CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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References

Hits 41 to 60 of 714

_id 6473
authors Caneparo, Luca and Robiglio, Matteo
year 2001
title Evolutionary Automata for Suburban Form Simulation
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 767-780
summary The paper outlines a research project to develop a dynamic simulation of suburbanization processes. The approach to simulating suburban form relies on modelling different interacting processes on various scales. Two layered models are implemented, the Socio-Economic and Zoning model and the Suburban Form model, respectively by means of cellular automata and genetic programming. The Socio-Economic and Zoning model simulates exogenous factors and endogenous processes of large-scale suburban dynamics. The model approximates the area by means of a rectangular grid to the scale of hundred meters. The Suburban Form model uses a smaller grid, to the scale of meters, and is three-dimensional. The resulting dynamic, 3D, fine-scale model will create scenarios of suburban growth, allowing evaluation of their consequences on built environment and landscape.
keywords Urban Morphology, Model Based Design Support System, Urban Design, Landscape, Genetic Programming, Cellular Automata
series CAAD Futures
email caneparo@polito.it
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id e693
authors Caneparo, Luca
year 2001
title Shared virtual reality for design and management: the Porta Susa project
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 217-228
summary The paper presents the implementation of a system of Shared Virtual Reality (SVR) in Internet applied to a large-scale project. The applications of SVR to architectural and urban design are presented in the context of a real project, the new railway junction of Porta Susa and the surrounding urban area in the city centre of Turin, Italy. SVR differs from Virtual Reality (VR) in that the experience of virtual spaces is no longer individual, but rather shared across the Internet with other users simultaneously connected. SVR offers an effective approach to Construction Data Model and Computer Supported Collaborative Work, because it integrates both the communicative tools to improve collaboration and the distributed environment to process information across the networks.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 793d
authors Chitchian, D., Sauren, E.G.M. and Heeling, J.
year 2001
title Urban-CAD, A Design Application for Urbanism
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 387-399
summary The existing CAAD programs and design applications are not much usefull for designers with urbanistic design activities. Those applications can be utilized in design tasks, but they are not useful means to support the whole design process. To assist the urban designers in their design process, we need new CAD applications capable of providing comprehensive information to the users and supporting the urbanistic design process. To fulfil these requirments we have been working to develop an Urban-CAD program to overcome the limitations of the already existing CAD applications furthermore suit the urbanistic designers needs.
keywords Urban Design Process, Scaling, Abstracted And Detailed Levels, CAAD
series CAAD Futures
email d.chitchian@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:23

_id 7ffb
authors Ciftcioglu, Özer and Durmisevic, Sanja
year 2001
title Knowledge management by information mining
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 533-545
summary Novel information mining method dealing with soft computing is described. By this method, in the first step, receptive fields of design information are identified so that connections among various design aspects are structured. By means of this, complex relationships among various design aspects are modeled with a paradigm, which is non-parametric and generic. In the second step, the structured connections between various pairs of aspects are graded according to the relevancy to each other. This is accomplished by means of sensitivity analysis, which is a computational tool operating on the model established and based on a concept measuring the degree of dependencies between pairs of quantities. The degree of relationships among various design aspects so determined enables one to select the most important independent aspects in the context of design or decision-making process. The paper deals with the description of the method and presents an architectural case study where numerical and as well as non-numerical (linguistic) design information are treated together, demonstrating a ranked or elective information employment which can be of great value for possible design intervention during reconstruction.
keywords Knowledge Management, Information Mining, Sensitivity Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email ciftciog@mail.bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ec4d
authors Croser, J.
