CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 21 to 40 of 713

_id 6430
authors Jabi, Wassim (Ed.)
year 2001
title ACADIA 2001 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1/ Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, 415 p.
summary The theme, which preceded my knowledge of ACADIA’s true age, resulted from a realization regarding the development and current state of CAD in Research, Education, and Practice. While I only got involved with ACADIA in the last half of its current life to date, I had the honor of studying with some of the early pioneers of CAD: 1) Harold Borkin, a founding member of ACADIA, 2) Jim Turner, a longtime ACADIAn, and a past ACADIA Conference organizer (actually the very first conference I attended), and 3) Ted Hall, another longtime ACADIAn. What I have learned from conversations with them and later witnessed for myself is a fundamental shift of focus in CAD from building tools to using tools. That is, while early CAD students, including myself, used to learn how to create software and tools to solve a particular problem, the current focus in the majority of schools that include a CAD component in their curriculum is on teaching the use of commercial software and/or the use of digital media in the design studio. One need only take a look at old list of courses that used to be offered in the CAD area and compare it with a new list to see this shift. Yet, one form of tool building that is continuing in a significant number of schools is the creation of scripts or small software modules (usually built using a visual editor) to create interactive systems for delivery over the web or on CD-ROM. Examples include the use of Macromedia Director or Flash for creating interactive digital titles. While this current state of affairs has increased the receptivity to digital tools and media, it does obscure an important fact. For knowledge to advance in this area, we need researchers who can not only use tools, but also invent new ones to solve new problems that are not addressed by the existing crop of commercial software. The more time we spend not educating our students in the art and science of building digital tools, the harder it will be to: 1) find teachers in the future with those skills, 2) advance and influence the development of the state-of-the-art in CAD, and 3) erase the use of CAD as a euphemism for slick computer-generated imagery. While not common, the tradition of tool building is still going on most notably in architecture schools with strong financial resources and those that offer doctoral level education. Commercial, governmental and business/education entities are also continuing the research tradition of tool building. ACADIA, as a reflection of the field it focuses on, has widened its scope to solicit papers that deal with CAD education and the use of CAD in practice. Thus, you will read in this book papers that focus on all three aspects: research, education, and practice and in some cases the intersection of two or more of those areas. Thankfully, ACADIA, while concerned with CAD in education has maintained its receptivity to basic research papers as well as a willingness to publish innovative papers in the area of practice. As chair of the technical committee, I made sure that the call for papers and the final selection reflects this desire. We should continue to emphasize the need for presenting this diversity of work in our annual conferences and I am optimistic that the ACADIA community is in support of this notion.
series ACADIA
email jabi@njit.edu
more www.acadia.org
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id avocaad_2001_01
id avocaad_2001_01
authors Maria Musat
year 2001
title 3D Intelligent Representations for the Facility Management Practice
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary New field, growing very fast since the nineteen eighties, facility management takes care of our built environment. As owners and users together become more and more aware of the importance that healthy built environment has for their lives, the need for high quality tools to help them manage their buildings, throughout their transformations, are growing in demand. The market is overflowed with 2D applications assembled in different information systems that have no links one to another. Intranets, that offer direct links between alphanumerical and 2D graphical databases, are considered nowadays the top tools for facility management experts. Nevertheless the sophistication of this information systems, we should not forget the fact that built environment is always 3D. Therefore, the representations not only should be 3D as well, but also they should include some of the intelligence that builders and managers have, in order to ease their tasks during the life cycle of the buildings. Health and life of our built environment bases on the quality of the management process. However their importance was pointed in the first paragraph, there are yet no norms to intelligently describe our buildings as to take the most profit of their 3D representations. Both owners and managers seem to be impressed by accurate renderings of the building models. They seem to forget that behind these models, the useful information for the facility management is the appearance of the built environment. No intelligent applications have yet been developed based on this information. Our goal is to examine the facility management specific needs in information and to research and define a coherent norm that could intelligently describe 3D representations of complex buildings for this practice.
series AVOCAAD
email mmusat@sprint.ca
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 0ca1
id 0ca1
authors Calderon, C, Cavazza., M
year 2001
title USING GAMES ENGINES TO IMPLEMENT INTELLIGENT VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS.
