CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 721 to 738 of 738

_id 7893
authors Woodbury, R.F., Wyeld, Th.G., Shannon, S.J., Roberts, I.W., Radford, A., Burry, M., Skates, H., Ham, J. and Datta, S.
year 2001
title The Summer Games
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 293-297
summary As part of a nationally funded project, we have developed and used “games” as studentcentred teaching resources to enrich the capacity for design in beginning students in architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. Students are encouraged to learn inter-actively in a milieu characterised by self-directed play in a low-risk computermodelling environment. Recently thirteen upper year design students, six from Adelaide University (Adelaide, South Australia, Australia), five from Deakin University (Geelong, Victoria, Australia), and two from Victoria University, (Wellington, New Zealand) were commissioned over a ten-week period of the 2000-2001 Australian summer to construct a new series of games. This paper discusses the process behind constructing these games. This paper discusses six topical areas: – what is a game; – specific goals of the summer games; – the structure of a game; – the game-making process; – key findings from the production unit; and – future directions.
keywords Reflection-In-Action, Design Making, Game Container, Collections, Meta-Cases, Data Repository
series eCAADe
email rob_woodbury@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id a05c
authors Wowo, Ding and Ziyu, Tong
year 2000
title A New Method for Structuring the Rural Settlement
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 65-75
summary As we have known that natural villages were grown up with their own environment and social structure, in terms of form language they are in random process but in the level duality of village structure they have certain regularity. By using the computer technique we designed a simulator program with environmental parameters and used this program to grow up a village. This village could be similar to the natural village and its space form will not only relate to physical environmental factor but also to local people's method of choosing the land.
series CAADRIA
email dww01@public1.ptt.js.cn, thet@21cn.com
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id ecaade2010_054
id ecaade2010_054
authors Wurzer, Gabriel; Fioravanti, Antonio; Loffreda, Gianluigi; Trento, Armando
year 2010
title Function & Action: Verifying a functional program in a game-oriented environment
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.389-394
summary The finding of a functional program for any kind of building involves a great amount of knowledge about the behavior of future building users. This knowledge can be gathered by looking at relevant building literature (Adler, 1999; Neufert and Neufert, 2000) or by investigating the actual processes taking place in similar environments, the latter being demonstrated e.g. by (Schütte-Lihotzky, 2004) or new functionalist approaches of the MVRDV group (Costanzo, 2006)). Both techniques have the disadvantage that the architect might assume a behavior which is seldom experienced in real life (either through lack of information or by failing to meet the building user’s expectations). What is needed is a verification step in which the design is tested on real users. We have devised a game-like environment (Figure 1a) in which it is possible to capture the behavior of future building users in order to verify the relevance of the design even at a very early stage. As result of applying our approach, we can find previously overlooked usage situations, which may be used to further adapt the design to the user’s needs.
wos WOS:000340629400041
keywords Requirements checking; Participative design
series eCAADe
email wurzer@iemar.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ffc7
authors Yakeley, Megan
year 1999
title Simultaneous Translation in Design: The Role of Computer Programming in Architectural Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 58-68
summary In this paper it is proposed that architectural design involves simultaneous translation between several different languages and their corresponding systems of notation. The process of educating architects involves teaching fluency in these systems both separately and together. To improve pedagogical efficiency the physical manifestation of the languages - the graphical product - should be separated from the continuous expression of ideas in these languages - the conversational process. Digital media offer the opportunity to learn the process of translation between these systems, and thus form a strong foundation for the ability to design. Here a course taught at MIT by the author is described whose central theme is the development of design process through the use of the intermediary system of notation of a procedural programming language.
keywords Architectural Design Education, Emergent Rules, Systems of Notation, Grounded Theory
series eCAADe
email yakeley@mit.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 20ab
authors Yakeley, Megan
year 2000
title Digitally Mediated Design: Using Computer Programming to Develop a Personal Design Process
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture
summary This thesis is based on the proposal that the current system of architectural design education confuses product and process. Students are assessed through, and therefore concentrate on, the former whilst the latter is left in many cases to chance. This thesis describes a new course taught by the author at MIT for the last three years whose aim is to teach the design process away from the complexities inherent in the studio system. This course draws a parallel between the design process and the Constructionist view of learning, and asserts that the design process is a constant learning activity. Therefore, learning about the design process necessarily involves learning the cognitive skills of this theoretical approach to education. These include concrete thinking and the creation of external artifacts to develop of ideas through iterative, experimental, incremental exploration. The course mimics the Constructionist model of using the computer programming environment LOGO to teach mathematics. It uses computer programming in a CAD environment, and specifically the development of a generative system, to teach the design process. The efficacy of such an approach to architectural design education has been studied using methodologies from educational research. The research design used an emergent qualitative model, employing Maykut and Morehouses interpretive descriptive approach (Maykut & Morehouse, 1994) and Glaser and Strausss Constant Comparative Method of data analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Six students joined the course in the Spring 1999 semester. The experience of these students, what and how they learned, and whether this understanding was transferred to other areas of their educational process, were studied. The findings demonstrated that computer programming in a particular pedagogical framework, can help transform the way in which students understand the process of designing. The following changes were observed in the students during the course of the year: Development of understanding of a personalized design process; move from using computer programming to solve quantifiable problems to using it to support qualitative design decisions; change in understanding of the paradigm for computers in the design process; awareness of the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication skills; change in expectations of, their sense of control over, and appropriation of, the computer in the design process; evidence of transference of cognitive skills; change from a Behaviourist to a Constructionist model of learning Thesis Supervisor: William J. Mitchell Title: Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 2190
authors Yan-chuen, L., Phil, M. and Gilleard, John D.
