CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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References

Hits 81 to 100 of 713

_id 0277
authors Brusilovsky, P.
year 2001
title Adaptive hypermedia
source User modelling and User-Adapted Interaction, volume 11, pp. 87-110, Kluwer
summary Hypertext/hypermedia systems and user-model-based adaptive systems in the areas of learning and information retrieval have for a long time been considered as two mutually exclusive approaches to information access. Adaptive systems tailor information to the user and may guide the user in the information space to present the most relevant material, taking into account a model of the user's goals, interests and preferences. Hypermedia systems, on the other hand, are `user neutral': they provide the user with the tools and the freedom to explore an information space by browsing through a complex network of information nodes. Adaptive hypertext and hypermedia systems attempt to bridge the gap between these two approaches. Adaptation of hypermedia systems to each individual user is increasingly needed. With the growing size, complexity and heterogeneity of current hypermedia systems, such as the World Wide Web, it becomes virtually impossible to impose guidelines on authors concerning the overall organization of hypermedia information. The networks therefore become so complex and unstructured that the existing navigational tools are no longer powerful enough to provide orientation on where to search for the needed information. It is also not possible to identify appropriate pre-defined paths or subnets for users with certain goals and knowledge backgrounds since the user community of hypermedia systems is usually quite inhomogeneous. This is particularly true for Web-based applications which are expected to be used by a much greater variety of users than any earlier standalone application. A possible remedy for the negative effects of the traditional `one-size-fits-all' approach in the development of hypermedia systems is to equip them with the ability to adapt to the needs of their individual users. A possible way of achieving adaptivity is by modeling the users and tailoring the system's interactions to their goals, tasks and interests. In this sense, the notion of adaptive hypertext/hypermedia comes naturally to denote a hypertext or hypermedia system which reflects some features of the user and/or characteristics of his system usage in a user model, and utilizes this model in order to adapt various behavioral aspects of the system to the user. This book is the first comprehensive publication on adaptive hypertext and hypermedia. It is oriented towards researchers and practitioners in the fields of hypertext and hypermedia, information systems, andpersonalized systems. It is also an important resource for the numerous developers of Web-based applications. The design decisions, adaptation methods, and experience presented in this book are a unique source of ideas and techniques for developing more usable and more intelligent Web-based systems suitable for a great variety of users. The practitioners will find it important that many of the adaptation techniques presented in this book have proved to be efficient and are ready to be used in various applications.
series other
email peterb@mail.sis.pitt.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id a4a1
authors Bukowski, Richard W. 
year 2001
title Interactive Walkthrough Environments for Simulation
source University of California at Berkeley
summary This thesis describes a second-generation walkthrough framework that provides extensive facilities for integrating many types of third-party simulation codes into a large-scale virtual environment model, and puts it in perspective with first-generation systems built during the last two decades. The framework provides an advanced model database that supports multiple simultaneous users with full consistency semantics, system independent storage and retrieval, and efficient prefetching and object reconstruction techniques to support second and third-generation walkthrough systems. Furthermore, our framework integrates support for scalable, distributed, interactive models with plug-in physical simulation to provide a large and rich environment suitable for architectural evaluation and training applications. A number of third-party simulations have been integrated into the framework, including dynamic physical interactions, fire simulation, multiple distributed users, radiosity, and online tapestry generation. All of these simulators interact with each other and with the user via a data distribution network that provides efficient, optimized use of bandwidth to transport simulation results to clients as they need them for visualization. These diverse simulators provide proof of concept for the generality of the framework, and show how quickly third-party simulations can be integrated into our system. The result is a highly interactive distributed architectural model with applications in research, training, and real-time data visualization. Finally, an outlook is given to a possible third generation of virtual environment architectures that are capable of integrating different heterogeneous walkthrough models.
series thesis:PhD
email bukowski@cs.berkeley.edu
more http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~bukowski/resume.html
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 0f49
authors Burry, M., Coulson, J., Preston, J. and Rutherford, E.
