CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 566

_id 6473
authors Caneparo, Luca and Robiglio, Matteo
year 2001
title Evolutionary Automata for Suburban Form Simulation
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 767-780
summary The paper outlines a research project to develop a dynamic simulation of suburbanization processes. The approach to simulating suburban form relies on modelling different interacting processes on various scales. Two layered models are implemented, the Socio-Economic and Zoning model and the Suburban Form model, respectively by means of cellular automata and genetic programming. The Socio-Economic and Zoning model simulates exogenous factors and endogenous processes of large-scale suburban dynamics. The model approximates the area by means of a rectangular grid to the scale of hundred meters. The Suburban Form model uses a smaller grid, to the scale of meters, and is three-dimensional. The resulting dynamic, 3D, fine-scale model will create scenarios of suburban growth, allowing evaluation of their consequences on built environment and landscape.
keywords Urban Morphology, Model Based Design Support System, Urban Design, Landscape, Genetic Programming, Cellular Automata
series CAAD Futures
email caneparo@polito.it
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id avocaad_2001_05
id avocaad_2001_05
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Analysis and the descriptive approach
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The rise of consciousness concerning the quality of working and living conditions has been a permanent though frequently underplayed theme in architecture and building since the reconstruction period. It has led to an explosive growth of programmatic requirements on building behaviour and performance, thus also stimulating the development of design analysis. The first stage of development was characterized by the evolution of prescriptive systems. These reversed the structure of pre-existing proscriptive systems into sequences of known steps that should be taken in order to achieve adequate results. Prescriptive systems complemented rather than replaced proscriptive ones, thereby creating an uncertain mixture of orthodoxy and orthopraxy that failed to provide design guidance for improving design performance and quality.The second stage in the development of design analysis focuses on descriptive methods and techniques for analyzing and supporting evaluation. Technologies such as simulation and scientific visualization are employed so as to produce detailed, accurate and reliable projections of building behaviour and performance. These projections can be correlated into a comprehensive and coherent description of a building using representations of form as information carriers. In these representations feedback and interaction assume a visual character that fits both design attitudes and lay perception of the built environment, but on the basis of a quantitative background that justifies, verifies and refines design actions. Descriptive analysis is currently the most promising direction for confronting and resolving design complexity. It provides the designer with useful insights into the causes and effects of various design problems but frequently comes short of providing clear design guidance for two main reasons: (1) it adds substantial amounts of information to the already unmanageable loads the designer must handle, and (2) it may provide incoherent cues for the further development of a design. Consequently the descriptive approach to analysis is always in danger of been supplanted by abstract decision making.One way of providing the desired design guidance is to complement the connection of descriptive analyses to representations of form (and from there to synthesis) with two interface components. The first is a memory component, implemented as case-bases of precedent designs. These designs encapsulate integrated design information that can be matched to the design in hand in terms of form, function and performance. Comparison between precedents with a known performance and a new design facilitate identification of design aspects that need be improved, as well as of wider formal and functional consequences. The second component is an adaptive generative system capable of guiding exploration of these aspects, both in the precedents and the new design. The aim of this system is to provide feedback from analysis to synthesis. By exploring the scope of the analysis and the applicability of the conclusions to more designs, the designer generates a coherent and consistent collection of partial solutions that explore a relevant solution space. Development of the first component, the design case-bases, is no trivial task. Transformability in the representation of cases and flexible classification in a database are critical to the identification and treatment of a design aspect. Nevertheless, the state of the art in case-based reasoning and the extensive corpus of analysed designs provide the essential building blocks. The second component, the adaptive generative system, poses more questions. Existing generative techniques do not possess the necessary richness or multidimensionality. Moreover, it is imperative that the designer plays a more active role in the control of the process than merely tweaking local variables. At the same time, the system should prevent that redesigning degenerates into a blind trial-and-error enumeration of possibilities. Guided empirical design research arguably provides the means for the evolutionary development of the second component.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 270d
authors Elezkurtaj, Tomor and Franck, Georg
year 2001
title Evolutionary Algorithms in Urban Planning
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 269-272
summary The functions supported by commercial CAD software are drawing, construction and presentation. Until now, no programssupporting the creative part of architectural and urban problem solving are on the market. The grand hopes of symbolic AI ofprogramming creative architectural and urban design have been disappointed. In the meantime, methods called New AI are available.Among these methods, evolutionary algorithms are particularly promising for solving design problems. The paper presents anapproach to town panning and architectural problem solving that combines an evolutionary strategy (ES), a genetic algorithm (GA)and a Particle System. The problem that remains incapable of being solved algorithmically has to do with the fact that in architectureand urbanizm form as well as function count. Because function relates to comfort, easiness of use, and aesthetics as well, it ishopeless to fully specify the fitness function of architecture. The approach presented circumvents a full specification through dividinglabor between the software and its user. The fitness function of town plans is defined in terms only of proportions of the shapes, areasand buildings to be accommodated and topological relations between them. The rest is left to the human designer who interactivelyintervenes in the evolution game as displayed on the screen.