source Game-On 2001, Holiday Inn London Docks, London, United Kingdom , November 30 - December 1, 2001. http://hobbes.rug.ac.be/~scs/conf/gameon2001/index.php3
summary In this paper we present an Intelligent Virtual Environment (IVE) obtained by incorporating a problem solving mechanism (AI technique) into a Virtual Environment. In particular, in this paper, we will discuss the implementation of the interaction with the problem solving mechanism by using the following metaphor: the visual space provided by the Virtual Environment is seen as the search space
keywords Game Engines, Artificial Intelligence
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:19

_id 40a6
authors Ennis, Gareth and Lindsay, Malcolm
year 2001
title VRGLASGOW.CO.UK implementation of internet multi-user functionality to Glasgow's virtual city
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 135-142 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary The development of the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) for the Internet has resulted in the emergence of a multiplicity of 3D web sites. The metaphor used by these sites varies enormously from virtual galleries to virtual cities and style varies from abstract to reality. Additionally these worlds are populated by virtual objects, some having reactive or interactive properties, including movement, audio, video, databases, artificial intelligence etc. Perhaps the most stimulating embodiment of these new environments are those that offer the participant the opportunity to meet and communicate with other visitors exploring the same virtual space/world. The Glasgow Directory is an established 3D web space, with around 10,000 visitors per year. The model represents approximayely 10,000 properties in the city and is populated by contextual information on its culture and socio-economic topography. This paper will describe the background to this VR space, and suggest a set of design criteria for successfully deploying multi-user software within this and similar environments. These criteria will take into account lessons learned by 'observing' and analysing how participants interact with the existing system under different conditions and also what benefits they perceive on entering the environment via the multi-user interface. These recommendations will hopefully be applicable to a wide spectrum of internet virtual environment builders and users.
series other
email gary.ennis@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 3dcd
authors Ennis, Gary and Maver, Tom
year 2001
title Visit VR Glasgow - Welcoming multiple visitors to the Virtual City
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 423-429
summary The development of the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) for the Internet has resulted in the emergence of a multiplicity of 3D web sites. The metaphor used by these sites varies enormously from virtual galleries to virtual cities and style varies from abstract to reality. Additionally these worlds are populated by virtual objects, some having reactive or interactive properties, including movement, audio, video, databases, artificial intelligence etc. Perhaps the most stimulating embodiment of these new environments are those that offer the participant the opportunity to meet and communicate with other visitors exploring the same virtual space/world. The Glasgow Directory is an established 3D web space, with around 10,000 visitors per year. The model represents approximately 10,000 properties in the city and is populated by contextual information on its culture and socio-economic topography. This paper describes the background to this VR space, and suggests a set of design criteria for successfully deploying multi-user software within this and similar environments. These criteria take into account lessons learned by ‘observing’ and analysing how participants interact with the existing system under different conditions and also what benefits they perceive on entering the environment via the multi-user interface. These recommendations will hopefully be applicable to a wide spectrum of internet virtual environment builders and users.
keywords Virtual, City, 3-D, Databases, Interaction
series eCAADe
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk, gary.ennis@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id c78f
authors Fischer, T. and Herr, C.M.
year 2001
title Teaching Generative Design
source Soddu, C., ed. (2001). The Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Generative Art 2001. Milan, Italy: Generative Design Lab, DiAP, Politechnico di Milano University
summary Generative design, which integrates multidisciplinary types of expertise in unconventional ways, was reserved just until recently to experienced and highly autodidactic designers. However, growing recognition of the importance of generative design methodologies have resulted in a need to introduce theories and applications of generative design to undergraduate students as part of their design studies. This emerging educational field of generative design teaching currently lacks methodologies, teaching experience and introductory study material. Available textbooks related to algorithmic form generation, discussing algorithmic growth, artificial life, fi-actal images, emergent behaviour and the like have originated in the field of mathematics. This resource provides an abundance of examples and generative approaches but when adapted to design education, it poses great interdisciplinary challenges which are addressed in this paper. Experiences in generative design teaching are presented, focusing on the relation between algorithmic reproduction of nature (as emphasized by authors in the mathematical field) and innovation (as commonly emphasized in design education). This discussion leads to a derivation of pedagogic suggestions as early steps on the way towards theories and curricula of generative design teaching, addressed to curriculum planners, generative design teachers as well as novices of the field such as undergraduate students.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 4a1a
authors Laird, J.E.
