CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 681 to 700 of 713

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 9ab2
authors Yun, Yong Gib
year 2001
title Structural Composite Members in Architecture Fabricated by CAD/CAE/CAM Technology
source Harvard University
summary The doctoral research in this dissertation is aimed at exploring new materials and innovative methods for fabricating complex-shaped buildings, which have surfaced as a prevailing trend in architecture today. Over the past few years, the field of architecture has witnessed revolutionary changes in design. The recent completion of Frank O. Gehry's new Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, brought unprecedented attention to complex-shaped, non-conventional designs and its influence on the global architectural trend has been immense. In following these latest trends, the author was drawn to the issues concerning construction materials and methods that are being currently adopted in realizing these complicated designs. It is perhaps inevitable that the traditional steel construction methods, suitable for use in the conventional linear shapes, face tremendous challenges and limitations in building such complex-shaped designs. In the author's opinion, the next step to go from here is to seek joint efforts between the architectural field and the engineering field to search for a new methodology which will best serve the contemporary design style. This research first focused on examining the problems that traditional methods pose for the new complex-shaped buildings. Paying attention to Gehry's recent projects, the author was able to identify major difficulties in association with representing and constructing these complicated shapes, mainly in terms of the relationship between the primary structure and the envelope surface. The second part of the research moved on to proposing a new alternative to the traditional methods, by utilizing polymer composite materials (PCM) as construction material and employing advanced Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer Aided Engineering (CAE)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) technologies. More specifically, the author has attempted to present effective theories in support of the two following ideas: (1) circular tubes made of PCM are the most promising alternative to regular steel members, especially steel tubes, to follow the envelope surface of the complex shaped building. (2) state-of-the-art CAD/CAE/CAM technologies are the most essential tools to achieve the geometrical and functional quality of the proposed new material. In the second phase, the primary focus of the quantitative approach was on fabricating an experimental model (1:1 scale prototype) called “ a unit of boundary structures”, the basic unit of structure system that wraps a complex-shaped building's entire territory . (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 7add
authors Zahnan, Lena
year 2001
title Computer-aided Design-based Project Management Model
source Concordia University (Canada)
summary The construction industry is one that is fragmented by nature. In current practice, information is exchanged between the designers and contractors in the form of paper documents such as drawings, bills of material and specifications. Information is lost and errors are made during the forward and backward exchange of the design-construction information and constructability knowledge between the design professionals, cost estimators and contractors. Despite the technological developments in IT, the industry has been slow in adopting change in its processes. Computer Integrated Construction (CIC) strives to bridge the gaps of information by integrating the tools and processes within the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industries. This thesis proposes an integrated methodology across the design and construction functions supported by available CAD technologies. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a prototype software application named “CAD-B PM” that allows the user to integrate the CAD design with a central database that is a repository of project information. Productivity and cost estimates are generated within the database and are further integrated to a scheduling application for project planning and control. The prototype system provides a unique solution where the project information is openly shared between the applications in a dynamic environment through the use of Open Database Connectivity (ODBC).
keywords Industrial Engineering
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id adc6
authors Zhang, H., Tan, C.M. and Shi, J.J.
year 2001
title Activity-object oriented simulation on a visual environment
source CIDAC, Volume 3 Issue 2 May 2001
summary Although computer simulation has been applied to analyse and plan construction processes for decades, the practitioners in construction have still experienced difficulties in modelling. To model a construction process requires multiple types of modelling elements, and to verify the models requires comprehensive knowledge and experience. This paper discusses an activity object-oriented analysis method that incorporates the object-oriented approach with the graphical activity-based modelling methods that requires only one type of modelling element, and the activity object-oriented simulation strategy that effectively advances the activity-based simulation. The visual modelling capabilities and the easy-to-use animation function are also introduced, which respectively help model graphically complicated construction processes with one single element (activities) without the use of simulation programming and assist users, especially the non-specialists of the construction industry, in verifying the simulation models.
keywords Simulation for Construction; Simulation Strategy; Object-Oriented; Visual Modelling, Animation; Verification
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 18:41