year 2001
title GDL Object
source The Architect’s Journal, 14 June 2001, pp. 49-50
summary It is all too common for technology companies to seek a new route to solving the same problem but for the most part the solutions address the effect and not the cause. The good old-fashioned pencil is the perfect example where inventors have sought to design-out the effect of the inherent brittleness of lead. Traditionally different methods of sharpening were suggested and more recently the propelling pencil has reigned king, the lead being supported by the dispensing sleeve thus reducing the likelihood of breakage. Developers convinced by the Single Building Model approach to design development have each embarked on a difficult journey to create an easy to use feature packed application. Unfortunately it seems that the two are not mutually compatible if we are to believe what we see emanating from Technology giants Autodesk in the guise of Architectural Desktop 3. The effect of their development is a feature rich environment but the cost and in this case the cause is a tool which is far from easy to use. However, this is only a small part of a much bigger problem, Interoperability. You see when one designer develops a model with one tool the information is typically locked in that environment. Of course the geometry can be distributed and shared amongst the team for use with their tools but the properties, or as often misquoted, the intelligence is lost along the way. The effect is the technological version of rubble; the cause is the low quality of data-translation available to us. Fortunately there is one company, which is making rapid advancements on the whole issue of collaboration, and data sharing. An old timer (Graphisoft - famous for ArchiCAD) has just donned a smart new suit, set up a new company called GDL Technology and stepped into the ring to do battle, with a difference. The difference is that GDL Technology does not rely on conquering the competition, quite the opposite in fact their success relies upon the continued success of all the major CAD platforms including AutoCAD, MicroStation and ArchiCAD (of course). GDL Technology have created a standard data format for manufacturers called GDL Objects. Product manufacturers such as Velux are now able to develop product libraries using GDL Objects, which can then be placed in a CAD model, or drawing using almost any CAD tool. The product libraries can be stored on the web or on CD giving easy download access to any building industry professional. These objects are created using scripts which makes them tiny for downloading from the web. Each object contains 3 important types of information: · Parametric scale dependant 2d plan symbols · Full 3d geometric data · Manufacturers information such as material, colour and price Whilst manufacturers are racing to GDL Technologies door to sign up, developers and clients are quick to see the benefit too. Porsche are using GDL Objects to manage their brand identity as they build over 300 new showrooms worldwide. Having defined the building style and interior Porsche, in conjunction with the product suppliers, have produced a CD-ROM with all of the selected building components such as cladding, doors, furniture, and finishes. Designing and detailing the various schemes will therefore be as straightforward as using Lego. To ease the process of accessing, sizing and placing the product libraries GDL Technology have developed a product called GDL Object Explorer, a free-standing application which can be placed on the CD with the product libraries. Furthermore, whilst the Object Explorer gives access to the GDL Objects it also enables the user to save the object in one of many file formats including DWG, DGN, DXF, 3DS and even the IAI's IFC. However, if you are an AutoCAD user there is another tool, which has been designed especially for you, it is called the Object Adapter and it works inside of AutoCAD 14 and 2000. The Object Adapter will dynamically convert all GDL Objects to AutoCAD Blocks during placement, which means that they can be controlled with standard AutoCAD commands. Furthermore, each object can be linked to an online document from the manufacturer web site, which is ideal for more extensive product information. Other tools, which have been developed to make the most of the objects, are the Web Plug-in and SalesCAD. The Plug-in enables objects to be dynamically modified and displayed on web pages and Sales CAD is an easy to learn and use design tool for sales teams to explore, develop and cost designs on a Notebook PC whilst sitting in the architects office. All sales quotations are directly extracted from the model and presented in HTML format as a mixture of product images, product descriptions and tables identifying quantities and costs. With full lifecycle information stored in each GDL Object it is no surprise that GDL Technology see their objects as the future for building design. Indeed they are not alone, the IAI have already said that they are going to explore the possibility of associating GDL Objects with their own data sharing format the IFC. So down to the dirty stuff, money and how much it costs? Well, at the risk of sounding like a market trader in Petticoat Lane, "To you guv? Nuffin". That's right as a user of this technology it will cost you nothing! Not a penny, it is gratis, free. The product manufacturer pays for the license to host their libraries on the web or on CD and even then their costs are small costing from as little as 50p for each CD filled with objects. GDL Technology has come up trumps with their GDL Objects. They have developed a new way to solve old problems. If CAD were a pencil then GDL Objects would be ballistic lead, which would never break or loose its point. A much better alternative to the strategy used by many of their competitors who seek to avoid breaking the pencil by persuading the artist not to press down so hard. If you are still reading and you have not already dropped the magazine and run off to find out if your favorite product supplier has already signed up then I suggest you check out the following web sites www.gdlcentral.com and www.gdltechnology.com. If you do not see them there, pick up the phone and ask them why.
series journal paper
email joec@adrem-dcx.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 1e3b
authors Crowe, Malcolm and Kydd, Sandy
year 2001
title Agents and suggestions in a Web-based dynamic workflow model
source Automation in Construction 10 (5) (2001) pp. 639-643
summary Two features of this dynamic workflow system make it suitable for the use of quasi-intelligent agents: (a) workflow processes need not be fully specified, and so can be non-prescriptive in approach, and (b) a job can be modified independently of the process of which it is an instance, and so some participants may have permissions to change its course. In the architecture that has been chosen for the research, web clients are used, and web agents generate suggestions based on analysis of the process itself, the current job, and the records of previous jobs.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 751d
authors Cubero, R., Caldera, N., Indriago, J.A., Camacaro, L., Nixon, M. and Cestary, J.