series other
email tomor@osiris.iemar.tuwien.ac.at
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:17

_id ga0109
id ga0109
authors Lewis, Chak Chan
year 2001
title Defects Defined by Form Making Method for Improving Generative Design System
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolutionary-based Generative Design System (GDS) is generally designed for industrial designers during the early stage of conceptual design. Although “additive” Rapid Prototyping (RP) methods are commonly applied for the physical realization, grown Surfaces Object (SO) created from these GDS still has room to be considered to a combined workable volume,especially for the more complex design. The inarticulate processes from GDS to Generative Production System (GPS) are linking up with different aspects and contexts as well as the conventional Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/RP integration, which has been conducted for along time. There are design constraints existing between 3D SO in industry design representation and feasible 3D production solution. Perception to object designing with knowledge is limited at SO forming by incomplete interpretations. Meanwhile, it is difficult to discern the problemsof incomplete object generation as hidden illegal design occurred from time to time because of the design constraints, despite the completion of the design representation. It has led to some of the invalidity of surface feature at the end. The reconstruction of the RP process ofthe SO pre-processing procedure can help to clarify these defects with thickness requirement in generative production. The aim of this paper is to verify an effective generative design strategy as a possibility ofimplementing method(s) or tool. They will be built within a surface-oriented GDS by mapping a valid object directly accepted by any RP system without any influence on generative object creating. Through the involvement of Form Making processes of RP from selected instants with their solid phenomena, evidences are used for defending this viewpoint.Throughout the process, generative design method and CAD method have been utilized for the creation of virtual form. The 3D printer and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology with “trial and error” method were employed in the RP processes.
series other
email chakchan@smartonebroadband.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 2005_787
id 2005_787
authors Veikos, Cathrine
year 2005
title The Post-Medium Condition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 787-794
summary Theorists in art, architecture and visual media have described the digital world as a world of mediumlessness and proclaimed that the medium of a work, once the ontological determinant for the classification of the arts, is rendered meaningless by recent technological and cultural developments (Krauss, 2000; Negroponte, 1995; Manovich, 2001). Although indebted to specific media-based techniques and their attendant ideologies, software removes the material reality of techniques to an immaterial condition where the effects of material operations are reproduced abstractly. This paper asserts that a productive approach for digital design can be found in the acknowledgement that the importance of the digital format is not that it de-materializes media, but that it allows for the maximum intermingling of media. A re-conceptualization of media follows from this, defined now as, a set of conventions derived from the material conditions of a given technical support, conventions out of which to develop a form of expressiveness that can be both projective and mnemonic (Krauss, 2000). The paper will focus on the identification of these conventions towards the development of new forms of expressiveness in architecture. Further demonstration of the intermingling of materially-based conventions is carried out in the paper through a comparative analysis of contemporary works of art and architecture, taking installation art as a particular example. A new design approach based on the maximum intermingling of media takes account of integrative strategies towards the digital and the material and sees them as inextricably linked. In the digital “medium” different sets of conventions derived from different material conditions transfer their informational assets producing fully formed, material-digital ingenuity.
keywords Expanded Architecture, Art Practice, Material, Information, ParametricTechniques, Evolutionary Logics
series eCAADe
email veikos@design.upenn.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ga0104
id ga0104
authors Caillaud, Bernard
year 2001
title Cellular Automata and Algorithmic Visual Creation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The cellular automaton concept, a reduced form of automaton concept (specific , in the beginning, to cybernetics and computer science) relates to the notion of local order, dear to Abraham Moles, and refers to the creation of a complex order in a set of cells ( or pixels for digital images) based on a simple law which determine the colorimetric state of each pixelaccording to the colorimetric state of its nearest neighbours. I will examine one-dimensional automata and then two-dimensional ones. I will study theirmorphogenetical properties in the case of neutral values and then of chromatic ones. I will talk about my own creative work, closely related to an "orientated morphogenesis".This latter has its place quite naturally in Generative Art . I will look at paradigmatic explorations,parametric creations, programming perturbations, conditional choices, "chromatisation" and hybridation. To finish, I will describe the last stage of the work which consists, if necessary, of reworking the initial files so as to modify then through "software creation".
