CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 743

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ga0018
id ga0018
authors Ciao, Quinsan
year 2000
title Hearing Architectural Design: Simulation and Auralization for Generating Better Acoustic Spaces
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper with demonstration is devoted to revealing and establishing the relationship between space and sound through computational acoustic analysis, simulation and electronic synthesis of audible sound. Based on science of acoustics and computing technology, acoustic effect of an architectural 3-D design can be analyzed and the resulted sound in space can be synthesized and predicted accordingly and being heard. Auralization refers to this process of acoustic analysis, sound synthesis and audio presentation of the result in the form of audible sound. Design alternatives can be experimented until satisfactory acoustic effect is achieved. Traditionally, designers rely on some minimum and vague understanding or specialists’ experiences to predict and design for a desirable sound behavior in spaces. Most likely acoustic design and analysis are seen as a luxury remedy only affordable in large-scale theatres and concert halls. The recent available PC based auralization tools brought significance in both in terms of new knowledge towards the science and art of architectural acoustics and the methods and practice in the design process. The examples demonstrated in the presentation will indicate that the auralization technology make it possible for the designers, consultants, end users or potential occupants to examine and evaluate the performance of different designs by hearing it directly before an informed decision can be made. The case studies also illustrated that the auralization is a powerful tool for general public with common building types to uncover everyday acoustic problems that have been constantly harming their well being and would otherwise be undetected.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id d0aa
authors Colajanni, Benedetto, Concialdi, Salvatore and Pellitteri, Giuseppe
year 1999
title CoCoMa: a Collaborative Constraint Management System for the Collaborative Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 364-369
summary Collaborative Design is a topic of particular current interest. Existing software allows a multiplicity of designers to work on the same project. What the software really allows is accessing to a part of the information of the project and changing it. Sometimes there is a hierarchical distribution of the power of change: some participants can be permitted to operate only on some limited layers of the object representation. In this case the changes they propose are to be accepted by a general manager of the design process. What is lacking in this kind of software is the explicit management on the reciprocal constraints posed by different participants. In this paper, an elementary Collaborative Design System is presented whose main concern is just the management of constraints. Each participant designs the part of the project of his/her concern instantiating objects comprised of geometric description, alphanumeric variables and constraints on both. Constraints can be of two types: absolute or defined by a range of allowed values of the constrained variable. A participant intervening later can accept the constraint, choosing a value in the permitted range, or decide to violate it. In this case the proposed violation is signalled to whom posed it.
keywords Collaborative Design, Design Process, Management System, Participant Designs, Constraints Violation
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@unipa.it, ciesse@neomedia.it, pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 6126
authors De Grassi, M., Giretti A. and Pinese, P.
year 1999
title Knowledge Structures of Episodic Memory in Architectural Design: An Example of Protocol Analysis
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 576-583
summary The Protocol Analysis of the design process is a very recent and very promising research field. It is believed that good application-oriented developments are possible mainly in the tutorial field (ITS). The research conducted up to now has primarily dealt with the study of the design process. On the contrary, we propose an investigation experiment on the knowledge structures relative to the use of the episodic memory in the architectural design. The proposed experiment concerns the monitoring of the cognitive processes utilised by tutors and students in a brief, but yet complete design session. The results have lead to a synthetic model (computational model) of the adopted knowledge structures, and to a complete index system oriented and organised according to semantic fields. The application of the synthetic model to the design process analysis of students and tutors enabled the definition of the different utilisation strategies of episodic memory to be defined. The results obtained will make up the structure of a tutorial program for the architectural design.
