CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 713

_id 943c
authors Hendricx, A. and Neuckermans, H.
year 2001
title The object model at the core of the IDEA+ design environment
source Beheshti, R. (ed), Advances in Building Informatics, Proceedings of the 8th EuropIA International Conference on the application of Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Image Processing to Architecture, Building Engineering & Civil Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands, April 25-27, 2001, pp. 113-125
summary This paper focuses on three different aspects in which the IDEA+ core model differs from many other product modelling research initiatives: the systematic approach in the construction of the model, the respect for the evolutionary nature of architectural design, and the use of actual and complete design cases to test the model. Key words: CAAD, product modelling, integrated design environment, MERODE 1 The IDEA+ project: towards an integrated design environment In spite of the extensive use of all kinds of hardware and software in the architectural offices, the use of computers still does not contribute essentially to better architecture. For the CAD packages on the one hand, they have proven to be an efficient alternative for the traditional drawing board. Yet they fail in the early conceptual stage of design where creativity and exploration play the leading role. For computational tests and analysis tools on the other hand, they can hardly handle the typical absence o
series other
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 6a37
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 13-23
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies ina tightly structured framework for the integration of Environmental Control Systems (ECS) principles intoa third year design studio. An interchangeable use of digital media and physical material enabledarchitectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement.The principles that provide the foundation for integrative strategies between a design studio and buildingtechnology course spring from the Bauhaus tradition where a systematic approach to craftsmanship andvisual perception is emphasized. Focusing particularly on color, light, texture and materials, Josef Albersexplored the assemblage of found objects, transforming these materials into unexpected dynamiccompositions. Moholy-Nagy developed a technique called the photogram or camera-less photograph torecord the temporal movements of light. Wassily Kandinsky developed a method of analytical drawingthat breaks a still life composition into diagrammatic forces to express tension and geometry. Theseschematic diagrams provide a method for students to examine and analyze the implications of elementplacements in space (Bermudez, Neiman 1997). Gyorgy Kepes's Language of Vision provides a primerfor learning basic design principles. Kepes argued that the perception of a visual image needs aprocess of organization. According to Kepes, the experience of an image is "a creative act ofintegration". All of these principles provide the framework for the studio investigation.The quarter started with a series of intense short workshops that used an interchangeable use of digitaland physical media to focus on ECS topics such as day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary tolead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration.In integrating ECS components with the design studio, an nine-step methodology was established toprovide students with a compelling and tangible framework for design:Examples of student work will be presented for the two times this course was offered (2001/02) to showhow exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series ACADIA
email tfowler@calpoly.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 8af6
authors Hoffmann, O., Stumptner, M. and Chalabi, T.
year 2001
title Tolerating Inconsistencies. The Distributed Perspectives Model
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 375-386
summary A new design model is presented. Information on the design is distributed over multiple self-contained design perspectives and translation functions between design perspectives. Inconsistencies between specifications in different design perspectives introduced by human designers are temporarily tolerated in order to support creative design processes. The implementation of a design support system currently under evaluation is outlined.
keywords CAD, Microstation, Artificial Intelligence, Creativity, Urban Design, Typology, Java, JATLite, JATLiteBean, Agent, JESS
series CAAD Futures
email oliver@hoffmann.org
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ga0122
id ga0122
authors Miranda Carranza, Pablo
year 2001
title Self-design and Ontogenetic evolution
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The context and long term goal of the project is to develop design environments in which the computer becomes an active and creative partner in the design process. To try to set-up a system that would enhance the design process by suggesting possibilities, has been preferredto an approach that emphasises optimisation and problem-solving.The work develops around the general concept of morphogenesis, the process of development of a system's form or structure. Besides the obvious example of embryological growth, biological evolution, learning, and societal development can also be considered as morphogenetic processes.The aim is to set a foundation from where latter work can develop in the study of how form unravels, and the implications and possibilities of the utilisation of such processes in design. Some basic principles are established, regarding the idea of Ontogenesis, the study of thedevelopment of organisms, and Epigenesis, the mode Ontogenesis operates.Drawing on D’Arcy Thompson’s ideas and inspired on the models and approaches developed in the recent field of Artificial Life, this work explores the possibilities of using a model based in bone accretion to develop structural systems. The mechanisms by which bone is able toadapt are relatively known and simple, and at the same time they address a sensible problem, such as it is the case of the static performance of a structure. This may seem contradictory with what was mentioned above regarding problem solving. The problem is anyway approached not with the intention of finding optimal solutions, but challenging and creativeones. It is not answers the computer should provide, but questions about the problematic of the design. It is in this context of “problem-worrying” (as opposed to problem solving) that the work has been carried.