year 2001
title Computer-aided design decision support: interfacing knowledge and information
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 203-215
summary Computer-aided design decision support has proved to be an elusive and intangible project for many researchers as they seek to encapsulate information and knowledge-based systems as useful multifunctional data structures. Definitions of `knowledge', `information', `facts', and `data' become semantic footballs in the struggle to identify what designers actually do, and what level of support would suit them best, and how that support might be offered. The Construction Primer is a database-drivable interactive multimedia environment that provides readily updated access to many levels of information aimed to suit students and practitioners alike. This is hardly a novelty in itself. The innovative interface and metadata structures, however, combine with the willingness of national building control legislators, standards authorities, materials producers, building research organisations, and specification services to make the Construction Primer a versatile design decision support vehicle. It is both compatible with most working methodologies while remaining reasonably future-proof. This paper describes the structure of the project and highlights the importance of sound planning and strict adhesion to library-standard metadata protocols as a means to avoid the support becoming too specific or too paradigmatic.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 602f
authors Büscher, Monika
year 2001
title Landscapes of Practice: Bricolage as a Method for Situated Design
source Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) 10(1): 1-28; Jan 2001
summary This paper proposes a ‘bricolage’ approach to designing systems for cooperative work.This involves users, participatory designers and ethnographers in a continuing cycle of design andrevised work practice, often in settings where resources are limited and short-termresults are required.If exploits the flood to market of hardware, software and services. The approach is illustrated withresults from a project with a practice of landscape architects. Their work is analysed in terms ofcommunities of practice and actor networks. These perspectives help to identify the ‘socilities’ ofpeople and technologies and of the relationships between them. They help to distinguish differentforms of cooperation with differing support needs, opportunities and vulnerabilities. They inform thedesign of technical support, the assessment of outcomes, and the design of further solutions, in acycle of ‘situated experimentation’.
keywords Actor-Networks; Bricolage; Communities of Practice; CSCW; Ethnography; Participatory Design
series other
email m.buscher@lancaster.ac.uk
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 88d3
id 88d3
authors Calderon, C., Cavazza., M
year 2001
title REACTIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS IN BUILDING DESIGN
source Proceedings: SCI 2001, The Fifth Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Orlando, Florida, USA, July 22 - 25, 2001. http://www.iiis.org/sci/
summary This paper presents the first prototype of a reconfigurable Virtual Environment (VE). The objective of the system is to link 3D Intelligent Virtual Environments to interactive planning systems. This type of system makes possible interactive solutions where the user refines a possible configuration and enables the system to generate a complete new solution enforcing all the design constraints, previously programmed. In this first prototype we link our constraint solver with the visualization engine so that the solution produced by the constraint solver is displayed in a VE.
keywords Intelligent, Reactive, Virtual Environment, Spatial configuration tasks
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:12

_id 0e58
authors Campbell, D.A. and Wells, M.
year 1994
title A Critique of Virtual Reality in the Architectural Design Process, R-94-3
source Human Interface Technology Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, http://www.hitl.washington.edu/publications/r-94-3/: 23 May 2001
summary An addition to a building was designed using virtual reality (VR). The project was part of a design studio for graduate students of architecture. During the design process a detailed journal of activities was kept. In addition, the design implemented with VR was compared to designs implemented with more traditional methods. Both immersive and non-immersive VR simulations were attempted. Part of the rationale for exploring the use of VR in this manner was to develop insight into how VR techniques can be incorporated into the architectural design process, and to provide guidance for the implementers of future VR systems. This paper describes the role of VR in schematic design, through design development to presentation and evaluation. In addition, there are some comments on the effects of VR on detailed design. VR proved to be advantageous in several phases of the design. However, several shortcomings in both hardware and software became apparent. These are described, and a number of recommendations are provided.
series other
email dcampbell@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

_id 3e51
authors Cerulli, C., Peng, C. and Lawson, B.