series other
email Bernard.Caillaud@info.unicaen.fr
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id avocaad_2001_13
id avocaad_2001_13
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Modeling irregular and complex forms
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Computational technologies provide arguably the first real opportunity architectural design has had for a comprehensive description of built form. With the advent of affordable computer-aided design systems (including drafting, modeling, visualization and simulation tools), architects believe they can be in full control of geometric aspects and, through these, of a wide spectrum of other aspects that are implicit or explicit in the geometric representation. This belief is based primarily on the efficiency and effectiveness of computer systems, ranging from the richness and adaptability of geometric primitives to the utility of geometric representations in simulations of climatic aspects. Such capabilities support attempts to design and construct more irregular or otherwise complex forms. These fall under two main categories: (1) parsing of irregularity into elementary components, and (2) correlation of the form of a building with complex geometric structures.The first category takes advantage of the compactness and flexibility of computational representations in order to analyse the form of a design into basic elements, usually elementary geometric primitives. These are either arranged into simple, unconstrained configurations or related to each other by relationships that define e.g. parametric relative positioning or Boolean combinations. In both cases the result is a reduction of local complexity and an increase of implicit or explicit relationships, including the possibility of hierarchical structures.The second category attempts to correlate built form with constraints that derive usually from construction but can also be morphological. The correlation determines the applicability of complex geometric structures (minimally ruled surfaces) to the description of a design. The product of this application is generally variable in quality, depending upon the designer's grounding in geometry and his ability to integrate constraints from different aspects in the definition of the design's geometry.Both categories represent a potential leap forward but are also equally hampered by the rigidity of the implementation mechanisms upon which they rely heavily. The paper proposes an approach to making these mechanisms subordinate to the cognitive and technical aspects of architectural thinking through fuzzy modeling. This way of modeling involves a combination of (a) canonical forms, (b) tolerances around canonical forms and positions, (c) minimal and maximal values, (d) fuzzy boundaries, and (e) plastic interaction between elements based on the dual principles of local intelligence and autonomy. Fuzzy models come therefore closer to the intuitive manners of sketching, while facilitating transition to precise and complex forms. The paper presents two applications of fuzzy modeling. The first concerns the generation of schematic building layouts, including adaptive control of programmatic requirements. The second is a system for designing stairs that can adapt themselves to changes in their immediate environment through a fuzzy definition of geometric and topological parametrization.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ga0118
id ga0118
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2001
title Learning and Contamination in Virtual Worlds
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories whereto explore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tool to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]. The combination of these concepts with robotics technology or with immersive-interactive 3D environments (virtual reality) are changing quickly well known paradigms like digital life, manmachineinterface, virtual world. The virtual world metaphor becomes interesting when the artificial beings can develop some form of learning, increasing their performances, adaptation, and developing the ability to exchange information with human visitors. In this sense the evolution enhances the creative power and meaningful of these environments, and human visitors experience an emotion of a shift from a simplified simulation of the reality to a real immersion into an imaginary life. We may think that these realization are the first sparks of a new form of life: simulated for the soft-alife thinkers, real for the hard-alife thinkers, or a simple imaginary vision for the artists.
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 6a70
authors Liapi, Katherine
year 2001
title Transformable Structures: Design Features and Preliminary Investigation
source Journal of Architectural Engineering -- March 2001 -- Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 13-17
summary Innovative building conceptions, that allow for the change of the building's shape and form, can offer advantages for certain types of applications compared to conventional structures. The conception, design,and realization of transformable building structures require the use of innovative building technologies, and the development of new analytical methods and procedures. Geometric complexity is usually acharacteristic of the architectural expression of transformable structures, and their initial geometric configuration and representation is one of the earliest and most challenging phases in their design. A preliminaryinvestigation with computer simulation and animation studies can help identify problems in their initial geometric conception.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 39ea
authors Maver, T., Harrison, C. and Grant, M.
