CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 521 to 538 of 538

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 9ab2
authors Yun, Yong Gib
year 2001
title Structural Composite Members in Architecture Fabricated by CAD/CAE/CAM Technology
source Harvard University
summary The doctoral research in this dissertation is aimed at exploring new materials and innovative methods for fabricating complex-shaped buildings, which have surfaced as a prevailing trend in architecture today. Over the past few years, the field of architecture has witnessed revolutionary changes in design. The recent completion of Frank O. Gehry's new Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, brought unprecedented attention to complex-shaped, non-conventional designs and its influence on the global architectural trend has been immense. In following these latest trends, the author was drawn to the issues concerning construction materials and methods that are being currently adopted in realizing these complicated designs. It is perhaps inevitable that the traditional steel construction methods, suitable for use in the conventional linear shapes, face tremendous challenges and limitations in building such complex-shaped designs. In the author's opinion, the next step to go from here is to seek joint efforts between the architectural field and the engineering field to search for a new methodology which will best serve the contemporary design style. This research first focused on examining the problems that traditional methods pose for the new complex-shaped buildings. Paying attention to Gehry's recent projects, the author was able to identify major difficulties in association with representing and constructing these complicated shapes, mainly in terms of the relationship between the primary structure and the envelope surface. The second part of the research moved on to proposing a new alternative to the traditional methods, by utilizing polymer composite materials (PCM) as construction material and employing advanced Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer Aided Engineering (CAE)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) technologies. More specifically, the author has attempted to present effective theories in support of the two following ideas: (1) circular tubes made of PCM are the most promising alternative to regular steel members, especially steel tubes, to follow the envelope surface of the complex shaped building. (2) state-of-the-art CAD/CAE/CAM technologies are the most essential tools to achieve the geometrical and functional quality of the proposed new material. In the second phase, the primary focus of the quantitative approach was on fabricating an experimental model (1:1 scale prototype) called “ a unit of boundary structures”, the basic unit of structure system that wraps a complex-shaped building's entire territory . (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 7add
authors Zahnan, Lena
year 2001
title Computer-aided Design-based Project Management Model
source Concordia University (Canada)
summary The construction industry is one that is fragmented by nature. In current practice, information is exchanged between the designers and contractors in the form of paper documents such as drawings, bills of material and specifications. Information is lost and errors are made during the forward and backward exchange of the design-construction information and constructability knowledge between the design professionals, cost estimators and contractors. Despite the technological developments in IT, the industry has been slow in adopting change in its processes. Computer Integrated Construction (CIC) strives to bridge the gaps of information by integrating the tools and processes within the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industries. This thesis proposes an integrated methodology across the design and construction functions supported by available CAD technologies. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a prototype software application named “CAD-B PM” that allows the user to integrate the CAD design with a central database that is a repository of project information. Productivity and cost estimates are generated within the database and are further integrated to a scheduling application for project planning and control. The prototype system provides a unique solution where the project information is openly shared between the applications in a dynamic environment through the use of Open Database Connectivity (ODBC).
keywords Industrial Engineering
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id fc1f
authors Zhang, Z., Tsou, J.-Y. and Hall, T.W.
year 2001
title Web-Based Virtual-Reality for Collaboration on Urban Visual Environment Assessment
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 781-794
summary This research aims to facilitate public participation in urban landscape visual assessment (ULVA). To support virtual collaboration in ULVA, it is desirable to provide both quantitative analysis and 3D simulation over the Internet. Although the rendering of urban models in common web browser plug-ins often lacks vividness compared with native workstation applications, the integration of VRML modeling and Java programming proves effective in sharing and rendering urban scenes through a familiar web interface. The ULVA simulation supports not only static scene rendering, but also interactive functional simulations. They include the viewpoint setting up, view corridor and panorama generation. Although popular VRML viewers such as CosmoPlayer provide similar functions, users are often disoriented by the interface. The obfuscation inhibits people’s immersion in the virtual urban environment and makes the assessment inconvenient. To eliminate such disorientation and improve users’ feelings of immersion, we integrate both a two-dimensional map and a three-dimensional model of the urban area in the user interface. The interaction between 2D map and 3D world includes the matching of avatar positions, visualization of avatar posture, and the setting up of viewpoints and view corridors. To support a web-based urban planning process, the system adopts client/server architecture. The city map is managed by a specific database management system (DBMS) on the server side. Users may retrieve information for various “what if” simulations. The system automatically remodels the virtual environment to respond to users’ requests.
