CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 87

_id avocaad_2001_13
id avocaad_2001_13
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Modeling irregular and complex forms
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Computational technologies provide arguably the first real opportunity architectural design has had for a comprehensive description of built form. With the advent of affordable computer-aided design systems (including drafting, modeling, visualization and simulation tools), architects believe they can be in full control of geometric aspects and, through these, of a wide spectrum of other aspects that are implicit or explicit in the geometric representation. This belief is based primarily on the efficiency and effectiveness of computer systems, ranging from the richness and adaptability of geometric primitives to the utility of geometric representations in simulations of climatic aspects. Such capabilities support attempts to design and construct more irregular or otherwise complex forms. These fall under two main categories: (1) parsing of irregularity into elementary components, and (2) correlation of the form of a building with complex geometric structures.The first category takes advantage of the compactness and flexibility of computational representations in order to analyse the form of a design into basic elements, usually elementary geometric primitives. These are either arranged into simple, unconstrained configurations or related to each other by relationships that define e.g. parametric relative positioning or Boolean combinations. In both cases the result is a reduction of local complexity and an increase of implicit or explicit relationships, including the possibility of hierarchical structures.The second category attempts to correlate built form with constraints that derive usually from construction but can also be morphological. The correlation determines the applicability of complex geometric structures (minimally ruled surfaces) to the description of a design. The product of this application is generally variable in quality, depending upon the designer's grounding in geometry and his ability to integrate constraints from different aspects in the definition of the design's geometry.Both categories represent a potential leap forward but are also equally hampered by the rigidity of the implementation mechanisms upon which they rely heavily. The paper proposes an approach to making these mechanisms subordinate to the cognitive and technical aspects of architectural thinking through fuzzy modeling. This way of modeling involves a combination of (a) canonical forms, (b) tolerances around canonical forms and positions, (c) minimal and maximal values, (d) fuzzy boundaries, and (e) plastic interaction between elements based on the dual principles of local intelligence and autonomy. Fuzzy models come therefore closer to the intuitive manners of sketching, while facilitating transition to precise and complex forms. The paper presents two applications of fuzzy modeling. The first concerns the generation of schematic building layouts, including adaptive control of programmatic requirements. The second is a system for designing stairs that can adapt themselves to changes in their immediate environment through a fuzzy definition of geometric and topological parametrization.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id db26
authors Cao, J., Chan, J.Y.K., Li, Heng, Mahdjoubi, Lamine and Love, Peter E.D.
year 2001
title REALMEDIA: providing multimedia-based real-estate services through the Internet
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 275-289
summary This paper presents the design and implementation of a software system, known as REALMEDIA, which provides Web-based, multimedia real-estate services on the Internet. REALMEDIA is innovative in that it is designed to provide both on-line services to clients and a tool for maintaining the system to real-estate agent. The software consists of a web-based interface, a client side editor and an application server. The web interface is used by both the customer and the real-estate agent to request particular services. When used by a customer, it allows the potential buyer to select and view desired properties, and to make an appointment with agents. Multimedia information, which integrates text, graphics and video clips, are presented to the customer. When used by the agent, the web interface allows the agent to dynamically update the contents of the web page and to manipulate property details through the Client Side Editor. The application server acts as a bridge between the Web Interface and the Client Side Editor. The computational architecture and major components of REALMEDIA as well as its implementation using JAVA, TCP/IP and FTP will be described.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 4b5f
authors Pang, King Wah
year 2001
title A Process planning and Optimization System for Laminated Object Manufacturing Application
source Hong Kong University of Schience and Technology (People’s Republic of China)
summary Rapid Prototyping (RP) technologies have emerged as a powerful set of manufacturing technologies in recent years. While these technologies invariably provide tremendous time-savings over traditional methods of manufacture of design prototypes, many are still quite inefficient. This thesis examines two ideas; first, that these processes can be optimized greatly by using better process planning; second, that several of these RP technologies use similar core planning technologies for optimization. The first hypothesis is verified in this thesis by presenting an improved process planning system for one RP technology, Laminated Object Manufacturing (LOM). The framework proposes the use of computational geometry and optimization tools at two levels to reduce process time and material wastage. Geometric techniques are used for process planning at the 3D part level. A genetic algorithm (GA) based path optimization technique is used for path planning optimization at the layer level. The second observation led to the development of an open architecture planning system for a host of RP technologies. A test-bed software system is described in this thesis. Evaluation on the performance of the new methodology is also provided. The methodologies developed can work equally well with the current industry standard STL format for storing object CAD data as well as direct slice data computed from the exact solid model of a part.
