CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 712

_id c10f
authors Chase, Scott C. and Liew, PakSan
year 2001
title A framework for redesign using FBS models and grammar adaptation
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 467-477
summary This paper describes a framework for redesign. Stylistic change in the form of rule modification is used to transform grammars to produce designs conforming to new requirements. The mechanism that enables this modification is based on the Function-Behaviour-Structure (FBS) model of design. The framework provides a formal mechanism for redesign and defines a means to generate and link structures with different behaviour and functions within the FBS model of design. Redesign of a wall illustrates this framework.
keywords Redesign, Stylistic Change, Feature Grammars, Function-Behaviour-Structure Models
series CAAD Futures
email scott@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id b534
authors Chase, Scott C. and Liew, Paksan
year 2001
title A Systematic Method for Redesign - Using function, behaviour and structure to facilitate grammar transformation
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 18-24
summary We present a formal framework for redesign. Stylistic change, defined by grammar rule modifications, serves as the basis for rule replacement with ones that produce designs satisfying revised requirements. Each grammar rule has an associated description that adds functional or behavioural information to the geometric representation of the design using Function-Behaviour-Structure representations. This method provides a formal mechanism for redesign and defines a means to generate and link structures with different behaviour and functions within the FBS model of design. We demonstrate this with an example of redesign of a wall responding to changing functional requirements, and also discuss its usage in other types of redesign problems.
keywords Redesign, Design Grammars, Function-Behaviour-Structure Models, Feature Based Design
series eCAADe
email scott@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id a469
authors Brown, Andre and Berridge, Phil
year 2001
title Games One : Two : Three A triangle of virtual game scenarios for architectural collaboration
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 95-120 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This paper is split into three parts, each of which deals with different aspects of, and approaches to, the collaboration process. Each of the approaches shares a common root in an aspect of games or gaming. Together the three approaches represent a tripartite attack on the spectrum of problems that need to be addressed to achieve successful collaboration. The first technique is dealt with in Game One One. This deals with the issue of encouraging collaboration. It is based on work using a role playing game scenario and is intended to allow construction industry professionals and clients to develop a common framework for discussion. It originally existed as a paper based game and is now being tested in a web-based environment. Game Two is based on work that has evolved from contemporary game and meeting place environments that have been attracting attention recently. Here internet-based three-dimensional worlds are used as a virtual replacement of real spaces and participants meet as avatars. In the architectural context we have investigated the potential for application of such 3D worlds as meeting, and discussion places where architectural information and ideas can be exchanged. In Game Three we take the idea that currently, virtual environments are still rather uncomfortable and unnatural in terms of human interaction, and in particular in the way that we move around and display architectural scenes. We develop the idea that games software incorporates techniques that make the representation of animated, interactive 3D architectural environments computationally efficient. We have augmented the software used in games environments and have considered how we construct architectural models and man-machine interfaces to improve the effectiveness of such environments in an architectural context.
series other
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 5225
authors Gomez de Silva Garza, Andres and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2001
title Using Evolutionary Methods for Design Case Adaptation
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 180-191
summary Case-based reasoning (CBR) provides a methodology for directly using previous designs in the development of a new design. An aspect of CBR that is not well developed for designing is the combination and adaptation of previous designs. The difficulty with this aspect of case-based design is partly due to the extensive amounts of specialised knowledge needed to select the appropriate features of a previous design to include in the new design and the adaptation of these features to fit the context of a new design problem. In this paper we present a design process model that combines ideas from CBR and genetic algorithms (GA’s). The CBR paradigm provides a method for the overall process of case selection and adaptation. The GA paradigm provides a method for adapting design cases by combining and mutating their features until a set of new design requirements and constraints are satisfied. We have implemented the process model and illustrate the model for residential floor plan layout. We use a set of Frank Lloyd Wright prairie house layouts as the case base. The constraints used to determine whether new designs proposed by the process model are acceptable are taken from feng shui, the Chinese art of placement. This illustration not only clarifies how our process model for design through the evolutionary adaptation of cases works, but it also shows how knowledge sources with distinct origins can be used within the same design framework.