year 2001
title Georeferenciando revicios y recursos turisticos para la plaificacion territorial: El Sigtur-Zulia [Georeferential Services and Touristic Resources for Territorial Planning: The Sigtur-Zulia]
source 2da Conferencia Venezolana sobre Aplicación de Computadores en Arquitectura, Maracaibo (Venezuela) december 2001, pp. 146-155
summary In 1997, the Research Institute of Faculty of Architecture and Design, University of Zulia, started the R&D project of a decision making support system for tourism planning. For this, GIS technologies have been used for geocodification and spatial analysis of all the tourism facilities and resources existing in Zulia State, studying this kind of socioeconomic development according to critical poverty problems that are typical of their population. This paper describes this geographic information system, with the application of accessibility analysis, areas of influence, and threedimensional studies through network analysisó three-dimensional analysis with ArcView GIS clients, ArcExplorer clients, and MapObjects clients, on an MS Windows NT client/server environment.
keywords GIS; Tourism Planning; Internet; Desktop Mapping
series other
email rcuberos@luz.ve, ncaldera@luz.ve, indriago@luz.ve, leriz@luz.ve, nmolina@luz.ve, jcestary@luz.ve
last changed 2003/02/14 07:29

_id f01c
authors Cuberos Mejía, R., Caldera de Ugarte, N., Indriago, J.A., Camacaro, L., Molina, N. and Cestary, J.
year 2001
title PLANIFICACIÓN TURÍSTICA Y TELEINFORMACIÓN (Planning in the Tourist Industry and Tele-information)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 311-314
summary This paper explains an object-based geographic information system (GIS) developed for tourism planning on Maracaibo, Venezuela. In order to establish a better way to manipulate georeferenced data, this system is migrating its structure from a fouryears- old relational database, incorporating distributed storage on a comprehensive catalog. A combination of operating system, SQL server and Map server, is being implemented to substitute a static web site for a real-time application to easily manipulate maps through a web browser. This work not only creates answers to implementing urban information systems, also it will facilitate their incorporation on collaborative geographical networks in the entire world.
series SIGRADI
email rcuberos@luz.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 16fb
authors Dokonal, W., Martens, B. and Ploesch, R.
year 2001
title On the Borderline - Building a 3-D City Model with Students
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 410-416
summary This paper describes ongoing experiences with the „digcity“ project at Graz University of Technology (Austria). It presents a different approach in creating a 3-D City Model compared to other urban modeling projects. The substantial input made by students defines the basic characteristic of this project. In this contribution the redefinition of the project management is described. An outline of the project itself has been presented already in previous papers and presentations (Dokonal et.al., 2000 and 2001). These papers are updated here and the latest developments in this project are presented.
keywords Urban Modeling, 3-D Modeling, Architectural Education, Collaboration
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tugraz.at, ploesch@zid.tu-graz.ac.at
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 7eb9
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Martens, Bob
year 2001
title A Working Session on 3-D City Modeling
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 417-422
summary On the occasion of a presentation on a city model for Graz at the eCAADe-conference in Weimar (2000), some attendees informed us about their previous work in this field and the idea of preparing a working session with collegues involved in 3-D city modeling was born. During the initial phase of research for this eCAADe conference activity it turned out that a large number of city models has been created in the course of time for different reasons resp. purposes. Therefore a rich variety in the production of city models can be noticed. This working session on 3-D city modeling brings together experts focusing on different aspects concerning the creation and use of city models, such as data input, data structure, data storage and data quality. Also the definition of a perspective on the future of 3-D city modeling can be regarded as an important topic. In this paper a rough overview on the different submissions will be presented. Furthermore three blitz statements are incorporated as time was too short to produce a full paper. Both with the individual contributions as with this overview paper it is intended to present a knowledge-base to this working field. Finally, the start for a growing bibliography was made in order to support future work in this area.
keywords Urban Modeling, 3-D Modeling, Collaboration, City Information, Model Adaptation
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tugraz.at
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id c596
authors Ekholm, Anders
year 2001
title Modelling of User Activities in Building Design
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 67-72
summary Architects manage not only information about the building but also about the user organisation. Therefore, information systems for architectural design must be able to handle both building and organisational data. The paper describes architectural design as a creative problem solving process, and presents a recently developed prototype application for user activity modelling built as an add-on to ArchiCAD.
