CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 703

_id 0657
authors Morozumi, M., Homma, R., Shounai, Y., Yamaguchi, S. and Kawasumi, N.
year 2001
title Web-based collaborative design studio: tools and programs
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 93-102
summary Since 1996, Kumamoto University has repeated several experiments to apply web-based collaborative design techniques to a junior design studio aiming to stimulate studentsí interaction in the class and to enhance their design abilities. When it became clear after a two-year experiment that writing web pages and uploading them to a web server was a barrier of communication for students, the authors developed a web-based groupware called GW-Notebook, and started using it in 1998. In the fall semester of 2000, the authors introduced a new design studio program, and tested the revised version of the groupware, GW-Notebook III. This paper discusses the features of the system, and gives an outline of the studio program and some of the findings in the studio as well as the use of the revised system.
series CAADRIA
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id fe09
authors Morozumi, Mitsuo and Homma, Riken
year 2001
title A Design Studio Program that Applied Groupware to Stimulate Students’ Interactions - A Case Study of Junior Studio
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 317-322
summary Since 1996, Kumamoto University has repeated several experiments to apply web-based collaborative design techniques to a junior design studio to stimulate students’ interaction in the class and to enhance their design abilities. As it became evident after a two-year experiment that writing web pages and uploading them to a web server was a barrier of communication for students, the authors developed a web-based groupware called GWNotebook, and started using it in 1998. In the fall semester of 2000, the authors tested the groupware in a revised version, and a new program of studio instructions that assumed the use of the groupware. This paper, referring students’ answers to two sets of questionnaire respectively carried out in 1997 and 2000, discusses the effectiveness of groupware and the instruction program.
keywords Design Studio, Groupware, Www, Information Sharing, Design Communication
series eCAADe
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 174f
authors Bakker, N.H.
year 2001
title Spatial Orientation in Virtual Environments
source Delft University of Technology
summary Recently, a growing interest can be detected in the application of Virtual Environment (VE) technology as an operator interface. VEs are three-dimensional computer-generated images that can be shown on a conventional monitor, on a large screen display, or on a head-mounted display. In order to use these three-dimensional interfaces for finding and retrieving information, the user must be able to spatially orient themselves. Different types of VE technology are available for navigating in these VEs, and different types of navigation can be enabled. A choice has to be made between the different options to enable good spatial orientation of the user. There are two main types of VE interfaces: an immersive interface that provides rich sensory feedback to the user when moving around in the VE, and a non-immersive interface that provides only visual feedback to the user when moving around in the VE. Furthermore, navigation through the VE can either be continuous providing fluent motion, or can be discontinuous which means that the viewpoint is displaced instantaneously over a large distance. To provide insight into the possible effects of these options a series of nine experiments was carried out. In the experiments the quality of spatial orientation behaviour of test subjects is measured while using the different types of interface and the different types of navigation. The results of the experiments indicate that immersive navigation improves the perception of displacement through the VE, which in turn aids the acquisition of spatial knowledge. However, as soon as the spatial layout of the VE is learned the two types of navigation interface do not lead to differences in spatial orientation performance. A discontinuous displacement leads to temporary disorientation, which will hinder the acquisition of spatial knowledge. The type of discontinuous displacements has an effect on the time needed for anticipation. The disorienting effects of a discontinuous displacement can be compensated for by enabling cognitive anticipation to the destination of the displacement. These results suggest that immersive navigation might only be beneficial for application domains in which new spatial layouts have to be learned every time or in domains where the primary users are novices. For instance, in training firemen to teach them the layout of new buildings with VE, or in using architectural walkthroughs in VE to show new building designs to potential buyers. Discontinuous movement should not be allowed when exploring a new environment. Once the environment is learned and if fast displacement is essential then discontinuous displacement should be preferred. In this case, the interface designer must make sure that information is provided about the destination of a discontinuous displacement.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id diss_long
id diss_long
authors Long, A.
