchange of a variety of historical documents and representations. The recent development of information technologies offers opportunities to favour a better access to such data, as well as means to represent architectural hypothesis or design. Developing applications for the Internet also introduces a greater capacity to exchange experiences or ideas and to invest on low-cost collaborative working platforms. In the field of the architectural heritage, our research addresses two problems: historical data and documentation of the edifice, methods of representation (knowledge modelling and visualisation) of the edifice. This research is connected with the ARKIW POLONIUM co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France) and the Institute HAiKZ of Kraków's Faculty of Architecture. The ARKIW programme deals with questions related to the use of information technologies in the recording, protection and studying of the architectural heritage. Case studies are chosen in order to experience and validate a technical platform dedicated to the formalisation and exchange of knowledge related to the architectural heritage (architectural data management, representation and simulation tools, survey methods, ...). A special focus is put on the evolution of the urban fabric and on the simulation of reconstructional hypothesis. Our contribution will introduce current ARKIW internet applications and experiences: The ARPENTEUR architectural survey experiment on Wie¿a Ratuszowa (a photogrammetrical survey based on an architectural model). A Gothic and Renaissance reconstruction of the Ratusz Krakowski using a commercial modelisation and animation software (MAYA). The SOL on line documentation interface for Kraków's Rynek G_ówny. Internet analytical approach in the presentation of morphological informations about Kraków's Kramy Bogate Rynku Krakowskiego. Object-Orientation approach in the modelling of the architectural corpus. The VALIDEUR and HUBLOT Virtual Reality modellers for the simulation and representation of reconstructional hypothesis and corpus analysis.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 792a
authors Blaschke, Thomas and Tiede, Dirk
year 2003
title Bridging GIS-based landscape analysis/modelling and 3D-simulation.Is this already 4D?
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Several studies have used remote sensing to map patterns of e.g. deforestation or to analyse the rates of land use change. Thesestudies have proven useful for interpreting the causes of urbanization, deforestation etc. and the impact of such changes on theregion. Monitoring of change (e.g. deforestation or reforestation) is frequently perceived as one of the most important contributionsof remote sensing technology to the study of global ecological and environmental change (Roughgarden et al. 1991). Manyresearchers believe that the integration of remote sensing techniques within analysis of environmental change is essential if ecologistsare to meet the challenges of the future, specifically issues relating to global change; however, in practice, this integration has so farbeen limited (Griffiths & Mather 2000). Considerable difficulties are encountered in linking, on the one hand, the biologies oforganisms and the ecologies of populations to the fluxes of material and energy quantifiable at the level of ecosystems. In this paper,we concentrate on the methodological aspects of the delineation of landscape objects and touch the ecological application onlysuperficially but we elucidate the potential of the proposed methodology for several ecological applications briefly.
series other
email thomas.blaschke@uni-tuebingen.de
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ga0018
id ga0018
authors Ciao, Quinsan
year 2000
title Hearing Architectural Design: Simulation and Auralization for Generating Better Acoustic Spaces
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper with demonstration is devoted to revealing and establishing the relationship between space and sound through computational acoustic analysis, simulation and electronic synthesis of audible sound. Based on science of acoustics and computing technology, acoustic effect of an architectural 3-D design can be analyzed and the resulted sound in space can be synthesized and predicted accordingly and being heard. Auralization refers to this process of acoustic analysis, sound synthesis and audio presentation of the result in the form of audible sound. Design alternatives can be experimented until satisfactory acoustic effect is achieved. Traditionally, designers rely on some minimum and vague understanding or specialists’ experiences to predict and design for a desirable sound behavior in spaces. Most likely acoustic design and analysis are seen as a luxury remedy only affordable in large-scale theatres and concert halls. The recent available PC based auralization tools brought significance in both in terms of new knowledge towards the science and art of architectural acoustics and the methods and practice in the design process. The examples demonstrated in the presentation will indicate that the auralization technology make it possible for the designers, consultants, end users or potential occupants to examine and evaluate the performance of different designs by hearing it directly before an informed decision can be made. The case studies also illustrated that the auralization is a powerful tool for general public with common building types to uncover everyday acoustic problems that have been constantly harming their well being and would otherwise be undetected.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 958e
authors Coppola, Carlo and Ceso, Alessandro
year 2000
title Computer Aided Design and Artificial Intelligence in Urban and Architectural Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 301-307
summary In general, computer-aided design is still limited to a rather elementary use of the medium, as it is mainly used for the representation/simulation of a design idea w an electronic drawing-table. hich is not computer-generated. The procedures used to date have been basically been those of an electronic drawing-table. At the first stage of development the objective was to find a different and better means of communication, to give form to an idea so as to show its quality. The procedures used were 2D design and 3D simulation models, usually used when the design was already defined. The second stage is when solid 3D modelling is used to define the formal design at the conception stage, using virtual models instead of study models in wood, plastic, etc. At the same time in other connected fields the objective is to evaluate the feasibility of the formal idea by means of structural and technological analysis. The third stage, in my opinion, should aim to develop procedures capable of contributing to both the generation of the formal idea and the simultaneous study of technical feasibility by means of a decision-making support system aided by an Artificial Intelligence procedure which will lead to what I would describe as the definition of the design in its totality. The approach to architectural and urban design has been strongly influenced by the first two stages, though these have developed independently and with very specific objectives. It is my belief that architectural design is now increasingly the result of a structured and complex process, not a simple act of pure artistic invention. Consequently, I feel that the way forward is a procedure able to virtually represent all the features of the object designed, not only in its definitive configuration but also and more importantly in the interactions which determine the design process as it develops. Thus A.I. becomes the means of synthesis for models which are hierarchically subordinated which together determine the design object in its developmental process, supporting decision-making by applying processing criteria which generative modelling has already identified. This trend is currently being experimented, giving rise to interesting results from process design in the field of industrial production.
series eCAADe
email carlo.coppola@unina2.it
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 2aca
authors Faucher, Didier and Nivet, Marie-Laure
year 2000
title Playing with design intents: integrating physical and urban constraints in CAD
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 93-105
summary Our work deals with the exploration of a universe of forms that satisfy some design intents. That is, we substitute a "generate and test" approach for a declarative approach in which an object is created from its properties. In this paper we present an original method that takes into account design intents relative to sunlight, visibility and urban regulation. First of all we study how current CAD tools have considered these properties until now. Our conclusion is that the classical design/simulation/analysis process does not suit design practices, especially in the early stages. We think that an improved CAD system should offer the architect the option of manipulating abstract information such as design intents. We define an intent as a conceptual expression of constraints having an influence on the project. For instance, a visual intent will be stated with no reference to vision geometry: "from this place, I want to see the front of the new building". We show how to represent each of these constraints with a 3D volume associated to some characteristics. If some solutions exist, we are sure that they are included in these volumes. For physical phenomena we compute the volume geometry using the principles of inverse simulation. In the case of urban regulation we apply deduction rules. Design intents are solved by means of geometrical entities that represent openings or obstructions in the project. Computing constraint volumes is a way of guiding the architect in his exploration of solutions. Constraint volumes are new spaces that can restore the link between form and phenomenon in a CAD tool. Our approach offers the designer the possibility of manipulating design intents.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

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