keywords Evolutionary Design, Case-Based Reasoning, Floor Plan Layout
series ACADIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id f8e3
authors Hew, K.-P., Fisher, N. and Awbi, H.B.
year 2001
title Towards an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format for building and services design
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 459-476
summary The emerging technology in building product design using knowledge-based engineering (KBE), is currently exciting practitioners in the building construction industry. This paper investigates the use of KBE techniques and assesses the contribution this approach can make to the traditional design process. To do this, the investigation has developed an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format, for integrating 3D electronic prototypes with building services information for use in building design. This approach has been developed on the basis of an open framework and has been applied to the design of an airport terminal building and its plant room. Within the framework, the design process and the information needed, are divided into modules and represented in the form of 3D digital mock-up models (or electronic prototypes). Within the integrated system, an interface has been developed to facilitate the sharing of information with a thermal analysis software application, which contributes to the design process. In this paper, the methodology is discussed and its working system is illustrated and evaluated.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id avocaad_2001_22
id avocaad_2001_22
authors Jos van Leeuwen, Joran Jessurun
year 2001
title XML for Flexibility an Extensibility of Design Information Models
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The VR-DIS research programme aims at the development of a Virtual Reality – Design Information System. This is a design and decision support system for collaborative design that provides a VR interface for the interaction with both the geometric representation of a design and the non-geometric information concerning the design throughout the design process. The major part of the research programme focuses on early stages of design. The programme is carried out by a large number of researchers from a variety of disciplines in the domain of construction and architecture, including architectural design, building physics, structural design, construction management, etc.Management of design information is at the core of this design and decision support system. Much effort in the development of the system has been and still is dedicated to the underlying theory for information management and its implementation in an Application Programming Interface (API) that the various modules of the system use. The theory is based on a so-called Feature-based modelling approach and is described in the PhD thesis by [first author, 1999] and in [first author et al., 2000a]. This information modelling approach provides three major capabilities: (1) it allows for extensibility of conceptual schemas, which is used to enable a designer to define new typologies to model with; (2) it supports sharing of conceptual schemas, called type-libraries; and (3) it provides a high level of flexibility that offers the designer the opportunity to easily reuse design information and to model information constructs that are not foreseen in any existing typologies. The latter aspect involves the capability to expand information entities in a model with relationships and properties that are not typologically defined but applicable to a particular design situation only; this helps the designer to represent the actual design concepts more accurately.The functional design of the information modelling system is based on a three-layered framework. In the bottom layer, the actual design data is stored in so-called Feature Instances. The middle layer defines the typologies of these instances in so-called Feature Types. The top layer is called the meta-layer because it provides the class definitions for both the Types layer and the Instances layer; both Feature Types and Feature Instances are objects of the classes defined in the top layer. This top layer ensures that types can be defined on the fly and that instances can be created from these types, as well as expanded with non-typological properties and relationships while still conforming to the information structures laid out in the meta-layer.The VR-DIS system consists of a growing number of modules for different kinds of functionality in relation with the design task. These modules access the design information through the API that implements the meta-layer of the framework. This API has previously been implemented using an Object-Oriented Database (OODB), but this implementation had a number of disadvantages. The dependency of the OODB, a commercial software library, was considered the most problematic. Not only are licenses of the OODB library rather expensive, also the fact that this library is not common technology that can easily be shared among a wide range of applications, including existing applications, reduces its suitability for a system with the aforementioned specifications. In addition, the OODB approach required a relatively large effort to implement the desired functionality. It lacked adequate support to generate unique identifications for worldwide information sources that were understandable for human interpretation. This strongly limited the capabilities of the system to share conceptual schemas.The