year 2001
title Virtual Environments for Special Needs. Changing the VR Paradigm
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 151-159
summary The normal application of Virtual Reality is to the simulation of environments, which are in some way special - remote, hazardous or purely imaginary. This paper describes research and development work which changes the paradigm by simulating perfectly ordinary buildings for special people. Some 15% of the population have some form of physical impairment - a proportion which is likely to rise in line with an ageing population. New legislation, such as the UK Disability Discrimination Act places additional responsibility on building owners to ensure adequate access for people with an impairment and this in turn will place additional responsibility on the architect. Current methods of auditing access for new building are primitive and require the auditor to interpret plans/sections of the proposed building against a checklist of requirements specific to the special need. This paper reports on progress in the use of an immersive VR facility to simulate access to buildings for two broad classes of user: i) those with a mobility impairment; ii) those with visual impairment. In the former case, a wheelchair motion platform has been designed which allows the wheelchair user to navigate the virtual building; a brake and motor connected to the rollers on which the wheelchair sits facilitate the effects of slope and surface resistance. In the latter case, the main categories and degrees of visual impairment can be simulated allowing architects to assess the contribution of form, colour and signage to safe access.
keywords Virtual Reality, Mobility Impairment, Visual Impairment, Access, Simulation
series CAAD Futures
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 737e
authors Riegler, A. (ed.)
year 2001
title Virtual Science: Virtuality and Knowledge Acquisition in Science and Cognition
source Virtual Reality: Cognitive Foundations, Technological Issues & Philosophical Implications. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang
summary The focus of this paper is the process of knowledge acquisition (KA) and which role virtuality plays in this context. We argue that there are three different modes of knowledge acquisition which can be identified both in the domains of cognition and science: the empirical, the "constructive", and the "synthetic" mode. We show that the method of constructing knowledge in the virtual domain (i.e., the synthetic mode of KA) is not only a principal mode of KA in our cognition (e.g., thought experiments, making plans, etc.). It becomes increasingly important in the field of (natural) science in the form of simulations and virtual experiments. The attempt to find an answer to the question of whether simulation can be an information source for science, and to validate the computational approach in science, leads to a new interpretation of the nature of virtual models. This new perspective renders the problem of "feature extraction" obsolete.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id f80f
authors Samiaji, Doddy
year 2001
title Development Simulator
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Development Simulator is a 3D simulation design application for architects and urban designers. Written in Visual Basic environment, using COM and ActiveX, it serves as a decision-making-support-system that reveals the impact of development numbers to three dimensional building form. The tool combines the power of a drawing program, AutoCAD 2000 and a spreadsheet program, Excel 2000. Development Simulator runs in Windows 2000.
series thesis:MSc
email doddys@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 993b
authors Seebohm, Thomas
year 2001
title The Ideal Digital Design Curriculumn: Its Bases and its Content
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 180-185
summary There is a potential for the computer to fundamentally change the design process towards a more holistically conceived architecture. One of these directions is the use of software to develop form and the other concerns the use of software that embodies specialist knowledge including design knowledge. Software embodying knowledge will be the capital of the future. As this software becomes more user-friendly it will give architects new power to bring together a multitude of issues in a holistic way without themselves being specialists. A prerequisite for this fundamental change in the design process is an architectural design curriculum that is broader than before and integrates computing across disciplines. In effect, the intention is to educate a new type of Renaissance architect
keywords Architectural Curriculum, Simulation Software, Expert Systems, Digital Design
series eCAADe
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 5225
authors Gomez de Silva Garza, Andres and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2001
title Using Evolutionary Methods for Design Case Adaptation
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 180-191
summary Case-based reasoning (CBR) provides a methodology for directly using previous designs in the development of a new design. An aspect of CBR that is not well developed for designing is the combination and adaptation of previous designs. The difficulty with this aspect of case-based design is partly due to the extensive amounts of specialised knowledge needed to select the appropriate features of a previous design to include in the new design and the adaptation of these features to fit the context of a new design problem. In this paper we present a design process model that combines ideas from CBR and genetic algorithms (GA’s). The CBR paradigm provides a method for the overall process of case selection and adaptation. The GA paradigm provides a method for adapting design cases by combining and mutating their features until a set of new design requirements and constraints are satisfied. We have implemented the process model and illustrate the model for residential floor plan layout. We use a set of Frank Lloyd Wright prairie house layouts as the case base. The constraints used to determine whether new designs proposed by the process model are acceptable are taken from feng shui, the Chinese art of placement. This illustration not only clarifies how our process model for design through the evolutionary adaptation of cases works, but it also shows how knowledge sources with distinct origins can be used within the same design framework.
keywords Evolutionary Design, Case-Based Reasoning, Floor Plan Layout
series ACADIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 943c
authors Hendricx, A. and Neuckermans, H.
