CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ascaad2004_paper12
id ascaad2004_paper12
authors Al-Qawasmi, Jamal
year 2004
title Reflections on e-Design: The e-Studio Experience
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The influence of digital media and information technology on architectural design education and practice is increasingly evident. The practice and learning of architecture is increasingly aided by and dependant on digital media. Digital technologies not only provide new production methods, but also expand our abilities to create, explore, manipulate and compose space. In contemporary design education, there is a continuous demand to deliver new skills in digital media and to rethink architectural design education in the light of the new developments in digital technology. During the academic years 2001-2003, I had the chance to lead the efforts to promote an effective use of digital media for design education at Department of Architecture, Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST). Architectural curriculum at JUST dedicated much time for teaching computing skills. However, in this curriculum, digital media was taught in the form of "software use" education. In this context, digital media is perceived and used mainly as a presentation tool. Furthermore, Computer Aided Architectural Design and architectural design are taught in separate courses without interactions between the two.
series ASCAAD
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ga0108
id ga0108
authors Caicco, Gregory P.
year 2001
title Cunning Crafts or Poetic Place-Making? Towards a Historiography of Generative Art
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper begins by considering the meaning and relationship between generativity and art. From there an historical analysis of these terms maps out the philosophical terrain of generative art in practice and theory. It is hypothesized that the degree to which a generativity, or birthing, may be understood as inherent in art understood as a poetic making, is the degree to which the term generative becomes a redundant qualifier of the term art. An argument is then made that art and art-making as a poetic production has an ethical vocation to critique its sources and its media in order to imagine worlds where the marginalized other, as other, is received. As a result, the unqualified adoption of computer, machine, biologicalor chemical media, as well as the mathematic or pragmatic instructions that define the execution of their works, needs to be questioned.I conclude with an historiographical examination of the Babylonian abacus and the medieval ars memoritiva, in particular, Ramon Lull’s 1274 figura universalis. Even though computing historians have claimed these as proto-computers, a deeper examination of their meaning, use and context reveal a fundamentally mimetic vocation that provides the possibility of poetic place-making, as an ethics, which is otherwise absent in thecontemporary microprocessor. The question is therefore raised whether the works presented at “generative art” galleries, websites and conferences such as this may make any claim to poetry, ethics or art per se if their use of mathematics and automation remains uncritical.
series other
email gregory.caicco@asu.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ef5d
authors Huang, Y.H. (et al.)
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in the design process
source International Journal of design computing 2001, 3
summary What role does visual impact play in different design stages of these media? What are the similarities and variances of computing techniques, principles of interaction, and practical applications among three computerized media?
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 6b40
authors Huang, Y.H., Liu, Y.T., Lin, C.Y., Chen, Y.T., Chiu, Y.-C., Oh, S., Kaga, A. and Sasada, T.
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in the design process
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 231-239
summary Evolved from freehand sketches, physical models to computerized drafting, modeling, animations, and virtual reality, different media are used to communicate to designers or users with different conceptual levels. This study investigates the similarities and variances among computing techniques, interacting principles, and their applications. Different computerized media in the design process are also adopted to explore related phenomenon by using these three media in the renew project of old Hsinchu, Taiwan. Finally, similarity and variance among these computerized media are discussed. This study not only provides insight into the fundamental characteristics of the three computerized media discussed herein, but also enables designers to adopt different media in the design stages.
series CAADRIA
email yinghsiu@iaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/05 07:26

_id 8b0b
authors Johnson, Scott and Goldman, Glenn
year 2001
title Binary Oppositions: Should an Introduction to Computing in Architecture Be Taught as Separate Course?
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 20, pp. 3-5
summary For quite some time, the traditional teaching approach by most architecture schools has been to separate design studios from other courses. New courses have occasionally added, to cover subjects not previously included in the curriculum. However, as technologies change and new, computer- based design tools are developed, it is worthwhile consider whether these new technologies should be introduced into the curriculum in the same way. Should courses be added to the curriculum, to supplement replace courses covering traditional tools and media? Or unnecessary or even inappropriate for the new technologies? This Binary Oppositions debate addresses this issue. question is, “Should an introduction to computing in architecture be taught as a separate course?” I argue to the affirmative. Glenn Goldman of NJIT argues to the negative. These arguments and our respective rebuttals are presented below.
