CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 695

_id 76ea
authors Petzold, F., Thurow, T. and Donath, D.
year 2001
title Planing relevant survey of buildings - starting point in the revitalization process of existing buildings - requirements, concepts, prototypes and visions
source Abstract Book CIPA 2001 International Symposium, Potsdam 2001, pp. 58
summary Future tasks for the building trade in Germany will be more and more a combination of the fields of revitalization and new building projects. Prerequisite for computer-aided planing for existing buildings is both, the use of onsite computer-aided measurement and the integration of all specialists involved in the building process. Existing approaches for this problem are not yet satisfying. The aim of this research project is twofold: to design a practice-relevant software concept and to develop various prototypic systems, for a structured way of capturing and organizing building-related information about existing buildings in digital form. The research is oriented towards existing buildings, in particular residential and commercial buildings. This project is a special branch of SFB524. The project is founded by "Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft (DFG)".
series other
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2003/02/26 17:58

_id 7d45
authors Stouffs, Rudi and Krishnamurti, Ramesh
year 2001
title On the road to standardization
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 75-88
summary This paper offers an analysis of current standardization efforts, including a classification of their approaches and an evaluation of their advantages and disadvantages with respect to different contexts. In focusing on the design context, a syntactic approach to standardization is recommended, and exemplified with a concept for representational flexibility termed sorts.
keywords Information Exchange, Standardization, Representations
series CAAD Futures
email r.stouffs@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 7180
authors Therakomen, Preechaya
year 2001
title Mouse.class: Experiments for Exploring Dynamic Behaviors in Urban Places
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Urban space comprises not only physical forms - buildings, streets, plazas, trees, etc. – but also the people 'acting on them'. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our awareness of behavior and environment relationships, focusing on local movement at the individual level in a pedestrian environment. The thesis describes the experiment Mouse.class, as a concept demonstration model, which allows users to create a 2D-virtual environment for accommodating autonomous agents, Mouse, to explore (pedestrian) dynamic behavior in relation to (urban) space. The program uses multi-agent technology to construct an individual-based simulation in which each agent employs individual behaviors. The agents have abilities to navigate through the environment using a behavior rule set derived from a wide range of research – both theoretical and empirical approaches – on spatial behavior in small-scale urban space. These simulated individuals also have the ability to improvise their actions according to the situations they find themselves in. In the simulation, each agent reacts to the space configuration, to specific attractions in the environment, as well as to other mice. The local movement of an individual is, therefore, the result of the interaction of its visual perception, motivation, and social actions. The program then tracks each movement – path of use – revealing patterns that emerge from interactions among the components of the environment. The exploration seeks to develop a way urban designers think of 'space' as fluid processes and recognize that objects in the urban environment can have radically differing effects, depending on the circumstances and contexts in which they exist. Indeed, people are parts of the environment.
series thesis:MSc
email glaang@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 657b
authors Wyeld, T.G. , Woodbury, R.F. and Shannon, S.J.
year 2001
title Leitmotif cases for design learning
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 401-409
summary We have developed several deep cases based on actual and hypothetical built environments and have used these in a strongly student-centred instructional style. On reflection, our approach seems qualitatively different from norms in architecture schools and from other case-based learning practices. We introduce it here under the rubric of the Leitmotif Case, explain its structure and compare it with other approaches.
series CAADRIA
email rw@arch.adelaide.edu.au
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id afd9
authors Yang, QZ and Li, Xiang
year 2001
title Representation and Execution of Building Codes for Automated Code Checking
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 315-329
summary Computer-based representation and execution of building codes are investigated from the perspective of facilitating the operation of automated building code checking. The automated procedure proposed in this paper is based on the object-oriented (OO) representations for both building design and building code. These OO representation models fully support the execution of building compliance checking automatically. A prototype in Java on Windows NT has been developed to implement our approaches presented in this paper. Case studies are also conducted by using this prototype for automatic checking of building designs compliance with building codes under the “Technical Requirements for Household and Storey Shelters” of Singapore.