approach that is currently being implemented for the core of the VR-DIS system is based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML). Rather than implementing the meta-layer of the framework into classes of Feature Types and Feature Instances, this level of meta-definitions is provided in a document type definition (DTD). The DTD is complemented with a set of rules that are implemented into a parser API, based on the Document Object Model (DOM). The advantages of the XML approach for the modelling framework are immediate. Type-libraries distributed through Internet are now supported through the mechanisms of namespaces and XLink. The implementation of the API is no longer dependent of a particular database system. This provides much more flexibility in the implementation of the various modules of the VR-DIS system. Being based on the (supposed to become) standard of XML the implementation is much more versatile in its future usage, specifically in a distributed, Internet-based environment.These immediate advantages of the XML approach opened the door to a wide range of applications that are and will be developed on top of the VR-DIS core. Examples of these are the VR-based 3D sketching module [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; the VR-based information-modelling tool that allows the management and manipulation of information models for design in a VR environment [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; and a design-knowledge capturing module that is now under development [first author et al., 2000a and 2000b]. The latter module aims to assist the designer in the recognition and utilisation of existing and new typologies in a design situation. The replacement of the OODB implementation of the API by the XML implementation enables these modules to use distributed Feature databases through Internet, without many changes to their own code, and without the loss of the flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas that are implemented as part of the API. Research in the near future will result in Internet-based applications that support designers in the utilisation of distributed libraries of product-information, design-knowledge, case-bases, etc.The paper roughly follows the outline of the abstract, starting with an introduction to the VR-DIS project, its objectives, and the developed theory of the Feature-modelling framework that forms the core of it. It briefly discusses the necessity of schema evolution, flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas, and how these capabilities have been addressed in the framework. The major part of the paper describes how the previously mentioned aspects of the framework are implemented in the XML-based approach, providing details on the so-called meta-layer, its definition in the DTD, and the parser rules that complement it. The impact of the XML approach on the functionality of the VR-DIS modules and the system as a whole is demonstrated by a discussion of these modules and scenarios of their usage for design tasks. The paper is concluded with an overview of future work on the sharing of Internet-based design information and design knowledge.
series AVOCAAD
email J.P.v.Leeuwen@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4c45
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed K.
year 2001
title Exploiting Tools of Evaluation to Improve CAAD Teaching Methods. A Case Study of Inter & Intra ECTM Model
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 215-230
summary This paper reports on an ongoing research study model into the Evaluation of CAAD Teaching Methods (ECTM) of which a number of resolutions and strategies were attained via an empirical investigation. The first stage of the study findings proposed a framework for the evaluation of architecture courses in tandem with CAAD. The second stage was based on the Inter & Intra ECTM design model as a strategy for acquiring solutions to CAAD problems through the exploitation of CAAD evaluation tools. The ECTM model structure criteria: the Model Concepts, the Operational Context, Dialectic Meanings, Relational Context, Performing Methods and Level of Integration were illuminated. ECTM model has a twofold involvement junctures, which describe CAAD evaluation behaviour. The first involves the evaluator in an interdepartmental comparison of CAAD integration into the curriculum, and/or between schools of architecture. The second engages the evaluator in an intradepartmental study of CAAD integration, and within the institution. The study projected an attempt to validate the Inter & Intra ECTM design model in concert with evaluation. The paper presents an extended description of the objectives, procedures and testing designed for the two abovementioned junctures composing the proposed ECTM case studies. Sequences of methods of data collection employed as a vehicle for the ECTM were Kirkpatrick model, questionnaire survey, observation (using an ECTM checklist) and experimental studies. The paper also explores variables and indicators used, and advances to shed some light on the methods of statistical analysis employment. ECTM model as a tool to attain CAAD effectiveness might redefine the role of collaborators/ team partnerships in CAAD tuition; and induce the level of technology selection and adaptation amongst schools, e.g. tutors and coursework interconnectivity. The ECTM model may also work as a framework of strategies to augment interactivity and positive learning amongst both staff and students.