_id cc97
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to iAD - A Web-based Steel Consulting of Steel Construction in Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 346-349
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve to iAD (Internet Aided Design) (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. At the same time, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the proposal of conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture (Zhou2002), we try to apply these theories and concepts into a specified area, steel construction consulting for architects. In previous research, first of all, we defined the contents and scope of steel construction consulting and their potential application. Second, we proposed a solid working model covering structure organization, audience, services provided and technology. In this research, a web-based application will be out by prototyped by conducting a conceptual design consulting in steel structure in order to show the whole process of how this Internet-based consulting model works.
series eCAADe
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 946b
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to IAD: A Working Model of the Internet-based Engineering Consulting in Architecture
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 073-80
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve into iAD (Internet Aided Design) in the near future (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. During the period of Internet development, the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry has not been changed. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the study of information technology both available today and in the near future, we propose a general abstracted model of an Internet-based consulting system by integrating a variety of disciplines and functions of design and construction processes. This model will cover a range of design phases, such as, information gathering, automatic remote consultation, specific problem solving, and collaboration. Finally, in future follow up research, we will apply the proposed model to steel construction in architectural design, and develop a prototype simulation by selecting one type of structural system.
series CAADRIA
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id caadria2003_a7-3
id caadria2003_a7-3
authors Zhou, Q.
year 2003
title From CAD to iAD - A Prototype Simulation of the Internet-based Steel Construction Consulting for Architects
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 919-936
summary Information technology has become so powerful and interactive that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve into iAD (Internet Aided Design). For Internet applications in the AEC (Architecture, Engineering and Construction) industry, most of the efforts and applications have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the area of design and engineering consulting, limited progress has been made. Even with some of this success, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research surveys (Zhou & Krawczyk 2001) of the development of Internet applications in the AEC industry and the proposal of a conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture, this research will apply these theories and concepts into a specified area of steel construction consulting for architects. The first phase of this research will define the content and scope of steel construction consulting and the potential Internet application. Second, a proposed solid working model is developed covering organizational structure, user network, services provided and technology. In the third phase (as this paper presented), a prototype simulation is used to apply the concepts and methodology in a preliminary design application to demonstrate how this Internet-based consulting model would work.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id d52b
authors Zimring, C., Khan, S., Craig, D., Haq, S. and Guzdial, M.
year 2001
title CoOL Studio: using simple tools to expand the discursive space of the design studio
source Automation in Construction 10 (6) (2001) pp. 675-685
summary Collaborative On-line Studio for Architecture (CoOL Studio) was aimed at aiding the architecture studio by: (1) supporting input by distant critics; (2) providing access to on-line cases and reference materials; (3) encouraging students to be clear and articulate about their projects; (4) supporting collaboration among students. The project employed a Collaborative Website (CoWeb), which allowed easy creation and modification of webpages without any security measures. Students posted their designs at several points during the term and six distant expert consultants provided critiques. This project demonstrates that a relatively simple representation tool, one that allowed students and critics to interact on editable webpages, can usefully open up the design space of the architecture studio. However, care is needed in understanding how computer tools relate to the tasks and rituals of interaction that go on in everyday architecture studio pedagogy.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id dd19
authors Ziuriene, Ryte
year 2001
title Some Problems of Intellectual Data Management in CAAD
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 161-164
summary An example of the list of school spaces made according to the strictly recommended standards is given in the article. A concept of computer-aided evaluation of various design parameters (i.e. lighting of the spaces, their position and geographical orientation, etc.) based on different regulating statements is presented.
keywords CAAD, Standards, Space Design, Intellectual Data Management
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 539d
authors Chateau, H.B., Vergara, R.L., Jorquera, J.H. and Viveros, C.M.
year 2001
title EL ESPACIO INTER-MEDIO (The Inter-Media Space)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 153-155
summary This paper explores the juxtaposition between architectonic space and virtual environments. It establishes the hypothesis that the intersection of virtual environments with our common life causes a break-up of time and space. Virtual environments are the last and most integral part of the technological revolution, becoming a parallel world, an unlimited extension of our limited world. The spatial and temporal juxtaposition of these two realities creates a new reality of being “inbetween”, it reveals the “inter-media”. This “inter-media” reality is the problem for architecture of our time, and it still lacks of responses.
series SIGRADI
email hbarria@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 0dbf
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen and Shih, Shen-Guan
year 2001
title Design through Information Filtering. A search driven approach for developing a layperson's CAAD environment
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 103-110
summary We propose a CAAD environment for non-designers. It is a new way to enable effective user participation during the design process. This CAAD environment contains an encapsulation of design knowledge and utilises information filtering as an interface to the design knowledge. Two prototypes are implemented as testbeds. So far, our experience has suggested that the approach has a promising future.
keywords Information Filtering, Design Knowledge Encapsulation, CAAD For Nondesigners
series CAAD Futures
email schien@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ga0112
id ga0112
authors Dehlinger, H. E.
year 2001
title Hitchhiking through a Maze of Transformations and Filters with a Bag of Data
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The disappearance of plotters as peripheral devices makes it necessary to explore alternative output devices like printers for the generation of art work, based on lines and HPGL-code. The findings are frustrating and the conclusion drawn is somewhat devastating: abandon all hope,write new programs to fully take advantage of the printing age. Plot as long as the old hard- and software is still working.
series other
email dehling@uni-kassel.de
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id b31a
authors Dodge, M. and Kitchin, R.
year 2001
title Mapping Cyberspace
source Routledge, London and New York
summary A ground-breaking book, Mapping Cyberspace provides an understanding of what cyberspace looks like and the social interactions that take place there. Written by and inter-disciplinary team of scholars this study explores the impacts of cyberspace on cultural, political and economic relations. Information on a companion website is also included.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id abf7
authors Grabowski, Ralph
year 2001
title CAD Manager's Guidebook
source Delmar Learning
summary There's one thing CAD managers agree upon: running a CAD department is a difficult job. This new edition of CAD Manager's Guidebook helps readers anticipate problems and devise solutions within their daily jobs. Complete with an all-new companion CD-ROM, this guidebook's convenient, 3-part organization explains the role of the CAD manager; details how to create and institute your own CAD standards, policies, and procedures; and offers tips and suggestions for maximizing CAD efficiency.
series other
last changed 2003/02/26 17:58