year 2000
title Refurbishment of building services engineering systems under a collaborative design environment
source Automation in Construction 9 (2) (2000) pp. 185-196
summary In this paper hypermedia is suggested as a suitable paradigm to represent the design processes associated with a shopping center refurbishment project. In addition, by adopting a collaborative design model, the paper makes reference to such factors as synchronous vs. asynchronous and active vs. passive modeling. Concepts in complex problem solving are also explored such as the soft system methodology as well as the application of agent-based decision support systems. Identification of primary information elements and analysis of the relations between these elements indicates that the flow of design information may be readily represented in hypermedia which features nonlinear characteristics in organizing information. The justification of developing a hypermedia tool to cope with changing conditions of a complex design problem instead of providing a solution for a predetermined problem is also argued. The paper illustrates the complex nature of collaborative design process with reference to a case study associated with the building services systems design for a Hong Kong Housing Authority refurbishment project.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 5f73
authors Yen-wen Cheng, Nancy
year 2000
title Web-based Teamwork in Design Education
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 24-26
summary Web-enhanced collaborations can be used throughout the design curriculum to increase interaction and critical thinking. Several kinds of architectural projects are well suited for Internet sharing: 1) case studies, 2) site analyses and 3) component sharing. Through these projects, students learn to work cooperatively while contributing to class resources and research efforts. Web template pages for the projects set standards for presentation and shape content organization. The visible nature of a class web page highlights early examples and publicizes achievements and difficulties. The collective class effort provides an accessible source for comparison, development of evaluation criteria and identification of exemplars. When students are encouraged to build on each others’ work, they reward strong efforts by their selections. Through careful planning of teamwork organization and technical preparations, Internet exercises can maximize cooperative learning.
series SIGRADI
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:03

_id 483a
authors Yu, K. Froese, Th. and Grobler, F.
year 2000
title A development framework for data models for computer-integrated facilities management
source Automation in Construction 9 (2) (2000) pp. 145-167
summary Open computer-integrated facilities management systems hold the promise to improve facilities management practice, but they require extensive underlying technical foundations: particularly standardized data models to enable information sharing among computer applications. The International Alliance for Interoperability is developing Industry Foundation Classes to provide this type of support for all architecture, engineering, construction, and facilities management industries. Facilities Management Classes are a similar effort in advance of, and in extension to, the Industry Foundation Classes for facilities management. This paper presents a framework for the development of Facilities Management Classes and computer-integrated facilities management systems, including objectives, methodologies, implementation issues, etc.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id d59a
authors Zarnowiecka, Jadwiga C.
year 1999
title AI and Regional Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 584-588
summary In 1976 Richard Foqué established periods in the development of methods of designing. The first stage (the 50's and early 60's) - automatization of the designing process - properly identified language of description that is understood by a machine is vital. Christopher Alexander publishes 'Pattern Language'. The second stage (late 60's) - the use of the Arts - research techniques as interview, questionnaire, active observation; ergonomic aspects are also taken into consideration. The third stage (starts at the turn of the 60's and 70's) - co-participation of all of the parties involved in the designing process, and especially the user. The designing process becomes more complex but at the same time more intelligible to a non-professional - Alexander's 'Pattern Language' returns. It's been over 20 years now since the publication of this work. In the mid 70's prototypes of integrate building description are created. We are dealing now with the next stage of the designing methods development. Unquestionable progress of computer optimalization of technical and economical solutions has taken place. It's being forecasted that the next stage would be using computer as a simulator of the designing process. This stage may be combined with the development of AI. (Already in 1950 Alan Turing had formulated the theoretical grounds of Artificial Intelligence.) Can the development of the AI have the influence on the creation of present time regional architecture? Hereby I risk a conclusion that the development of AI can contribute to the creation of modern regional architecture.
keywords Design Process, Artificial Intelligence, Regional Architecture
series eCAADe
email zarnow@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ed24
authors Zarnowiecka, Jadwiga C.
year 2000
title Promise and Reality - For Three Times
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 331-334
summary Promise and Reality - such a clear and straightforward problem mentioned in the conference title makes one look back and reflect on the subject. I have distinguished three groups: teaching of CAAD, databases, AI tools in designing. All the conclusions drawn in the case of each problem, in fact, are to broaden and perfect the forms of education of the youth and students, of job circles and the local ones.