year 2001
title Quill A Gesture Design Tool for Pen-based User Interfaces
source U.C. Berkeley
summary This dissertation describes the motivation, design, and development of a tool for designing gestures for pen-based user interfaces. Pens and other styli have been ubiquitous for recording information for centuries. Recently, pen-based computers have recently become common, especially small devices such as the Palm Pilot. One benefit pens provide in computer interfaces is the ability to draw gestures—marks that invoke commands. Gestures can be intuitive and faster than other methods of invoking commands. However, our research shows that gestures are sometimes misrecognized and hard to remember. We believe these problems are due in part to the difficulty of designing “good” gestures—that is, gestures that are easy to remember and are recognized well—and the lack of tools for helping designers create good gestures. We believe that an improved gesture design tool can help interface designers create good gestures for their applications. Since people confuse similar objects and misremember them, we performed experiments to measure why people perceived gestures as similar. We derived computational metrics for predicting human perception of gesture similarity. Based on the results of our experiments, we developed a gesture design tool, quill. The tool warns designers about gestures that may be hard to remember or recognize, and provides advice about how to improve the gestures. It also provides a convenient way to test recognition of gestures. To evaluate quill, a user study was performed with 10 professional user interface designers and one professional web designer. All designers were able to create gesture sets using quill, but not all designers benefited from quill’s suggestions. More work is needed to make suggestions useful for most designers. The primary contributions of this work are: • Improved understanding of the gesture design process, including the types of problems people encounter when designing gestures. • Computational models for predicting human-perceived gesture similarity. • Confirmation of the importance of good naming for gesture memorability. • An intelligent gesture design tool, quill, which automatically warns designers about potential problems with their gestures and advises them about how to fix these problems. This work also suggests several areas for future work in the areas of gesture design tools and gesture similarity and memorability.
series thesis:PhD
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
more http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~chrisl/work/pubs/
last changed 2003/09/24 12:54

_id 02bb
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2001
title THREE-D MAZE: GETTING LOST IN VIRTUAL REALITY
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 145-147
summary Virtual Environments (VE) influence design processes increasingly. We investigate the outcome of creation, interpretation and communication of architectural design, by using a three-dimensional (3D) maze together with text-based communication in a series of collaborative design experiments. The goal of our study was to identify how designers use and communicate design ideas by using VEs versa conventional methods of two-dimensional representations such as paper and pen. We developed a 3D-maze tool and set-up a series of experiments, including navigation- and perception-challenges, transcription of design, remote communication between design partners and controlled observations. We discuss how architects collaborate with partners and communicate their proposals in VE compared to actions in paper environments.
series SIGRADI
email marcaurel@hku.hk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 3a73
authors Silva, Neander F.
year 2001
title PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING IN CAAD CURRICULUM: THE SEARCH FOR A FEASIBLE MODEL
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 210-212
summary Problem-based learning as a teaching approach has been object of several experiments in CAAD education. However, we argue in this paper that such experiences have been limited to isolated courses within programmes, rarely affecting the whole CAAD curriculum. We identify as the cause of this gap the inherent contradictions between the traditional curriculum and the nature of design process. We then describe a PBL-oriented implementation of a post-grad CAAD curriculum which has as its major objective to better simulate a professional experience by inducing enforced recurrence along the programme’s structure.
series SIGRADI
email Neander@unb.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id d911
authors Verbeke, Johan and Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2001
title A Future Focus on Collaborative Design
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 98-103
summary In this paper, we will report on the experiences and insights discussed during a workshop of the Special Interest Group on Collaborative Architectural Design. Participants from 12 universities and four firms (for architecture, engineering, consultancy and software) brainstormed and discussed on multidisciplinary simultaneous collaborative design and exchanged their ideas on the subject. The effort of the diverse participants covered theoretical, social and technical issues of collaborative architectural design. The topic of the workshop was explored by means of paper presentations, software tests, experiments, different types of brainstorm sessions and the formulation of future scenarios. The combination of junior and senior researchers of each university proved to be fruitful and inspiring for the discussions. As an outcome of these activities a framework for future research in the field will be presented. Special focus will be on the aspects of communication language, communication behavior, communication environment, goals and roles in the context of collaborative design. The name {ACCOLADE} is an acronym of Architectural Collaborative Design. The name brings a number of different words together in a group. E.g. {England, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, ...}. The meaning of the word in English is ‘a mark of honour’ and the French meaning of the word is a ‘solemn embrace’. It also refers to the multi-disciplinary design process. These connotations can be useful for a collaboration project in which many different people and parties plan to make a joint design effort.