keywords Object Orientation, Design Representation, Code Representation, Rule Execution, Automated Building Code Checking
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id avocaad_2001_14
id avocaad_2001_14
authors Adam Jakimowicz
year 2001
title Non-Linear Postrationalisation: Architectural Values Emergence in a Teamwork Interpretation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The paper presents the outcomes of the experiment being conducted at the Faculty of Architecture in Bialystok, which derives form three main sources: a new course of architectural composition by computer modelling, developed and conducted in Bialystok postrationalisation as a formulation platform for new architectural values and theories, applied by e.g. Bernard Tschumi the idea of new values emergence resulting form a teamwork, when placed in an appropriate environment; It is assumed that the work performed first intuitively, can be later seriously interpreted, and to some extent rationalised, verbalised, described. With no doubt we can state, that in creative parts of architectural activities, very often decision are taken intuitively (form design). So this ‘procedure’ of postrationalisation of intuitively undertaken efforts and results seems to be very important –when trying to explain ideas. This kind of activity is also very important during the first years of architectural education. In case of this experiment, the students’ works from the course of architectural composition are taken as a base and subjects for interpretation, and values research. However, when at first, individual works are being interpreted by their authors, at the latter stage, the teams are to be formed. The aim of the teamwork is to present individual works, analyse them, find common value(s), and represent it (them) in an appropriate, creative way. The ideal environment to perform this work is hypertext based internet, because the non-linearity of team interpretations is unavoidable. On the other hand, the digital input data (computer models) is a very appropriate initial material to be used for hypermedia development. The experiment is to analyse the specific of the following: the self-influence of the group on the individual work ‘qualification’, mutual influence of the team members on their own work interpretation, the influence of the digital non-linear environment on the final outcome definition. The added value of hypertext in architectural groupwork digital performance shall be examined and described. A new value of individualised, though group based, non-linearity of expression will be presented and concluded.
series AVOCAAD
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4b30
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Mohd Fazidin, J.
year 2001
title ARMY WAR GAME SIMULATION (AWAS) system - Utilising architectural knowledge in virtual environments
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 435-438
summary This research briefly examines the importance of collaborative design in developing a multi-user, multi-tiered, networked and real-time information base system. Aspects such as navigation, interaction, communication, movements (objects or virtual camera), control, level of details, spatial design and virtual spaces will be explained to show their importance in the development of virtual world. This paper will further explore the aspects of collaborative design in the context of Army War Game Simulation System (AWAS). A generic collaborative design-based framework will be demonstrated to simulate the overall operations of a war in command-control structure of the force.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 12e3
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Che Zulkhairi, A. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title Interactive Storytelling and Its Role in the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 151-158
summary Projects of ever increasing complexity and size have incited the need for new and robust design methodologies and tools in an effort to manage complexity, lower costs, ascertain quality and reduce risk. Technology convergence through the growing availability of networked computers, rapid progress in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and information management have encouraged the undertaking of even more complex designs that demand high degrees of interaction, collaboration and the efficient sharing and dissemination of information. It is suggested that interactive storytelling and interactive design (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2001) techniques that use non-linear information mapping systems can be deployed to assist users as they navigate information that is structured to address localized needs as they arise. The design process is a collaborative effort that encompasses diverse knowledge disciplines and demands the management and utilization of available resources to satisfy the needs of a single or set of goals. It is thought that building industry specialists should work close together in an organised manner to solve design problems as they emerge and find alternatives when designs fall short. The design process involves the processing of dynamic and complex information, that can be anything from the amount of soil required to level lands - to the needs of specific lightings systems in operation theatres. Other important factors that affect the design process are related to costs and deadlines. This paper will demonstrate some of our early findings in several experiments to establish nonlinear storytelling. It will conclude with a recommendation for a plausible design of such a system based on experimental work that is currently being conducted and is reaching its final stages. The paper will lay the foundations of a possible path to implementation based on the concept of multi-path animation that is appropriate for structuring the design process as used in the building industry.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id avocaad_2001_05
id avocaad_2001_05
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Analysis and the descriptive approach