series ACADIA
email sven@umich.edu
last changed 2002/12/15 13:17

_id b36d
authors Lewis, Martin Lewis and Wojtowicz, Jerzy
year 2001
title Design in the New Media - Digital Design Pedagogy at the SoA, University of British Columbia
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 256-261
summary The idea of the Bauhaus education was born out of the conviction that designs for mass production and modern architecture needed a new fundamental design strategy. Today, seventy-five years later, the modern, basic design pedagogy needs to be revisited, as the impact of the Information Technology Revolution on design practice and education is now extensive. The illustrations and reflections on a modern curriculum for fundamental design and communication presented in this paper are derived from the authors’ introduction of the new media to design studios at UBC and from design practice. In the case of the nascent student of architecture, a different, rudimentary approach is required: one calling for the combining of the modern, basic design agenda with the introduction of the new media. The fundamental digital design pedagogy is young and not fully established. This is a considerable problem, since the practice and learning of architecture today is increasingly aided by and dependent upon digital media. Parallel to the traditional methods, the contemporary student of design is now obliged to engage new and dynamic conditions at the formative stage of his or her education. In the recent past, the computer was considered as just another device, requiring the development of mechanical techniques or skills. While those skills still have to be mastered, more recently in design education and practice, IT has become accepted as MEDIA - not just as a drafting or modeling tool. This process is perhaps due to the rapid dissemination of computing literacy and to the progressive accessibility and ease of use of IT. At UBC, Techniques and the Foundation Studio are introductory courses intended to make students engage the new media in parallel with, and complimentary to, established conventions in design.
keywords Imagining, Communicating
series eCAADe
email jw@arch.ubc.ca
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id a64e
authors Liu, Yu-Tung
year 2001
title Spatial Representation of Design Thinking in Virtual Space
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary “Space” has long been an important concept in architecture;and architectural spaces and forms have been continuously evolved dueto the appearance of new concepts of space. Since the invention ofInternet, new spaces have been created through the computer. Tounderstand how human beings in the digital age experience these newvirtual spaces, and to discover the implications of the possible newconcepts of space into the physical architectural world, this paperdiscusses the nature of virtual spaces by examining the verbal and visualelements involved in the creation of a sense of virtual spaces. All theverbal and visual elements of virtual spaces discovered through ourexperiments and interviews are presented. It is found that the three coreelements of both verbally and visually constructed virtual spaces are:movements, interactions, and acoustic effects. In addition, a comparisonbetween verbally and visually constructed spaces, and between physicaland virtual spaces are explored. Finally, further studies related to therole of digital media in the construction of a sense of space aresuggested at the end of this paper.
series other
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:15

_id ecaade03_601_68_penttila
id ecaade03_601_68_penttila
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 2003
title Survey of Architectural-ICT in the Educational Curriculumns of Europe
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 601-606
summary The paper documents the findings of the post-graduate study carried out among the 180 European schools of architecture in more than 30 countries during 2002-2003. The objective has been to describe the role of ""modern digital information technology"" and to give an understandable and measurable overview the current architectural education and its relation with ICT and CAAD. The study material has been collected with a web-survey, with questionnaires to eCAADe-conference participants in Helsinki 2001 and Warsaw 2002, and with direct email-contacts to schools’ key-persons. Computer-aided design has developed into architectural information and communication technology (ICT), to become the main tool of the majority. The general image of new media use in the architectural schools seems to be slightly too positive. The invisible or ”normal” ICT-use - writing, surfing, emailing - has a lot more volume than documented. The major hardware platform in european architecture schools is PC/Windows (90-95 %), Linux and Unix are used also commonly (25-35 %). Macintoshes are also used much more widely within architecture (50-55 %) than within the common computing platforms. MS/Office (90-95 %) and PhotoShop (85-90 %) are obviously also used widely in the architecture schools. Graphic tools PageMaker, QuarkXpress, Illustrator, Freehand are common tools for architecture students (30-50 %). AutoCAD is ”the marketing leader"" in architectural platforms (80-90 %) followed by ArchiCAD (60-65 %). MicroStation/Bentley has also a remarkable volume in the schools (35-40 %). 3DStudio is the most common 3D-modelling tool (80-85 %), followed by formZ (35-40 %). Slightly less volume but still remarkable (15-25 %) have Rhino, Maya, Alias, Lightscape and Radiance.