keywords Architecture, Collaboration, Design
series eCAADe
email johan.verbeke@archb.sintlucas.wenk.be, m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 6a37
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 13-23
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies ina tightly structured framework for the integration of Environmental Control Systems (ECS) principles intoa third year design studio. An interchangeable use of digital media and physical material enabledarchitectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement.The principles that provide the foundation for integrative strategies between a design studio and buildingtechnology course spring from the Bauhaus tradition where a systematic approach to craftsmanship andvisual perception is emphasized. Focusing particularly on color, light, texture and materials, Josef Albersexplored the assemblage of found objects, transforming these materials into unexpected dynamiccompositions. Moholy-Nagy developed a technique called the photogram or camera-less photograph torecord the temporal movements of light. Wassily Kandinsky developed a method of analytical drawingthat breaks a still life composition into diagrammatic forces to express tension and geometry. Theseschematic diagrams provide a method for students to examine and analyze the implications of elementplacements in space (Bermudez, Neiman 1997). Gyorgy Kepes's Language of Vision provides a primerfor learning basic design principles. Kepes argued that the perception of a visual image needs aprocess of organization. According to Kepes, the experience of an image is "a creative act ofintegration". All of these principles provide the framework for the studio investigation.The quarter started with a series of intense short workshops that used an interchangeable use of digitaland physical media to focus on ECS topics such as day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary tolead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration.In integrating ECS components with the design studio, an nine-step methodology was established toprovide students with a compelling and tangible framework for design:Examples of student work will be presented for the two times this course was offered (2001/02) to showhow exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series ACADIA
email tfowler@calpoly.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 2004_444
id 2004_444
authors Ham, Jeremy J. and Dawson, Anthony
year 2004
title Managing Digital Resources for Design Education
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 444-450
summary This paper outlines the evolution of digital management systems used in the School of Architecture and building at Deakin University from 2001 to the present. These systems have been implemented to support a curriculum development programme in the design, construction and computing units. Two school-based information management systems are discussed in depth: low-tech network submission system and Bentley Systems Inc’s ProjectWise. Early experiences in using a universitybased system are also reported on. Lessons learnt from three years experience in managing digital resources for design education have informed the development of a growing digital culture in the architectural and construction management curricula. Whilst digital curriculum design and management systems supporting this curriculum have been developed effectively in this school, full optimization of IT to enhance design education is reliant on fundamental changes within traditional academic culture.
keywords Digital Management, Digital Curriculum, Design Education
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ga0122
id ga0122
authors Miranda Carranza, Pablo
year 2001
title Self-design and Ontogenetic evolution
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The context and long term goal of the project is to develop design environments in which the computer becomes an active and creative partner in the design process. To try to set-up a system that would enhance the design process by suggesting possibilities, has been preferredto an approach that emphasises optimisation and problem-solving.The work develops around the general concept of morphogenesis, the process of development of a system's form or structure. Besides the obvious example of embryological growth, biological evolution, learning, and societal development can also be considered as morphogenetic processes.The aim is to set a foundation from where latter work can develop in the study of how form unravels, and the implications and possibilities of the utilisation of such processes in design. Some basic principles are established, regarding the idea of Ontogenesis, the study of thedevelopment of organisms, and Epigenesis, the mode Ontogenesis operates.Drawing on D’Arcy Thompson’s ideas and inspired on the models and approaches developed in the recent field of Artificial Life, this work explores the possibilities of using a model based in bone accretion to develop structural systems. The mechanisms by which bone is able toadapt are relatively known and simple, and at the same time they address a sensible problem, such as it is the case of the static performance of a structure. This may seem contradictory with what was mentioned above regarding problem solving. The problem is anyway approached not with the intention of finding optimal solutions, but challenging and creativeones. It is not answers the computer should provide, but questions about the problematic of the design. It is in this context of “problem-worrying” (as opposed to problem solving) that the work has been carried.
series other
email pablom@interactiveinstitute.se
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ecaade03_301_36_rafi
id ecaade03_301_36_rafi
authors Rafi, Ahmad M. E. and Jabar, Mohd. Fazidin
year 2003
title FCM: An Automated Flood Crisis Management System
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 301-304
summary This research presents our progress of the second phase of City Administration System (CAS) (Rafi and Fazidin, 2001). It covers the terrain generation of Kuala Lumpur’s Central Business District about 30km x 30km at 1 meter resolution using the latest stereoscopic satellite data and survey data from Mapping Department of Malaysia’s Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment. CAS will be designed to have three main functions, namely: Flood Crisis Management (FCM), Architectural and Town Planning Management, and City Services and Administration. At a 1meter resolution, CAS will be able to predict, manage and visualise flash and major floods within the city with a very high degree of accuracy. It has been identified for CAS that there is a need to share information through collaborative environment in a more centralised manner that allows collective decisions, facilitates continuous updates, communicates effectively and permits the sharing of experiences and ideas.
