CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 695

_id bb5f
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Mohd Fazidin, J.
year 2001
title Creating a City Administration System (CAS) using Virtual Reality in an Immersive Collaborative Environment (ICE)
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 449-453
summary Current problems in administration of a city are found to be decentralized and noninteractive for an effective city management. This usually will result in inconsistencies of decision-making, inefficient services and slow response to a particular action. City administration often spends more money, time and human resource because of these problems. This research demonstrates our research and development of creating a City Administration System (CAS) to solve the problems stated above. The task of the system is to use information, multimedia and graphical technologies to form a database in which the city administrators can monitor, understand and manage an entire city from a central location. The key technology behind the success of the overall system uses virtual reality and immersive collaborative environment (ICE). This system employs emerging computer based real-time interactive technologies that are expected to ensure effective decisionmaking process, improved communication, and collaboration, error reduction, (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2000) between multi disciplinary users and approaches. This multi perspective approach allows planners, engineers, urban designers, architects, local authorities, environmentalists and general public to search, understand, process and anticipate the impact of a particular situation in the new city. It is hoped that the CAS will benefit city administrators to give them a tool that gives them the ability to understand, plan, and manage the business of running the city.
keywords City Administration System (CAS), Virtual Reality, Immersive Collaborative Environment (ICE), Database
series eCAADe
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my, fazidin@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2006_182
id 2006_182
authors Bridges, Alan
year 2006
title A Critical Review of Problem Based Learning in Architectural Education
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 182-189
summary There is limited research and discussion on pedagogical approaches in architectural education, simply because it is considered as one of the “unimportant” areas that researchers “do not bother studying” (Teymur, 2001). Problem Based Learning has been known to provide competent graduates in other professional disciplines, and, consequently, there have been attempts to utilise the same pedagogical approach in architectural education where PBL is seen as a potential solution to the problems encountered in architectural education. This paper critically reviews PBL implementations at TU Delft Netherlands and Newcastle University, N.S.W. Australia and draws conclusions with particular respect to the teaching of architectural computing
keywords PBL; architecture; computing
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ga0120
id ga0120
authors Devetakovic, M.
year 2001
title Communicating Generic Process – Some Issues of Representation Related to Architectural Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary It is commonly the intent of an architect to represent the development of an idea from the early sketches to the final artefact, as well as to explain particular functions of its parts or complex construction processes. But the opening of the secret of generic process to the public - presenting a range of possibilities instead of one final solution and even involving external participants in the creation process - is brand new. The contemporary communication of architectural ideas presumes both – visual/formal representation and interaction. As a result of research in the field of communication in architecture, this paper is focused ongeneric process phenomena, in particular on issues of its representation. It is based on analysis of a wide range of examples that have appeared in recent years, either in electronic, printed or physical form. It offers a systematization of approaches to representation and discusses thepotential and limitations of each type – series of physical objects, sequences of graphics (single, linear, planar and spatial) and animation, as well as their combinations (sequences of animations). A particular emphasis is placed on increasing the functionality of sequence-basedrepresentation (interacting, navigating…) and its interdependence with animation as a special case. Finally, the author proposes a rethinking of the role of both the architect, who defines a system of possibilities rather than a single solution, and the information recipient, who becomes not merely a passive spectator, but a creative participant in the design process.
series other
email mdevetakovic@unitec.ac.nz
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 9e0d
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Martens, Bob
year 2002
title Round Table Session on “3D-City-Modeling”
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 610-613
summary According to eCAADe’s mission, the exchange and collaboration within the area of computer aided architectural design education and research, while respecting the pedagogical and administrative approaches in the different schools and countries, can be regarded as a core activity. On the occasion of eCAADe 2001 in Helsinki a working session on the topic “3D-City-Modeling” was held, in which a varietybundle of papers was presented. The eCAADe 2002 round table session on “3D-City-Modeling” is opening up for an intensive discussion on a number of goals which were elaborated by a working group in Helsinki.
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tugraz.at
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id bbfa
authors Donath, D., Beetz, J., Grether, K., Petzold, F. and Seichter, H.
year 2001
title Augmented Reality Techniques for Design and Revitalisation in Existing Built Environments
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 322-329
summary Building activity in Germany is moving increasingly toward combined newbuild and renovation projects. Essential for effective computer-aided planning within an existing context is not only the use of on-site computer-aided measurement tools but also an integrative cooperation between the different disciplines involved via an information and communication system. Interdisciplinary cooperation needs to be tailored to the integrative aspects in renovation and revitalisation work. Economic factors determine the viability of an architectural project, and reliable costing information is vital. Existing IT-approaches to this problem are not yet sufficiently exploited. In ongoing research at our university (collaborative research center ”Materials and Structure in the Revitalisation of Buildings”) methods and techniques of revitalisation are being investigated. A special branch of the collaborative research center is investigating possibilities of computer-aided building measurement and communication platforms for professional disciplines (www.uni-weimar.de/sfb). The aim is to develop a general approach to the revitalisation of buildings. This paper discusses possible application areas of AR/VR techniques in the revitalisation of buildings from the point of view of the user and are based on the real project “Cooling factory Gera”. Based on the necessities of revitalisation projects, technical requirements are developed. The project is funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft (DFG).
keywords Augmented Reality, Architecture, Modernization, Measurement
series ACADIA
email petzold@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id d5a7