keywords Architectural education; architectural curriculumns; information and communication technology; IT; ICT; questionnaires; statistics
series eCAADe
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
more http://www.arkit.net
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id bf19
id bf19
authors Rafi, A
year 2001
title Design computing: A new challenge for creative synergy
source In Saito, N. (Ed.), Creative digital media: Its impact on the new century (pp. 132-136), Japan: Keio University Press
summary As content becomes increasingly significant in giving ‘face’ to information technology (IT), the need to train and produce content designers has also become more and more important. The development of powerful computer technologies and the complexity of design have demanded designers to re-examine the design process and consider the adaptation of tools that will provide for creativity, improve the overall design process and, at the same time, reveal new insights (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2000). This paper gives an overview of the relationship between art and science through the ages, and discusses their relatively recent re-convergence. This text further argues that a re-convergence between art and science is currently occurring, highlighting the need to accelerate the process. It is suggested that re-convergence is a result of new technologies being researched, namely related to effective visualisation and communication of ideas and concepts, subsequently adopted by practitioners. Such elements, with tools that offer increased power and new abilities, are widely found today in the multimedia and the Virtual Environment (VE) as scientists and designers venture into each other’s domain. This paper also argues that content designers of the future must not only be both artist and technologist, but artist and technologist that are aware of the context in which content is being developed. The presentation will be a showcase of our exploration at the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University for the last 4 years, in integrating design and computer skills – the synergy that we called DESIGN COMPUTING.
keywords design computing, creativity, content, design
series book
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2007/09/13 01:43

_id caadria2003_b3-1
id caadria2003_b3-1
authors Stipech, Alfredo and Morahan, Thomas
year 2003
title Digital Media Its Incorporation into the Education of Architects and Graphic Designers
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 397-410
summary Here we introduce a pedagogic experience in the Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina. It has begun about ten years ago, with the first intents of incorporating the computer into the design and teaching process , until current days with the setting of a Class for Introduction to Digital Media (IMD), as an obligatory subject in the first course of careers such as Architecture and Urbanism (AU) and Graphic Design of Visual Communication (DGCV). The introduction of "Computing Science" in this university resembled the process of other Universities (Pentill‰ Hannu, 2001), Today we can see that this was not adjusted to the necessities of these professions neither in the educational process nor in the professional production. In our case we will address particular experiences that enabled us to evolve in a pedagogic model towards the concept of Digital Media (DM) that we currently practice.
series CAADRIA
email arqasoc@satlink.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id avocaad_2001_17
id avocaad_2001_17
authors Ying-Hsiu Huang, Yu-Tung Liu, Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yi-Ting Cheng, Yu-Chen Chiu
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in design process
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Design media is a fundamental tool, which can incubate concrete ideas from ambiguous concepts. Evolved from freehand sketches, physical models to computerized drafting, modeling (Dave, 2000), animations (Woo, et al., 1999), and virtual reality (Chiu, 1999; Klercker, 1999; Emdanat, 1999), different media are used to communicate to designers or users with different conceptual levels¡@during the design process. Extensively employed in design process, physical models help designers in managing forms and spaces more precisely and more freely (Millon, 1994; Liu, 1996).Computerized drafting, models, animations, and VR have gradually replaced conventional media, freehand sketches and physical models. Diversely used in the design process, computerized media allow designers to handle more divergent levels of space than conventional media do. The rapid emergence of computers in design process has ushered in efforts to the visual impact of this media, particularly (Rahman, 1992). He also emphasized the use of computerized media: modeling and animations. Moreover, based on Rahman's study, Bai and Liu (1998) applied a new design media¡Xvirtual reality, to the design process. In doing so, they proposed an evaluation process to examine the visual impact of this new media in the design process. That same investigation pointed towards the facilitative role of the computerized media in enhancing topical comprehension, concept realization, and development of ideas.Computer technology fosters the growth of emerging media. A new computerized media, scenario scripting (Sasada, 2000; Jozen, 2000), markedly enhances computer animations and, in doing so, positively impacts design processes. For the three latest media, i.e., computerized animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting, the following question arises: What role does visual impact play in different design phases of these media. Moreover, what is the origin of such an impact? Furthermore, what are the similarities and variances of computing techniques, principles of interaction, and practical applications among these computerized media?This study investigates the similarities and variances among computing techniques, interacting principles, and their applications in the above three media. Different computerized media in the design process are also adopted to explore related phenomenon by using these three media in two projects. First, a renewal planning project of the old district of Hsinchu City is inspected, in which animations and scenario scripting are used. Second, the renewal project is compared with a progressive design project for the Hsinchu Digital Museum, as designed by Peter Eisenman. Finally, similarity and variance among these computerized media are discussed.This study also examines the visual impact of these three computerized media in the design process. In computerized animation, although other designers can realize the spatial concept in design, users cannot fully comprehend the concept. On the other hand, other media such as virtual reality and scenario scripting enable users to more directly comprehend what the designer's presentation.Future studies should more closely examine how these three media impact the design process. This study not only provides further insight into the fundamental characteristics of the three computerized media discussed herein, but also enables designers to adopt different media in the design stages. Both designers and users can more fully understand design-related concepts.
