CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 5f69
authors Kvan, Th., Gibson, I. and Ming, L.W.
year 2000
title Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Models
source ECPPM2000 – Product and Process Modelling in Building and Construction, Lisbon, Portugal, Balkema Publishers, September 25-27, 2000, pp. 351-359
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) technology has developed as a result of the requirements of manufacturing industry. There are a number of other application areas where RP has been used to good effect and one of these is architectural modelling. However; such application areas often have different requirements from what is offered by the current technology. This paper describes work carried out by the authors to investigate potential applications for architectural modelling; as well as an attempt to explore the limits of the technology. It will go on to discuss how the technology may be developed to better serve the requirements of architects.
keywords Rapid Prototyping; Architectural Design
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id avocaad_2001_17
id avocaad_2001_17
authors Ying-Hsiu Huang, Yu-Tung Liu, Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yi-Ting Cheng, Yu-Chen Chiu
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in design process
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Design media is a fundamental tool, which can incubate concrete ideas from ambiguous concepts. Evolved from freehand sketches, physical models to computerized drafting, modeling (Dave, 2000), animations (Woo, et al., 1999), and virtual reality (Chiu, 1999; Klercker, 1999; Emdanat, 1999), different media are used to communicate to designers or users with different conceptual levels¡@during the design process. Extensively employed in design process, physical models help designers in managing forms and spaces more precisely and more freely (Millon, 1994; Liu, 1996).Computerized drafting, models, animations, and VR have gradually replaced conventional media, freehand sketches and physical models. Diversely used in the design process, computerized media allow designers to handle more divergent levels of space than conventional media do. The rapid emergence of computers in design process has ushered in efforts to the visual impact of this media, particularly (Rahman, 1992). He also emphasized the use of computerized media: modeling and animations. Moreover, based on Rahman's study, Bai and Liu (1998) applied a new design media¡Xvirtual reality, to the design process. In doing so, they proposed an evaluation process to examine the visual impact of this new media in the design process. That same investigation pointed towards the facilitative role of the computerized media in enhancing topical comprehension, concept realization, and development of ideas.Computer technology fosters the growth of emerging media. A new computerized media, scenario scripting (Sasada, 2000; Jozen, 2000), markedly enhances computer animations and, in doing so, positively impacts design processes. For the three latest media, i.e., computerized animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting, the following question arises: What role does visual impact play in different design phases of these media. Moreover, what is the origin of such an impact? Furthermore, what are the similarities and variances of computing techniques, principles of interaction, and practical applications among these computerized media?This study investigates the similarities and variances among computing techniques, interacting principles, and their applications in the above three media. Different computerized media in the design process are also adopted to explore related phenomenon by using these three media in two projects. First, a renewal planning project of the old district of Hsinchu City is inspected, in which animations and scenario scripting are used. Second, the renewal project is compared with a progressive design project for the Hsinchu Digital Museum, as designed by Peter Eisenman. Finally, similarity and variance among these computerized media are discussed.This study also examines the visual impact of these three computerized media in the design process. In computerized animation, although other designers can realize the spatial concept in design, users cannot fully comprehend the concept. On the other hand, other media such as virtual reality and scenario scripting enable users to more directly comprehend what the designer's presentation.Future studies should more closely examine how these three media impact the design process. This study not only provides further insight into the fundamental characteristics of the three computerized media discussed herein, but also enables designers to adopt different media in the design stages. Both designers and users can more fully understand design-related concepts.
series AVOCAAD
email yinghsiu@iaaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id b0e7
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2000
title The Re-Convergence of Art and Science: A Vehicle for Creativity
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 491-500
summary Ever-increasing complexity in product design and the need to deliver a cost-effective solution that benefits from a dynamic approach requires the employment and adoption of innovative design methods which ensure that products are of the highest quality and meet or exceed customers' expectations. According to Bronowski (1976) science and art were originally two faces of the same human creativity. However, as civilisation advances and works became specialised, the dichotomy of science and art gradually became apparent. Hence scientists and artists were born, and began to develop work that was polar opposite. The sense of beauty itself became separated from science and was confined within the field of art. This dichotomy existed through mankind's efforts in advancing civilisation to its present state. This paper briefly examines the relationship between art and science through the ages and discusses their relatively recent re-convergence. Based on this hypothesis, this paper studies the current state of the convergence between arts and sciences and examines the current relationship between the two by considering real world applications and products. The study of such products and their successes and impact they had in the marketplace due to their designs and aesthetics rather than their advanced technology that had partially failed them appears to support this argument. This text further argues that a re-convergence between art and science is currently occurring and highlights the need for accelerating this process. It is suggested that re-convergence is a result