keywords Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs), Architectural Design Education, Case Based Reasoning, Protocol Analisys, Design Cognition
series eCAADe
email giretti@idau.unian.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ddssar0213
id ddssar0213
authors De Groot, Ellie and Paule, Bernard
year 2002
title DIAL-Europe: New Functionality’s for an Integrated Daylighting Design Tool
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The European project DIAL-Europe started in April 2000 and intends to enhance and to enlarge the capabilities of the LesoDIAL software. The aim of this “Swiss” tool was to give architects relevant information regarding the use of daylight, at the very first stage of the design process. DIAL-Europe focuses on European standards and climatic data. Further, a Heating & Cooling evaluation module and an Artificial Lighting module will be added. The objective of the Heating & Cooling module is to indicate the implications of the user’s design on heating and cooling energy and on thermal comfort.The objective of Artificial Lighting module is to develop a tool that will give an estimation of illuminance values on the work plane and provide guidance on qualitative aspects and visual comfort as well as on switching control and integration with daylight based on generic light sources and luminaires. Furthermore, the scope of the examples of simulated rooms will be increased in order to allow the user to compare their design with more similar cases. This paper will present the state of achievement and give an overview of the first version of the DIAL-Europe software, which will beavailable at the beginning of 2002.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id caadria2013_043
id caadria2013_043
authors Freitas, Márcia Regina de and Regina Coeli Ruschel
year 2013
title What is Happening to Virtual and Augmented Reality Applied to Architecture?
source Open Systems: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2013) / Singapore 15-18 May 2013, pp. 407-416
summary This paper presents the results of a comprehensive survey of activities on research and development of Virtual and Augmented Reality applied to architecture. 200 papers were reviewed, taken from annual conferences of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture (ACADIA) and its sibling organizations in Europe (ECAADE and CAAD Futures), Asia (CAADRIA), the Middle East (ASCAAD) and South America (SIGRADI). The papers were grouped in research areas (design method, architectural theory and history, performance evaluation, human interaction, representation and process & management), emphasis (education, application, collaboration, visualization, practice and theory) and technology development stage (specification, development, application demonstration and evaluation). The period of study comprises 11 years, from 2000 to 2011. Findings for each category are described and key publications and authors are identified.  
wos WOS:000351496100040
keywords Virtual reality, Augmented reality, Study of activity 
series CAADRIA
email marciarf@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id f78f
authors Fridqvist, Sverker
year 2000
title Property-Oriented Information Systems for Design Prototypes for the BAS•CAAD system
source Lund Institute of Technology, School of Architecture
summary Property-oriented systems are a new kind of information systems that are based on concepts of properties instead of concepts of things or classes of things. By focusing on properties, the property-oriented systems become more flexible and more suited to the dynamic early stages of design than the traditional class-oriented systems can be. The theoretical framework for property-oriented systems developed within the BAS*CAAD project and presented in this thesis has previously been presented in several papers, a selection of which are included here. Some of the basic considerations from the papers are further developed in a separate chapter. Additionally, the thesis covers several questions regarding prerequisites for and implications of property-oriented systems. These questions have not been addressed in earlier BAS*CAAD publications. The development of research proptotypes based on the theoretical framework is presented, with a discussion of the different versions and the considerations behind them. A study of the history of computer aided building design has revealed that many basic ideas of today were developed the first time at the beginning of electronic computing, in the early sixties. Since the early development seems to be unknown today, a brief account is presented in this thesis, with special focus on issues considered in the BAS*CAAD project. Finally, the experimental architectural design software DASK, developed mainly by the present author in the later 1980s, will get its first presentation in writing in this thesis.
keywords Information Technology; Design; Construction; Product Modelling
series thesis:PhD
email S.Fridqvist@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.lub.lu.se/cgi-bin/show_diss.pl?db=global&fname=tec_391.html
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 600e
authors Gavin, Lesley
year 1999
title Architecture of the Virtual Place
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 418-423
summary The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London (UCL), set up the first MSc in Virtual Environments in the UK in 1995. The course aims to synthesise and build on research work undertaken in the arts, architecture, computing and biological sciences in exploring the realms of the creation of digital and virtual immersive spaces. The MSc is concerned primarily with equipping students from design backgrounds with the skills, techniques and theories necessary in the production of virtual environments. The course examines both virtual worlds as prototypes for real urban or built form and, over the last few years, has also developed an increasing interest in the the practice of architecture in purely virtual contexts. The MSc course is embedded in the UK government sponsored Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment which is hosted by the Bartlett School of Architecture. This centre involves the UCL departments of architecture, computer science and geography and includes industrial partners from a number of areas concerned with the built environment including architectural practice, surveying and estate management as well as some software companies and the telecoms industry. The first cohort of students graduated in 1997 and predominantly found work in companies working in the new market area of digital media. This paper aims to outline the nature of the course as it stands, examines the new and ever increasing market for designers within digital media and proposes possible future directions for the course.