year 2001
title Using Computer Game to Develop Advanced AI
source Computer, 34 (7), July pp. 70-75
summary Although computer and video games have existed for fewer than 40 years, they are already serious business. Entertainment software, the entertainment industry's fastest growing segment, currently generates sales surpassing the film industry's gross revenues. Computer games have significantly affected personal computer sales, providing the initial application for CD-ROMs, driving advancements in graphics technology, and motivating the purchase of ever faster machines. Next-generation computer game consoles are extending this trend, with Sony and Toshiba spending $2 billion to develop the Playstation 2 and Microsoft planning to spend more than $500 million just to market its Xbox console [1]. These investments have paid off. In the past five years, the quality and complexity of computer games have advanced significantly. Computer graphics have shown the most noticeable improvement, with the number of polygons rendered in a scene increasing almost exponentially each year, significantly enhancing the games' realism. For example, the original Playstation, released in 1995, renders 300,000 polygons per second, while Sega's Dreamcast, released in 1999, renders 3 million polygons per second. The Playstation 2 sets the current standard, rendering 66 million polygons per second, while projections indicate the Xbox will render more than lOO million polygons per second. Thus, the images on today's $300 game consoles rival or surpass those available on the previous decade's $50,000 computers. The impact of these improvements is evident in the complexity and realism of the environments underlying today's games, from detailed indoor rooms and corridors to vast outdoor landscapes. These games populate the environments with both human and computer controlled characters, making them a rich laboratory for artificial intelligence research into developing intelligent and social autonomous agents. Indeed, computer games offer a fitting subject for serious academic study, undergraduate education, and graduate student and faculty research. Creating and efficiently rendering these environments touches on every topic in a computer science curriculum. The "Teaching Game Design " sidebar describes the benefits and challenges of developing computer game design courses, an increasingly popular field of study
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3815
authors Qaqish, Ra’ed
year 2001
title VDS/DDS Practice Hinges on Interventions and Simplicity - A Case Study of Hard Realism vs. Distorted Idealism
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 249-255
summary This paper reports on a contemporary and laborious ongoing experimental work initiated during the establishment of a new Virtual/Digital design studio “VDS” in Sept. 1999 by CAAD tutors at University of Petra “UOP”. The new VDS/DDS now works as an experimental laboratory to explore several solutions to problems of efficiency in design teaching as a new digital design studio paradigm, in tandem with CAD/Design staff, DS environment, materials and facilities. Two groups of graduating level students participated as volunteers in this experiment. The first group was comprised of three fifth-year architectural design students while the second group was comprised of two fourth-year interior design students. The media currently in use are ArchiCAD 6.5 as a design tool along with CorelDraw 9 as a presentational tool, running on Pentium III computers. The series of experiments evaluated the impression on architectural design studio tuition requirements arising from the changes brought about by the implementation of the new CAD pedagogical approach (VDS/DDS) at UOP. The findings echo several important key issues in tandem with CAAD, such as: the changes brought about by the new design strategies, adaptation in problem solving decision-making techniques, studio employment in terms of environment, means and methods. Other issues are VDS/DDS integration schemes carried out by both students and staff as one team in design studio practice on one hand and the curriculum on the other. Finally, the paper discusses the negative impact of conventional design studio hardliner teaching advocates and students alike whose outlook and impressions undermine and deplete effective CAAD integration and obstruct, in many instances, the improvement of such experiments in a VDS environment.