of new technologies which are adopted by practitioners that include effective visualisation and communication of ideas and concepts. Such elements are widely found today in multimedia and Virtual Environments (VEs) where such tools offer increased power and new abilities to both scientists and designers as both venture in each other's domains. This paper highlights the need for the employment of emerging computer based real-time interactive technologies that are expected to enhance the design process through real-time prototyping and visualisation, better decision-making, higher quality communication and collaboration, lessor error and reduced design cycles. Effective employment and adoption of innovative design methods that ensure products are delivered on time, and within budget, are of the highest quality and meet customer expectations are becoming of ever increasing importance. Such tools and concepts are outlined and their roles in the industries they currently serve are identified. Case studies from differing fields are also studied. It is also suggested that Virtual Reality interfaces should be used and given access to Computer Aided Design (CAD) model information and data so that users may interrogate virtual models for additional information and functionality. Adoption and appliance of such integrated technologies over the Internet and their relevance to electronic commerce is also discussed. Finally, emerging software and hardware technologies are outlined and case studies from the architecture, electronic games, and retail industries among others are discussed, the benefits are subsequently put forward to support the argument. The requirements for adopting such technologies in financial, skills required and process management terms are also considered and outlined.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my, karboulonis@clara.co.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id cc97
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to iAD - A Web-based Steel Consulting of Steel Construction in Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 346-349
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve to iAD (Internet Aided Design) (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. At the same time, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the proposal of conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture (Zhou2002), we try to apply these theories and concepts into a specified area, steel construction consulting for architects. In previous research, first of all, we defined the contents and scope of steel construction consulting and their potential application. Second, we proposed a solid working model covering structure organization, audience, services provided and technology. In this research, a web-based application will be out by prototyped by conducting a conceptual design consulting in steel structure in order to show the whole process of how this Internet-based consulting model works.
series eCAADe
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 389b
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2000
title Sketch that Scene for Me: Creating Virtual Worlds by Freehand Drawing
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 265-268
summary With the Web people can now view virtual threedimensional worlds and explore virtual space. Increasingly, novice users are interested in creating 3D Web sites. Virtual Reality Modeling Language gained ISO status in 1997, although it is being supplanted by the compatible Java3D API and alternative 3D Web technologies compete. Viewing VRML scenes is relatively straightforward on most hardware platforms and browsers, but currently there are only two ways to create 3D virtual scenes: One is to code the scene directly using VRML. The other is to use existing CAD and modeling software, and save the world in VRML format or convert to VRML from some other format. Both methods are time consuming, cumbersome, and have steep learning curves. Pen-based user interfaces, on the other hand, are for many an easy and intuitive method for graphics input. Not only are people familiar with the look and feel of paper and pencil, novice users also find it less intimidating to draw what they want, where they want it instead of using a complicated tool palette and pull-down menus. Architects and designers use sketches as a primary tool to generate design ideas and to explore alternatives, and numerous computer-based interfaces have played on the concept of "sketch". However, we restrict the notion of sketch to freehand drawing, which we believe helps people to think, to envision, and to recognize properties of the objects with which they are working. SKETCH employs a pen interface to create three-dimensional models, but it uses a simple language of gestures to control a three-dimensional modeler; it does not attempt to interpret freehand drawings. In contrast, our support of 3D world creation using freehand drawing depend on users’ traditional understanding of a floor plan representation. Igarashi et al. used a pen interface to drive browsing in a 3D world, by projecting the user’s marks on the ground plane in the virtual world. Our Sketch-3D project extends this approach, investigating an interface that allows direct interpretation of the drawing marks (what you draw is what you get) and serves as a rapid prototyping tool for creating 3D virtual scenes.
keywords Freehand Sketching, Pen-Based User Interface, Interaction, VRML, Navigation
series eCAADe
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id 3936
authors Geroimenko, Vladimir
year 1999
title Online Photorealistic VR with Interactive Architectural Objects
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 414-417
summary This paper describes how Virtual Reality (VR) technologies can be used for modelling photorealistic environments with interactive and changeable architectural content. This application of VR allows us to create photograph-based panoramic models of real places that include a variety of interactive architectural objects and details. The user is able not only to navigate through a virtual environment (look around, up and down, zoom, jump to another viewpoint or location) but also to change buildings or their architectural details by clicking, moving or rotating. The following types of interactive objects are completely integrated with a virtual environment: 2D image-based objects, 3D image-based objects, 3D VRML-based objects and onscreen world controls. The application can be used effectively for teaching, including distance Internet-based education, project presentations and rapid prototyping. A sample VR environment is presented and some of the key creative and technological issues are discussed.