authors Mark, E., Martens, B. and Oxman, R.
year 2002
title Round Table Session on “Theoretical and Experimental Issues in the Preliminary Stages of Learning/Teaching CAAD”
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 205-212
summary According to eCAADe’s mission, the exchange and collaboration within the area of computer aided architectural design education and research, while respecting the pedagogical and administrative approaches in the different schools and countries, can be regarded as a core activity. The current education session follows up on a round table discussion held at eCAADe 2000 in Weimar, Germany, which was continued in the form of a plenary session at eCAADe 2001, focusing on sharing ideas on a more progressive curriculum under the topic “The Ideal Computer Curriculum”. The primary objective for the 2002 education session is to engage participants in an active discussion, not the longer format presentation of prepared positions. The round-table itself is limited to short opening statements so as to ensure time is allowed for viewpoints to be exchanged and for the conference attendees to weigh in on the issues discussed. The panel will critique current patterns teaching of computer aided design in schools of architecture, a review of past practices with the potential for guiding future direction.
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 0651
authors Petzold, F., Thurow, T., Richter, K. and Donath, D.
year 2001
title Planning-oriented building surveying - Modules in the computer aided architectural planning process of existing buildings
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 144-149
summary Activities in the building industry in Germany concentrate increasingly on a combination of renovation and new-build. A prerequisite for computer-aided planning in the context of existing buildings is both the use of on-site computer aided surveying techniques and the integration of all professional disciplines in an integrated information and communication system. Current approaches to these issues are unsatisfactory. Methods and techniques in renovation work are being investigated as part of ongoing research at the Bauhaus- Universität Weimar (SFB524 - “Collaborative research center 524 „Materials and Structure in Revitalization of Buildings”). A sub-group (SFB524 - D2 „Planning-Relevant Digital Building Surveying and Information System”) is currently investigating the possibilities of computer-aided building surveying and of joint communcation platforms for engineering disciplines (www.uni-weimar.de/sfb: May 2001). The objective is the development of a general approach for the renovation of buildings. The paper discusses concepts and requirements for a computer-aided system supporting the entire surveying process from the initial site visit to its use in a CAD system.
keywords Surveying, CAAD Systems, Computer Aided Planning Process, Building Model
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 6df6
authors Pratini, Edison
year 2001
title New Approaches to 3D Gestural Modeling - The 3D SketchMaker Project
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 466-471
summary The 3D SketchMaker project has developed two prototypes for a gestural 3D sketching system to be used in the earliest phases of the design process. The goal of this ongoing research is to provide architects, and other designers involved in object conception, with a 3D gestural instrument that takes advantage of new virtual reality resources and is more natural than using the mouse, less difficult than learning complex software and less abstract than manipulating 2D entities on orthogonal projections. The system was conceived to assist or replace the first 2D drawing steps in the design process, generating rough 3D sketches that can be refined later using any 3D package. It is, in essence, a 3D modeling system directed to do sketching with hand movements and gestures in a virtual reality environment.
keywords Gestural Interface, Virtual Reality, 3D Modeling, Sketching
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 1906
authors Silva, Neander F.
year 2001
title Design computing education: Developing a post-grad CAAD curriculum based on specific desing project
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 315-318
summary The idea of teaching design computing through design-based approaches has been increasingly adopted over the past 15 years. However, most of the resulting experiments have been limited to specific courses within larger programmes. This approach has rarely affected CAAD curriculum. A glance at the syllabus of some CAAD programmes may reveal their non design-based nature. We describe here a post-graduate programme that has been structured around a specific design project through a set of courses in which the emphasis falls on the needs of the design process rather than on software categories.
series CAADRIA
email neander@pop3.unb.br
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 98bb
authors Li, Andrew
year 2001
title A shape grammar for teaching the architectural style of the Yingzao Fashi
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture
summary The Yingzaofashi [Building standards] is a Chinese building manual written by Li Jie (d. 1110) and published in 1103. I present a shape grammar for teaching the architectural style - the language of designs - described in this manual. This grammar is distinguished by two objectives, and the technical means used to accomplish them. First, the grammar is for teaching. Usually, the author of a grammar of a style aims to generate all and only the designs in the language. To do this, he not only writes the grammar, but also judges whether the designs it generates are members of the language. In the Yingzaofashi grammar, on the other hand, I want to generate all and more than the designs in the language. It is then the student who evaluates the designs - does this design belong to the language? - and adjusts the grammar accordingly. Thus the student participates actively in defining the language of designs, and learns that style is a human construct. Second, the grammar is designerly. As already observed, most authors of style grammars focus on the language of designs; they do not consider how to structure the user's interaction with the grammar. By contrast, I consider explicitly what the user decides and when he decides it, and organize the grammar accordingly. In other words, I consider process as well as products. The grammar exploits several technical devices for the first time: the design as an n-tuple of drawings, descriptions, and other elements; the generation of descriptions in the n-tuple; and techniques that are made possible by these devices.
series thesis:PhD
email andrewili@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 24db
authors Tang, Tsien-Hui
year 2001
title Exploring the Roles of Exploring the roles of Sketches and Knowledge in the Design Process
source The University of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture
summary The needs of computational tools provide the motivation to have a better understanding of the roles of knowledge and sketches in the design process. The inadequacies of current computer-aided conceptual design tools result from our vague comprehension of the nature of the design process. The hypothesis of this study is that the design process involves interlocked and multi-mode processes in which design knowledge and sketches interact with each other to advance the design process. These interactions make current computer-aided design systems unsatisfactory in the conceptual design process. The understanding of these interactions would provide the foundation of more useful computational tools and potentially play a role in developing better pedagogical methods.