year 2001
title The object model at the core of the IDEA+ design environment
source Beheshti, R. (ed), Advances in Building Informatics, Proceedings of the 8th EuropIA International Conference on the application of Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Image Processing to Architecture, Building Engineering & Civil Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands, April 25-27, 2001, pp. 113-125
summary This paper focuses on three different aspects in which the IDEA+ core model differs from many other product modelling research initiatives: the systematic approach in the construction of the model, the respect for the evolutionary nature of architectural design, and the use of actual and complete design cases to test the model. Key words: CAAD, product modelling, integrated design environment, MERODE 1 The IDEA+ project: towards an integrated design environment In spite of the extensive use of all kinds of hardware and software in the architectural offices, the use of computers still does not contribute essentially to better architecture. For the CAD packages on the one hand, they have proven to be an efficient alternative for the traditional drawing board. Yet they fail in the early conceptual stage of design where creativity and exploration play the leading role. For computational tests and analysis tools on the other hand, they can hardly handle the typical absence o
series other
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ga0114
id ga0114
authors Hung, C.K., Frazer, J.H. and Xi, T.M.
year 2001
title Interactive Evolutionary Design in a Hierarchical Way
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper introduces a computational system framework for enhancing design in an evolutionary manner. The framework provides a structure for supporting design activities at the conceptual design stage at different levels of representation and manipulation. With this framework, designers can interactively manipulate design data and develop a solution in ahierarchical manner. Furthermore this system framework provides explorative and adaptive ability through its inter-links with a number of computational evolutionary and generative modules. In this paper, this system framework and its application in the design of wine glasses are presented.
series other
email John.Frazer@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 9057
authors Knight, M., Bandyopadhyay, S., Berridge, P. and Brown, A.
year 2001
title Digital Hindcasting - Critical Analysis through Virtual Reconstruction
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 529-533
summary Manah is an abandoned oasis settlement in Oman. During what is termed the “Golden period” in the region’s cultural development the settlement became on of the most important cultural centres of the interior. For a long period Manah stood as the seat of learning in sciences and arts. A current project is underway to establish, as far as possible, how the settlement evolved; how tribal, cultural, religious and social factors impinged on Manah as it grew over the years. The work described here is directed as applying computational methods to augment the analysis and critical review of that evolution. We are aiming to explain the evolutionary process using computer mediated techniques, working backwards from the current state, to the inception of the settlement; hence the term Digital Hindcasting.
keywords Reconstruction, Critical Analysis, Settlements
series eCAADe
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 90b5
authors Zhou, Qi and Krawczyk, Robert J.
year 2001
title From CAD to iAD: A survey of Internet application in the AEC industry
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 392-397
summary The internet is becoming increasingly more valuable in the field of architectural design that what we conventionally called CAD might soon be changed to iAD (internet Aided Design) (Zhou and Krawczyk 2000). In order to have a clear vision of what iAD will be or could be, we should first examine what is currently available. This research focuses on an investigation of selected web vendors, which are typical and most influential in providing internet related services for the AEC industry. Our purpose for doing this survey is: to understand the progress and development of internet application in the AEC industry, identify the technology used in this area, determine the advantages and deficiencies of current practice and develop a base for future research in proposing a evolutionary model of internet Aided Design for architecture.
keywords Internet Aided Design, Web-Based Application, On-Line Collaboration
series ACADIA
email zhouqi@netscape.net
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id ga0135
id ga0135
authors Roncoroni, Umberto
year 2001
title BioIcons
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary BioIcons are images developed with artificial life, especially modified Cellular Automata to simulate a sort of living artistic tool. Each image is a spontaneous creation of Artificial Life: different shapes and colors are assigned to each cell of the digital being; this is done linking the “biological” state of each cell and the auto similarity existing between the cell and the digital being as a whole. The resulting picture is like a microscopic view, because we can endlessly magnify portions of the image, using this process to reach, conceptually and visually, the integration between Fractals andArtificial Life. BioIcons, as the rest of my work, is the product of my programming efforts: I think that using proprietary algorithms supports autonomy and originality. I started this work studying Cellular Automata algorithms; some of them are mutations of classic Cellular Automata, others are my own creations. After that, I studied how to force the Cellular Automata to behave like an artistic tool, introducing special parameters linked with color theory, perception and auto similarity. Finally, I studied an interface in such a way to allow interaction between the artificial artists and the user, and to transform the image into an interactive and dynamic process. The dynamic interactions between the piece of art and the public, the transformation of the artistic process into something open and free and the close connections between art and investigation are the orienting ideas of my artistic effort. Yet I’m also concerned with digital technology as it should be applied to art, mainly to discover the medium’s artistic language. I consider of great importance, for my artistic development, the opportunity to integrate my strong love for nature and life with art and mathematics, with the help of computer technologies.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

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