CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 743

_id f2f1
authors Breen, Jack and Nottrot, Robert
year 2000
title Project a2W. A Dialogue on New Media Perspectives
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 291-296
summary This paper documents an initiative taking the form of a "dialogue". The format which has been developed is somewhat similar to that of the "conversation" which Mondrian conceived in 1919, taking place between two fictitious characters - A and B - discussing the new direction in art, which he called "Nieuwe Beelding" and which contributed to the "De Stijl" movement (the dialogue was followed later that year by a "trialogue" between X, Y and Z on a virtual walk taking them from the countryside to the city) 1 . This time the issue is not so much the evolvement of a new artistic or architectural style, but the role of "new media" in architecture... The present dialogue takes place between two fictitious media proponents ("Alpha" and "Omega"). They take turns questioning several issues and exchanging proposals... What are the values - and the promises - of computer supported instruments in creative design and research - concerning the art and science shaping the built environment? How do the present applications measure up, how do they compare to the expectations and ambitions expressed a number of years ago? The form of a dialogue means that issues and ideas, which are not often aired within the confines of academic discourse, can be played back and forth and a measure of exaggeration was intended from the beginning... This contribution does not in any way pretend to be all-inclusive. Rather, the paper is meant to put forward ideas and experiences - from the perspective of the Delft Media group, in practice, in teaching and in research - which may stimulate (or even irritate?) but will hopefully activate. The aim is to open up discussions, to allow other (hidden) agendas for the future to become more visible and to look for platforms for sharing concepts and fascinations, however improbable they might be...
keywords A Dialogue on New Media
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl, r.nottrot@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id f73b
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 2000
title Percept vs. Precept: Digital Media & the Creative Process
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 261-264
summary The design of architecture, as well as all of the arts, is a creative act concerned with the expression of ideas through culturally significant and relevant form. In order for the creative act to transcend the authority or dictates of precedents or trends, it must be informed and guided by a process and not a product; one which reveals, but does not dictate, expressive, functional form. The initial impact of digital media on architectural design has been the ability to render the look of a final project or to create shapes that reflect the facility of the tool. Digital media also enables the composition and structure of space and form to be discovered simultaneously and relationally with the phenomena of color and kinetics, to generate and visualize an idea as form, and to represent form as experience. This requires interweaving computing with a creative process in which percept, rather than precept, is the driving force of the investigation. This paper explores the role of ideation, tectonic color and kinetics as an intentional design strategy and formgiver for architecture. The role of the computer is to enable the designer to generate meaningful architecture beyond precepts of image and style. Design as a making in the mind uses our rational and imaginative faculties. Complete freedom is not a necessity for inventiveness. Research on creativity indicates that "constraining options and focusing thought in a specific, rigorous and discerning direction" play an important role. The key is a balance of structured and discursive inquiry that encourages a speculative, free association of ideas. Tim Berners-Lee, one of the creators of the World Wide Web, likened creativity to a weblike process that is nonlinear but also not random; which when placed in an environment rich with information will float ideas so the mind "can jiggle them into an insight." Geoffrey Vickers in his essay, "Rationality and Intuition" described this symbiotic relationship as "...two functions which in practice are never wholly separated but which are, nonetheless, logically distinct as two reciprocating phases in a recurrent process of mental activity." The rational is formative and intuition is generative; both are essential to creativity.
keywords Percept, Creativity, Ideation, Tectonic Color, Kinetics
series eCAADe
email architexture@earthlink.net
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id b5f3
authors Johnson, Brian R.
year 2000
title Sustaining Studio Culture: How Well Do Internet Tools Meet the Needs of Virtual Design Studios?