year 2001
title Capturing Histories of Design Processes for Collaborative Building Design Development. Field Trial of the ADS Prototype
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 427-437
summary The ADS Project - Advanced Design Support for the Construction Design Process - builds on the technological results of the previous COMMIT Project to exploit and demonstrate the benefits of a CAD based Design Decision Support System. COMMIT provides a system for storing knowledge about knowledge within the design process. It records design decisions, the actors who take them and the roles they play when doing so. ADS links COMMIT to an existing object-oriented CAD system, MicroStation/J from Bentley Systems. The project focuses on tackling the problem of managing design information without intruding too much on the design process itself. It provides the possibility to effectively link design decisions back to requirements, to gather rationale information for later stages of the building lifecycle, and to gather knowledge of rationale for later projects. The system enables members of the project team, including clients and constructors, to browse and search the recorded project history of decision making both during and after design development. ADS aims to facilitate change towards a more collaborative process in construction design, to improve the effectiveness of decision-making throughout the construction project and to provide clients with the facility to relate design outcomes to design briefs across the whole building life cycle. In this paper we will describe the field trials of the ADS prototype carried out over a three-month period at the Building Design Partnership (BDP) Manchester office. The objective of these trials is to assess the extent, to which the approach underlying ADS enhances the design process, and to gather and document the views and experiences of practitioners. The ADS prototype was previously tested with historical data of real project (Peng, Cerulli et al. 2000). To gather more valuable knowledge about how a Decision Support System like ADS can be used in practice, the testing and evaluation will be extended to a real project, while it is still ongoing. The live case study will look at some phases of the design of a mixed residential and retail development in Leeds, UK, recording project information while it is created. The users’ feedback on the system usability will inform the continuous redevelopment process that will run in parallel to the live case study. The ADS and COMMIT Projects were both funded by EPSRC.
keywords Design Rationale, Design Support Systems, Usability Evaluation
series CAAD Futures
email c.cerulli@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 0761
authors Cheng, Min-Yuan and Chang, Guey-Lin
year 2001
title Automating utility route design and planning through GIS
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 507-516
summary In trench construction, one of the tasks for engineers is to select a suitable route to minimize construction cost and obstructions. This paper discusses the development of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based system to automate the process of routing and design of an underground power supply system. In the system, surface and underground utilities are represented in several coverages. Using network analysis, the system determines the optimal paths for routing the utilities. Through database queries and spatial operations, the construction conflict points between the basic coverages and the selected route are not only identified, but a reallocation schedule is also determined.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4e8c
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen and Flemming, Ulrich
year 2001
title Design space navigation in generative design systems
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 1-22
summary Generative design systems make it easier for designers to generate and explore design alternatives, but the amount of information generated during a design session can become very large. Intelligent navigation aids are needed if designers wish to access the information they generate with ease. We present a comprehensive approach to support information navigation in requirement-driven generative design systems, which gain their power form explicit representations of design requirements, which in turn add to the information generated by the system. Our approach takes into account studies dealing with human spatial cognition, wayfinding in physical environments, and information navigation in electronic media. We structure the information to be accessed in terms of a five-dimensional design space model that applies across generative design systems of the type considered here. The model structure supports basic generic navigation operations along its five dimensions. We validated the model in the context of the SEED-Layout system and used it to extend the built-in navigation tools of the system through novel ones, which we subjected to a limited usability study. The study suggests that these tools have promise and warrant further investigation.
series journal paper
email ujf@cmu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 8a8c
authors Choi, J.W., Kwon, D.-Y. and Lee, H.-S.