series other
email pablom@interactiveinstitute.se
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c55e
authors Miranda, Pablo
year 2001
title Self-design and Ontogenetic evolution
source 4th International Conference on Generative Art, Politecnico di Milano University, Milan, Italy
summary The work develops around the general concept of morphogenesis, the process of development of a system's form or structure. Besides the obvious example of embryological growth, biological evolution, learning, and societal development can also be considered as morphogenetic processes. The aim is to set a foundation from where latter work can develop in the study of how form unravels, and the implications and possibilities of the utilisation of such processes in design. Some basic principles are established, regarding the idea of Ontogenesis, the study of the development of organisms, and Epigenesis, the mode Ontogenesis operates. Drawing on D'Arcy Thompson's ideas and inspired on the models and approaches developed in the recent field of Artificial Life, this work explores the possibilities of using a model based in bone accretion to develop structural systems. The mechanisms by which bone is able to adapt are relatively known and simple, and at the same time they address a sensible problem, such as it is the case of the static performance of a structure. The problem is anyway approached not with the intention of finding optimal solutions, but challenging and creative ones. It is not answers the computer should provide, but questions about the problematics of the design. It is in this context of 'problem-worrying' (as opposed to problem solving) that the work has been carried.
keywords Ontogenesis; Bone Accretion; Self-designed Structures; Problem-worrying
series other
email pablom@interactiveinstitute.se
last changed 2003/03/24 15:47

_id ga0133
id ga0133
authors Comino, Angelo (Motor)
year 2001
title The Eliza’s Dream- Il sogno di Eliza
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The Eliza’s dream (Il sogno di Eliza) is a small project about the practical use of generative or computer based methods applied on story writing. During this project the author, Motor (a.k.a Angelo Comino) explored all kind of help and interaction with the digital environment in order to write a common, but hopefully pleasant, mistery book, trough generative software,dialogues with classic artificial intelligence, with automated brainstormer or story telling expert systems.
series other
email progettoeliza@ilsognodieliza.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0118
id ga0118
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2001
title Learning and Contamination in Virtual Worlds
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories whereto explore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tool to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]. The combination of these concepts with robotics technology or with immersive-interactive 3D environments (virtual reality) are changing quickly well known paradigms like digital life, manmachineinterface, virtual world. The virtual world metaphor becomes interesting when the artificial beings can develop some form of learning, increasing their performances, adaptation, and developing the ability to exchange information with human visitors. In this sense the evolution enhances the creative power and meaningful of these environments, and human visitors experience an emotion of a shift from a simplified simulation of the reality to a real immersion into an imaginary life. We may think that these realization are the first sparks of a new form of life: simulated for the soft-alife thinkers, real for the hard-alife thinkers, or a simple imaginary vision for the artists.
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id caadria2010_042
id caadria2010_042
authors Celento, David
year 2010
title Open-source, parametric architecture to propagate hyper-dense, sustainable urban communities: parametric urban dwellings for the experience economy
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 443-452
summary Rapid developments in societal, technological, and natural systems suggest profound changes ahead if research in panarchical systems (Holling, 2001) is to be believed. Panarchy suggests that systems, both natural and man-made, rise to the point of vulnerability then fail due to disruptive forces in a process of ‘creative destruction.’ This sequence allows for radical, and often unpredictable, renewal. Pressing sustainability concerns, burgeoning urban growth, and emergent ‘green manufacturing’ laws, suggest that future urban dwellings are headed toward Gladwell’s ‘tipping point’ (2002). Hyper-dense, sustainable, urban communities that employ open-source standards, parametric software, and web-based configurators are the new frontier for venerable visions. Open-source standards will permit the design, manufacture, and sale of highly diverse, inter-operable components to create compact urban living environments that are technologically sophisticated, sustainable, and mobile. These mass-customised dwellings, akin to branded consumer goods, will address previous shortcomings for prefabricated, mobile dwellings by stimulating consumer desire in ways that extend the arguments of both Joseph Pine (1992) and Anna Klingman (2007). Arguments presented by authors Makimoto and Manners (1997) – which assert that the adoption of digital and mobile technologies will create large-scale societal shifts – will be extended with several solutions proposed.