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 15-22
summary The Internet beckons seductively to students. The prospect of nearly instantaneous communication with acquaintances spread across the face of the earth is alluring. The ease with which rich graphical content can be made available to the world is stunning. The possibility of a design being seen by friends, family, and famous architects is tantalizing. Faculty are drawn by the potent synergy and learning that can be found in the opposition and cooperation of different cultural roots. It is probable that entire design studio sequences will be offered through distance-learning programs in the near future. Is that a good idea? Much has been written about "virtual design studios" in architecture schools and "virtual offices" in practice. Most offices have largely or totally abandoned drafting boards in favor of digital tools of production. Yet, regarding design, Ken Sanders, author of The Digital Architect, and Manager of Information Services at Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership (ZGF), of Portland, Oregon, has written "we still make an effort to locate project teams together and always will". Production CAD work requires different kinds of interaction than design and design instruction. The experiments have been invaluable in developing strategies for use of the Internet as a component of a design studio series, but rarely depend entirely on use of the Internet for all course communications. In fact, most describe fairly isolated efforts to augment some aspect of traditional design environments using Internet tools (ftp, email, web). A few have implemented new pedagogic or collaboration paradigms (e.g., ETH’s phase(x)). This paper considers the traditional design studio in terms of formal and informal activities, characterizes the major Internet technologies with regard to the resulting interaction issues. In particular, it describes an area of informal work group communications that appears to be ill-supported with existing tools. The paper goes on to describe a web-based collaboration tool which was developed to address the need for less formal communication. The context for this development is the concept of a fully distributed collaboration environment with particular attention to questions of informal communication. Finally, it describes how the tool was deployed in an experimental "web studio" setting and student responses to use of the tool.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Collaboration, Online Communities, Web Tools
series eCAADe
email brj@u.washington.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ca3d
authors Shakarchi, Ali Y.
year 2000
title Tools for Distributed Design Practice
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 89-92
summary During collaboration designers jointly solve problems as well as interact for critical feedback. Today’s heterogeneous, distributed and global market demands of designers collaboration in both synchronous and asynchronous mode. The management and control of such projects is frequently geographical and temporally distributed. Increasingly, efficient communication is becoming a vital component in the design process, whether in managing the project data or controlling the compatibility of different inputs by design team members or minimizing the revision cycles. Paper presents and discuss iSPACE, the mature prototype software application developed to serve different scenarios of communication between the distributed design team members. The iSPACE is web based application that can deliver an interactive environment over low-bandwidth connections. Application of iSPACE in the educational environment is monitored and discussed. Giving the potential of this technology to enhance and to streamline complex tasks associated with the design process, the quality of the design product is changing. The new style of design practice can be now practically further modeled, supported and enhanced.
keywords Design Collaboration, Design Process, i-space, Digital Media
series eCAADe
email ashakarc@arch.ubc.ca
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 7ee9
authors Wood, J. B. and Chambers, Tom
year 2000
title CAD - Enabled by the Organisation of Science and the Poetics of a Visual Language
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 327-329
summary CADET, CAD education and training, a research unit with the Department of Architecture and Building Science (Faculty of Engineering, University of Strathclyde) promotes an integrated approach to the built environment, seeking to bring together the rational and expressive modes of thought by teaching design through IT and CAD. In recent years this has been introduced as a pilot project within the primary and secondary school sector as well as Year 1 and Year 2 of the Building Design Engineering (BDE). The presentations discussed in this paper demonstrate recent projects in a social context - modelling possible spaces via virtual reality on behalf of clients in education and social work environments. The motivation for such a creative and participatory dialogue in a community context acknowledges that, in the wake of post industrialisation, the reconstruction of our urban environments demands that we develop the tools required for a meaningful participation in the design process. The nature of a participatory process demands a demystification of the design process, which is a reality made possible by CAD.
keywords Teaching, Organisation, Participation, Knowledge and Demystification
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id d64b
authors Kieferle, Joachim B.
year 2000
title Virtual Space - New Tasks for Architects
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 205-208
summary The meaning of architecture is extended due to the new media. As never before, computers help architects to handle huge amounts of information or give them a freedom to handle complex shaped models. However, it is not the shapes, but the space and its qualities they are created in, that imposes a new kind of architecture. This article focuses in an abridged version on some attributes of virtual space, its expanding features for real space and what the chances for architecture might be. But - what is space? Is it something objective? How is it perceived by man? This questions have to be answered first to understand the following hypothesis.