keywords Virtual Reality, Immersive Spaces, Digital Media, Education
series eCAADe
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
more http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/ve/
last changed 2002/11/22 18:44

_id 70c4
authors Gross, M.D., Do, E.Y.-L. and Johnson, B.R.
year 2000
title Beyond the low-hanging fruit: Information technology in architectural design past, present and future
source W. Mitchell and J. Fernandez (eds), ACSA Technology Conference, MIT Press, Cambridge MA
summary Today's commercial CAD software is the product of years of research that began in the 1960's and 1970's. These applications have found widespread use in the architectural marketplace; nevertheless they represent only the first fruits of research in computer aided design. New developments based on research in human-computer interaction (HCI), computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW), and virtual reality (VR) will result in a next generation of tools for architectural design. Although preliminary applications to design have been demonstrated in each of these areas, excellent opportunities remain to exploit new technologies and insights in service of better design software. In this paper we briefly examine each of these areas using examples from our own work to discuss the prospects for future research. We envision that future design technologies will develop from current and traditional conventions of practice combined with forward looking application of emerging technologies. In HCI, pen based interaction will allow architects to use the pencil again, without sacrificing the added power of computer aided design tools, and speech recognition will begin to play a role in capturing and retrieving design critique and discussion. In CSCW, a new generation of applications will address the needs of designers more closely than current general purpose meeting tools. In VR, applications are possible that use the technology not simply to provide a sense of three-dimensional presence, but that organize design information spatially, integrating it into the representation of artifacts and places.
series other
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3940
authors Hall, Rick
year 1999
title Realtime 3D visual Analysis of Very Large Models at Low Cost
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 437-441
summary Computer based visualisation of 3D models in architecture has been possible for 20 years or more, and the software technology has steadily improved during this time so that now incredibly realistic images can be generated from any viewpoint in a model, and impressive fly through sequences can bring a model to life in ways previously not possible. Virtual reality is with us and multi-media enables us to present a finished design in increasingly seductive ways. However, these forms of output from a 3D model offer much more limited benefits during the design process and particularly on large complex models because they are so computing intensive and it often require many hours to produce just one image. Anything other than a small and relatively simple model cannot be viewed dynamically in real-time on a desktop PC of the type commonly used by architects in a design office. Until now the solution to this problem has meant investing in expensive design review hardware and software with its inherent need for trained, skilled labour. As a result, design review products are often viewed as a luxury or costly necessity.
keywords Visual Analysis, Low Cost, 3D Modelling
series eCAADe
last changed 2002/11/22 17:13

_id 2004
authors Hendricx, A.
year 2000
title A Core Object Model for Architectural Design
source Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
summary A core object model apt to describe architectural objects and their functionality is one of the keystones to an integrated digital design environment for architecture. The object model presented in this thesis is based on a conceptual framework for computer aided architectural design (CAAD) and aims to assist the architect designer right from the early stages in the design process. For its development the object-oriented analysis method MERODE (Model-based Existence-dependency Relationship Object-oriented Development) is used. After a survey on the role of computers in the architectural design process and on particular Product Modelling initiatives, the model is elaborated in two phases: the enterprise-modelling phase and the higher functionality-modelling phase. Actual design cases and test implementations help to establish the conceptual model and illustrate its concepts. The appendices provide a detailed description of both the object model and one of the case studies. The architect’s point of view and the specific nature of the architectural design process are the basic considerations, thus leading to a unique model that hopes to make a valuable contribution to the research area of integrated design environments.