keywords Virtual Reality Modelling, Architectural Design, Interactive Contents, Photorealistic Environments
series eCAADe
email vladg@soc.plym.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga0009
id ga0009
authors Lewis, Matthew
year 2000
title Aesthetic Evolutionary Design with Data Flow Networks
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary For a little over a decade, software has been created which allows for the design of visual content by aesthetic evolutionary design (AED) [3]. The great majority of these AED systems involve custom software intended for breeding entities within one fairly narrow problem domain, e.g., certain classes of buildings, cars, images, etc. [5]. Only a very few generic AED systems have been attempted, and extending them to a new design problem domain can require a significant amount of custom software development [6][8]. High end computer graphics software packages have in recent years become sufficiently robust to allow for flexible specification and construction of high level procedural models. These packages also provide extensibility, allowing for the creation of new software tools. One component of these systems which enables rapid development of new generative models and tools is the visual data flow network [1][2][7]. One of the first CG packages to employ this paradigm was Houdini. A system constructed within Houdini which allows for very fast generic specification of evolvable parametric prototypes is described [4]. The real-time nature of the software, when combined with the interlocking data networks, allows not only for vertical ancestor/child populations within the design space to be explored, but also allows for fast "horizontal" exploration of the potential population surface. Several example problem domains will be presented and discussed. References: [1] Alias | Wavefront. Maya. 2000, http://www.aliaswavefront.com [2] Avid. SOFTIMAGE. 2000, http://www.softimage.com [3] Bentley, Peter J. Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufmann, 1999. [4] Lewis, Matthew. "Metavolve Home Page". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/AED/Metavolve/ [5] Lewis, Matthew. "Visual Aesthetic Evolutionary Design Links". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/aed.html [6] Rowley, Timothy. "A Toolkit for Visual Genetic Programming". Technical Report GCG-74, The Geometry Center, University of Minnesota, 1994. [7] Side Effects Software. Houdini. 2000, http://www.sidefx.com [8] Todd, Stephen and William Latham. "The Mutation and Growth of Art by Computers" in Evolutionary Design by Computers, Peter Bentley ed., pp. 221-250, Chapter 9, Morgan Kaufmann, 1999.    
series other
email mlewis@cgrg.ohio-state.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 9834
authors Tibaut, A., Kaucic, B. and Rebolj, D.
year 2000
title Design visualisation using product data technology
source CIDAC, Volume 2 Issue 4 November 2000, pp. 251-258
summary Because of its monolitic nature, visualisation software, integrated with legacy engineering applications, contains every possible feature one might use, whether or not a user really wants them. With the advent of distributed objects and interpreted platform-independent languages such as Java and VRML, it is possible to develop cross-platform portable visualisation software and components that work in plug and play manner. Adopting these advances, rapid visualisation can considerably simplify the job of maintaining the lifecycle activities of a product. This paper aims to introduce new levels of support to engineers throughout the integrated product life cycle process by dealing with issues such as rapid platform independent visualisation and product data technology. The paper demonstrates the visualisation of product models using roads as an example.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id dbfa
authors Ucelli, G., Conti, G., Lindsay, M. and Ryder, G.
year 2000
title From “Soft” to “Hard” Prototyping: A Unique Combination of VR and RP for Design
source Proceedings from UkVRSig 2000, Glasgow
summary This paper will highlight innovative approaches to the building design process made possible by the application of two of the most sophisticated technologies currently available: Virtual Reality (VR) and Rapid Prototyping (RP). These will be discussed by drawing examples from recent case studies.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2d1b
authors Underwood, Jason and Alshawi, Mustafa
year 2000
title Forecasting building element maintenance within an integrated construction environment
source Automation in Construction 9 (2) (2000) pp. 169-184
summary Previous work has adopted various structured analysis techniques to model an application, which aims to generate the building element maintenance forecast valuation from the building design and project estimate, as an integral part of an integrated construction environment. The Automation and Integration in Construction (AIC) Research Group at the University of Salford has developed an integrated construction environment for the construction industry in the UK––the Simultaneous Prototyping for An integrated Construction Environment (SPACE). SPACE aims to incorporate various construction applications enabling project information to be shared between these applications and allowing the user to run them simultaneously. The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the MAINtenance ForeCASTing in an Integrated Construction Environment (MAINCAST) application of SPACE. The implementation of the resulting Express-G (static data) and IDEFØ (process) models into SPACE and the development of the external remedy databases are described. Finally, through the aid of a case study project, the MAINCAST application prototype is presented.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 449f
authors Aish, Robert
year 2000
title Collaborative Design using Long Transactions and "Change Merge"
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 107-111
summary If our goal is implement collaborative engineering across temporal, spatial and discipline dimensions, then it is suggested that we first have to address the necessary pre-requisites, which include both the deployment of "enterprise computing" and an understanding of the computing concepts on which such enterprise systems are based. This paper will consider the following computing concepts and the related concepts in the world of design computing, and discuss how these concepts have been realised in Bentley SystemsÕ ProjectBank collaborative engineering data repository: Computing Concept Related Design Concept Normalisation Model v. Report (or Drawing) Transaction Consistency of Design Long Transaction Parallelisation of Design Change Merge Coordination (synchronisation) Revisions Coordination (synchronisation) While we are most probably familiar with the applications of existing datadase concepts (such as Normalisation and Transaction Management) to the design process, the intent of this paper to focus
series eCAADe
email robert.aish@bentley.com
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id f2f1
authors Breen, Jack and Nottrot, Robert
year 2000
title Project a2W. A Dialogue on New Media Perspectives
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 291-296
summary This paper documents an initiative taking the form of a "dialogue". The format which has been developed is somewhat similar to that of the "conversation" which Mondrian conceived in 1919, taking place between two fictitious characters - A and B - discussing the new direction in art, which he called "Nieuwe Beelding" and which contributed to the "De Stijl" movement (the dialogue was followed later that year by a "trialogue" between X, Y and Z on a virtual walk taking them from the countryside to the city) 1 . This time the issue is not so much the evolvement of a new artistic or architectural style, but the role of "new media" in architecture... The present dialogue takes place between two fictitious media proponents ("Alpha" and "Omega"). They take turns questioning several issues and exchanging proposals... What are the values - and the promises - of computer supported instruments in creative design and research - concerning the art and science shaping the built environment? How do the present applications measure up, how do they compare to the expectations and ambitions expressed a number of years ago? The form of a dialogue means that issues and ideas, which are not often aired within the confines of academic discourse, can be played back and forth and a measure of exaggeration was intended from the beginning... This contribution does not in any way pretend to be all-inclusive. Rather, the paper is meant to put forward ideas and experiences - from the perspective of the Delft Media group, in practice, in teaching and in research - which may stimulate (or even irritate?) but will hopefully activate. The aim is to open up discussions, to allow other (hidden) agendas for the future to become more visible and to look for platforms for sharing concepts and fascinations, however improbable they might be...