keywords Design Studio Strategies, Problem Solving Decisions, Transformation And Integration Policies
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@index.com.jo
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id f2f0
authors Tang, Ming Xi and Frazer, John
year 2001
title A representation of context for computer supported collaborative design
source Automation in Construction 10 (6) (2001) pp. 715-729
summary This paper presents a computational definition of design context and discusses its role for collaborative design. A brief review of design representation and modeling approaches is given first. This is followed by a discussion on the necessity for modeling design context in collaborative design. This discussion provides a basis for a definition of design context and a description of Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for representing and reasoning about this design context. The development of an intelligent collaborative design system supporting context management is presented. Finally, the limitations of our current approach to representing design contexts, and possible ways for future improvement are discussed.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 793a
authors Turk, Ziga
year 2001
title Multimedia: providing students with real world experiences
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 247-255
summary Multimedia has been quickly accepted by the engineering community. In the first part of the paper, the author provides a theoretical explanation why multimedia is popular in engineering: because it tries to provide an artificial "being-in-the-world" experience. This explanation is backed-up by Heidegger's philosophy and Winogard's critique of artificial intelligence (AI). Heidegger believed that humans basically act pre-reflectively, depending on the situation into which they are thrown. Such decisions are based on common sense and intuitive knowledge accumulated while "being-in-the-world", and particularly during breakdowns. Engineering students have few opportunities to observe breakdowns, however, information technology, particularly virtual reality and multimedia provide them. In the second part of the paper, a system to teach earthquake engineering is presented, based on the principles of breakdown-oriented learning. The system is built around a multimedia database that contains digitised photographs of damages caused by some of the recent major earthquakes. To a large extent, such multimedia tools can replace the learning from real breakdowns and complements theoretical knowledge that can be passed on using traditional means.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 70cc
authors Witten, I.H. and Frank, E.
year 2000
title Data Mining - Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques with JAVA Implementations
source Morgan Kaufmann
summary Witten and Frank's textbook was one of two books that I used for a data mining class in the Fall of 2001. The book covers all major methods of data mining that produce a knowledge representation as output. Knowledge representation is hereby understood as a representation that can be studied, understood, and interpreted by human beings, at least in principle. Thus, neural networks and genetic algorithms are excluded from the topics of this textbook. We need to say "can be understood in principle" because a large decision tree or a large rule set may be as hard to interpret as a neural network. The book first develops the basic machine learning and data mining methods. These include decision trees, classification and association rules, support vector machines, instance-based learning, Naive Bayes classifiers, clustering, and numeric prediction based on linear regression, regression trees, and model trees. It then goes deeper into evaluation and implementation issues. Next it moves on to deeper coverage of issues such as attribute selection, discretization, data cleansing, and combinations of multiple models (bagging, boosting, and stacking). The final chapter deals with advanced topics such as visual machine learning, text mining, and Web mining.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id avocaad_2001_14
id avocaad_2001_14
authors Adam Jakimowicz
year 2001
title Non-Linear Postrationalisation: Architectural Values Emergence in a Teamwork Interpretation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The paper presents the outcomes of the experiment being conducted at the Faculty of Architecture in Bialystok, which derives form three main sources: a new course of architectural composition by computer modelling, developed and conducted in Bialystok postrationalisation as a formulation platform for new architectural values and theories, applied by e.g. Bernard Tschumi the idea of new values emergence resulting form a teamwork, when placed in an appropriate environment; It is assumed that the work performed first intuitively, can be later seriously interpreted, and to some extent rationalised, verbalised, described. With no doubt we can state, that in creative parts of architectural activities, very often decision are taken intuitively (form design). So this ‘procedure’ of postrationalisation of intuitively undertaken efforts and results seems to be very important –when trying to explain ideas. This kind of activity is also very important during the first years of architectural education. In case of this experiment, the students’ works from the course of architectural composition are taken as a base and subjects for interpretation, and values research. However, when at first, individual works are being interpreted by their authors, at the latter stage, the teams are to be formed. The aim of the teamwork is to present individual works, analyse them, find common value(s), and represent it (them) in an appropriate, creative way. The ideal environment to perform this work is hypertext based internet, because the non-linearity of team interpretations is unavoidable. On the other hand, the digital input data (computer models) is a very appropriate initial material to be used for hypermedia development. The experiment is to analyse the specific of the following: the self-influence of the group on the individual work ‘qualification’, mutual influence of the team members on their own work interpretation, the influence of the digital non-linear environment on the final outcome definition. The added value of hypertext in architectural groupwork digital performance shall be examined and described. A new value of individualised, though group based, non-linearity of expression will be presented and concluded.