keywords Industrial Engineering; Mechanical Engineering
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 3645
authors Tsou, Jin-Yeu
year 2001
title Strategy on applying computational fluid dynamic for building performance evaluation
source Automation in Construction 10 (3) (2001) pp. 327-335
summary Predicting and evaluating building performance plays an important role in the training of responsible architects. Building performance includes issues such as: structural stability, acoustic quality, natural lighting, thermal comfort, and ventilation and indoor air quality. These types of analyses are often laborious, non-intuitive, and non-graphical. As a result, these important issues do not arouse the enthusiasm of architecture students or building professionals. The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) research team proposes to explore and develop a long-term strategy to apply scientific visualization on teaching and research in environmental technology and building performance. This paper presents the development process and results of research projects for applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on building performance evaluation. CFD On-line Teaching project's aim is to develop a web-based training course for architecture students to apply CFD simulation on design problem solving. Each lesson not only illustrates basic principles regarding airflow in the building design, it also contains CFD sample files with predefined flow cells for students to test different concepts. GiLin Temple project's aim is to apply CFD simulation on investigating the wind resistance of Tong Dynasty heavy timber structure. Airflow information generated in the project includes the visual representation of the pressure distribution and velocity field on all slices through the temple, and the tracking of particles as they flow around or through a building. The China housing residential airduct study focuses on simulating the indoor airflow regarding the airduct design of China Experimental Urban Housing Scheme. The visual representation of the pressure distribution and velocity field in the airducts provides vital information for helping China Housing Research Center improve the current design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id da3a
authors Borges Sanches, Thais and Leão de Amorim, Arivaldo
year 2001
title AVALIAÇÃO DO USO DA SIMULAÇÃO COMPUTACIONAL EM PROJETOS DE ILUMINAÇÃO ARTIFICIAL (Evaluation of the Use of Computer Simulation for Artificial Illumination Projects)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 95-97
summary This paper tries to evaluate the quantitative e qualitative aspects of the uses of the computational simulation for the analysis of enclosed environments light designs, and its feasibility in teaching in Architectural and Urbanism courses. The importance of this paper is associated with the determining of the illumination levels and its effects. Simulations were made with the Lightscape software in a specific room and their results were compared with the experimental measurements taken in that place. From this comparison it was possible to make the analysis of the software characteristics and to evaluate the advantages or disadvantages of its uses. The results confirm its feasibility as a tool for illumination simulation and its adequate uses in the teaching of environmental comfort. The good correlation achieved in visual effects derived from the lighting design and also the information of values related to illuminance and luminance for the simulated space support this affirmative.
series SIGRADI
email alamorim@ufba.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 7ff9
authors Choi, J.-W., Lee, H.-S., Hwang, J.-E. and Kim, M.-J.