keywords Evaluation, Teaching Methods, Interactivity, Effectiveness
series CAAD Futures
email r.qaqish@index.com.jo
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 34d2
authors Rottensteiner, Franz
year 2001
title Semi-automatic extraction of buildings based on hybrid adjustment using 3D surface models and management of building data in a TIS
source Vienna University of Technology
summary A new method for semi-automatic building extraction together with a concept for storing building models alongside with terrain data in a topographical information system (TIS) is presented. A user interface based on Constructive Solid Geometry is combined with an internal data structure completely based on boundary representation. Each building can be de-composed into a set of simple primitives which are reconstructed individually. After selecting a primitive from a data base of common building shapes, the primitive parameters can be modified by interactive measurement in digital images in order to provide approximate values for automatic fine measurement. In all phases, the properties of the boundary models are directly connected to parameter estimation: the parameters of the building primitives are determined in a hybrid adjustment of camera co-ordinates and fictitious observations of points being situated on building faces. Automatic fine measurement is an application of a general framework for object surface reconstruction using hierarchical feature based object space matching. The integration of object space into the matching process is achieved by the new modeling technique. The management of both building and terrain data in a TIS is based on a unique principle. Meta data are managed in a relational data base, whereas the actual data are treated as binary large objects. The new method is evaluated in a test project (image scale: 1:4500, 70 % overlap, 50 % side lap). The automatic tool gives results with an accuracy of +-2-5 cm in planimetric position and +-5-10 cm in height.
keywords Building Extraction; Semi-automatic building extraction; Object modelling; 3D City models; Data acquisition; Spatial Information Systems; Image matching; Photogrammetry
series thesis:PhD
email fr@ipf.tuwien.ac.at
more http://www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/fr/buildings/diss/node5.html
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 898a
authors Bay, J.H.
year 2002
title Cognitive Biases and Precedent Knowledge in Human and Computer-Aided Design Thinking
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 213-220
summary Cognitive biases (illusions) and potential errors can occur when using precedent knowledge for analogical, pre-parametric and qualitative design thinking. This paper refers largely to part of a completed research (Bay 2001) on how heuristic biases, discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) in cognitive psychology, can affect judgement and learning of facts from precedents in architectural design, made explicit using a kernel of conceptual system (Tzonis et. al., 1978) and a framework of architectural representation (Tzonis 1992). These are used here to consider how such illusions and errors may be transferred to computer aided design thinking.
series CAADRIA
email akibayp@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id cf2003_m_040
id cf2003_m_040
authors BAY, Joo-Hwa
year 2003
title Making Rebuttals Available Digitally for Minimising Biases in Mental Judgements
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 147-156
summary The problem of heuristic biases (illusions) discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) that can lead to errors in judgement by human designers, when they use precedent knowledge presented graphically (Bay 2001). A Cognitive framework of belief, goal, and decision, and a framework of representation of architectural knowledge by Tzonis are used to map out the problem of heuristic biases in the human mind. These are used to discuss what aspects of knowledge can be presented explicitly and digitally to users to make rebuttal more available for human thinking at the cognitive level. The discussion is applicable to both inductive and analytic digital knowledge systems that use precedent knowledge. This discussion is targeted directly at means of addressing bias in the human mind using digital means. The problem of human bias in machine learning and generalisation are discussed in a different paper, and the problems of international or non-intentional machine bias are not part of discussion in this paper.
keywords analogy, bias, design thinking, environmental design, heuristics
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/22 06:26

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id d9f0
authors Bhavnani, S.K., Reif, F. and John, B.E.