keywords A Dialogue on New Media
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl, r.nottrot@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id sigradi2006_e183a
id sigradi2006_e183a
authors Costa Couceiro, Mauro
year 2006
title La Arquitectura como Extensión Fenotípica Humana - Un Acercamiento Basado en Análisis Computacionales [Architecture as human phenotypic extension – An approach based on computational explorations]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 56-60
summary The study describes some of the aspects tackled within a current Ph.D. research where architectural applications of constructive, structural and organization processes existing in biological systems are considered. The present information processing capacity of computers and the specific software development have allowed creating a bridge between two holistic nature disciplines: architecture and biology. The crossover between those disciplines entails a methodological paradigm change towards a new one based on the dynamical aspects of forms and compositions. Recent studies about artificial-natural intelligence (Hawkins, 2004) and developmental-evolutionary biology (Maturana, 2004) have added fundamental knowledge about the role of the analogy in the creative process and the relationship between forms and functions. The dimensions and restrictions of the Evo-Devo concepts are analyzed, developed and tested by software that combines parametric geometries, L-systems (Lindenmayer, 1990), shape-grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1971) and evolutionary algorithms (Holland, 1975) as a way of testing new architectural solutions within computable environments. It is pondered Lamarck´s (1744-1829) and Weismann (1834-1914) theoretical approaches to evolution where can be found significant opposing views. Lamarck´s theory assumes that an individual effort towards a specific evolutionary goal can cause change to descendents. On the other hand, Weismann defended that the germ cells are not affected by anything the body learns or any ability it acquires during its life, and cannot pass this information on to the next generation; this is called the Weismann barrier. Lamarck’s widely rejected theory has recently found a new place in artificial and natural intelligence researches as a valid explanation to some aspects of the human knowledge evolution phenomena, that is, the deliberate change of paradigms in the intentional research of solutions. As well as the analogy between genetics and architecture (Estévez and Shu, 2000) is useful in order to understand and program emergent complexity phenomena (Hopfield, 1982) for architectural solutions, also the consideration of architecture as a product of a human extended phenotype can help us to understand better its cultural dimension.