keywords Architectural Design, Problem Solving, User Activity Modelling, Model Based CAD
series eCAADe
email anders.ekholm@caad.lth.se
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 40a6
authors Ennis, Gareth and Lindsay, Malcolm
year 2001
title VRGLASGOW.CO.UK implementation of internet multi-user functionality to Glasgow's virtual city
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 135-142 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary The development of the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) for the Internet has resulted in the emergence of a multiplicity of 3D web sites. The metaphor used by these sites varies enormously from virtual galleries to virtual cities and style varies from abstract to reality. Additionally these worlds are populated by virtual objects, some having reactive or interactive properties, including movement, audio, video, databases, artificial intelligence etc. Perhaps the most stimulating embodiment of these new environments are those that offer the participant the opportunity to meet and communicate with other visitors exploring the same virtual space/world. The Glasgow Directory is an established 3D web space, with around 10,000 visitors per year. The model represents approximayely 10,000 properties in the city and is populated by contextual information on its culture and socio-economic topography. This paper will describe the background to this VR space, and suggest a set of design criteria for successfully deploying multi-user software within this and similar environments. These criteria will take into account lessons learned by 'observing' and analysing how participants interact with the existing system under different conditions and also what benefits they perceive on entering the environment via the multi-user interface. These recommendations will hopefully be applicable to a wide spectrum of internet virtual environment builders and users.
series other
email gary.ennis@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 3dcd
authors Ennis, Gary and Maver, Tom
year 2001
title Visit VR Glasgow - Welcoming multiple visitors to the Virtual City
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 423-429
summary The development of the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) for the Internet has resulted in the emergence of a multiplicity of 3D web sites. The metaphor used by these sites varies enormously from virtual galleries to virtual cities and style varies from abstract to reality. Additionally these worlds are populated by virtual objects, some having reactive or interactive properties, including movement, audio, video, databases, artificial intelligence etc. Perhaps the most stimulating embodiment of these new environments are those that offer the participant the opportunity to meet and communicate with other visitors exploring the same virtual space/world. The Glasgow Directory is an established 3D web space, with around 10,000 visitors per year. The model represents approximately 10,000 properties in the city and is populated by contextual information on its culture and socio-economic topography. This paper describes the background to this VR space, and suggests a set of design criteria for successfully deploying multi-user software within this and similar environments. These criteria take into account lessons learned by ‘observing’ and analysing how participants interact with the existing system under different conditions and also what benefits they perceive on entering the environment via the multi-user interface. These recommendations will hopefully be applicable to a wide spectrum of internet virtual environment builders and users.
keywords Virtual, City, 3-D, Databases, Interaction
series eCAADe
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk, gary.ennis@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id a58e
authors Evans, S. and Hudson-Smith, A.
year 2001
title Information Rich 3D Computer Modeling of Urban Environments
source Working Paper 35, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis Working Papers; London, August 2001
summary We are living in an increasingly information rich society. Geographical Information Systems now allow us to precisely tag information to specific features, objects and locations. The Internet is enabling much of this information to be accessed by a whole spectrum of users. At CASA we are attempting to push this technology towards a three-dimensional GIS, that works across the Internet and can represent significant chunks of a large city. We believe that the range of possible uses for such technology is diverse, although we feel that urban planning is an area that can benefit greatly. An opportunity to push this ìplanning technologyî arose when CASA won a tender from Hackney Council to develop a dynamic website for community participation in the process of regenerating the Woodberry Down Estate. This is a run down part of northeast London that is undergoing a major redevelopment. CASA has developed a system that not only informs the local residents about the redevelopment process but it also enables them to use dynamic visualisations of the ìbefore and after effectsî of different plans, and then to discuss and vote on the variety of options.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id bb4f
authors He, Jie and Tsou Jin-Yeu
year 2001
title GIS-based Visual Perception Analysis of Urban Natural Landscape for Urban Planning Supporting: A Case Study of Jinzishan Hill Region
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 505-510
summary In this paper we present a GIS-based system prototype in evaluating visual perception quality of natural landscape within urban environment. Through a case study, we demonstrate the entire procedure which includes data modification, model making, viewshed and view sensibility analysis as well as design aiding presentation of this system. This system prototype offers a calculatable and visulizable technique to evaluate the visual quality of urban natural landscape in either actual situation or planning future. Furthermore, we collaborate with local professional organization in a real urban site study to preparing regional planning instruction items by means of this system.
keywords GIS, Urban Natural Landscape, Visual Perception, Viewshed, Jinzishan
series eCAADe
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk, jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id e6c5
authors Heintz, John L.