series eCAADe
email kieferle@igp.uni-stuttgart.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 1f5c
authors Beesley, Philip and Seebohm, Thomas
year 2000
title Digital Tectonic Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 287-290
summary Digital tectonic design is a fresh approach to architectural design methodology. Tectonics means a focus on assemblies of construction elements. Digital tectonics is an evolving methodology that integrates use of design software with traditional construction methods. We see digital tectonic design as a systematic use of geometric and spatial ordinances, used in combination with details and components directly related to contemporary construction. The current approach will, we hope, lead to an architectural curriculum based on generative form making where the computer can be used to produce systems of forms algorithmically. Digital design has tended to remain abstract, emphasizing visual and spatial arrangements often at the expense of materials and construction. Our pursuit is translation of these methods into more fully realized physical qualities. This method offers a rigorous approach based on close study of geometry and building construction elements. Giving a context for this approach, historical examples employing systematic tectonic design are explored in this paper. The underlying geometric ordinance systems and the highly tuned relationships between the details in these examples offer design vocabularies for use within the studio curriculum. The paper concludes with a detailed example from a recent studio project demonstrating particular qualities developed within the method. The method involves a wide range of scales, relating large-scale gestural and schematic studies to detailed assembly systems. Designing in this way means developing geometric strategies and, in parallel, producing detailed symbols or objects to be inserted. These details are assembled into a variety of arrays and groups. The approach is analogous to computer-aided designŐs tradition of shape grammars in which systems of spatial relationships are used to control the insertion of shapes within a space. Using this approach, a three-dimensional representation of a building is iteratively refined until the final result is an integrated, systematically organized complex of symbols representing physical building components. The resulting complex offers substantial material qualities. Strategies of symbol insertions and hierarchical grouping of elements are familiar in digital design practice. However these strategies are usually used for automated production of preconceived designs. In contrast to thsse normal approaches this presentation focuses on emergent qualities produced directly by means of the complex arrays of symbol insertions. The rhyth
keywords 3D CAD Systems, Design Practice, 3D Design Strategies
series eCAADe
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4915
authors Counsell, J.A. and Marshall, D.J.
year 2000
title Computer Based Quizzes to Test Understanding of Videos on Building Construction and the BEATL Project
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 117-120
summary BEATL (Built Environment Appropriate Technology for Learning) is a research project based on a process of module pairing and collaboration between Built Environment Faculties. It is more about how one can embed technology in pedagogically sound ways than about the technology itself. This paper describes a case study of innovative self-paced diagnostic on-line illustrated Quizzes introduced at the University of the West of England (UWE) last year and now partnered by the University of Westminster (WU). It focuses on the development of the innovation, embedding it in teaching at UWE, its transfer to WU, and the support of “Educational Technology Officers” (ETO) in each. The methodologies used for evaluating the costs and benefits of this innovation are discussed.