_id f8b3
authors Gross, M.D., Do, E.Y.-L. and Johnson, B.R.
year 2001
title The Design Amanuensis. An Instrument for Multimodal Design Capture and Playback
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 1-13
summary The Design Amanuensis supports design protocol analysis by capturing designers’ spoken and drawing actions and converting speech to text to construct a machine-readable multimedia document that can be replayed and searched for words spoken during the design session or for graphical configurations.
keywords Protocol Analysis, Recording, Design Process Research
series CAAD Futures
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 6fdc
authors Gross, Mark D.
year 2001
title FormWriter. A Little Programming Language for Generating Three-Dimensional Form Algorithmically
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 577-588
summary FormWriter is a simple and powerful programming language for generating three-dimensional geometry, intended for architectural designers with little programming experience to be able to generate three dimensional forms algorithmically without writing complex code. FormWriter’s main features include a unified coding and graphics environment providing immediate feedback and a “flying turtle” - a means of generating three dimensional data through differential geometry.
keywords Programming Language, Geometry, Form Generation
series CAAD Futures
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 8652
authors Han, Seung-Hoon and Turner, James A.
year 2001
title An Architectural Approach to Virtual Reality Support of Multi-user Environments
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 439-452
summary The Internet and its multimedia component, the World Wide Web (WWW), are the essential technological foundations, and the tools to construct cyberspace on these foundations are beginning to be created. Two of those tools are the network programming language, Java, and the 3D graphics standard for the Internet, the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) which has the ability to support programmable behavior. This paper documents at experiment with the use of networks with Java-VRML connectivity, applying it to a collaborative system which will make it possible for multiple users to navigate and dynamically update an architectural VR environment.
keywords Collaborative Design, Distributed Virtual Environments, Multi-User, Internet
series CAAD Futures
email hshoon@umich.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id maver_092
id maver_092
authors Jarvis, G., Ennis, G., Maver, T. and Lindsay, M.
year 2001
title Glasgow 2000 - Interactive history of the development of Glasgow and the surrounding area covering the last 2000 years
source CD-ROM
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id a184
authors Johnson, Peter and Johnson, Hilary
year 2001
title Interaction, Collaboration and Communication: A Human-Computer Interaction Perspective
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 43-58 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This paper considers the problem of supporting collaborative information brokering. The aim is to develop information brokering environments based upon models of collaboration and supported by user interface designs through which user-user, user-agent and user-information interactions are effortless and effective.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 880b
authors Kruijff, Ernst and Donath, Dirk
year 2001
title Supporting Shared Architectural Understanding
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 143-152 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This article describes how architects can use the strengths of an immersive or semi-immersive virtual environment to create a shared understanding about a design problem. Virtual environments can allow the strong shared understanding under particular circumstances within a collaborative design set-up. The authors will describe which particular factors of shared understanding could be supported within a virtual environment, and which kind of requirements this poses on the virtual environment itself, and the technology which generates the environment. Specifically focused is at how one can create a common understanding of the spatial construction and meaning of a preliminary design idea. Therefore, a major focus is at the transfer of spatial knowledge about architectural space.
series other
email caad@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

For more results click below:

show page 0... show page 29show page 30show page 31show page 32show page 33this is page 34show page 35HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_787844 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002