keywords Geographic Information Systems, Internet, Urban Landscape, Visual Assessment, Virtual Reality
series CAAD Futures
email s992332@mailserv.cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id cc97
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to iAD - A Web-based Steel Consulting of Steel Construction in Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 346-349
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve to iAD (Internet Aided Design) (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. At the same time, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the proposal of conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture (Zhou2002), we try to apply these theories and concepts into a specified area, steel construction consulting for architects. In previous research, first of all, we defined the contents and scope of steel construction consulting and their potential application. Second, we proposed a solid working model covering structure organization, audience, services provided and technology. In this research, a web-based application will be out by prototyped by conducting a conceptual design consulting in steel structure in order to show the whole process of how this Internet-based consulting model works.
series eCAADe
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 946b
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to IAD: A Working Model of the Internet-based Engineering Consulting in Architecture
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 073-80
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve into iAD (Internet Aided Design) in the near future (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. During the period of Internet development, the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry has not been changed. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the study of information technology both available today and in the near future, we propose a general abstracted model of an Internet-based consulting system by integrating a variety of disciplines and functions of design and construction processes. This model will cover a range of design phases, such as, information gathering, automatic remote consultation, specific problem solving, and collaboration. Finally, in future follow up research, we will apply the proposed model to steel construction in architectural design, and develop a prototype simulation by selecting one type of structural system.
series CAADRIA
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id caadria2003_a7-3
id caadria2003_a7-3
authors Zhou, Q.
year 2003
title From CAD to iAD - A Prototype Simulation of the Internet-based Steel Construction Consulting for Architects
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 919-936
summary Information technology has become so powerful and interactive that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve into iAD (Internet Aided Design). For Internet applications in the AEC (Architecture, Engineering and Construction) industry, most of the efforts and applications have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the area of design and engineering consulting, limited progress has been made. Even with some of this success, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research surveys (Zhou & Krawczyk 2001) of the development of Internet applications in the AEC industry and the proposal of a conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture, this research will apply these theories and concepts into a specified area of steel construction consulting for architects. The first phase of this research will define the content and scope of steel construction consulting and the potential Internet application. Second, a proposed solid working model is developed covering organizational structure, user network, services provided and technology. In the third phase (as this paper presented), a prototype simulation is used to apply the concepts and methodology in a preliminary design application to demonstrate how this Internet-based consulting model would work.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 90b5
authors Zhou, Qi and Krawczyk, Robert J.
year 2001
title From CAD to iAD: A survey of Internet application in the AEC industry
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 392-397
summary The internet is becoming increasingly more valuable in the field of architectural design that what we conventionally called CAD might soon be changed to iAD (internet Aided Design) (Zhou and Krawczyk 2000). In order to have a clear vision of what iAD will be or could be, we should first examine what is currently available. This research focuses on an investigation of selected web vendors, which are typical and most influential in providing internet related services for the AEC industry. Our purpose for doing this survey is: to understand the progress and development of internet application in the AEC industry, identify the technology used in this area, determine the advantages and deficiencies of current practice and develop a base for future research in proposing a evolutionary model of internet Aided Design for architecture.
keywords Internet Aided Design, Web-Based Application, On-Line Collaboration
series ACADIA
email zhouqi@netscape.net
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id d52b
authors Zimring, C., Khan, S., Craig, D., Haq, S. and Guzdial, M.