series AVOCAAD
email yinghsiu@iaaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 444b
authors Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 2001
title Positioning of Buildings in a Land
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 493-499
summary Configurational studies are useful tools to architectural designing, since they help to understand the grouping of objects in the space (two-dimensional and/or threedimensional). The designer, after a classification of objects that satisfies the needs set to a group of objects, impose some restrictions to the objects that will govern the composition. These restrictions are those that will define the result through operations carried out by the designer. Among these operations the location of buildings in a determined area and the particular environmental qualities condition the final result. This work presents the results obtained by means of the implementation of a computing program of the type Evolution Program (EP) implemented in language C. The implementation of the program is explained in the first part of the paper. In the second part the successive steps are described. The numerical results obtained with the mentioned program are shown graphically. Examples of different complexity level illustrate the discussion of the theoretical matters.
keywords Positioning Buildings, Configurational Studies, Evolutionary Design, Evolutionary Algorithms, Evolutionary Programming
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id cf9f
authors Basso, Andrea and Cattelán, Ma. Eugenia
year 2001
title PATRIMONIO. SU VISUALIZACION DESARROLLOS INFORMÁTICOS COMO HERRAMIENTAS PARA LA SISTEMATIZACIÓN DE INFORMACIÓN, VISUALIZACIÓN Y CONSULTAS DEL PATRIMONIO URBANO Y ARQUITECTÓNICO. (Patrimony. Its Visualization. Developments in Computing as a Tool for the Systematization of Information, Visualization and Consultations of the Urban and Architectural Patrimony)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 40-42
summary Two specific applications were developed in order to elaborate a database to consider the demands for the architectural and urbanistic patrimony inventory of Rosario, and to allow for the link with other city databases. One of these is to enter information and to make layers of different kinds of categories of buildings and groups of them. The other application facilitates the viewing and the performance of interrogations from different accesses. It is possible to visualize specific buildings with theirs details and to produce general maps showing different levels of information, such as buildings with patrimonial value that have definite degree of protection, or those belongs to the same category, etc, according to the special inquiry carried out.
series SIGRADI
email abasso@agatha.unr.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 8948
authors Bertola Duarte, Rovenir
year 2001
title AS APROXIMAÇÕES DO COMPUTADOR AO PROCESSO DE ENSINO/ APRENDIZADO DO PROJETO ARQUITETÔNICO (An Approach to Computing in the Teaching/Learning Proces in Architectural Project Design)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 207-209
summary This article seeks to disclose part of the results obtained with the development of the master dissertation. (DUARTE [2], 2000) The several approach forms between the computers and the process teaching/learning of architectural design were investigated in this work, standing out, close moment the edict of MEC that regulated the introduction of the computers in the architecture schools in Brazil. Ten Brazilian schools of architecture were researched, through questionnaires and visits, in which four approach forms were detected, that were understood more deeply with a study of cases, highlighting: methods, supports, components and the teaching process and the design process built by the student.
series SIGRADI
email rovenir@uel.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2006_182
id 2006_182
authors Bridges, Alan
year 2006
title A Critical Review of Problem Based Learning in Architectural Education
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 182-189
summary There is limited research and discussion on pedagogical approaches in architectural education, simply because it is considered as one of the “unimportant” areas that researchers “do not bother studying” (Teymur, 2001). Problem Based Learning has been known to provide competent graduates in other professional disciplines, and, consequently, there have been attempts to utilise the same pedagogical approach in architectural education where PBL is seen as a potential solution to the problems encountered in architectural education. This paper critically reviews PBL implementations at TU Delft Netherlands and Newcastle University, N.S.W. Australia and draws conclusions with particular respect to the teaching of architectural computing
keywords PBL; architecture; computing
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 0b74
authors Chow, B., Lam, S. and Tsou, J.