This research utilized both process-oriented and content-oriented coding schemes to examine different aspects of the design process. Concurrent and retrospective protocols were analyzed to determine their utility in revealing the design processes. Retrospective protocols and the content-oriented coding scheme were selected for design cognition studies in this research, and the procedures of experiments and analyses were described in detail.

The results of encoded protocols were presented in terms of segments, levels, and instances. They represented the design process in a way that enabled us to observe the interactions among sketches, knowledge, and different cognitive levels.

The examination of the conceptual design process demonstrated its features of interlinked levels and multiple modes; even one snippet of the process contained various modes and sub-processes. The shifting speed of intentions and the vagueness of sketches and functional references were also shown.

The study of the meditated roles of the sketches and knowledge in the design process shows the following. First, sketches are the affordances of perceptual and functional instances while designing. Most of the sketches made by designers are multi-functionally bounded. Second, design knowledge plays various roles in the conceptual design process. The ubiquitous designerly way of knowing demonstrates the differences between active developing and passive utilizing design knowledge. Finally, one of the roles of design sketches and knowledge is shown to be the connector among different cognitive levels in the design process.

The unpredictability of the design process is demonstrated in the results. Design knowledge provides previously generated solutions for the problem at hand, and design situatedness describes the phenomenon that a designer uses his/her experience to produce novelty and innovation. A method to measure the design innovation through an encoded protocol is proposed based on the concept of situated creativity.

The implications for future computer-aided design systems are presented based on the roles of sketches, knowledge, and situatedness in the interlinked and multimode design process. The concept of cognition-oriented CAD is proposed to provide empirical clues to improve current CAD systems.