keywords CAS; FCM; collaborative environment; sensor
series eCAADe
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my, fazidin@mmu.edu.my
more http://www.mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id 5b1e
authors Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2001
title The concept of Carrying in Collaborative Virtual Environments
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 195-208 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Collaborative Architectural Design can take place within a virtual environment with a team of remote but virtually present people. However, in most virtual environments, the ability to perform actions is still limited to the availability of some interactive objects and a set of tools for the specific purposes of the system. As the interface of most systems is designed for unshared use, the graphic feedback signals are limited to local information about the state of objects and tools. If multiuser interaction is added to such Virtual Environments, many new possibilities and problems emerge. Users of shared applications should not only be informed about the state of local objects, tools and their own actions, they should also be made aware of what the other users undertake. Aspects, which are in daily life so obvious, should be restudied thoroughly for the application within Virtual Environments for Collaborative Design. Much research has to be undertaken in order to make such virtual places as intuitively interactive as ordinary shared working places. The 'concept of carrying', which is proposed and explained in this paper, is expected to become a useful metaphoric mechanism for solving several issues related to Spatial User Interfaces (SUI's) and Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE's). The visual feedback from 'carrying-events' should provide more mutual understanding about ongoing processes in shared applications and it should add a more 'natural' interface for processes concerning people, tools and content in virtual and digitally augmented environments. At the start of this paper some basic human action patterns for tasks on a 2Ddesktop are compared to tasks in a 3D-environment. These action patterns are checked for their implementation in Windows Icons Menus and Pointer (WIMP) interfaces and Virtual Reality systems. Carrying is focused upon as an important interactive event in Virtual Environments. Three carrying actions related to Collaborative Architectural Design are explained by means of prototypes in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). Finally the usefulness of a general carrying concept as part of a new Visual Language is considered. The research at hand is in its first exploring phases and draws from a running PhD research about SUI's for Context Related Architectural Design and from recent experiences in CVE's.
series other
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 988c
authors Szewczyk, Jaroslaw and Jakimowicz, Adam
year 2001
title Multi User Interface Problems in Current CAD Systems
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 183-194 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary The general problem of software and hardware interface has been discussed since the first personal computers had appeared on the market. Interface solutions, proposed by the CAD software producers themselves, have been deeply criticised. In fact, learning how to use the software means how to operate its interface. In the process of software developments, interfaces became 'second languages', which are to be learnt by the user. This is a real problem especially for the beginner. The problem is even more complicated in case of interfaces for many users. They should help in the processes of computer networks based cooperative design. In this paper we try to juxtapose the main features of user interfaces in CAD, especially ones for collaborative work. The most important problems were detected, and conclusions were made with an aim to research interfaces adequate for architect's work in the future.
series other
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 5da8
authors Tokman, Leyla Y.
year 2001
title Collaborative e-Design
source DCNET'2000: Design Computing on the Net'2000, Organized by Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney ve the International Journal of Design Computing
summary In early 1900’s, successful architects who have a strong influencewith not only their ideas on architecture but also their own work gave desk criticism ‘the form of one-on-one conversation’ in their atelier or studio. Being in these studios was a big opportunity for limited number of accepted students. The architectural education in the first half of 1900’s has many other parallels to education from the other professions. Developments in computer technology have been created a new medium in architectural design and education since 1960’s. Today, Computer technology and communication technology together (Information Technology- IT) help architects and students communicate ideas. This is a big opportunity for architecture candidates in 1990’s comparing with the candidates in 1900âs. One of the main changes is desk criticism from ‘the form of one-on-one conversation’ to ‘the form of multiple consultants’. That means today, not only students but also professionals can develop projects together with any adviser/ partner at any time and at any place where IT can be accessible. Moreover, This collaboration for synchronous - asynchronous studies in virtual environments also brings the equal opportunity to the students from not only developed countries but also developing countries. Students and professionals can share and enhance different ideas, progression of design decisions in educational view and practice view. In this study, some experiences will be shared on design computing and also some new visions/ conceptual models of design computing in collaborative environments will be offered.