year 2001
title CoOL Studio: using simple tools to expand the discursive space of the design studio
source Automation in Construction 10 (6) (2001) pp. 675-685
summary Collaborative On-line Studio for Architecture (CoOL Studio) was aimed at aiding the architecture studio by: (1) supporting input by distant critics; (2) providing access to on-line cases and reference materials; (3) encouraging students to be clear and articulate about their projects; (4) supporting collaboration among students. The project employed a Collaborative Website (CoWeb), which allowed easy creation and modification of webpages without any security measures. Students posted their designs at several points during the term and six distant expert consultants provided critiques. This project demonstrates that a relatively simple representation tool, one that allowed students and critics to interact on editable webpages, can usefully open up the design space of the architecture studio. However, care is needed in understanding how computer tools relate to the tasks and rituals of interaction that go on in everyday architecture studio pedagogy.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id e4e6
authors Batty, M., Dodge, M., Doyle, S. and Smith, A.
year 2001
title Modelling virtual urban environments
summary Contributed by Jose Ripper Kós (josekos@ufrj.br)
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
more http://www.casa.ucl.ac.uk/modelvue.pdf
last changed 2001/06/04 18:27

_id 37e5
authors Cruickshank, G., Paterson, I. and Natanson, L.
year 2001
title A CREATIVE CURRICULUM: PUTTING TECHNOLOGY IN ITS PLACE
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 218-220
summary The accessibility of 3D Modelling software presents challenges in the delivery of education aimed at developing creativity. Despite opening up innovative avenues of artistic possibility, computer technologies are essentially two-dimensional, hard to master and may restrict creativity itself. This paper describes a curriculum designed to develop creativity within an Electronic Arts programme. A student-centred, experiential learning approach was taken, which challenged students to set personal objectives within set project constraints. Formal critique sessions allowed students to develop a critical perspective. Conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of the approach to other non-artistic areas.
series SIGRADI
email I.Paterson@tay.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id avocaad_2001_15
id avocaad_2001_15
authors Henri Achten, Jos van Leeuwen
year 2001
title Scheming and Plotting your Way into Architectural Complexity
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, our ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Following the four waves of design methodology as distinguished by Cross (1984), we see changing architectural design attitudes with respect to complexity. Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, designers such as Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke embrace complexity and make it a focus in their design work. The computer is an indispensable instrument in this approach. The paper discusses the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and reflects in particular on the role of design representations in this discussion. It is advanced that a number of recent developments are based on an intensified use of design representations such as schema’s, diagrams, and interactive modelling techniques. Within the field of possibilities in this field, the authors discuss Feature-Based Modelling (FBM) as a formalism to represent knowledge of the design. It is demonstrated how the FBM approach can be used to describe graphic representations as used in design, and how other levels and kinds of design knowledge can be incorporated, in particular the less definite qualitative information in the early design phase. The discussion section concludes with an extrapolation of the current role of design representation in the design process, and advances a few positions on the advantage and disadvantage of this role in architectural design.
series AVOCAAD
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id a40c
authors Inkinen, Tommi
year 2001
title A city revised: representing or recreating the urban space as a polygon experience – a discussion of the case of virtual Turku
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 351-354
summary The Internet has provided a new means to represent urban space. The development of modelling languages,like VRML, has given us the tools to recreate urban locations on the net. In this paper, the virtual image ofTurku, a city located in Southwest Finland is discussed. My approach is twofold. Firstly, I focus on the‘official’ city web-page and its two dimensional textual appearance. This constitutes the essence of virtualcity as ‘public’ project. Secondly, there is a challenging new field that combines aspects from computersciences, urban studies and Internet research. This refers to three-dimensional city models that are used torepresent an exact copy of the material space of cities. The analysis is based on interpretation of interviewsand contents of the two site structures. The following conclusions are proposed. The mission of a virtualpublic city is twofold: it is a local project, purposed to build a new and efficient medium to connect theadministration and citizens; and it is also a global/national project, a medium of advertising and givingknowledge of the tourist possibilities and attractions. On the other hand, the private virtual city project isbased on potential future incomes. It is a means of gaining profit via expanding possibilities provided by ecommerce.