series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/05/06 09:35

_id 7e52
authors Achten, Henri
year 2001
title Normative Positions in Architectural Design - Deriving and Applying Design Methods
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 263-268
summary This paper presents a recently finished course of eight weeks where CAAD skills, design methodology, and architectural theory are combined to discuss possible perspectives on the use of the computer in design, and its influence on architecture. In the course, three contemporary architects were studied; Peter Eisenman, Ben van Berkel, and Greg Lynn. Each was discussed on aspects of ontology (which are the elements of discourse), design method (design process and organization of the process), and the use of the computer (techniques and approaches). These were linked with design theory, architectural theory, and CAD-theory. The reflection on the work of the architects resulted in a number of design methods for each architect. The design methods were adapted to the available technologies in the university as well as to the scope of the exercise, since the period of eight weeks for an exercise cannot compete with design processes in practice that take many participants and much time. The students then applied the design methods to a design task: student housing and an exhibition pavilion on the campus area of the university. The task was so devised, that students could focus on either architectural or urban design level with one of the design methods. Also, the choice of architects and accompanying design methods was made in such a way that students with low, medium, and advanced computer skills could take part in the course and exercise. In a workshop held at the Czech Technical University (CVUT) in Prague, the same procedure was used in a one-week period for a different design task, but in an otherwise almost identical setting with respect to the CAAD software used. The methods and material were easily transferred to the other setting. The students were able to cope with the task and produced surprising results in the short time span available. The paper will provide an overview of the course, discuss the pedagogical implications of the work, and discuss how this particular work can be generalized to incorporate other architects and approaches.
keywords CAAD: Design Methods, Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id af65
authors Akleman, E., Chen, J. and Sirinivasan, V.
year 2001
title An Interactive Shape Modeling System for Robust Design of Functional 3D Shapes
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 248-257
summary In Architecture, it is essential to design functional and topologically complicated 3D shapes (i.e. shapes with many holes, columns and handles). In this paper, we present a robust and interactive system for the design of functional and topologically complicated 3D shapes. Users of our system can easily change topology (i.e. they can create and delete holes and handles, connect and disconnect surfaces). Our system also provide smoothing operations (subdivision schemes) to create smooth surfaces. Moreover, the system provides automatic texture mapping during topology and smoothing operations. We also present new design approaches with the new modeling system. The new design approaches include blending surfaces, construction of crusts and opening holes on these crusts.
keywords Modeling, Shape Design, Sculpting, Computer Aided Geometric Design
series ACADIA
email ergun@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id a469
authors Brown, Andre and Berridge, Phil
year 2001
title Games One : Two : Three A triangle of virtual game scenarios for architectural collaboration
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 95-120 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This paper is split into three parts, each of which deals with different aspects of, and approaches to, the collaboration process. Each of the approaches shares a common root in an aspect of games or gaming. Together the three approaches represent a tripartite attack on the spectrum of problems that need to be addressed to achieve successful collaboration. The first technique is dealt with in Game One One. This deals with the issue of encouraging collaboration. It is based on work using a role playing game scenario and is intended to allow construction industry professionals and clients to develop a common framework for discussion. It originally existed as a paper based game and is now being tested in a web-based environment. Game Two is based on work that has evolved from contemporary game and meeting place environments that have been attracting attention recently. Here internet-based three-dimensional worlds are used as a virtual replacement of real spaces and participants meet as avatars. In the architectural context we have investigated the potential for application of such 3D worlds as meeting, and discussion places where architectural information and ideas can be exchanged. In Game Three we take the idea that currently, virtual environments are still rather uncomfortable and unnatural in terms of human interaction, and in particular in the way that we move around and display architectural scenes. We develop the idea that games software incorporates techniques that make the representation of animated, interactive 3D architectural environments computationally efficient. We have augmented the software used in games environments and have considered how we construct architectural models and man-machine interfaces to improve the effectiveness of such environments in an architectural context.
series other
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 403f
authors Clark, Steve and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2001
title The Role of Place in Designing a Learner Centred Virtual Learning Environment
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 187-200
summary There are numerous approaches and tools for creating a virtual learning environment. The most common approach is to provide a repository of learning materials on a network to facilitate the distribution of the course content and to supplement this material with communications software such as email and bulletin boards. In this paper we highlight the role of place in creating a learning experience and its relevance to current learning theories. Architectural design becomes an important consideration when virtual learning environments are considered places. We present a framework for guiding the development of virtual learning environments that shows how place and design can combine with learning theories and technology. Finally, we draw on our experience in developing a virtual campus and virtual design studios to demonstrate how place and design can be the basis for virtual learning environments.
keywords Virtual Place, Virtual Learning Environments, Design Studio
series CAAD Futures
email stevec@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:23