series AVOCAAD
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_18
id avocaad_2001_18
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 2001
title The End of Methodology - Towards New Integration
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The present paper is devoted to the deliberation on the genesis and development of designing from the point of view of the potential use of computers in the process. Moreover, it also presents the great hopes which were connected with the use of the systematic designing methods in the 1960’s, as well as the great disappointment resulting from the lack of concrete results. At this time a great deal of attention was paid to the process of design as a branch of a wider process of problem-solving. Many people believed that the intuitive methods of design traditionally used by architects were incapable of dealing with the complexity of the problems to be solved. Therefore, the basic problem was the definition of a vertical structure of the designing process, which would make it possible to optimise each process of architectural design. The studies of design methodology directed at the codification of the norms of actions have not brought about any solutions which could be commonly accepted, as the efforts to present the designing process as a formally logical one and one that is not internally “uncontrary” from the mathematical point of view, were doomed to fail. Moreover, the difficulties connected with the use of the computer in designing were caused by the lack of a graphic interface, which is so very characteristic of an architect’s workshop. In result, the methodology ceased to be the main area of the architect’s interest and efforts were focused on facilitating the method of the designer’s communication with the computer. New tools were created, which enabled both the automatic generation of diversity and the creation of forms on the basis of genetic algorithms, as well as the presentation of the obtained results in the form of rendering, animation and VRML. This was the end of the general methodology of designing and the beginning of a number of methods solving the partial problems of computer-supported design. The present situation can be described with the words of Ian Stewart as a “chaotic run in all directions”. An immediate need for new integration is felt. Cyber-real space could be a solution to the problem. C-R-S is not a virtual reality understood as an unreal world. Whilst VR could be indeed treated as a sort of an illusion, C-R-S is a much more realistic being, defining the area in which the creative activities are taking place. The architect gains the possibility of having a direct contact with the form he or she is creating. Direct design enables one to creatively use the computer technology in the designing process. The intelligent system of recognising speech, integrated with the system of virtual reality, will allow to create an environment for the designer – computer communication which will be most natural to the person. The elimination of this obstacle will facilitate the integration of the new methods into one designing environment. The theoretical assumptions of such an environment are described in the present paper.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ga0127
id ga0127
authors Antonini, Riccardo
year 2001
title The darwinian structure of the design process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This text is meant only to be a stimulus for the discussion to be held, in a specific panel, at Generative Art 2001. In the text, “provocative enough” to spur animated discussion, some very basics of darwinism and genetics are given with the only purpose of declaring a common “stage for the play” where everybody feels at ease. Common stage and common vocabulary ifnot even common language. The main thesis is very strong, therefore comments and critics are warmly encouraged. They are the selective pressure that steers the evolution of ideas. We all need them. The thesis is basically the following: “Every creative process is a darwinian one”.Besides, it will be shown that it is also a very peculiar one where the information and its implementation sometimes switch their role one another.
series other
email Riccardo.Antonini@Uniroma2.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 66f8
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 2001
title Information at Early Design Stages
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 105-110
summary This paper concentrates on information at the early stages of the design process. However those do not concern all the information regarding the task available to the designer or the already existing solutions, but the information generated by the designer during the process of problem solving. The creative nature of architectural design and the lack of complete information during the process determine the role and the place of the information system in the design. It is necessary that the information system correspond to the raw form of expression of the designer as it appears at the early design stages. In the traditional creative activity, an image of the architectural form is developed through graphic expression such as sketches, words and sentences. Changing the design environment from analog to digital does not solve the design problems at all. IT creates new possibilities for generating design information thanks to new tools as well as new software. The multiplicity of methods only makes the problem of the amount and accessibility of information more complicated.