keywords evolutionary computation; genetic architectures; artificial/natural intelligence
series SIGRADI
email mail@maurocosta.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id avocaad_2001_22
id avocaad_2001_22
authors Jos van Leeuwen, Joran Jessurun
year 2001
title XML for Flexibility an Extensibility of Design Information Models
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The VR-DIS research programme aims at the development of a Virtual Reality – Design Information System. This is a design and decision support system for collaborative design that provides a VR interface for the interaction with both the geometric representation of a design and the non-geometric information concerning the design throughout the design process. The major part of the research programme focuses on early stages of design. The programme is carried out by a large number of researchers from a variety of disciplines in the domain of construction and architecture, including architectural design, building physics, structural design, construction management, etc.Management of design information is at the core of this design and decision support system. Much effort in the development of the system has been and still is dedicated to the underlying theory for information management and its implementation in an Application Programming Interface (API) that the various modules of the system use. The theory is based on a so-called Feature-based modelling approach and is described in the PhD thesis by [first author, 1999] and in [first author et al., 2000a]. This information modelling approach provides three major capabilities: (1) it allows for extensibility of conceptual schemas, which is used to enable a designer to define new typologies to model with; (2) it supports sharing of conceptual schemas, called type-libraries; and (3) it provides a high level of flexibility that offers the designer the opportunity to easily reuse design information and to model information constructs that are not foreseen in any existing typologies. The latter aspect involves the capability to expand information entities in a model with relationships and properties that are not typologically defined but applicable to a particular design situation only; this helps the designer to represent the actual design concepts more accurately.The functional design of the information modelling system is based on a three-layered framework. In the bottom layer, the actual design data is stored in so-called Feature Instances. The middle layer defines the typologies of these instances in so-called Feature Types. The top layer is called the meta-layer because it provides the class definitions for both the Types layer and the Instances layer; both Feature Types and Feature Instances are objects of the classes defined in the top layer. This top layer ensures that types can be defined on the fly and that instances can be created from these types, as well as expanded with non-typological properties and relationships while still conforming to the information structures laid out in the meta-layer.The VR-DIS system consists of a growing number of modules for different kinds of functionality in relation with the design task. These modules access the design information through the API that implements the meta-layer of the framework. This API has previously been implemented using an Object-Oriented Database (OODB), but this implementation had a number of disadvantages. The dependency of the OODB, a commercial software library, was considered the most problematic. Not only are licenses of the OODB library rather expensive, also the fact that this library is not common technology that can easily be shared among a wide range of applications, including existing applications, reduces its suitability for a system with the aforementioned specifications. In addition, the OODB approach required a relatively large effort to implement the desired functionality. It lacked adequate support to generate unique identifications for worldwide information sources that were understandable for human interpretation. This strongly limited the capabilities of the system to share conceptual schemas.The approach that is currently being implemented for the core of the VR-DIS system is based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML). Rather than implementing the meta-layer of the framework into classes of Feature Types and Feature Instances, this level of meta-definitions is provided in a document type definition (DTD). The DTD is complemented with a set of rules that are implemented into a parser API, based on the Document Object Model (DOM). The advantages of the XML approach for the modelling framework are immediate. Type-libraries distributed through Internet are now supported through the mechanisms of namespaces and XLink. The implementation of the API is no longer dependent of a particular database system. This provides much more flexibility in the implementation of the various modules of the VR-DIS system. Being based on the (supposed to become) standard of XML the implementation is much more versatile in its future usage, specifically in a distributed, Internet-based environment.These immediate advantages of the XML approach opened the door to a wide range of applications that are and will be developed on top of the VR-DIS core. Examples of these are the VR-based 3D sketching module [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; the VR-based information-modelling tool that allows the management and manipulation of information models for design in a VR environment [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; and a design-knowledge capturing module that is now under development [first author et al., 2000a and 2000b]. The latter module aims to assist the designer in the recognition and utilisation of existing and new typologies in a design situation. The replacement of the OODB implementation of the API by the XML implementation enables these modules to use distributed Feature databases through Internet, without many changes to their own code, and without the loss of the flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas that are implemented as part of the API. Research in the near future will result in Internet-based applications that support designers in the utilisation of distributed libraries of product-information, design-knowledge, case-bases, etc.The paper roughly follows the outline of the abstract, starting with an introduction to the VR-DIS project, its objectives, and the developed theory of the Feature-modelling framework that forms the core of it. It briefly discusses the necessity of schema evolution, flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas, and how these capabilities have been addressed in the framework. The major part of the paper describes how the previously mentioned aspects of the framework are implemented in the XML-based approach, providing details on the so-called meta-layer, its definition in the DTD, and the parser rules that complement it. The impact of the XML approach on the functionality of the VR-DIS modules and the system as a whole is demonstrated by a discussion of these modules and scenarios of their usage for design tasks. The paper is concluded with an overview of future work on the sharing of Internet-based design information and design knowledge.
series AVOCAAD
email J.P.v.Leeuwen@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ba17
authors Muñoz, Patricia Laura and López Coronel, Juan Pablo
year 2000
title Eliminando Bordes: las Superficies de Redondeo en la Generación de Formas para el Diseño - (Eliminating Edges: The Rounded Surfaces in the Generation of Forms for Design)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 289-291
summary Fillets can be understood as connecting surfaces, created by a sphere - of constant or variable diameter - that moves tangent to the components. These complex forms have been mainly developed through CAD-CAM processes but, in order to understand them thoroughly and so use them in all their potential, some basic morphological concepts are necessary. They will be explained in distinctive spatial situations. In relation to the language of design products, these surfaces are fundamental in the subtle operation of curve forms. They have an effect on the understanding of geometric and perceptual continuity between different spatial surfaces. They let us identify the original components but they also conceal them in a new form that includes them. A tension arises, a game of seduction where forms are covered and revealed to the comprehension of man.