year 2001
title The Wooden Construction data modeling of korean traditional architecture - Focused on the structure of Gongpo in Buseoksa MuRyangsujun
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 265-274
summary Finding national identities from its traditional heritages might be an important research issue especially for Asian architects and researchers. Nevertheless, it is noticed that the structure of Korean traditional architecture has not been fully explored in a systematical or computational manner and its information is not shared efficiently. This study thus explores a computational way of structuring construction knowledge and building information of Korean traditional architecture.Ý To do this, we select a well-known old temple building, Buseoksa Muryangsujun, one of the oldest Buddhist temple in Korea, as a prototype. We first build an accurateÝ three-dimensional model of the building with an aid of a traditional building expert, categorize its building components, and then analyze their connectivity and the connectivity patterns and rules by especially focusing on the capital order system, called Gongpo. The result of the study shows several schema diagrams representing the wooden construction data model carefully designed for an intelligent building simulation and generative system that will be developed in the near future.Ý The paper also demonstrates a way of computationally describing some shape grammars that explain the components' connectivity.
series CAADRIA
email jchoi@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2001/05/27 16:30

_id 7ffb
authors Ciftcioglu, Özer and Durmisevic, Sanja
year 2001
title Knowledge management by information mining
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 533-545
summary Novel information mining method dealing with soft computing is described. By this method, in the first step, receptive fields of design information are identified so that connections among various design aspects are structured. By means of this, complex relationships among various design aspects are modeled with a paradigm, which is non-parametric and generic. In the second step, the structured connections between various pairs of aspects are graded according to the relevancy to each other. This is accomplished by means of sensitivity analysis, which is a computational tool operating on the model established and based on a concept measuring the degree of dependencies between pairs of quantities. The degree of relationships among various design aspects so determined enables one to select the most important independent aspects in the context of design or decision-making process. The paper deals with the description of the method and presents an architectural case study where numerical and as well as non-numerical (linguistic) design information are treated together, demonstrating a ranked or elective information employment which can be of great value for possible design intervention during reconstruction.
keywords Knowledge Management, Information Mining, Sensitivity Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email ciftciog@mail.bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 67fa
authors Datta, Sambit and Woodbury, Robert F.
year 2001
title An approach to search and exploration through mixed-initiative
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 275-282
summary Generative design environments need support for human intervention as well as sound computational formalisms. A systematic approach to integrating the two, formal generation and the exploratory, is lacking. In this paper, we posit the possibility of a design support system that combines formal search with user driven exploration. Our approach is to cast the interaction between the user and the generative formalism as agent collaboration in a mixed-initiative environment. We describe the role of interaction and agency in an experimental mixed-initiative design support system, FOLDS and demonstrate its application.
series CAADRIA
email sdatta@deakin.edu.au
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id ecaade2015_217
id ecaade2015_217
authors Davis, Felecia and Dumitrescu, Delia
year 2015
title What and When Is the Textile? Extending the Reach of Computation through Textile Expression
source Martens, B, Wurzer, G, Grasl T, Lorenz, WE and Schaffranek, R (eds.), Real Time - Proceedings of the 33rd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, 16-18 September 2015, pp. 417-426
wos WOS:000372316000048
summary The authors of this article argue for 'making time appear' in computational materials and objects so that it can be used to help people become aware of their relation to their environments. [Hallnäs & Redström 2001] As more computational and responsive materials come into play when designing architectural spaces designers might consider opening up the dimension of time to 'make time appear' rather than disappear. [Hallnäs & Redström 2001] Computational materials are materials which transform expression and respond to inputs read by computer programs. Making time appear can have many uses particularly in applications where people can be helped by the awareness of unfolding of time, where the temporality is linked to transformative body experience rather than project efficiency or collapsing distance. If architects, designers, engineers and others could begin to consider and use time as a way to promote reflection then it would be possible to design materials which could expand human thinking through the material itself.
series eCAADe
email fadav@psu.edu
more https://mh-engage.ltcc.tuwien.ac.at/engage/ui/watch.html?id=44daf674-70d7-11e5-8041-1b36fa35af4a
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id a3e8
authors Economou, Athanassios
year 2001
title Four Algebraic Structures In Design
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 192-201
summary A constructive program for the generation of three-dimensional languages of designs based on nested group structures is outlined.