year 2001
title The impact of computer-based design tools for daylighting simulation and prediction for a built environment
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 169-179
summary This paper investigates the application of computer daylighting simulation to provide qualitative assessment and comparison for designers to improve the built environment especially for non-technical architecture students. A comprehensive study was carried out to evaluate different daylighting design tools and to identify the limitation of current systems in the academic field. The paper will focus mainly on the dynamic information exchange between scientific visualization and the design decision-making process. Both architectural design studio environment and practical design problems in the real world setting were experimented and evaluated. Two case studies are presented: a proposed gallery space for a museum, and a detail architectural design of a community church. Architectural design alterations are proposed, simulated and discussed. The recursive feedback of the designers are studied and documented. Through a combination of qualitative assessment and comparison, designers can evaluate and compare different design options in the computing environment before implementing in the real world situation.
series CAADRIA
email kaming@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 7ffb
authors Ciftcioglu, Özer and Durmisevic, Sanja
year 2001
title Knowledge management by information mining
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 533-545
summary Novel information mining method dealing with soft computing is described. By this method, in the first step, receptive fields of design information are identified so that connections among various design aspects are structured. By means of this, complex relationships among various design aspects are modeled with a paradigm, which is non-parametric and generic. In the second step, the structured connections between various pairs of aspects are graded according to the relevancy to each other. This is accomplished by means of sensitivity analysis, which is a computational tool operating on the model established and based on a concept measuring the degree of dependencies between pairs of quantities. The degree of relationships among various design aspects so determined enables one to select the most important independent aspects in the context of design or decision-making process. The paper deals with the description of the method and presents an architectural case study where numerical and as well as non-numerical (linguistic) design information are treated together, demonstrating a ranked or elective information employment which can be of great value for possible design intervention during reconstruction.
keywords Knowledge Management, Information Mining, Sensitivity Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email ciftciog@mail.bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ga0123
id ga0123
authors Coates P., Appels, T. Simon, C. and Derix, C.
year 2001
title Current work at CECA
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The centre for environment computing and architecture continues to experiment with new ways to form, and this paper presents three recent projects from the MSc programme. The three projects all share underlying assumptions about the use of generative algorithms to constructform, using fractal decomposition, lindenmayer systems and the marching cubes algorithm respectively to construct three dimensional "architectural" objects. The data needed to drive the morphology however ranges from formal proportional systems and Genetic L systems programming through swarming systems to perceptive self organising neural nets. In all cases, the projects pose the question what is architectural form. While after Stanford Anderson (Anderson 66) we know it is simplistic to say that it is an automatic outcome of a proper definition of the brief, it is also difficult to accept that the form of a building is an entirely abstract geometrical object existing without recourse to social or contextual justification. In anattempt to resolve these issues we have turned to the study of systems and general system theory as a way of understanding the mechanics of emergence and morphogenesis generally, and the
series other
email P.S.Coates@uel.ac.uk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 1b32
authors Da Conceição Garcia, Cláudia and De Souza Tenorio, Gabriela
year 2001
title UMA REFLEXÃO SOBRE PROPOSTA PEDAGÓGICA DO ENSINO DA COMPUTAÇÃO GRÁFICA NO CURSO DE ARQUITETURA E URBANISMO (A Reflection on a Pedagogical Proposal for Teaching Computer Graphics in an Architecture and Urbanism Course)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 224-226
summary In the last few years, the use of computers methods on architecture and urban undergraduate courses have been a matter of criticism. Many professors and lectures argue that computers have not contributed for students creativity development. This paper presents a proposal for a graphic computing course of the Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo of the Universidade de Brasília that aims to use computer in a creative manner. During the last 5 years, faculties from applied architecture computing from our institute have applied new pedagogical strategies to lecture this course. We intend to use this tool not only to express and represent architecture projects, but also to evaluate the development of architecture and urban projects. Our experience on this topic allowed the development of a methodological procedure that focus on the architecture and urban projects and not on the graphic computing software.
series SIGRADI
email csgarcia@unb.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

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