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The rise of consciousness concerning the quality of working and living conditions has been a permanent though frequently underplayed theme in architecture and building since the reconstruction period. It has led to an explosive growth of programmatic requirements on building behaviour and performance, thus also stimulating the development of design analysis. The first stage of development was characterized by the evolution of prescriptive systems. These reversed the structure of pre-existing proscriptive systems into sequences of known steps that should be taken in order to achieve adequate results. Prescriptive systems complemented rather than replaced proscriptive ones, thereby creating an uncertain mixture of orthodoxy and orthopraxy that failed to provide design guidance for improving design performance and quality.The second stage in the development of design analysis focuses on descriptive methods and techniques for analyzing and supporting evaluation. Technologies such as simulation and scientific visualization are employed so as to produce detailed, accurate and reliable projections of building behaviour and performance. These projections can be correlated into a comprehensive and coherent description of a building using representations of form as information carriers. In these representations feedback and interaction assume a visual character that fits both design attitudes and lay perception of the built environment, but on the basis of a quantitative background that justifies, verifies and refines design actions. Descriptive analysis is currently the most promising direction for confronting and resolving design complexity. It provides the designer with useful insights into the causes and effects of various design problems but frequently comes short of providing clear design guidance for two main reasons: (1) it adds substantial amounts of information to the already unmanageable loads the designer must handle, and (2) it may provide incoherent cues for the further development of a design. Consequently the descriptive approach to analysis is always in danger of been supplanted by abstract decision making.One way of providing the desired design guidance is to complement the connection of descriptive analyses to representations of form (and from there to synthesis) with two interface components. The first is a memory component, implemented as case-bases of precedent designs. These designs encapsulate integrated design information that can be matched to the design in hand in terms of form, function and performance. Comparison between precedents with a known performance and a new design facilitate identification of design aspects that need be improved, as well as of wider formal and functional consequences. The second component is an adaptive generative system capable of guiding exploration of these aspects, both in the precedents and the new design. The aim of this system is to provide feedback from analysis to synthesis. By exploring the scope of the analysis and the applicability of the conclusions to more designs, the designer generates a coherent and consistent collection of partial solutions that explore a relevant solution space. Development of the first component, the design case-bases, is no trivial task. Transformability in the representation of cases and flexible classification in a database are critical to the identification and treatment of a design aspect. Nevertheless, the state of the art in case-based reasoning and the extensive corpus of analysed designs provide the essential building blocks. The second component, the adaptive generative system, poses more questions. Existing generative techniques do not possess the necessary richness or multidimensionality. Moreover, it is imperative that the designer plays a more active role in the control of the process than merely tweaking local variables. At the same time, the system should prevent that redesigning degenerates into a blind trial-and-error enumeration of possibilities. Guided empirical design research arguably provides the means for the evolutionary development of the second component.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 7c56
authors Alvarado, R.G., Parra Marquez, J.C. and Vildosola, G.V.
year 2001
title Qualitative contribution of a vr-system to architectural design: Why we failed?
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 423-427
summary The paper exposes the development of a Virtual-Reality system for modeling timber structures, and evaluations with students about its contribution to the architectural project.
series CAADRIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 45a2
authors Armesto, Tristán
year 2001
title SIMULACRO ARQUITECTÓNICO AL ALCANCE DE LAS MANOS (Architectonic Simulacrum within Reach)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 148-150
summary Since middle ‘90’s, the outbreak of 3d hardware acceleration devices for PC software, has facilitated a great evolvement in what is known as “Role Play Games” (RPG) – within the entertainment software industry. This development has produced such a phenomenon that surpassed all expectations. Through the game “engine” tools, virtual spaces can be achieved according to an editor’s criterium. Thus, a varied range of uses in different research fields are permitted. It is possible to build architectural simulations with high degree of realism an interactivity by means of ‘levels editors’ found in most of this games.
series SIGRADI
email trisar@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 0bef
authors Ataman, Osman and Wingert, Kate
year 2001
title DEVELOPING AN INTERACTIVE URBAN MODEL PROTOTYPE
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 300-303
summary The application of new digital media provides a methodology for reconstructing and analyzing certain architectural elements from the past. In this paper, a research project is described to develop a prototype system to represent and manipulate information in urban settings. In general, our research is aimed at developing a prototype urban database model and Philadelphia is chosen as a case study. An emphasis is placed on identification, categorization and representation of information in a way that is useful for urban researchers for analysis.