series other
email toalin@utu.fi
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:18

_id 49fc
id 49fc
authors KOUZELEAS Stelios, SEMIDOR Catherine
year 2001
title THE INFLUENCE OF THE SIMPLIFIED ARCHITECTURAL MODEL ON THE ACOUSTICAL SIMULATION RESULTS
source 17th International Congress on Acoustics, Proceedings : Vol. III - Architectural acoustics - Opera house acoustics - p. 46-47 – ISBN : 88-88387-02-1, 2-7 Septembre 2001, Rome, Italy
summary The sometimes complex architectural shape of halls creates modelling difficulties as the simulation computing systems need plane surfaces. In order to approach a perfect shape of curved surfaces, a big number of facets is necessary. This poses, as a consequence, computer memory problems which is the case of the horse shoe shaped Opera House with its richly decorated columns, balconies, etc. This paper compares the acoustical measurement results and the calculation results of a computer simulation software applied on several models (from the most simple till the most complex ones) of the Grand Theatre of Bordeaux.
keywords Acoustics simulation, CAD modeling, room acoustics, architectural model simplification
series other
type normal paper
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
more http://ims-ism.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/ica/proceedg.html
last changed 2005/10/24 17:59

_id 3582
authors Maver, Th.W., Ennis, G. and Jarvis, G.
year 2001
title CHRONICLE OF THE CITY
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 322-324
summary The great cities of all continents have a remarkable story to tell about their social, economic, industrial, cultural and architectural evolution. This paper gives an insight into an ambitious project to construct a 2000 year historical chronicle of Glasgow – the city at the heart of the Industrial Revolution in Northern Europe. The multimedia document which holds the chronicle draws from a huge range of paperbased resources and pulls together contributions from experts in many disparate fields. A significant characteristic of the chronicle is the use of “place” in the telling of the story. This has been achieved by sophisticated merging of artistic impressions, digital terrain modelling and aerial photography.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 2905
authors Pereira, Gilberto Corso
year 2001
title Urban Information Visualization - The Salvador project
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 517-521
summary Before popularity of GIS a map is a tool with two basic functions - storage of spatial data and presentation of spatial information. Now, a digital database store spatial data and cartographic visualization is how spatial information usually is presented. Recent technological development applied to visualization area can increase analyse and interpretation capacity of professionals concern with urban planning, design and management. In other hand, many professionals and students involved with urban studies are not familiar with GIS software and this can limit casual users to access urban databases. One solution is to build software that allows direct visualization of spatial information based in users needs and knowledge. The project discussed in this paper introduces a computer application structured like a hypermedia atlas using concepts from cartographic modelling. The city of Salvador is represented by a model based in a combination of maps, and others images. User composes visualization.
keywords Visualization, Hypermedia, GIS, Urban Information, Digital Atlas
series eCAADe
email corso@ufba.br
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 9edf
authors Radford, A., Woodbury, R., Wyeld, Th., Genimahaliotis, B., Gill, J., Lee, S.J., Lundberg, E., O’Shea, S, Patterson, T. and Williams, H.
year 2001
title Modelling the Australian Lightweight House
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 540-545
summary This paper outlines the process of making a series of highly detailed CAD models showing the form and construction of a group of contemporary award-winning houses by leading Australian architects. It discusses the issues of collecting information, clarifying details with the architects, the differences between ‘as built’ and ‘as designed’ descriptions and the organization of data.
keywords Houses, Construction, CAD Models, Australia, Rapid Prototyping
series eCAADe
email antony.radford@adelaide.edu.au
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

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