keywords Formative Assessment, CAL, Video, BEATL, Embedment
series eCAADe
email john.counsell@uwe.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 389b
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2000
title Sketch that Scene for Me: Creating Virtual Worlds by Freehand Drawing
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 265-268
summary With the Web people can now view virtual threedimensional worlds and explore virtual space. Increasingly, novice users are interested in creating 3D Web sites. Virtual Reality Modeling Language gained ISO status in 1997, although it is being supplanted by the compatible Java3D API and alternative 3D Web technologies compete. Viewing VRML scenes is relatively straightforward on most hardware platforms and browsers, but currently there are only two ways to create 3D virtual scenes: One is to code the scene directly using VRML. The other is to use existing CAD and modeling software, and save the world in VRML format or convert to VRML from some other format. Both methods are time consuming, cumbersome, and have steep learning curves. Pen-based user interfaces, on the other hand, are for many an easy and intuitive method for graphics input. Not only are people familiar with the look and feel of paper and pencil, novice users also find it less intimidating to draw what they want, where they want it instead of using a complicated tool palette and pull-down menus. Architects and designers use sketches as a primary tool to generate design ideas and to explore alternatives, and numerous computer-based interfaces have played on the concept of "sketch". However, we restrict the notion of sketch to freehand drawing, which we believe helps people to think, to envision, and to recognize properties of the objects with which they are working. SKETCH employs a pen interface to create three-dimensional models, but it uses a simple language of gestures to control a three-dimensional modeler; it does not attempt to interpret freehand drawings. In contrast, our support of 3D world creation using freehand drawing depend on users’ traditional understanding of a floor plan representation. Igarashi et al. used a pen interface to drive browsing in a 3D world, by projecting the user’s marks on the ground plane in the virtual world. Our Sketch-3D project extends this approach, investigating an interface that allows direct interpretation of the drawing marks (what you draw is what you get) and serves as a rapid prototyping tool for creating 3D virtual scenes.
keywords Freehand Sketching, Pen-Based User Interface, Interaction, VRML, Navigation
series eCAADe
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id 4c4b
authors Gavin, Lesley
year 2000
title 3D Online Learning in Multi-User Environments
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 187-191
summary Over the last 2 years the MSc Virtual Environments course in the Bartlett School of Graduate Studies has used a 3-dimensional on-line multi-user environment to explore the possibilities for the architectural design of virtual environments. The "Bartlett" virtual world is established as the environment where students undertake group design projects. After an initial computer based face-toface workshop, students work from terminals at home and around the university. Using avatar representations of themselves, tutors and students meet in the on-line environment. The environment is used for student group discussions and demonstrations, tutorials and as the virtual "siteŐ for their design projects. The "Bartlett" world is currently open to every internet user and so often has "visitors". These visitors often engage in discussions with the students resulting in interesting dynamics in the teaching pattern. This project has been very successful and is particularly popular with the students. Observations made over the 2 years the project has been running have resulted in interesting reflections on both the role of architectural design in virtual environments and the use of such environments to extend the pedagogical structure used in traditional studio teaching. This paper will review the educational experience gained by the project and propose the ideal software environment for further development. We are now examining similar types of environments currently on the market with a view to adapting them for use as a distance learning medium.
series eCAADe
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 6645
authors Ozel, Filiz
year 2000
title Architectural Knowledge and Database Management Systems
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 135-138
summary Although the theory and practice of using database management systems in managing information has been a well recognized area of research in other disciplines such as business, urban planning, and engineering, architectural researchers have only occasionally explored the implications of these tools in structuring architectural knowledge. Among these are studies that look at facilities management aspects of databases as well as project management aspects mostly focusing on document management issues 6 . While visual databases have been the focus of other work, the term "database" has been used in architectural research sometimes to indicate any set of underlying data and at other times to indicate an actual relational database management system. Inconsistent use of terminology has led to difficulties in developing established theory regarding the use and development of database management systems for architectural problems. While such systems can be very powerful in structuring design knowledge, in architectural education the only place where their potential has been recognized is in the digitizing of slide libraries with the intention to make them accessible through electronic retrieval and viewing systems, which has mostly been seen within the purview of slide librarians with little interest from the faculty.
series eCAADe
email ozel@asu.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id aeec
authors Regenbrecht, H., Kruijff, E., Donath, D., Seichter, H. and Beetz, J.