series thesis:PhD
email ann.hendricx@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddssar0012
id ddssar0012
authors Hendricx, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title Setting objects to work: adding functionality to an architectural object model
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Several research initiatives in the field of product modelling have produced static descriptions of the architectural and geometrical objects capable of describing architectural design projects. Less attention is paid to the development phase in which these static models are transformed into workable architectural design environments. In the context of the IDEA+ research project (Integrated Design Environment for Architectural Design), we use the object-oriented analysis method MERODE to develop and describe both an enterprise (or product) model and a functionality model. On the one hand, the enterprise model defines the architectural and geometrical objects, their methods and their relation with other objects. On the other hand, the functionality model organizes the functionality objects – ranging from single-event objects to complex-workflow objects – in a layered and easily expandable system. The functionality model is created on top of the enterprise model and closes the gap between the static enterprise model and the dynamic design environment as a whole. After a short introduction of the envisaged design environment and its underlying enterprise model, the paper will concentrate on the presentation of the higher-level functionality model. Elaborated examples of functionality objects on the different levels will clarify its concepts and proof its feasibility.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar0013
id ddssar0013
authors Hensen, J.L.M. and Clarke, J.A.
year 2000
title Building systems and indoor environment: simulation for design decision support
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary This paper outlines the state-of-the-art in integrated building simulation for design support. The ESP-r system is used as an example where integrated simulation is a core philosophy behind the development. The paper finishes with indicating a number of barriers, which hinder routine application of simulation for building design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ga0004
id ga0004
authors Lund, Andreas
year 2000
title Evolving the Shape of Things to Come - A Comparison of Interactive Evolution and Direct Manipulation for Creative Tasks
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper is concerned with differences between direct manipulation and interactive evolutionary design as two fundamentally different interaction styles for creative tasks. Its main contribution to the field of generative design is the treatment of interactive evolutionary design as a general interaction style that can be used to support users in creative tasks. Direct manipulation interfaces, a term coined by Ben Shneiderman in the mid-seventies, are the kind of interface that is characteristic of most modern personal computer application user interfaces. Typically, direct manipulation interfaces incorporate a model of a context (such as a desktop environment) supposedly familiar to users. Rather than giving textual commands (i.e. "remove file.txt", "copy file1.txt file2.txt") to an imagined intermediary between the user and the computer, the user acts directly on the objects of interest to complete a task. Undoubtedly, direct manipulation has played an important role in making computers accessible to non-computer experts. Less certain are the reasons why direct manipulation interfaces are so successful. It has been suggested that this kind of interaction style caters for a sense of directness, control and engagement in the interaction with the computer. Also, the possibilities of incremental action with continuous feedback are believed to be an important factor of the attractiveness of direct manipulation. However, direct manipulation is also associated with a number of problems that make it a less than ideal interaction style in some situations. Recently, new interaction paradigms have emerged that address the shortcomings of direct manipulation in various ways. One example is so-called software agents that, quite the contrary to direct manipulation, act on behalf of the user and alleviate the user from some of the attention and cognitive load traditionally involved in the interaction with large quantities of information. However, this relief comes at the cost of lost user control and requires the user to put trust into a pseudo-autonomous piece of software. Another emerging style of human-computer interaction of special interest for creative tasks is that of interactive evolutionary design (sometimes referred to as aesthetic selection). Interactive evolutionary design is inspired by notions from biological evolution and may be described as a way of exploring a large – potentially infinite – space of possible design configurations based on the judgement of the user. Rather than, as is the case with direct manipulation, directly influencing the features of an object, the user influences the design by means of expressing her judgement of design examples. Variations of interactive evolutionary design have been employed to support