series SIGRADI
email pamun@teletel.com.ar, dable@infomatic.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 6dbd
authors Pereira, Gilberto Corso
year 2000
title Hipermídia e Visualização de Informações Urbanas (Hypermedia and Visualization of Urban Information)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 224-226
summary Digital data are the key for the plain utilization of potential already available with geoprocessing technologies. Information that interest urban planners came from several sources and information technologies beside integration and manipulation permit visual investigation of spatial data in diverse aspects, from witch the most evident but not less effective is a map, tool that let us correlate a great variety of qualitative and quantitative data, for organization, interpretation, evaluation, presentation and communication. The work intend to build a urban digital database from Salvador and provide architects, geographers and urban planners a tool to visualize urban information in an easy way. It is structured like a hypermedia atlas using concepts from cartographic modeling. Information is organized in general and specific themes - physical environment, socioeconomic, land use, habitation, infra-structure, etc - that can be visualized alone or coexistent with others themes. Scale of visualization can be various.
series SIGRADI
email corso@ufba.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id ga0026
id ga0026
authors Ransen, Owen F.
year 2000
title Possible Futures in Computer Art Generation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Years of trying to create an "Image Idea Generator" program have convinced me that the perfect solution would be to have an artificial artistic person, a design slave. This paper describes how I came to that conclusion, realistic alternatives, and briefly, how it could possibly happen. 1. The history of Repligator and Gliftic 1.1 Repligator In 1996 I had the idea of creating an “image idea generator”. I wanted something which would create images out of nothing, but guided by the user. The biggest conceptual problem I had was “out of nothing”. What does that mean? So I put aside that problem and forced the user to give the program a starting image. This program eventually turned into Repligator, commercially described as an “easy to use graphical effects program”, but actually, to my mind, an Image Idea Generator. The first release came out in October 1997. In December 1998 I described Repligator V4 [1] and how I thought it could be developed away from simply being an effects program. In July 1999 Repligator V4 won the Shareware Industry Awards Foundation prize for "Best Graphics Program of 1999". Prize winners are never told why they won, but I am sure that it was because of two things: 1) Easy of use 2) Ease of experimentation "Ease of experimentation" means that Repligator does in fact come up with new graphics ideas. Once you have input your original image you can generate new versions of that image simply by pushing a single key. Repligator is currently at version 6, but, apart from adding many new effects and a few new features, is basically the same program as version 4. Following on from the ideas in [1] I started to develop Gliftic, which is closer to my original thoughts of an image idea generator which "starts from nothing". The Gliftic model of images was that they are composed of three components: 1. Layout or form, for example the outline of a mandala is a form. 2. Color scheme, for example colors selected from autumn leaves from an oak tree. 3. Interpretation, for example Van Gogh would paint a mandala with oak tree colors in a different way to Andy Warhol. There is a Van Gogh interpretation and an Andy Warhol interpretation. Further I wanted to be able to genetically breed images, for example crossing two layouts to produce a child layout. And the same with interpretations and color schemes. If I could achieve this then the program would be very powerful. 1.2 Getting to Gliftic Programming has an amazing way of crystalising ideas. If you want to put an idea into practice via a computer program you really have to understand the idea not only globally, but just as importantly, in detail. You have to make hard design decisions, there can be no vagueness, and so implementing what I had decribed above turned out to be a considerable challenge. I soon found out that the hardest thing to do would be the breeding of forms. What are the "genes" of a form? What are the genes of a circle, say, and how do they compare to the genes of the outline of the UK? I wanted the genotype representation (inside the computer program's data) to be directly linked to the phenotype representation (on the computer screen). This seemed to be the best way of making sure that bred-forms would bare some visual relationship to their parents. I also wanted symmetry to be preserved. For example if two symmetrical objects were bred then their children should be symmetrical. I decided to represent shapes as simply closed polygonal shapes, and the "genes" of these shapes were simply the list of points defining the polygon. Thus a circle would have to be represented by a regular polygon of, say, 100 sides. The outline of the UK could easily be represented as a list of points every 10 Kilometers along the coast line. Now for the important question: what do you get when you cross a circle with the outline of the UK? I tried various ways of combining the "genes" (i.e. coordinates) of the shapes, but none of them really ended up producing interesting shapes. And of the methods I used, many of them, applied over several "generations" simply resulted in amorphous blobs, with no distinct family characteristics. Or rather maybe I should say that no single method of breeding shapes gave decent results for all types of images. Figure 1 shows an example of breeding a mandala with 6 regular polygons: Figure 1 Mandala bred with array of regular polygons I did not try out all my ideas, and maybe in the future I will return to the problem, but it was clear to me that it is a non-trivial problem. And if the breeding of shapes is a non-trivial problem, then what about the breeding of interpretations? I abandoned the genetic (breeding) model of generating designs but retained the idea of the three components (form, color scheme, interpretation). 1.3 Gliftic today Gliftic Version 1.0 was released in May 2000. It allows the user to change a form, a color scheme and an interpretation. The user can experiment with combining different components together and can thus home in on an personally pleasing image. Just as in Repligator, pushing the F7 key make the program choose all the options. Unlike Repligator however the user can also easily experiment with the form (only) by pushing F4, the color scheme (only) by pushing F5 and the interpretation (only) by pushing F6. Figures 2, 3 and 4 show some example images created by Gliftic. Figure 2 Mandala interpreted with arabesques   Figure 3 Trellis interpreted with "graphic ivy"   Figure 4 Regular dots interpreted as "sparks" 1.4 Forms in Gliftic V1 Forms are simply collections of graphics primitives (points, lines, ellipses and polygons). The program generates these collections according to the user's instructions. Currently the forms are: Mandala, Regular Polygon, Random Dots, Random Sticks, Random Shapes, Grid Of Polygons, Trellis, Flying Leap, Sticks And Waves, Spoked Wheel, Biological Growth, Chequer Squares, Regular Dots, Single Line, Paisley, Random Circles, Chevrons. 