year 2001
title Beyond Command Knowledge: Identifying and Teaching Strategic Knowledge for Using Complex Computer Applications
source Proceedings of CHI' 01 (2001), 229-236
summary Despite experience, many users do not make efficient use of complex computer applications. We argue that this is caused by a lack of strategic knowledge that is difficult to acquire just by knowing how to use commands. To address this problem, we present efficient and general strategies for using computer applications, and identify the components of strategic knowledge required to use them. We propose a framework for teaching strategic knowledge, and show how we implemented it in a course for freshman students. In a controlled study, we compared our approach to the traditional approach of just teaching commands. The results show that efficient and general strategies can in fact be taught to students of diverse backgrounds in a limited time without harming command knowledge. The experiment also pinpointed those strategies that can be automatically learned just from learning commands, and those that require more practice than we provided. These results are important to universities and companies that wish to foster more efficient use of complex computer applications.
keywords Strategies; Training; Instruction; GOMS
series other
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a4a1
authors Bukowski, Richard W. 
year 2001
title Interactive Walkthrough Environments for Simulation
source University of California at Berkeley
summary This thesis describes a second-generation walkthrough framework that provides extensive facilities for integrating many types of third-party simulation codes into a large-scale virtual environment model, and puts it in perspective with first-generation systems built during the last two decades. The framework provides an advanced model database that supports multiple simultaneous users with full consistency semantics, system independent storage and retrieval, and efficient prefetching and object reconstruction techniques to support second and third-generation walkthrough systems. Furthermore, our framework integrates support for scalable, distributed, interactive models with plug-in physical simulation to provide a large and rich environment suitable for architectural evaluation and training applications. A number of third-party simulations have been integrated into the framework, including dynamic physical interactions, fire simulation, multiple distributed users, radiosity, and online tapestry generation. All of these simulators interact with each other and with the user via a data distribution network that provides efficient, optimized use of bandwidth to transport simulation results to clients as they need them for visualization. These diverse simulators provide proof of concept for the generality of the framework, and show how quickly third-party simulations can be integrated into our system. The result is a highly interactive distributed architectural model with applications in research, training, and real-time data visualization. Finally, an outlook is given to a possible third generation of virtual environment architectures that are capable of integrating different heterogeneous walkthrough models.
series thesis:PhD
email bukowski@cs.berkeley.edu
more http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~bukowski/resume.html
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 6756
authors Butler, K.S., Rincón, H., Maria Lane, K. and Brand, R.
year 2001
title Construyendo una ciudad sostenible en la frontera: planificación de la ciudad de Colombia, Nuevo León, México [Constructing A Sustainable City In the Border: Planning of the City of Colombia, Nuevo León, Mexico ]
source 2da Conferencia Venezolana sobre Aplicación de Computadores en Arquitectura, Maracaibo (Venezuela) december 2001, pp. 194-203
summary The policy rationale for promotion of urban development in the Mexico-Texas borderland of Nuevo León is likely to be sustained and even strengthened. The University of Texasí participation in new town planning for Colombia spans at least three hierarchical levels with students, faculty members, practitioners and government officials joining efforts. At the ìstudio levelî, students completed a comprehensive landscape assessment for portions of the future city using GPS surveying and GIS database and modeling. Graduate students, using field data, updated 2000 maps/shapefiles, and spatial modeling as an analysis tool, created a series of spatial models to produce useful information about the study areaís inherent suitability for agriculture, human settlement and preservation. This work culminated in a research symposium, planning charrette, refinement of land use and infrastructure assumptions, and the development of masterplan elements for the future city. In contrast to the professional firm, the project provides unique opportunities for intensive learning and applied research that contribute to the ecological, social and economic well-being of new cities and developing regions,
keywords USA-Mexico Border; Sustainable Development; Regional Planning; Arch View
series other
email k.butler@mail.utexas.edu, rinconhr@mail.utexas.edu, maria@lane.web, rbrand@mail.utexas.edu
last changed 2003/02/14 07:29

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 24d2
authors Da Costa Silva, Heitor
year 2001
title MODELOS: FORMA E CONFORTO NA ARQUITETURA (Models: Form and Environment in Architecture)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 51-53
summary The work presents a research project in its first phase of implementation. The research project deals with the manufacturing of architectural models which use new technology, for thermal and lighting investigation and using one heliodon as means of building assessment. The models to be produced will be chosen from built examples of the Modern Architecture of the XX Century. Initially virtual models will be constructed and afterwards the models will be printed in 3D. Once the three dimensional models were built they will be examined in one heliodon to evaluate their thermal and light performance. Also the models will be used as means of calibrating the heliodon itself. Lately the models will be incorporate as building examples for projects museum.