design and creation of a variety of objects. Examples of such objects include artistic images, web advertising banners and facial expressions. In order to make an empirical investigation possible, two functional prototypes have been designed and implemented. Both prototypes are targeted at typeface design. The first prototype allows a user to directly manipulate a set of predefined attributes that govern the design of a typeface. The second prototype allows a user to iteratively influence the design of a typeface by means of expressing her judgement of typeface examples. Initially, these examples are randomly generated but will, during the course of interaction, converge upon design configurations that reflect the user’s expressed subjective judgement. In the evaluation of the prototypes, I am specifically interested in users’ sense of control, convergence and surprise. Is it possible to maintain a sense of control and convergence without sacrificing the possibilities of the unexpected in a design process? The empirical findings seem to suggest that direct manipulation caters for a high degree of control and convergence, but with a small amount of surprise and sense of novelty. The interactive evolutionary design prototype supported a lower degree of experienced control, but seems to provide both a sense of surprise and convergence. One plausible interpretation of this is that, on the one hand, direct manipulation is a good interaction style for realizing the user’s intentions. On the other hand, interactive evolutionary design has a potential to actually change the user’s intentions and pre-conceptions of that which is being designed and, in doing so, adds an important factor to the creative process. Based on the empirical findings, the paper discusses situations when interactive evolutionary design may be a serious contender with direct manipulation as the principal interaction style and also how a combination of both styles can be applied.
series other
email andreas.lund@interactiveinstitute.se
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id f9f7
authors Mullins, Michael
year 1999
title Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 178-185
summary This paper sets out to define aspects of the architectural design process, using historical precedent and architectural theory, and tests the relationship of those aspects to the application of computers in architectural design, particularly in an educational context. The design process sub-sets are defined as: Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting. Historical precedents are uncovered in Classical, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary architecture. The defined categories of the design process are related to current usages of computers in architectural education towards elucidating the strengths and weaknesses of digital media in those areas. Indications of their concurrent usage in digital design will be demonstrated in analysis of design studio programs presented at recent ACADIA conferences. An example of a current design studio programme set at the School of Architecture University of Natal, South Africa in which the above described categories give an underlying structure to the introduction of 3D digital modelling to undergraduates through design process. The definition of this set of design activities may offer a useful method for other educators in assessing existing and future design programs where digital tools are used.
keywords Design-Process, Digital-Media, Design-Programmes
series eCAADe
email madura@iafrica.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ddssar0022
id ddssar0022
authors Peng, C., Cerulli, C., Lawson, B., Cooper, G., Rezqui, Y. and Jackson, M.
year 2000
title Recording and managing design decision-making processes through an object-oriented framework
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary In this paper we describe our current research into an object-oriented approach to the recording and managing of design decision-making in the processes of building design. The Advanced Design Support for the Construction Design Process (ADS) project, funded under the Innovative Manufacturing Initiative by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), aims to exploit and demonstrate the benefits of a CAD-based Design Decision Support System. The research focuses on how to provide designers with tools for recording and managing the group dynamics of design decision making in a project's life time without intruding too much on the design process itself. In collaboration with Building Design Partnership, a large multidisciplinary construction design practice, we look at design projects that require decision-making on an extraordinarily wide range of complex issues, and many different professional consultants were involved in making and approving these decisions. We are interested in developing an advanced CAD tool that will facilitate capturing designers' rationales underlying their design decision making throughout the project. The system will also enable us to explore how a recorded project history of decision-making can be searched and browsed by members of the project team during and after design development.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 15e4
authors Sariyildiz, S., Stouffs, R. and Tunçer, B.