keywords Mass customisation; urban dwellings; open source standards; parametric design; sustainability
series CAADRIA
email dcelento@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ga0120
id ga0120
authors Devetakovic, M.
year 2001
title Communicating Generic Process – Some Issues of Representation Related to Architectural Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary It is commonly the intent of an architect to represent the development of an idea from the early sketches to the final artefact, as well as to explain particular functions of its parts or complex construction processes. But the opening of the secret of generic process to the public - presenting a range of possibilities instead of one final solution and even involving external participants in the creation process - is brand new. The contemporary communication of architectural ideas presumes both – visual/formal representation and interaction. As a result of research in the field of communication in architecture, this paper is focused ongeneric process phenomena, in particular on issues of its representation. It is based on analysis of a wide range of examples that have appeared in recent years, either in electronic, printed or physical form. It offers a systematization of approaches to representation and discusses thepotential and limitations of each type – series of physical objects, sequences of graphics (single, linear, planar and spatial) and animation, as well as their combinations (sequences of animations). A particular emphasis is placed on increasing the functionality of sequence-basedrepresentation (interacting, navigating…) and its interdependence with animation as a special case. Finally, the author proposes a rethinking of the role of both the architect, who defines a system of possibilities rather than a single solution, and the information recipient, who becomes not merely a passive spectator, but a creative participant in the design process.
series other
email mdevetakovic@unitec.ac.nz
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c596
authors Ekholm, Anders
year 2001
title Modelling of User Activities in Building Design
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 67-72
summary Architects manage not only information about the building but also about the user organisation. Therefore, information systems for architectural design must be able to handle both building and organisational data. The paper describes architectural design as a creative problem solving process, and presents a recently developed prototype application for user activity modelling built as an add-on to ArchiCAD.
keywords Architectural Design, Problem Solving, User Activity Modelling, Model Based CAD
series eCAADe
email anders.ekholm@caad.lth.se
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 270d
authors Elezkurtaj, Tomor and Franck, Georg
year 2001
title Evolutionary Algorithms in Urban Planning
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 269-272
summary The functions supported by commercial CAD software are drawing, construction and presentation. Until now, no programssupporting the creative part of architectural and urban problem solving are on the market. The grand hopes of symbolic AI ofprogramming creative architectural and urban design have been disappointed. In the meantime, methods called New AI are available.Among these methods, evolutionary algorithms are particularly promising for solving design problems. The paper presents anapproach to town panning and architectural problem solving that combines an evolutionary strategy (ES), a genetic algorithm (GA)and a Particle System. The problem that remains incapable of being solved algorithmically has to do with the fact that in architectureand urbanizm form as well as function count. Because function relates to comfort, easiness of use, and aesthetics as well, it ishopeless to fully specify the fitness function of architecture. The approach presented circumvents a full specification through dividinglabor between the software and its user. The fitness function of town plans is defined in terms only of proportions of the shapes, areasand buildings to be accommodated and topological relations between them. The rest is left to the human designer who interactivelyintervenes in the evolution game as displayed on the screen.
series other
email tomor@osiris.iemar.tuwien.ac.at
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:17

_id ga0125
id ga0125
authors Galanter, Philip
year 2001
title Foundations of Generative Art Systems - a hybrid survey and studio class for graduate students
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The Interactive Telecommunications Program is a well known professional master's program for artists interested in new media, and is part of the Tisch School of the Arts...informally known as the "NYU Film School". ITP graduates are very much in demand, and can be found in creative leadership positions throughout the multimedia industry. For two years the author has taught a class exclusively focused on generative art. This talk willoutline the structure of the class, discuss the challenges and rewards of teaching such an eclectic and interdisciplinary mix of topics, and show examples of student work.
series other
email galanter@nyu.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 51e4
authors Huanambal Coral, Carlos Alfonso
year 2001
title COMPORTAMIENTO CREATIVO EN LA PRODUCCIÓN DE ARQUITECTURA VIRTUAL (Creative Behavior in the Production of Virtual Architecture)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 183-185
summary This investigation is because of the necessity to understand the Creative Act in Architecture. Objectives: 1.- To observe the Creative Personality in the production of Virtual Architecture related to informatic systems. 2.- Conditioning the Creative Environment for Virtual Architecture Production 3.- Analyze the Creative Process of Architectonic design produces between informatic Systems. 4.- Verify the Creative Product in Virtual Architecture. The students look for new ways to get new forms in their designs. In present time we design the architectonic objects by three dimensions in the computer it’s a virtual reality. We say Virtual Architecture. “The man’s Creative Environment always will be attend to raise its talent or geniality with anyone tolls to be used “.