keywords Teaching of CAAD, Databases, AI Tools in Designing, Fractal Geometry
series eCAADe
email zarnow@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 9e61
authors Zarzar, Karina Moraes
year 2000
title The Question of Representing Design Based on Precedents. A Review of the Evolutionary Biological Analogy in the Making of Design Tools
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 411-421
summary This paper is a critical appreciation of the application of the evolutionary analogy in representing the use of precedents in design. It departs from architectural practice and the architects' possible cognitive use of the tools already developed. Pursuing this, two applications of the evolutionary model in design are reviewed. Furthermore, the paper looks into ways the analogy was applied to minimize risks of misapplication and maximize innovation.
series CAADRIA
email K.MoraesZarzar@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id caadria2018_142
id caadria2018_142
authors Zeng, Jia, Xing, Kai and Sun, Cheng
year 2018
title A Parametric Approach for Ascertaining Daylighting in Unit Offices with Perforated Solar Screens in Daylight Climate of Northeast China
source T. Fukuda, W. Huang, P. Janssen, K. Crolla, S. Alhadidi (eds.), Learning, Adapting and Prototyping - Proceedings of the 23rd CAADRIA Conference - Volume 2, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 17-19 May 2018, pp. 133-142
summary Perforated solar screens (PSS) are broadly adopted, providing obvious control over daylight, and also affecting heating and cooling loads. In this paper, a parametric information model is proposed for analyzing daylight of unit offices with PSS, aiming to ascertain the impact exerted by PSS design variables on daylighting, i.e. perforation size, porosity, overhanging distance and perforation width/height ratio. As the results uncover, in comparison to cases of no shading, PSS can reduce overlighting possibility and increase quantity of useful daylight percentage in the near and middle zones of room, but decrease illuminance in the far zone. Porosity is the factor of most significance with UDI100-2000 inclining maximally by 65%. Overhanging distance and width/height ratio rank behind and larger overhanging distance and ratio at 1 are recommend with more useful daylight in the maximum range. Perforation size is of the least importance.
keywords Perforated solar screens; Dynamic daylight performance simulation; The Northeast China; Parametric design
series CAADRIA
email 1362818583@qq.com
last changed 2018/05/17 07:08

_id edd9
authors Zerefos, S.C., Kotsiopoulos, A.M. and Pombortsis, A.
year 2000
title Responsive Architecture: An Integrated Approach for the Future
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 245-249
summary An integrated approach towards a responsive architecture is presented. This new direction in architecture is based on recent scientific advances and on available technology in materials, telecommunications, electronics and sustainability principles. The integrated responsive architecture is not confined to offices or housing, but may well extend to intelligent neighborhoods and to intelligent cities. The dynamics of these future systems focus on security, comfort and health for the inhabitants.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 03b7
authors Zhou, Ming
year 2000
title Use of Computers in Reconstruction of Ancient Buildings
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 223-225
summary Many cities in China today are in the midst of a profound architectural transformation. Among these rapidly developing cities, most of them are many centuries old, possessing rich historical architecture of distinct local traditions. However, the ancient buildings and the neighborhood are disappearing quickly, because of the wholesale demolition for urban development or many years of neglect. In this paper, the use of computers in reconstruction of ancient buildings is briefly discussed with some case studies. The advanced computer technology provides a powerful tool for the ancient architecture preservation and reproduction. It makes the reconstruction engineering more efficient, true to the original, and low cost.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 946b
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to IAD: A Working Model of the Internet-based Engineering Consulting in Architecture
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 073-80
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve into iAD (Internet Aided Design) in the near future (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. During the period of Internet development, the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry has not been changed. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the study of information technology both available today and in the near future, we propose a general abstracted model of an Internet-based consulting system by integrating a variety of disciplines and functions of design and construction processes. This model will cover a range of design phases, such as, information gathering, automatic remote consultation, specific problem solving, and collaboration. Finally, in future follow up research, we will apply the proposed model to steel construction in architectural design, and develop a prototype simulation by selecting one type of structural system.
series CAADRIA
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 90b5
authors Zhou, Qi and Krawczyk, Robert J.
year 2001
title From CAD to iAD: A survey of Internet application in the AEC industry
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 392-397
summary The internet is becoming increasingly more valuable in the field of architectural design that what we conventionally called CAD might soon be changed to iAD (internet Aided Design) (Zhou and Krawczyk 2000). In order to have a clear vision of what iAD will be or could be, we should first examine what is currently available. This research focuses on an investigation of selected web vendors, which are typical and most influential in providing internet related services for the AEC industry. Our purpose for doing this survey is: to understand the progress and development of internet application in the AEC industry, identify the technology used in this area, determine the advantages and deficiencies of current practice and develop a base for future research in proposing a evolutionary model of internet Aided Design for architecture.
keywords Internet Aided Design, Web-Based Application, On-Line Collaboration
series ACADIA
email zhouqi@netscape.net
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 0b61
authors Raper, Jonathan
year 2000
title Multidimensional Geographic Information Science
source London: Taylor & Francis
summary Contributed by Jose Ripper Kós (josekos@ufrj.br)
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:27

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