_id e6c5
authors Heintz, John L.
year 2001
title Coordinating virtual building design teams
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 65-76 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Most research in design project management support systems treats the subject as an isolated objective problem. The goals to be met are defined in terms of a supposed universal view of the project, and now outside concerns are taken into account. While such approaches, including project simulation, may yield excellent results, they ignore what, for many projects, are the real difficulties. Design projects are not isolated. All participants have other obligations that compete with the given project for attention and resources. The various participants in the design process have different goals. For these reasons it is proposed that design project management can be best facilitated by tools which assist the participating actors to share suitable management information in order to make better co-ordination possible, while allowing the resource balancing between projects to occur in private. Such a tool represents the design project management task as a negotiation task that spans both projects and firms; the management of one project is the management of all. The model of design collaboration upon which the Design Coordination System (DeCo) is built was developed from 1) a heuristic case study used to gain insight into the ways in which designers co-ordinate their efforts, and 2) the application of the theory of the social contract as developed by John Rawls to the problem of design project management. The key innovation in the DeCo system is the shaping of the project management system around existing practices of collaborative project design management and planning. DeCo takes advantage of how designers already co-ordinate their work with each other and resolve disputes over deadlines and time lines. The advantage of DeCo is that it formalises these existing practices in order to accommodate both the increasing co-ordination burden and the difficulties brought about by the internationalisation of design practice. DeCo, the design project management system proposed here, provides a representation, a communications protocol, and a game theoretical decision structure. The combination of these three units provides users with the ability to exchange structured pictures of the project as seen from the points of view of individual actors. Further, it suggests a mechanism based on a specific principle of fairness for arriving at mutually acceptable project plans. The DeCo system permits the users freedom to manage their design processes as they will, while providing a basic compatibility between practices of design team members which supports their collaborative efforts to co-ordinate their design work.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id acadia11_372
id acadia11_372
authors James, Anne; Nagasaka, Dai
year 2011
title Integrative Design Strategies for Multimedia in Architecture
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 372-379
summary Multidisciplinary efforts that have shaped the current integration of multimedia into architectural spaces have primarily been conducted by collaborative efforts among art, engineering, interaction design, informatics and software programming. These collaborations have focused on the complexities of designing for applications of multimedia in specific real world contexts. Outside a small but growing number of researchers and practitioners, architects have been largely absent from these efforts. This has resulted in projects that deal primarily with developing technologies augmenting existing architectural environments. (Greenfield and Shepard 2007)This paper examines the potential of multimedia and architecture integration to create new possibilities for architectural space. Established practices of constructing architecture suggest creating space by conventional architectural means. On the other hand, multimedia influences and their effect on the tectonics, topos and typos (Frampton 2001) of an architectural space (‘multimedia effects matrix’) suggest new modes of shaping space. It is proposed that correlations exist between those two that could inform unified design strategies. Case study analyses were conducted examining five works of interactive spaces and multimedia installation artworks, selected from an initial larger study of 25 works. Each case study investigated the means of shaping space employed, according to both conventional architectural practices and the principles of multimedia influence (in reference to the ‘multimedia effects matrix’) (James and Nagasaka 2010, 278-285). Findings from the case studies suggest strong correlations between the two approaches to spatial construction. To indicate these correlations, this paper presents five speculative integrative design strategies derived from the case studies, intended to inform future architectural design practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email annejames.07@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id 554e
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2001
title 3 x 2 Approaches to Design Management
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 220-225
summary Following the arguably successful introduction of building, project and real estate management to traditional architectural areas, design management is emerging as the new hot issue. One of the main arguments for it is the alleged low performance of the architect in the face of the technical complexity and operational intricacy that characterizes current design problems. In this respect, management is seen as the missing link in the architect’s methodical and operational framework. The paper suggests that this link derives more from the constraints of the domain and its subject matter rather than a management perspective. Design management refers to two main dimensions of architectural design, these of design method and of design subject. With respect to the first dimension we distinguish between three main categories: proscriptive, prescriptive and descriptive approaches. In the second dimension the distinction is between the coordination of the design process and that of the design product. The 3x2 matrix defined by these two dimensions stresses the significance of descriptive approaches for the informatization of the representation and communication of the design product. In this framework design information management emerges as an applied area of (computational) design theory that facilitates the amphidrome development of a design, i.e. not only from brief to postoccupancy but also from detail, case and precedent to design idea and solution, as well as the identification and management of critical moments, i.e. moments characterized by convergence of activities and hence extensive and intensive communication.
keywords Method, Management, Descriptive, Informatization
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 603d
authors McCall, R., Vlahos, E. and Zabel, J.
year 2001
title Conceptual Design as HyperSketching. Theory and Java Prototype
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 285-297
summary Hand-done design drawing still has a several advantages over current, CADbased approaches to generating form, especially in the early stages of design. One advantage is the indeterminacy of hand drawing--i.e. its abstractness and ambiguity. Another is a non-destructive drawing process, where new drawings are created without modifying old ones. A third is designers’ creation of large collections of inter-related drawings--i.e. graphical hyperdocuments. A fourth is the unobtrusive character of conventional drawing tools. These advantages might be taken as reasons for continuing to do early design on paper, but they also suggest ways in which CAD might be improved. We have created software prototypes that incorporate these features into a new type of CAD based on sketching with electronic pens on LCD tablets. One prototype, which we call HyperSketch II, simulates tracing paper in the sense that it enables the user to trace over previous drawings and to build stacks of traced over drawings. It also enables the user to create a hypermedia network in which the nodes are sketches and the links represent various relationships between sketches.
keywords Sketching, Hypertext, Hypermedia, Conceptual Design
series CAAD Futures
email wowdesigner@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 34HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_322983 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002