series SIGRADI
email ataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ef4b
authors Babalola, Olubi and Eastman, Charles
year 2001
title Semantic Interpretation of Architectural Drawings
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 166-179
summary The paper reviews the needs and issues of automatically interpreting architectural drawings into building model representations. It distinguishes between recognition and semantic interpretation and reviews the steps involved in developing such a conversion capability, referring to the relevant literature and concepts. It identifies two potentially useful components, neither of which has received attention. One is the development of a syntactically defined drafting language. The other is a strategy for interpreting the semantic content of architectural drawings, based on the analogy of natural language interpretation
keywords Semantic Interpretation, Drawing Understanding
series ACADIA
email olubi.babalola@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0f18
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2001
title A Digital Design Coach for Young Designers
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 330-335
summary The present use of digital media in architectural practice and education is primarily focused on representation, communication of ideas and production. Designers, however, still use pencil and paper to assist the early conception of ideas. Recently, research into providing digital tools for designers to use in conceptual designing has focused on enhancing or assisting the designer. Rarely has the computer been regarded as a potential teaching tool for design skills. Based on previous work by the author about visual thinking and the justification for a digital design assistant, the intention of this paper is to illustrate to the reader the feasibility of a digital design coach. Reference is made to recent advances in research about design computability. In particular, research by Mark Gross and Ellen Do with respect to their Electronic Cocktail Napkin project is used as a basis on which to determine what such a digital coach may look and feel like.
keywords Design Education, Protocol Analysis, CADD, Sketching
series ACADIA
email rohan.bailey@vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 1543
authors Bailey, Rohan O.
year 2001
title A digital design coach for young designers
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 311-314
summary It is the intention of this paper is to construct for the reader a suitable foundation on which to determine a digital design coach. It seeks to define this possibility by examining two ideas. The first is visual thinking, as used by designers in the process of design. The second idea, that of providing students with expert partners for the learning of design is supported by evidence from a variation on protocol analysis (developed by the author) and a related design studio conducted in New Zealand and Jamaica. Using these concepts in relation to recent advances in the development of digital tools the paper proposes what a digital coach may look like.
series CAADRIA
email baileyroha@scs.vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id caadria2010_043
id caadria2010_043
authors Barker, Tom and M. Hank Haeusler
year 2010
title Urban digital media: facilitating the intersection between science, the arts and culture in the arena of technology and building
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 457-466
summary The research presented in this paper investigates ways of providing better design applications for technologies in the field of Urban Digital Media (UDM). The work takes an emergent approach, evolving a design strategy through the early engagement of stakeholders. The paper discusses research in a design-led creative intersection between media technology, culture and the arts in the built environment. The case study discusses opportunities for the enhancement of a university campus experience, learning culture and community, through the provision of an integrated digital presence within campus architecture and urban spaces. It considers types of information architecture (Manovich, 2001) and designs for use in urban settings to create communication-rich, advanced and interactive designed spaces (Haeusler, 2009). The presented research investigates how to create a strategy for display technologies and networked communications to transform and augment the constructed reality of the built environment, allowing new formats of media activity.
keywords Urban design; outdoor digital media; information architecture; multidisciplinary design; augmented reality; media facades
series CAADRIA
email Matthias.Haeusler@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 898a
authors Bay, J.H.
year 2002
title Cognitive Biases and Precedent Knowledge in Human and Computer-Aided Design Thinking
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 213-220
summary Cognitive biases (illusions) and potential errors can occur when using precedent knowledge for analogical, pre-parametric and qualitative design thinking. This paper refers largely to part of a completed research (Bay 2001) on how heuristic biases, discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) in cognitive psychology, can affect judgement and learning of facts from precedents in architectural design, made explicit using a kernel of conceptual system (Tzonis et. al., 1978) and a framework of architectural representation (Tzonis 1992). These are used here to consider how such illusions and errors may be transferred to computer aided design thinking.
series CAADRIA
email akibayp@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id cf2003_m_040
id cf2003_m_040
authors BAY, Joo-Hwa
year 2003
title Making Rebuttals Available Digitally for Minimising Biases in Mental Judgements
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 147-156
summary The problem of heuristic biases (illusions) discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) that can lead to errors in judgement by human designers, when they use precedent knowledge presented graphically (Bay 2001). A Cognitive framework of belief, goal, and decision, and a framework of representation of architectural knowledge by Tzonis are used to map out the problem of heuristic biases in the human mind. These are used to discuss what aspects of knowledge can be presented explicitly and digitally to users to make rebuttal more available for human thinking at the cognitive level. The discussion is applicable to both inductive and analytic digital knowledge systems that use precedent knowledge. This discussion is targeted directly at means of addressing bias in the human mind using digital means. The problem of human bias in machine learning and generalisation are discussed in a different paper, and the problems of international or non-intentional machine bias are not part of discussion in this paper.