year 2001
title DesignBUF: Exploring and Extending 2D Boolean Set Operations with Multiple Modes in the Early Design Phase
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 589-602
summary Boolean set operations have been a powerful design function set for any CAD systems including 2D and 3D domains. Their capacity to provide even more powerful design tools have not, however, been fully explored in the 2D system. The purpose of this study is to further explore 2D Boolean set operations with multiple modes, which include a pick mode, a wait mode, a drag-and-drop mode, and a draw-and-action mode. We develop a prototype design tool, called DesignBUF. It introduces a new concept of “design object buffer,” an intermediate design zone in which a designer freely sketches his/her design with design objects in a brainstorming fashion since valuable design ideas are ephemeral? and the designer needs to generate design schemes rapidly before the ideas disappear or are forgotten. After finishing such fast brainstorming processes, especially in the early design phase, the designer gets a stable and refined form of a floor plan, which in turn becomes a well structured form to maintain building and design information systematically. Therefore, the designer keeps switching back and forth between the “design object buffer” and structured floor plans. We believe that this dual working memory will not only increase system flexibility, but also reduce computation with unnecessarily complex design objects. This study also develops a robust algorithm to transform the intermediate design objects into a well-structured floor plan. In fact, the algorithm is also used for the extended Boolean set operations described above. A structured floor plan can also be transformed into non-structured forms. Research issues for future development are also identified at the end of the paper.
keywords Design Buffer, Extended Boolean Set Operations, Structured Floor Plan.
series CAAD Futures
email jchoi@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 0b74
authors Chow, B., Lam, S. and Tsou, J.
year 2001
title The impact of computer-based design tools for daylighting simulation and prediction for a built environment
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 169-179
summary This paper investigates the application of computer daylighting simulation to provide qualitative assessment and comparison for designers to improve the built environment especially for non-technical architecture students. A comprehensive study was carried out to evaluate different daylighting design tools and to identify the limitation of current systems in the academic field. The paper will focus mainly on the dynamic information exchange between scientific visualization and the design decision-making process. Both architectural design studio environment and practical design problems in the real world setting were experimented and evaluated. Two case studies are presented: a proposed gallery space for a museum, and a detail architectural design of a community church. Architectural design alterations are proposed, simulated and discussed. The recursive feedback of the designers are studied and documented. Through a combination of qualitative assessment and comparison, designers can evaluate and compare different design options in the computing environment before implementing in the real world situation.
series CAADRIA
email kaming@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id ga0123
id ga0123
authors Coates P., Appels, T. Simon, C. and Derix, C.
year 2001
title Current work at CECA
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The centre for environment computing and architecture continues to experiment with new ways to form, and this paper presents three recent projects from the MSc programme. The three projects all share underlying assumptions about the use of generative algorithms to constructform, using fractal decomposition, lindenmayer systems and the marching cubes algorithm respectively to construct three dimensional "architectural" objects. The data needed to drive the morphology however ranges from formal proportional systems and Genetic L systems programming through swarming systems to perceptive self organising neural nets. In all cases, the projects pose the question what is architectural form. While after Stanford Anderson (Anderson 66) we know it is simplistic to say that it is an automatic outcome of a proper definition of the brief, it is also difficult to accept that the form of a building is an entirely abstract geometrical object existing without recourse to social or contextual justification. In anattempt to resolve these issues we have turned to the study of systems and general system theory as a way of understanding the mechanics of emergence and morphogenesis generally, and the
series other
email P.S.Coates@uel.ac.uk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id f97e
authors Commission of the European Communities
year 2001
title The e-learning action plan: designing tomorrow’s education
source Communication from the Commission to the Council and the EuropeanParliament, COM(2001) 172 final, 28 March 2001
summary The "eLearning: Designing tomorrow's education" initiative1 was adopted by the European Commission on 24 May 2000. Following up the conclusions of the Lisbon European Council, it set out the principles, objectives and lines of action of eLearning, defined as the use of new multimedia technologies and the Internet to improve the quality of learning by facilitating access to resources and services as well as remote exchanges and collaboration. The eLearning initiative was welcomed by the Ministers of Education and by the Feira European Council in June 2000. The eLearning initiative is part of the comprehensive eEurope Action Plan2, the aim of which is to allow Europe to exploit its strengths and overcome the barriers holding back the uptake of digital technologies. It also falls in with the Report on the concrete future objectives of education systems3 by adopting information and communication technology development as one of its objectives. The effectiveness of education systems depends entirely on the effectiveness of the approaches to teaching and learning. In order to be effective, the introduction of information and communication technologies will have to be accompanied by a far-reaching reorganisation of learning structures. The eLearning initiative is also of relevance for the candidate countries given the interest they have shown for the eEurope action plan.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id f01c
authors Cuberos Mejía, R., Caldera de Ugarte, N., Indriago, J.A., Camacaro, L., Molina, N. and Cestary, J.