keywords Early Design Stages, Hybrid Design Environment
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id caadria2010_043
id caadria2010_043
authors Barker, Tom and M. Hank Haeusler
year 2010
title Urban digital media: facilitating the intersection between science, the arts and culture in the arena of technology and building
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 457-466
summary The research presented in this paper investigates ways of providing better design applications for technologies in the field of Urban Digital Media (UDM). The work takes an emergent approach, evolving a design strategy through the early engagement of stakeholders. The paper discusses research in a design-led creative intersection between media technology, culture and the arts in the built environment. The case study discusses opportunities for the enhancement of a university campus experience, learning culture and community, through the provision of an integrated digital presence within campus architecture and urban spaces. It considers types of information architecture (Manovich, 2001) and designs for use in urban settings to create communication-rich, advanced and interactive designed spaces (Haeusler, 2009). The presented research investigates how to create a strategy for display technologies and networked communications to transform and augment the constructed reality of the built environment, allowing new formats of media activity.
keywords Urban design; outdoor digital media; information architecture; multidisciplinary design; augmented reality; media facades
series CAADRIA
email Matthias.Haeusler@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 7b69
authors Borkowski, A., Branki, C., Grabska, E. and Palacz, W.
year 2001
title Towards collaborative creative design
source Automation in Construction 10 (5) (2001) pp. 607-616
summary The paper presents a design support system for collaborative work based upon the composite knowledge representation. It addresses the main challenges of distributed environment: ensuring a convenient access to the common data by multiple users and maintaining consistency of such data. The main idea is to couple the design support system implemented in C/C++ with the knowledge database using the ODBC library developed by the Microsoft. The ability of the proposed system is demonstrated on several examples.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 35a7
authors Brown, André G.P.
year 2001
title Architectural critique through digital scenariobuilding. Augmenting Architectural Criticism and Narrative
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 697-709
summary As an idea scenario-building has parallels the use of creative faking in related disciplines, most particularly, in contemporary art. The techniques involved in scenario-building and faking offer us enhanced ways of undertaking creative thinking and critical review of architecture and architectural projects. Critical review and theoretical analysis of architecture can be undertaken via a range of methods that Attoe (1978) classifies as Normative, Interpretive and Descriptive. Digital representation now offers us new ways of augmenting these critical styles in ways that have yet to be fully exploited, and possible means of exploitation are illustrated in this paper. In short the work described here shows how digital techniques can be used to enrich architectural investigation, critical reporting and debate.
keywords Digital Recreation, Scenario-Building, Narrative, Fake, Architectural Critique
series CAAD Futures
email andygpb@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ga0104
id ga0104
authors Caillaud, Bernard
year 2001
title Cellular Automata and Algorithmic Visual Creation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The cellular automaton concept, a reduced form of automaton concept (specific , in the beginning, to cybernetics and computer science) relates to the notion of local order, dear to Abraham Moles, and refers to the creation of a complex order in a set of cells ( or pixels for digital images) based on a simple law which determine the colorimetric state of each pixelaccording to the colorimetric state of its nearest neighbours. I will examine one-dimensional automata and then two-dimensional ones. I will study theirmorphogenetical properties in the case of neutral values and then of chromatic ones. I will talk about my own creative work, closely related to an "orientated morphogenesis".This latter has its place quite naturally in Generative Art . I will look at paradigmatic explorations,parametric creations, programming perturbations, conditional choices, "chromatisation" and hybridation. To finish, I will describe the last stage of the work which consists, if necessary, of reworking the initial files so as to modify then through "software creation".
series other
email Bernard.Caillaud@info.unicaen.fr
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 43ec
authors Chen, Sheng-Chih
year 2001
title The Role of Design Creativity in Computer Media
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 226-231
summary This study discusses the use of design media and design creativity in design education. By combining cognitive studies with educational psychology, it analyzes the cognitive processes involved in the use of the computer by experts and novices, and compares the effects of the computer on the design process of both subjects. In doing so, it discusses computer design media as well as creative thinking.
keywords Computer Media, Creativity, Expert And Novice, Creative Thinking
series eCAADe
email phd222@iris.seed.net.tw, shengchih@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

For more results click below:

show page 0this is page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5show page 6... show page 35HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_959101 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002