series SIGRADI
email heitor@prisma.unisinos.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id ede5
authors De J. Ramos Rojas, Yajaira
year 2001
title TÉCNICAS DE MODELADO DE BASES DE DATOS GEO-REFERENCIADOS O ESPACIALES (Modeling Techniques of Geo-Referenced Data Bases or Space)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 315-318
summary To model a database that stores geo-indexed data or space, a diversity of models exists in the literature. In this article the models will be studied proposed by Michael F. Worboys, Peter Milne and S. A. Roberts and will be represented using OMT (Object Modelling Technique) of Rumbaugh. The models will be evaluated following a methodology based on the existence of a ideal model of reference against the one which to be able to contrast them. The created ideal pattern will be constituted in a new model for the design of space databases OxO.
series SIGRADI
email rryj@ing.ula.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 7eb9
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Martens, Bob
year 2001
title A Working Session on 3-D City Modeling
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 417-422
summary On the occasion of a presentation on a city model for Graz at the eCAADe-conference in Weimar (2000), some attendees informed us about their previous work in this field and the idea of preparing a working session with collegues involved in 3-D city modeling was born. During the initial phase of research for this eCAADe conference activity it turned out that a large number of city models has been created in the course of time for different reasons resp. purposes. Therefore a rich variety in the production of city models can be noticed. This working session on 3-D city modeling brings together experts focusing on different aspects concerning the creation and use of city models, such as data input, data structure, data storage and data quality. Also the definition of a perspective on the future of 3-D city modeling can be regarded as an important topic. In this paper a rough overview on the different submissions will be presented. Furthermore three blitz statements are incorporated as time was too short to produce a full paper. Both with the individual contributions as with this overview paper it is intended to present a knowledge-base to this working field. Finally, the start for a growing bibliography was made in order to support future work in this area.
keywords Urban Modeling, 3-D Modeling, Collaboration, City Information, Model Adaptation
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tugraz.at
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 6a37
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 13-23
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies ina tightly structured framework for the integration of Environmental Control Systems (ECS) principles intoa third year design studio. An interchangeable use of digital media and physical material enabledarchitectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement.The principles that provide the foundation for integrative strategies between a design studio and buildingtechnology course spring from the Bauhaus tradition where a systematic approach to craftsmanship andvisual perception is emphasized. Focusing particularly on color, light, texture and materials, Josef Albersexplored the assemblage of found objects, transforming these materials into unexpected dynamiccompositions. Moholy-Nagy developed a technique called the photogram or camera-less photograph torecord the temporal movements of light. Wassily Kandinsky developed a method of analytical drawingthat breaks a still life composition into diagrammatic forces to express tension and geometry. Theseschematic diagrams provide a method for students to examine and analyze the implications of elementplacements in space (Bermudez, Neiman 1997). Gyorgy Kepes's Language of Vision provides a primerfor learning basic design principles. Kepes argued that the perception of a visual image needs aprocess of organization. According to Kepes, the experience of an image is "a creative act ofintegration". All of these principles provide the framework for the studio investigation.The quarter started with a series of intense short workshops that used an interchangeable use of digitaland physical media to focus on ECS topics such as day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary tolead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration.In integrating ECS components with the design studio, an nine-step methodology was established toprovide students with a compelling and tangible framework for design:Examples of student work will be presented for the two times this course was offered (2001/02) to showhow exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series ACADIA
email tfowler@calpoly.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

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