keywords Computational Design, Symmetry, Group Theory, Shape Grammars, VRML
series ACADIA
email economou@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 7023
authors Eissa, H., Mahdavi, A., Klatzky, R. and Siegel, J.
year 2001
title Computationally rendered architectural spaces as means of lighting design evaluation
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 349-360
summary This paper describes an empirical study that was conducted to determine whether and to what extent subjective evaluation of lighting in architectural spaces can be reproduced using computationally rendered images of such spaces. The results imply that such images can reliably represent certain aspects of the lighting conditions in real spaces.
keywords Lighting Simulation, Computational Visualization, Subjective Lighting Evaluation
series CAAD Futures
email hesheissa@netscape.net
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 943c
authors Hendricx, A. and Neuckermans, H.
year 2001
title The object model at the core of the IDEA+ design environment
source Beheshti, R. (ed), Advances in Building Informatics, Proceedings of the 8th EuropIA International Conference on the application of Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Image Processing to Architecture, Building Engineering & Civil Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands, April 25-27, 2001, pp. 113-125
summary This paper focuses on three different aspects in which the IDEA+ core model differs from many other product modelling research initiatives: the systematic approach in the construction of the model, the respect for the evolutionary nature of architectural design, and the use of actual and complete design cases to test the model. Key words: CAAD, product modelling, integrated design environment, MERODE 1 The IDEA+ project: towards an integrated design environment In spite of the extensive use of all kinds of hardware and software in the architectural offices, the use of computers still does not contribute essentially to better architecture. For the CAD packages on the one hand, they have proven to be an efficient alternative for the traditional drawing board. Yet they fail in the early conceptual stage of design where creativity and exploration play the leading role. For computational tests and analysis tools on the other hand, they can hardly handle the typical absence o
series other
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id dfe6
authors Hendricx, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2001
title The Use of Design Cases to Test Architectural Building Models
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 73-78
summary The IDEA+ project aims at developing an Integrated Design Environment for Architect designers, in which design tools and computational tests make use of one and the same core building description. Such a description must be apt to describe architecture in a full-fledged way. Hereto, the authors have put the IDEA+ model to the test with actual design cases. These cases have been used to test isolated design concepts and to mimic the global design process.
keywords Building Model, CAAD, Case, Object-Oriented, Architecture, Architectural Model
series eCAADe
email herman.neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be, ann.hendricx@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id caadria2007_233
id caadria2007_233
authors Hoseini, Ali Ghaffarian; Rahinah Ibrahim
year 2007
title Using Social Network Analysis for Visualising Spatial Planning During Conceptual Design Phase
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Spatial diagramming exercises with clients are difficult when most clients are not able to visualize the end results of their requirements. This paper would like to introduce a computational tool—Social Network Analysis (SNA)—commonly used in the communications field to study relationships between people we believe can resolve this visualization problem. Our research intent is to affirm whether or not we can use SNA as a spatial planning tool during conceptual building design. We posit that since the nodes and structural relationships between the nodes may have similar architectural characteristics, the tool would enable architects to make changes by moving any spaces on a floor plan while safely maintaining their spatial relationships to other spaces. In this paper, we would like to develop a proof-of-concept model using an available SNA tool to facilitate spatial diagramming visualization during conceptual design phase. We tested the use of a SNA tool at four levels. The first level determined whether we could develop spatial relationship between functional spaces (such as the living room must be adjacent to the front entry). The second level is on setting priorities values for the different nodes and the linkages. The third level determined whether we could develop grouping relationship between several functional spaces that have a common characteristic (such as public versus private spaces) on one horizontal plane. The final fourth level determined whether we could develop multiple layers that are connected by one common connector (such as a staircase in a double-story house). Our models are validated intellectually by visual comparison between our model and another diagramming by Nooshin (2001) that was developed manually. We are most interested in the fourth level because complexity in the spatial diagramming exercises is caused by multi-layered spatial arrangements at the horizontal and vertical planes. We expect our study to provide us guidelines in developing a prototype for a spatial diagramming tool using SNA, which architects can use to resolve visualization problems when conducting the exercise with their clients.