year 2001
title PLANIFICACIÓN TURÍSTICA Y TELEINFORMACIÓN (Planning in the Tourist Industry and Tele-information)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 311-314
summary This paper explains an object-based geographic information system (GIS) developed for tourism planning on Maracaibo, Venezuela. In order to establish a better way to manipulate georeferenced data, this system is migrating its structure from a fouryears- old relational database, incorporating distributed storage on a comprehensive catalog. A combination of operating system, SQL server and Map server, is being implemented to substitute a static web site for a real-time application to easily manipulate maps through a web browser. This work not only creates answers to implementing urban information systems, also it will facilitate their incorporation on collaborative geographical networks in the entire world.
series SIGRADI
email rcuberos@luz.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 158e
authors De Vries, B., Van Leeuwen, J. and Achten, H. (Eds.)
year 2001
title Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2001
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, 814 p.
summary CAAD Futures is a bi-annual conference that aims to promote the advancement of computer-aided architectural design in the service of those concerned with the quality of the built environment. The conferences are organized under the auspices of the CAAD Futures Foundation, which has its secretariat at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands.

This volume provides state-of-the-art articles in the following areas: capturing design, information modelling, CBR techniques, Virtual Reality, CAAD education, (hyper) media, design evaluation, design systems development, collaboration, generation, design representation, knowledge management, form programming, simulation, architectural analysis, and urban design.

series CAAD Futures
email B.d.Vries@tue.nl
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/2001
last changed 2003/04/02 08:52

_id diss_duarte
id diss_duarte
authors Duarte, J. P.
year 2001
title Customizing mass housing: a discursive grammar for Siza’s Malagueira houses
source PhD dissertation, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass
summary This thesis proposes a process of providing mass-customized housing based on computer-aided design and production systems. It focuses on the design part, which mainly consists of an interactive system for the generation of design solutions based on a mathematical model called discursive grammar. A discursive grammar includes a shape grammar, a description grammar, and a set of heuristics. The shape grammar provides the rules of formal composition, whereas the description grammar describes the design from other relevant viewpoints. The set of heuristics is used to guide the generation of designs by comparing the description of the evolving design with the description of the desired house. The generation of a design proceeds first by producing a design brief from the user-prompted requirements and then by finding a solution that satisfies this brief. Search is largely deterministic, which decreases the amount of time required to find a solution, thereby making it reasonable to develop Web-based implementations. The proposed model enables an enduring designer's dream, that of the mass customization of housing. The model is illustrated with a case study that includes a shape grammar developed for the houses designed by the architect Alvaro Siza at Malagueira, a description grammar based on the Portuguese housing regulations, and a set of heuristics inferred after a set of experiments. In these experiments, designers were asked to generate houses based on the Malagueira grammar for specific clients. It is argued that this discursive grammar provides a rigorous method for understanding and teaching Siza's design process and that similar grammars could be developed for other styles. A Web page for explaining the grammar and generating new designs on-line was developed as a prototype.
series thesis:PhD
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id 7d11
authors Duda, R.O., Peter, E.H. and Stork, D.G.
year 2001
title Pattern Classification
source Wiley Interscience, New York
summary Pattern recognition systems play a role in applications as diverse as speech recognition, optical character recognition, image processing, and signal analysis. This reference provides information needed to choose the most appropriate of the many available techniques for a given class of problems. The latest edition includes explanations of classical and new methods, including neural networks, stochastic methods, genetic algorithms, and theory of learning. It provides algorithms to explain specific pattern-recognition and learning techniques as well as appendices covering the necessary mathematical background.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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