keywords Collaborative Design, Computing, Information Technology, Participation, Opportunity, Network, Team Design
series journal paper
email lytokman@anadolu.edu.tr
more http://www.arch.usyd.EDU.AU/kcdc/journal/vol3/dcnet/tokman
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 793a
authors Turk, Ziga
year 2001
title Multimedia: providing students with real world experiences
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 247-255
summary Multimedia has been quickly accepted by the engineering community. In the first part of the paper, the author provides a theoretical explanation why multimedia is popular in engineering: because it tries to provide an artificial "being-in-the-world" experience. This explanation is backed-up by Heidegger's philosophy and Winogard's critique of artificial intelligence (AI). Heidegger believed that humans basically act pre-reflectively, depending on the situation into which they are thrown. Such decisions are based on common sense and intuitive knowledge accumulated while "being-in-the-world", and particularly during breakdowns. Engineering students have few opportunities to observe breakdowns, however, information technology, particularly virtual reality and multimedia provide them. In the second part of the paper, a system to teach earthquake engineering is presented, based on the principles of breakdown-oriented learning. The system is built around a multimedia database that contains digitised photographs of damages caused by some of the recent major earthquakes. To a large extent, such multimedia tools can replace the learning from real breakdowns and complements theoretical knowledge that can be passed on using traditional means.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 12e3
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Che Zulkhairi, A. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title Interactive Storytelling and Its Role in the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 151-158
summary Projects of ever increasing complexity and size have incited the need for new and robust design methodologies and tools in an effort to manage complexity, lower costs, ascertain quality and reduce risk. Technology convergence through the growing availability of networked computers, rapid progress in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and information management have encouraged the undertaking of even more complex designs that demand high degrees of interaction, collaboration and the efficient sharing and dissemination of information. It is suggested that interactive storytelling and interactive design (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2001) techniques that use non-linear information mapping systems can be deployed to assist users as they navigate information that is structured to address localized needs as they arise. The design process is a collaborative effort that encompasses diverse knowledge disciplines and demands the management and utilization of available resources to satisfy the needs of a single or set of goals. It is thought that building industry specialists should work close together in an organised manner to solve design problems as they emerge and find alternatives when designs fall short. The design process involves the processing of dynamic and complex information, that can be anything from the amount of soil required to level lands - to the needs of specific lightings systems in operation theatres. Other important factors that affect the design process are related to costs and deadlines. This paper will demonstrate some of our early findings in several experiments to establish nonlinear storytelling. It will conclude with a recommendation for a plausible design of such a system based on experimental work that is currently being conducted and is reaching its final stages. The paper will lay the foundations of a possible path to implementation based on the concept of multi-path animation that is appropriate for structuring the design process as used in the building industry.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 1445
authors Caldas, L. and Rocha, J.
year 2001
title A generative design system applied to Sizaís school of architecture at Oporto
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 253-264
summary A new generative design system based on a genetic algorithm is tested within the framework of Alvaro Sizaís School of Architecture at Oporto, Portugal. The system works over a detailed three-dimensional description of the building and uses natural lighting and overall environmental performance as objective functions to guide the generation of solutions. This paper researches the encoding of architectural design intentions into the system, using constraints derived from Sizaís original design. Experiments using this generative system were performed on three different geographical locations to test the algorithmís capability to adapt solutions to different climatic characteristics within the same language constraints.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2002/09/04 13:44

_id af64
authors Nam, Tek-Jin and Wright, David
year 2001
title The development and evaluation of Syco3D: a real-time collaborative 3D CAD system
source Design Studies 22 (6) (2001) pp. 557-582
summary This paper describes the development and evaluation of a real-time collaborative 3D CAD system, Syco3D, which allows distributed designers in a small team to work together to build and edit virtual 3D models. A shared 3D workspace, Shared Stage, is incorporated in a conventional CAD interface and provides a number of real-time collaborative features in two main interface elements: Synchronised Stage View and Data Structure Diagram. This paper also reports on a usability experiment with two versions of the system, one with the Shared Stage module and the other without, and discusses the issues raised from the development and experiments with the real-time collaborative 3D CAD system.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id d3d4
authors Sato, Tomoya and Hagiwara, Masafumi
year 2001
title IDSET: Interactive Design System using Evolutionary Techniques
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 33 (5) (2001) pp. 367-377
summary In this paper, we propose a tool-creating support system named IDSET (Interactive Design System using Evolutionary Techniques). Two kinds of Stages are used in theproposed IDSET: Stages where fundamental shapes are generated and Stages where they are combined. At each Stage, new shapes are generated by the system usingevolutionary techniques, and they are shown to the user. The user's creativity is stimulated by this process. Since the system begins with creating parts instead of usingparts that are prepared in advance, various novel tools can be formed. The user only has to evaluate the displayed tools, not to have to make them. A system to create toolsthat are composed of two fundamental parts has been implemented as an example of the proposed system. Computer experiments have been carried out, and various toolsand artistic shapes have been created. Some shapes which human beings could not easily envisage were included in the created shapes. This underlines the effectiveness ofthe proposed IDSET.
keywords Interactive Design, Evolutionary Techniques, Tool-Creating Support System
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

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