series SIGRADI
email gaudi001@amauta.rcp.net.pe
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id bf19
id bf19
authors Rafi, A
year 2001
title Design computing: A new challenge for creative synergy
source In Saito, N. (Ed.), Creative digital media: Its impact on the new century (pp. 132-136), Japan: Keio University Press
summary As content becomes increasingly significant in giving ‘face’ to information technology (IT), the need to train and produce content designers has also become more and more important. The development of powerful computer technologies and the complexity of design have demanded designers to re-examine the design process and consider the adaptation of tools that will provide for creativity, improve the overall design process and, at the same time, reveal new insights (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2000). This paper gives an overview of the relationship between art and science through the ages, and discusses their relatively recent re-convergence. This text further argues that a re-convergence between art and science is currently occurring, highlighting the need to accelerate the process. It is suggested that re-convergence is a result of new technologies being researched, namely related to effective visualisation and communication of ideas and concepts, subsequently adopted by practitioners. Such elements, with tools that offer increased power and new abilities, are widely found today in the multimedia and the Virtual Environment (VE) as scientists and designers venture into each other’s domain. This paper also argues that content designers of the future must not only be both artist and technologist, but artist and technologist that are aware of the context in which content is being developed. The presentation will be a showcase of our exploration at the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University for the last 4 years, in integrating design and computer skills – the synergy that we called DESIGN COMPUTING.
keywords design computing, creativity, content, design
series book
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2007/09/13 01:43

_id ga0106
id ga0106
authors Soddu, Celestino
year 2001
title Generative Natural Flux
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary I believe to interpret the thought of all the participants to this fourth conference on Generative Art affirming that generative art is a deep creative experience and, somehow, visionary too. This experience, in fact, anticipates the possible evolution of the fields proper of humancreativeness, rediscovering paths and approaches to ideation that have been proper of one of the most fertile moments of the human history and culture as Renaissance. In this paper I would like to deal with some aspects, and also some different approaches of generative creativeness. In particular, the importance to use specific reading keys, bothsubjective and objective, the possibility to reach concrete and feasible design results entering a complex figuration of possible incoming worlds. In other terms, to reach projects directly interfaceable with productive reality. Lastly, I will evaluate if and how it is possible andprofitable to use the random factor in evolutionary processes, investigating on the differences that the use of such factor involves in the creative and design experience and the quality of the obtainable results.But how can we define generative creativeness?
series other
email celestino.soddu@generativeart.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id avocaad_2001_05
id avocaad_2001_05
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Analysis and the descriptive approach
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The rise of consciousness concerning the quality of working and living conditions has been a permanent though frequently underplayed theme in architecture and building since the reconstruction period. It has led to an explosive growth of programmatic requirements on building behaviour and performance, thus also stimulating the development of design analysis. The first stage of development was characterized by the evolution of prescriptive systems. These reversed the structure of pre-existing proscriptive systems into sequences of known steps that should be taken in order to achieve adequate results. Prescriptive systems complemented rather than replaced proscriptive ones, thereby creating an uncertain mixture of orthodoxy and orthopraxy that failed to provide design guidance for improving design performance and quality.The second stage in the development of design analysis focuses on descriptive methods and techniques for analyzing and supporting evaluation. Technologies such as simulation and scientific visualization are employed so as to produce detailed, accurate and reliable projections of building behaviour and performance. These projections can be correlated into a comprehensive and coherent description of a building using representations of form as information carriers. In these representations feedback and interaction assume a visual character that fits both design attitudes and lay perception of the built environment, but on the basis of a quantitative background that justifies, verifies and refines design actions. Descriptive analysis is currently the most promising direction for confronting and resolving design complexity. It provides the designer with useful insights into the causes and effects of various design problems but frequently comes short of providing clear design guidance for two main reasons: (1) it adds substantial amounts of information to the already unmanageable loads the designer must handle, and (2) it may provide incoherent cues for the further development of a design. Consequently the descriptive approach to analysis is always in danger of been supplanted by abstract decision making.One way of providing the desired design guidance is to complement the connection of descriptive analyses to representations of form (and from there to synthesis) with two interface components. The first is a memory component, implemented as case-bases of precedent designs. These designs encapsulate integrated design information that can be matched to the design in hand in terms of form, function and performance. Comparison between precedents with a known performance and a new design facilitate identification of design aspects that need be improved, as well as of wider formal and functional consequences. The second component is an adaptive generative system capable of guiding exploration of these