year 2000
title VRAM - A Virtual Reality Aided Modeller
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 235-237
summary This article describes VRAM, short for Virtual Reality Aided Modeler. VRAM is a conceptual design tool supported by Virtual Reality technology and an ongoing testbed for theory and methodology in the field of three dimensional user interfaces (3DUIs). The outcomes from the project should consist of an intuitive and comprehensive immersive surface modeler, next to a set of taxonomies and guidelines for the development of 3DUIs. Based on a modular structure, VRAMs program architecture allows the easy extension of functionality. The application consists of the seamless integration of four main functionality modules, namely system control, viewing & browsing, editing and modeling. Based on the premise of portability, the software environment runs on both SGI Irix and MS Windows NT platforms. To be relatively independent in developing 3DUI techniques, the VRAM environment supports a multiplicity of input and output devices. Due to the focus on immersive modeling, tracking devices, head mounted displays and stereoprojection devices are the main I/O channels. In this article, we will primary focus on the functionality of the virtual modeller.
series eCAADe
email caad@archit.uni-weimar.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id f8a3
authors Tuzmen, Ayca
year 2000
title Collaborative Building Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 93-99
summary Studies on team performance have observed that some teams at the same stage in their development perform better than other teams, even of the same composition. Why is this? One of the main reasons is found to be a good team process. Researchers argue that collaborative process is an ideal case through which parties who see different aspects of a problem can constructively explore their differences and search for solutions that go beyond their own limited vision of what is possible. Much attention is now being paid to improvement of the design team process by establishing a collaborative environment in building design practice. Many scholars have prescribed various techniques and technology as ways of achieving collaboration in building design practice. A combination of these prescriptions does support design teams by facilitating one or more of the following: (a) team internal communication, (b) team external communication, (c) information sharing, and (d) decision making. Only recently have there been studies that have provided the strategies for integrating these techniques and technology for the establishment of a collaborative work environment. Researchers from various areas of research have this intention. This includes studies in Business Process Management (BPM), Business Process Re-Engineering (BPR), Total Quality Management (TQM), Project Management (PM), Workflow Management (WfM). All of these studies share one common feature. They all contribute to the study of the management of the team process. Despite the power of the concept and the history of successful application of process management techniques in building practice, the process management strategies are not a panacea. Rather it is a tool which, when properly used under appropriate circumstances, can aid design teams in the achievement of a collaborative design environment. The successful implementation or enactment of process management strategies in building design practice requires a mediator, a facilitator, or a project manager with a variety of managerial skills. However, it is not only enough to support major facilitators in the implementation or in the enactment of a design process that is planned for that teamwork. The performance of a design process should not only be depended on the skills or capabilities of tools that managers use to enact design processes. In order to achieve a collaborative design environment, members of the design team should also be given the support for monitoring and implementing of a collaborative design process. Team members should also have the ability to define, implement and track their personal subprocesses. Team members should also be able to monitor the process and be able to resolve the conflicts between their actions and other members' actions. A distributed process management environment is required in order to facilitate the management and control of the enactment of a collaborative design process. Such an environment should enable the control and monitoring of the enactment of a process and the resources required for its enactment. This paper presents the conceptual model of a process management environment that is developed in order to establish such a process management environment. It also discusses the findings of a study that is conducted for the validation and verification of this conceptual model.
keywords Collaborative Design, Process Management, Workflow Management
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email atuzmen@asu.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2006/06/06 04:39

_id 456a
authors Alvarado, R.G., Parra, J.C., Vergara, R.L. and Chateau, H.B.
year 2000
title Architectural References to Virtual Environments Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 151-155
summary Based on a comparison between the perception of digital and real construction, the development of virtual systems and the review of additional sources, this paper states some differences between the design of virtual environments and architectural spaces. Virtual-reality technologies provide advanced capabilities to simulate real situations, and also to create digital worlds not referred to physical places, such as imaginary landscapes or environments devoted to electronic activities, like entertainment, learning or commerce. Some on-line services already use 3D-stages, resembling building halls and domestic objects, and several authors have mentioned virtual modeling as a job opportunity to architects. But it will argue in this paper that the design of those environments should consider their own digital characteristics. Besides, the use of virtual installations on networks impells a convergence with global media, like Internet or TV. Virtual environments can be a 3Devolution of communicational technologies, which have an increasing participation in culture, reaching a closer relationship to contemporary architecture.