keywords analogy, bias, design thinking, environmental design, heuristics
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/22 06:26

_id 1b10
id 1b10
authors Bay, Joo-Hwa
year 2001
title Cognitive Biases - The case of tropical architecture
source Delft University of Technology
summary This dissertation investigates, i) How cognitive biases (or illusions) may lead to errors in design thinking, ii) Why architects use architectural precedents as heuristics despite such possible errors, and iii) Develops a design tool that can overcome this type of errors through the introduction of a rebuttal mechanism. The mechanism controls biases and improves accuracy in architectural thinking. // The research method applied is interdisciplinary. It employs knowledge from cognitive science, environmental engineering, and architectural theory. The case study approach is also used. The investigation is made in the case of tropical architecture. The investigation of architectural biases draws from work by A. Tversky and D. Kahneman in 1982 on “Heuristics and biases”. According to Tversky and Kahneman, the use of heuristics of representativeness (based on similarity) and availability (based on ease of recall and imaginability) for judgement of probability can result in cognitive biases of illusions of validity and biases due to imaginability respectively. This theory can be used analogically to understand how errors arise in the judgement of environmental behaviour anticipated from various spatial configurations, leading to designs with dysfunctional performances when built. Incomplete information, limited time, and human mental resources make design thinking in practice difficult and impossible to solve. It is not possible to analyse all possible alternative solutions, multiple contingencies, and multiple conflicting demands, as doing so will lead to combinatorial explosion. One of the ways to cope with the difficult design problem is to use precedents as heuristic devices, as shortcuts in design thinking, and at the risk of errors. This is done with analogical, pre-parametric, and qualitative means of thinking, without quantitative calculations. Heuristics can be efficient and reasonably effective, but may not always be good enough or even correct, because they can have associated cognitive biases that lead to errors. Several debiasing strategies are discussed, and one possibility is to introduce a rebuttal mechanism to refocus the designer’s thinking on the negative and opposite outcomes in his judgements, in order to debias these illusions. The research is carried out within the framework of design theory developed by the Design Knowledge System Research Centre, TUDelft. This strategy is tested with an experiment. The results show that the introduction of a rebuttal mechanism can debias and improve design judgements substantially in environmental control. The tool developed has possible applications in design practice and education, and in particular, in the designing of sustainable environments.
keywords Design bias; Design knowledge; Design rebuttal; Design Precedent; Pre-parametric design; Tropical architecture; Sustainability
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email philipjhbay@gmail.com
last changed 2006/05/28 05:42

_id 22ec
authors Bechthold, Martin
year 2001
title Complex shapes in wood: Computer-aided design and manufacture of wood-sandwich roof shells
source Harvard University
summary Computer-Aided-Design, Engineering and Manufacturing (CAD/CAE/CAM) technology has changed the way consumer products, automobiles or airplanes are designed and made. The emerging applications for CAD/CAE/CAM technology in architecture, and the way this technology impacts how we design and construct the built environment, are yet unclear. This thesis investigates the relation between advanced digital design tools and the making of physical objects by focusing on an exemplary architectural element—wooden roof shells. The research objective is to expand the scope of architectural design through the application of CAD/CAE/CAM technology rather than to use this technology to streamline existing processes. The thesis develops a specific technical solution that allows the design and manufacture of new types of wooden roof shells. These are complexly shaped multifunctional construction elements that are manufactured off-site. Based on the close connection between digital design tools and the new Computer-Numerically-Controlled manufacturing process the author proposes a theoretical model of shared digital environments for collaborative design in architecture. The proposed manufacturing process treats wood as a modern composite material. Thin wood strips and foams combine into structural sandwich panels that can then be joined into a roof shell. The geometrically complex panels are generated by a combination of subtractive Computer-Numerically-Controlled machining processes and manual work. Infrastructure elements can be embedded into the sandwich build-up in order to enhance the functionality of the roof as a building envelope. Numerical tools are proposed that allow the determination of manufacturing-related parameters in the digital design environment. These inform the architectural and structural design in the early design phases. The digital collaborative design environment is based on a shared parametric solid model and an associated database. This collectively owned, feature-based design model is employed throughout the design and manufacturing process and constitutes the means of concurrent design coordination of all participants. The new manufacturing process for wood/foam sandwich shells is verified by designing and manufacturing prototypes. Design guidelines and a cost estimation are presented as the practical basis for architects and engineers to incorporate new types of roof shells into architectural projects.
keywords Architecture; Agriculture; Wood Technology; Design and Decorative Arts
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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