year 2000
title Vision on ICT Developments for the Building Sector
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 11-18
summary The building sector is entering a new era. Developments in information and communication technology have an impact throughout the entire life cycle of a building, not only from a process and technical point of view but also from a creative design point of view. As a result of developments of advanced modeling software for architectural design, the gap between what the architect can envision and what the building technician or product architect can materialize is enlarging. Internet technology has already started to provide a closer link between the participants in the building process, their activities, knowledge, and information. Concurrent and collaborative engineering will be the future of building practice in respect to efficiency and quality improvement of this sector. The nature of the building process is complex, not only from a communication point of view, but also from the information of the number of participants, the spatial organization and the infrastructure etc. In the near future, soft computing techniques such as artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms will make contributions to the problem solving aspects of the complex design process. This paper provides an overview of these and other future developments of information and communication technology (ICT) within the building sector.
series ACADIA
email i.s.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id caadria2003_a2-4
id caadria2003_a2-4
authors Seichter, Hartmut
year 2003
title Sketchand+ a Collaborative Augmented Reality Sketching Application
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 209-222
summary The sketch is the embodiment of the architectural discussion. It incorporates rapidness and fuzziness and as this it is an object of interpretation. The interesting thing there is the question, if the usage of VR/AR already in the early phases of a design can have an impact for the quality of a design-process. Examples like VRAM (Regenbrecht et al., 2000) or TAP (Seichter et al., 2000) showed that there is a huge potential for research. The sketch as one of the parts of an early design is tightly coupled with cognitive aspects and communication. Pictured by a sketch is just a snapshot of what have to be discussed in the ensuing design procedure. The intention behind this work is an exploration about a medium which is not yet adapted to the digital world (Myers et al., 2000) and it can be easily be described with the words of Harald Innis: Mankind constantly being caught in his own traps: language and systems, developed and most difficult to break down. (Innis, 1951)
series CAADRIA
email hartmut@technotecture.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 83cb
authors Telea, Alexandru C.
year 2000
title Visualisation and simulation with object-oriented networks
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary Among the existing systems, visual programming environments address best these issues. However, producing interactive simulations and visualisations is still a difficult task. This defines the main research objective of this thesis: The development and implementation of concepts and techniques to combine visualisation, simulation, and application construction in an interactive, easy to use, generic environment. The aim is to produce an environment in which the above mentioned activities can be learnt and carried out easily by a researcher. Working with such an environment should decrease the amount of time usually spent in redesigning existing software elements such as graphics interfaces, existing computational modules, and general infrastructure code. Writing new computational components or importing existing ones should be simple and automatic enough to make using the envisaged system an attractive option for a non programmer expert. Besides this, all proven successful elements of an interactive simulation and visualisation environment should be provided, such as visual programming, graphics user interfaces, direct manipulation, and so on. Finally, a large palette of existing scientific computation, data processing, and visualisation components should be integrated in the proposed system. On one hand, this should prove our claims of openness and easy code integration. On the other hand, this should provide the concrete set of tools needed for building a range of scientific applications and visualisations. This thesis is structured as follows. Chapter 2 defines the context of our work. The scientific research environment is presented and partitioned into the three roles of end user, application designer, and component developer. The interactions between these roles and their specific requirements are described and lead to a more precise formulation of our problem statement. Chapter 3 presents the most used architectures for simulation and visualisation systems: the monolithic system, the application library, and the framework. The advantages and disadvantages of these architectural models are then discussed in relation with our problem statement requirements. The main conclusion drawn is that no single existing architectural model suffices, and that what is needed is a combination of the features present in all three models. Chapter 4 introduces the new architectural model we propose, based on the combination of object-orientation in form of the C++ language and dataflow modelling in the new MC++ language. Chapter 5 presents VISSION, an interactive simulation and visualisation environment constructed on the introduced new architectural model, and shows how the usual tasks of application construction, steering, and visualisation are addressed. In chapter 6, the implementation of VISSION’s architectural model is described in terms of its component parts. Chapter 7 presents the applications of VISSION to numerical simulation, while chapter 8 focuses on its visualisation and graphics applications. Finally, chapter 9 concludes the thesis and outlines possible direction for future research.
keywords Computer Visualisation
series thesis:PhD
email a.c.telea@tue.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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