aspects, both in the precedents and the new design. The aim of this system is to provide feedback from analysis to synthesis. By exploring the scope of the analysis and the applicability of the conclusions to more designs, the designer generates a coherent and consistent collection of partial solutions that explore a relevant solution space. Development of the first component, the design case-bases, is no trivial task. Transformability in the representation of cases and flexible classification in a database are critical to the identification and treatment of a design aspect. Nevertheless, the state of the art in case-based reasoning and the extensive corpus of analysed designs provide the essential building blocks. The second component, the adaptive generative system, poses more questions. Existing generative techniques do not possess the necessary richness or multidimensionality. Moreover, it is imperative that the designer plays a more active role in the control of the process than merely tweaking local variables. At the same time, the system should prevent that redesigning degenerates into a blind trial-and-error enumeration of possibilities. Guided empirical design research arguably provides the means for the evolutionary development of the second component.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_13
id avocaad_2001_13
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Modeling irregular and complex forms
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Computational technologies provide arguably the first real opportunity architectural design has had for a comprehensive description of built form. With the advent of affordable computer-aided design systems (including drafting, modeling, visualization and simulation tools), architects believe they can be in full control of geometric aspects and, through these, of a wide spectrum of other aspects that are implicit or explicit in the geometric representation. This belief is based primarily on the efficiency and effectiveness of computer systems, ranging from the richness and adaptability of geometric primitives to the utility of geometric representations in simulations of climatic aspects. Such capabilities support attempts to design and construct more irregular or otherwise complex forms. These fall under two main categories: (1) parsing of irregularity into elementary components, and (2) correlation of the form of a building with complex geometric structures.The first category takes advantage of the compactness and flexibility of computational representations in order to analyse the form of a design into basic elements, usually elementary geometric primitives. These are either arranged into simple, unconstrained configurations or related to each other by relationships that define e.g. parametric relative positioning or Boolean combinations. In both cases the result is a reduction of local complexity and an increase of implicit or explicit relationships, including the possibility of hierarchical structures.The second category attempts to correlate built form with constraints that derive usually from construction but can also be morphological. The correlation determines the applicability of complex geometric structures (minimally ruled surfaces) to the description of a design. The product of this application is generally variable in quality, depending upon the designer's grounding in geometry and his ability to integrate constraints from different aspects in the definition of the design's geometry.Both categories represent a potential leap forward but are also equally hampered by the rigidity of the implementation mechanisms upon which they rely heavily. The paper proposes an approach to making these mechanisms subordinate to the cognitive and technical aspects of architectural thinking through fuzzy modeling. This way of modeling involves a combination of (a) canonical forms, (b) tolerances around canonical forms and positions, (c) minimal and maximal values, (d) fuzzy boundaries, and (e) plastic interaction between elements based on the dual principles of local intelligence and autonomy. Fuzzy models come therefore closer to the intuitive manners of sketching, while facilitating transition to precise and complex forms. The paper presents two applications of fuzzy modeling. The first concerns the generation of schematic building layouts, including adaptive control of programmatic requirements. The second is a system for designing stairs that can adapt themselves to changes in their immediate environment through a fuzzy definition of geometric and topological parametrization.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddss9829
id ddss9829
authors De Hoog, J., Hendriks, N.A. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 1998
title Evaluating Office Buildings with MOLCA(Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment)
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary MOLCA (Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment) is a project that aims to develop a tool that enables designers and builders to evaluate the environmental impact of their designs (of office buildings) from a environmental point of view. The model used is based on guidelinesgiven by ISO 14000, using the so-called Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method. The MOLCA project started in 1997 and will be finished in 2001 resulting in the aforementioned tool. MOLCA is a module within broader research conducted at the Eindhoven University of Technology aiming to reduce design risks to a minimum in the early design stages.Since the MOLCA project started two major case-studies have been carried out. One into the difference in environmental load caused by using concrete and steel roof systems respectively and the role of recycling. The second study focused on biases in LCA data and how to handle them. For the simulations a computer-model named SimaPro was used, using the world-wide accepted method developed by CML (Centre for the Environment, Leiden, the Netherlands). With this model different life-cycle scenarios were studied and evaluated. Based on those two case studies and a third one into an office area, a first model has been developed.Bottle-neck in this field of study is estimating average recycling and re-use percentages of the total flow of material waste in the building sector and collecting reliable process data. Another problem within LCA studies is estimating the reliability of the input data and modelling uncertainties. All these topics will be subject of further analysis.