keywords Virtual Environments, Spatial Perception, Design Methodology
series eCAADe
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 0c0d
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2000
title Computer as an Metaphorisation Machine
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 283-286
summary Digital media is transforming the practice and teaching of design. Information technologies offer not only better production and rendering tools but also the ability to model, manipulate, and understand design in new ways. A new era in CAAD has started. One of the aspects of this situation is the increase in the number of computers in design offices and architectural schools (many of our students have their own computers, which a re often better than the computers we have at our school). We can submit a proposition that the critical point in the creative use of computers is over, and we should think how computers and new media may extend the designer’s perception and imagination.
keywords Creation of a Form, Imagination, Metaphors, Computer Support of Form Searching
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id b966
authors Ceccato, Cristiano and Janssen, Patrick
year 2000
title GORBI: Autonomous Intelligent Agents Using Distributed Object-Oriented Graphics
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 297-300
summary Autonomous agents represent a new form of thinking that is of primary importance in the age of the Internet and distributed networks, and provide a platform on which Turing’s model of sequential instruction-executing machines and von NeumannŐs connectionist vision of interconnected, concurrent fine-grain processors may be reconciled. In this paper we map this emergent paradigm to design and design intelligence by to illustrating examples of decentralised interacting agents projects.
keywords Graphics, CAD, Internet, Evolutionary, Generative, Distributed, Decentralised, Object, Request, Broker, CORBA, OpenGL, Java, C++
series eCAADe
email sdchris@polyu.edu.hk, 99902961r@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 7e01
authors Earl Mark
year 2000
title A Prospectus on Computers Throughout the Design Curriculum
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 77-83
summary Computer aided architectural design has spread throughout architecture schools in the United States as if sown upon the wind. Yet, the proliferation alone may not be a good measure of the computer’s impact on the curriculum or signify the true emergence of a digital design culture. The aura of a relatively new technology may blind us from understanding its actual place in the continuum of design education. The promise of the technology is to completely revolutionize design; however, the reality of change is perhaps rooted in an underlying connection to core design methods. This paper considers a transitional phase within a School reviewing its entire curriculum. Lessons may be found in the Bauhaus educational program at the beginning of the 20 th century and its response to the changing shape of society and industry.
keywords Pedagogy, Computer Based Visualization, Spatial and Data Analysis Methods, Interdisciplinary Computer Based Models
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/05/29 04:45

_id 1f21
authors Geebelen, Benjamin and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title IDEA-l. Bringing Natural Lighting to the Early Design Stages
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 193-196
summary This paper discusses the use of computers as design tools for natural lighting in the early stages of the architectural design process. It focuses on IDEA-l, a new natural-lighting design tool, currently under development, that is meant to offer the architect/designer a digital equivalent for scale models, artificial sky simulators and heliodons.
series eCAADe
email ben.geebelen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 06e8
authors Knight, Michael W. and Brown, Andre G.P.
year 2000
title Interfaces for Virtual Environments; A Review Recent Developments and Potential Ways forward
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 215-219
summary The physical and visual nature of the interface devices and media that enable the human agent to interact with a virtual world have evolved over the past few years. In this paper we consider the different lines of development that have taken place in the refinement of these interfaces and summarise what has been learned about the appropriate nature of the interface for such interaction. In terms of the physical aspects we report on the kind of devices that have been used to enable the human agent to operate within the computer generated environment. We point out the successes and failures in the systems that have been tried out in recent years. Likewise we consider the kinds of software generated interface that have been used to represent virtual worlds. Again, we review the efficacy of the environments that have been devised; the quality of the Cyberplace. Our aim is to be able to comment on the effectiveness of the systems that have been devised from a number of points of view. We consider the physical and software-based aids for navigation; the nature of the representation of architectural worlds; strengthening “groundedness”; the inclusion of “otherness”; and reinforcement of the idea of “presence”
keywords Virtual Environments, Games Engines, Collaborative Design, Navigation Metaphors
series eCAADe
email mknight@liv.ac.uk
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

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