1.5 Color Schemes in Gliftic V1 When combining a form with an interpretation (described later) the program needs to know what colors it can use. The range of colors is called a color scheme. Gliftic has three color scheme types: 1. Random colors: Colors for the various parts of the image are chosen purely at random. 2. Hue Saturation Value (HSV) colors: The user can choose the main hue (e.g. red or yellow), the saturation (purity) of the color scheme and the value (brightness/darkness) . The user also has to choose how much variation is allowed in the color scheme. A wide variation allows the various colors of the final image to depart a long way from the HSV settings. A smaller variation results in the final image using almost a single color. 3. Colors chosen from an image: The user can choose an image (for example a JPG file of a famous painting, or a digital photograph he took while on holiday in Greece) and Gliftic will select colors from that image. Only colors from the selected image will appear in the output image. 1.6 Interpretations in Gliftic V1 Interpretation in Gliftic is best decribed with a few examples. A pure geometric line could be interpreted as: 1) the branch of a tree 2) a long thin arabesque 3) a sequence of disks 4) a chain, 5) a row of diamonds. An pure geometric ellipse could be interpreted as 1) a lake, 2) a planet, 3) an eye. Gliftic V1 has the following interpretations: Standard, Circles, Flying Leap, Graphic Ivy, Diamond Bar, Sparkz, Ess Disk, Ribbons, George Haite, Arabesque, ZigZag. 1.7 Applications of Gliftic Currently Gliftic is mostly used for creating WEB graphics, often backgrounds as it has an option to enable "tiling" of the generated images. There is also a possibility that it will be used in the custom textile business sometime within the next year or two. The real application of Gliftic is that of generating new graphics ideas, and I suspect that, like Repligator, many users will only understand this later. 2. The future of Gliftic, 3 possibilties Completing Gliftic V1 gave me the experience to understand what problems and opportunities there will be in future development of the program. Here I divide my many ideas into three oversimplified possibilities, and the real result may be a mix of two or all three of them. 2.1 Continue the current development "linearly" Gliftic could grow simply by the addition of more forms and interpretations. In fact I am sure that initially it will grow like this. However this limits the possibilities to what is inside the program itself. These limits can be mitigated by allowing the user to add forms (as vector files). The user can already add color schemes (as images). The biggest problem with leaving the program in its current state is that there is no easy way to add interpretations. 2.2 Allow the artist to program Gliftic It would be interesting to add a language to Gliftic which allows the user to program his own form generators and interpreters. In this way Gliftic becomes a "platform" for the development of dynamic graphics styles by the artist. The advantage of not having to deal with the complexities of Windows programming could attract the more adventurous artists and designers. The choice of programming language of course needs to take into account the fact that the "programmer" is probably not be an expert computer scientist. I have seen how LISP (an not exactly easy artificial intelligence language) has become very popular among non programming users of AutoCAD. If, to complete a job which you do manually and repeatedly, you can write a LISP macro of only 5 lines, then you may be tempted to learn enough LISP to write those 5 lines. Imagine also the ability to publish (and/or sell) "style generators". An artist could develop a particular interpretation function, it creates images of a given character which others find appealing. The interpretation (which runs inside Gliftic as a routine) could be offered to interior designers (for example) to unify carpets, wallpaper, furniture coverings for single projects. As Adrian Ward [3] says on his WEB site: "Programming is no less an artform than painting is a technical process." Learning a computer language to create a single image is overkill and impractical. Learning a computer language to create your own artistic style which generates an infinite series of images in that style may well be attractive. 2.3 Add an artificial conciousness to Gliftic This is a wild science fiction idea which comes into my head regularly. Gliftic manages to surprise the users with the images it makes, but, currently, is limited by what gets programmed into it or by pure chance. How about adding a real artifical conciousness to the program? Creating an intelligent artificial designer? According to Igor Aleksander [1] conciousness is required for programs (computers) to really become usefully intelligent. Aleksander thinks that "the line has been drawn under the philosophical discussion of conciousness, and the way is open to sound scientific investigation". Without going into the details, and with great over-simplification, there are roughly two sorts of artificial intelligence: 1) Programmed intelligence, where, to all intents and purposes, the programmer is the "intelligence". The program may perform well (but often, in practice, doesn't) and any learning which is done is simply statistical and pre-programmed. There is no way that this type of program could become concious. 2) Neural network intelligence, where the programs are based roughly on a simple model of the brain, and the network learns how to do specific tasks. It is this sort of program which, according to Aleksander, could, in the future, become concious, and thus usefully intelligent. What could the advantages of an artificial artist be? 1) There would be no need for programming. Presumbably the human artist would dialog with the artificial artist, directing its development. 2) The artificial artist could be used as an apprentice, doing the "drudge" work of art, which needs intelligence, but is, anyway, monotonous for the human artist. 3) The human artist imagines "concepts", the artificial artist makes them concrete. 4) An concious artificial artist may come up with ideas of its own. Is this science fiction? Arthur C. Clarke's 1st Law: "If a famous scientist says that something can be done, then he is in all probability correct. If a famous scientist says that something cannot be done, then he is in all probability wrong". Arthur C Clarke's 2nd Law: "Only by trying to go beyond the current limits can you find out what the real limits are." One of Bertrand Russell's 10 commandments: "Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric" 3. References 1. "From Ramon Llull to Image Idea Generation". Ransen, Owen. Proceedings of the 1998 Milan First International Conference on Generative Art. 2. "How To Build A Mind" Aleksander, Igor. Wiedenfeld and Nicolson, 1999 3. "How I Drew One of My Pictures: or, The Authorship of Generative Art" by Adrian Ward and Geof Cox. Proceedings of the 1999 Milan 2nd International Conference on Generative Art.