keywords Life-Cycle Assessment, Office Buildings, Uncertainties in LCA
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id b07d
authors Gero, J.S., Chase, S. and Rosenman, M. (Eds.)
year 2001
title CAADRIA 2001 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6 / Sydney 19-21 April 2001, 506 p.
summary Computer-aided architectural design research and teaching has a long history going back to the 1960s. However, the last ten years has seen a dramatic upsurge in activity brought about by factors such as the increasing use of CAD systems in practice, the increase in computer literacy generally and perhaps, equally importantly, the development and widespread use of the World Wide Web. The CAADRIA conference series provides a forum for the presentation and exchange of ideas and experiences in CAAD, particularly focussed on Asian research and teaching. This, the proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research and Teaching in Asia, presents 57 (31 long and 26 short) papers. The 57 papers were selected from the 114 submissions following a blind review of extended abstracts. Each submission was reviewed by two referees and the decision to accept was based on a committee's assessment of all the submissions. The final papers were assessed to determine if the reviewers' recommendations had been complied with. The authors of the selected papers represent 17 countries, making this an international as well as an Asian conference.
series CAADRIA
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id d146
authors He, Jie
year 2001
title CAD Study in Visual Analysis of the Visual Sustainability for China Urban Natural Landscape Planning
source Chinese University of Hong Kong
summary In this thesis a GIS-based CAD system prototype of evaluating visual quality of urban natural landscape environment is presented. This prototype is an indispensable component of the integrative Visual Sustainability research, and offers a calculable and visualizable technique to urban visual natural landscape assessment. This scientific method provides precise data to estimate the visibility of natural landscape in urban construction actuality. Furthermore, it can also work out supporting information for maintaining and protecting valuable visual landscape resources in further planning. Introduction of this methodology intends to improve the natural landscape cooperation in China urban planning through visual protection. Combining with popular CAD software such as AutoCAD and Microstation, the research team uses ArcView GIS software and its 3D Analyst extension to accomplish a set of research procedure, which includes data modification, model making, viewshed and view sensibility analysis. In addition, this system can create simultaneous 3D scenes or hire other information media as reference tools for professional analysis, design consultation and intercommunication. The core technologies of this proposed system are viewshed calculation and overlay analysis. In viewshed analysis, human visual characteristics are simulated by a series of ergonomics parameters of viewpoints. Viewshed of each viewpoint can be calculated into vector data and mapped by polygons identifying which region is visible and which is not. Overlay function of the proposed system is used in visual sensibility analysis to achieve the division of higher visual sensible area which indicates the common visible area from different viewpoints. Additionally, viewshed maps and visual sensibility results can add more information to mark out the areas that can satisfy certain visual parameters such as appropriate visual angle or visual distance. These overlaying results can visualized the visible areas into hierarchical visual perception quality categories in order to define the visual landscape significance of particular planning regions. A case study was operated to evaluate this system. The case is in Zhongshan city, Guangdong Province of China. Jinzishan hill region is the study site that picked by collaborating discussion of research team and the local government. It is located on the edge of urban built-up area. Jinzishan massif is the prominent landscape element of the surrounding environment. There are three topics in Jinzishan visual perception in this paper. The first topic is the visual quality evaluation of the intersections of its surrounding road system. The second is the integrated visual perception of two main roads called Qiwandao and Bo’ailu. Finally is the analysis of the hill skyline visual quality in surrounding area. The analysis results in GIS vector data can be converted into popular data format and combined with other spatial information for practical application. And comments for future urban planning are collected and analyzed by professional responses to the computer-generated information investigation.
keywords Natural Landscaping; Computer-Aided Design; Landscape Architecture; City Planning; Geographic Information Systems
series thesis:MSc
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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