series CAADRIA
email Ali_ghaffarian_hoseini@yahoo.com
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id ga0114
id ga0114
authors Hung, C.K., Frazer, J.H. and Xi, T.M.
year 2001
title Interactive Evolutionary Design in a Hierarchical Way
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper introduces a computational system framework for enhancing design in an evolutionary manner. The framework provides a structure for supporting design activities at the conceptual design stage at different levels of representation and manipulation. With this framework, designers can interactively manipulate design data and develop a solution in ahierarchical manner. Furthermore this system framework provides explorative and adaptive ability through its inter-links with a number of computational evolutionary and generative modules. In this paper, this system framework and its application in the design of wine glasses are presented.
series other
email John.Frazer@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 18ea
authors Janssen, P.H.T., Frazer, J.H. and Tang, M.X.
year 2001
title Generating-predicting soup: A conceptual framework for a design environment
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 137-148
summary A framework for the development of a computational environment that supports generative design is proposed. This environment is referred to as a generating-predicting soup. This paper discusses such an environment at a conceptual level. The research focuses on the architecture, engineering, construction, and facilities management (AEC/FM) domain. The general framework is however applicable to many design domains.
series CAADRIA
email patrick.janssen@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 9057
authors Knight, M., Bandyopadhyay, S., Berridge, P. and Brown, A.
year 2001
title Digital Hindcasting - Critical Analysis through Virtual Reconstruction
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 529-533
summary Manah is an abandoned oasis settlement in Oman. During what is termed the “Golden period” in the region’s cultural development the settlement became on of the most important cultural centres of the interior. For a long period Manah stood as the seat of learning in sciences and arts. A current project is underway to establish, as far as possible, how the settlement evolved; how tribal, cultural, religious and social factors impinged on Manah as it grew over the years. The work described here is directed as applying computational methods to augment the analysis and critical review of that evolution. We are aiming to explain the evolutionary process using computer mediated techniques, working backwards from the current state, to the inception of the settlement; hence the term Digital Hindcasting.
keywords Reconstruction, Critical Analysis, Settlements
series eCAADe
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 7c0e
authors Koutamanis, Alexander and Den Hartog, Peter
year 2001
title Simulation and representation. Learning from airflow analyses in buildings
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 657-666
summary The simulation of environmental aspects is a current priority in design research and practice. The availability of relatively efficient and reliable simulation systems and the emphasis on environmental aspects throughout a building’s lifecycle combine to stimulate exploration of aspects such as lighting and air quality by computational means. Nevertheless, a frequent complaint is that the addition of such simulations makes design information processing timeconsuming and cumbersome, thereby increasing uncertainty and indecision. Therefore, it is imperative that simulation is integrated in the strategies and tools normally used by the digitally-minded architect. In this respect a central issue is the relations between the simulation and the design representation used as connecting tissue for the whole design environment. Input of design information in the simulation means identification of relevant objects, aspects, parts and properties of these objects, as well as relationships between objects. The explicit description of objects such as spaces, doors and windows in the design representation allows for ready extraction of relevant information, including automatic recognition of relationships such as adjacency between a window and a space. The addition of information specific to the airflow analysis was resolved by the extension of the representation to cover front-end service components such as inlets and outlets and general properties (annotations) such as activities accommodated in a space and the primary choice of cooling and heating subsystems. The design representation is also the obvious target for the output of the simulation (feedback). Visualization of airflow in terms of the resulting voxels makes effortless and enjoyable viewing but merely allowing the visualization to coexist with the representation of spaces and building elements does not provide design guidance. One way of achieving that is by treating spaces not as integral entities but as containers of relevant surfaces. These surfaces determine the adaptive subdivision of the space and function as attractors for voxel clustering.
keywords Simulation, Representation, Visualization
series CAAD Futures
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

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