series other
email owen@ransen.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 83cb
authors Telea, Alexandru C.
year 2000
title Visualisation and simulation with object-oriented networks
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary Among the existing systems, visual programming environments address best these issues. However, producing interactive simulations and visualisations is still a difficult task. This defines the main research objective of this thesis: The development and implementation of concepts and techniques to combine visualisation, simulation, and application construction in an interactive, easy to use, generic environment. The aim is to produce an environment in which the above mentioned activities can be learnt and carried out easily by a researcher. Working with such an environment should decrease the amount of time usually spent in redesigning existing software elements such as graphics interfaces, existing computational modules, and general infrastructure code. Writing new computational components or importing existing ones should be simple and automatic enough to make using the envisaged system an attractive option for a non programmer expert. Besides this, all proven successful elements of an interactive simulation and visualisation environment should be provided, such as visual programming, graphics user interfaces, direct manipulation, and so on. Finally, a large palette of existing scientific computation, data processing, and visualisation components should be integrated in the proposed system. On one hand, this should prove our claims of openness and easy code integration. On the other hand, this should provide the concrete set of tools needed for building a range of scientific applications and visualisations. This thesis is structured as follows. Chapter 2 defines the context of our work. The scientific research environment is presented and partitioned into the three roles of end user, application designer, and component developer. The interactions between these roles and their specific requirements are described and lead to a more precise formulation of our problem statement. Chapter 3 presents the most used architectures for simulation and visualisation systems: the monolithic system, the application library, and the framework. The advantages and disadvantages of these architectural models are then discussed in relation with our problem statement requirements. The main conclusion drawn is that no single existing architectural model suffices, and that what is needed is a combination of the features present in all three models. Chapter 4 introduces the new architectural model we propose, based on the combination of object-orientation in form of the C++ language and dataflow modelling in the new MC++ language. Chapter 5 presents VISSION, an interactive simulation and visualisation environment constructed on the introduced new architectural model, and shows how the usual tasks of application construction, steering, and visualisation are addressed. In chapter 6, the implementation of VISSION’s architectural model is described in terms of its component parts. Chapter 7 presents the applications of VISSION to numerical simulation, while chapter 8 focuses on its visualisation and graphics applications. Finally, chapter 9 concludes the thesis and outlines possible direction for future research.
keywords Computer Visualisation
series thesis:PhD
email a.c.telea@tue.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 792a
authors Blaschke, Thomas and Tiede, Dirk
year 2003
title Bridging GIS-based landscape analysis/modelling and 3D-simulation.Is this already 4D?
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Several studies have used remote sensing to map patterns of e.g. deforestation or to analyse the rates of land use change. Thesestudies have proven useful for interpreting the causes of urbanization, deforestation etc. and the impact of such changes on theregion. Monitoring of change (e.g. deforestation or reforestation) is frequently perceived as one of the most important contributionsof remote sensing technology to the study of global ecological and environmental change (Roughgarden et al. 1991). Manyresearchers believe that the integration of remote sensing techniques within analysis of environmental change is essential if ecologistsare to meet the challenges of the future, specifically issues relating to global change; however, in practice, this integration has so farbeen limited (Griffiths & Mather 2000). Considerable difficulties are encountered in linking, on the one hand, the biologies oforganisms and the ecologies of populations to the fluxes of material and energy quantifiable at the level of ecosystems. In this paper,we concentrate on the methodological aspects of the delineation of landscape objects and touch the ecological application onlysuperficially but we elucidate the potential of the proposed methodology for several ecological applications briefly.
series other
email thomas.blaschke@uni-tuebingen.de
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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