year 2001
title Coordinating virtual building design teams
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 65-76 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Most research in design project management support systems treats the subject as an isolated objective problem. The goals to be met are defined in terms of a supposed universal view of the project, and now outside concerns are taken into account. While such approaches, including project simulation, may yield excellent results, they ignore what, for many projects, are the real difficulties. Design projects are not isolated. All participants have other obligations that compete with the given project for attention and resources. The various participants in the design process have different goals. For these reasons it is proposed that design project management can be best facilitated by tools which assist the participating actors to share suitable management information in order to make better co-ordination possible, while allowing the resource balancing between projects to occur in private. Such a tool represents the design project management task as a negotiation task that spans both projects and firms; the management of one project is the management of all. The model of design collaboration upon which the Design Coordination System (DeCo) is built was developed from 1) a heuristic case study used to gain insight into the ways in which designers co-ordinate their efforts, and 2) the application of the theory of the social contract as developed by John Rawls to the problem of design project management. The key innovation in the DeCo system is the shaping of the project management system around existing practices of collaborative project design management and planning. DeCo takes advantage of how designers already co-ordinate their work with each other and resolve disputes over deadlines and time lines. The advantage of DeCo is that it formalises these existing practices in order to accommodate both the increasing co-ordination burden and the difficulties brought about by the internationalisation of design practice. DeCo, the design project management system proposed here, provides a representation, a communications protocol, and a game theoretical decision structure. The combination of these three units provides users with the ability to exchange structured pictures of the project as seen from the points of view of individual actors. Further, it suggests a mechanism based on a specific principle of fairness for arriving at mutually acceptable project plans. The DeCo system permits the users freedom to manage their design processes as they will, while providing a basic compatibility between practices of design team members which supports their collaborative efforts to co-ordinate their design work.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id f8e3
authors Hew, K.-P., Fisher, N. and Awbi, H.B.
year 2001
title Towards an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format for building and services design
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 459-476
summary The emerging technology in building product design using knowledge-based engineering (KBE), is currently exciting practitioners in the building construction industry. This paper investigates the use of KBE techniques and assesses the contribution this approach can make to the traditional design process. To do this, the investigation has developed an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format, for integrating 3D electronic prototypes with building services information for use in building design. This approach has been developed on the basis of an open framework and has been applied to the design of an airport terminal building and its plant room. Within the framework, the design process and the information needed, are divided into modules and represented in the form of 3D digital mock-up models (or electronic prototypes). Within the integrated system, an interface has been developed to facilitate the sharing of information with a thermal analysis software application, which contributes to the design process. In this paper, the methodology is discussed and its working system is illustrated and evaluated.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id caadria2007_233
id caadria2007_233
authors Hoseini, Ali Ghaffarian; Rahinah Ibrahim
year 2007
title Using Social Network Analysis for Visualising Spatial Planning During Conceptual Design Phase
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Spatial diagramming exercises with clients are difficult when most clients are not able to visualize the end results of their requirements. This paper would like to introduce a computational tool—Social Network Analysis (SNA)—commonly used in the communications field to study relationships between people we believe can resolve this visualization problem. Our research intent is to affirm whether or not we can use SNA as a spatial planning tool during conceptual building design. We posit that since the nodes and structural relationships between the nodes may have similar architectural characteristics, the tool would enable architects to make changes by moving any spaces on a floor plan while safely maintaining their spatial relationships to other spaces. In this paper, we would like to develop a proof-of-concept model using an available SNA tool to facilitate spatial diagramming visualization during conceptual design phase. We tested the use of a SNA tool at four levels. The first level determined whether we could develop spatial relationship between functional spaces (such as the living room must be adjacent to the front entry). The second level is on setting priorities values for the different nodes and the linkages. The third level determined whether we could develop grouping relationship between several functional spaces that have a common characteristic (such as public versus private spaces) on one horizontal plane. The final fourth level determined whether we could develop multiple layers that are connected by one common connector (such as a staircase in a double-story house). Our models are validated intellectually by visual comparison between our model and another diagramming by Nooshin (2001) that was developed manually. We are most interested in the fourth level because complexity in the spatial diagramming exercises is caused by multi-layered spatial arrangements at the horizontal and vertical planes. We expect our study to provide us guidelines in developing a prototype for a spatial diagramming tool using SNA, which architects can use to resolve visualization problems when conducting the exercise with their clients.
series CAADRIA
email Ali_ghaffarian_hoseini@yahoo.com
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id 78e7
authors Hu, Wen-Chang
year 2001
title A comparative observation on applying knowledge between intuitive design and theoretical design
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 65-70
summary Akin provides the main idea of this paper, "It is necessary to understand intuitive-design to predict the performance criteria useful in developing appropriate tools for machine-design or design-method." This paper discussing the knowledge applied in design bases on previous studies and focuses on theoretical-design. Firstly, the relationship between theoretical design and other kind of design is addressed. Secondly, a cognitive model is proposed and to be the basis of discussion. Thirdly, two cognitive experiments are conducted, and then analysis including coding scheme is discussed.
series CAADRIA
email wenchanghu@kimo.com.tw
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

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