CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 700

_id a3e8
authors Economou, Athanassios
year 2001
title Four Algebraic Structures In Design
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 192-201
summary A constructive program for the generation of three-dimensional languages of designs based on nested group structures is outlined.
keywords Computational Design, Symmetry, Group Theory, Shape Grammars, VRML
series ACADIA
email economou@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 8646
authors Barelkowski, Robert
year 2001
title Referential Information Systems as a Source of Architectural Design Solutions in P.R.S. Method
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 486-492
summary The paper presents the work on planning procedures improved with basic information technology mechanisms. These procedures are extended according to P.R.S. method, containing three main elements: planning, references and seminars. The focus is on references to show four different appearances of referential data. Paper snapshots the theoretical background of reference, its methodological implementation with computer techniques support, practical formulation, collecting and composition of reference and finally the impact, references can have on architectural design solutions.
keywords Spatial Planning, Planning Methods, GIS, CAD, Spatial References
series eCAADe
email robert@armageddon.poznan.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 8948
authors Bertola Duarte, Rovenir
year 2001
title AS APROXIMAÇÕES DO COMPUTADOR AO PROCESSO DE ENSINO/ APRENDIZADO DO PROJETO ARQUITETÔNICO (An Approach to Computing in the Teaching/Learning Proces in Architectural Project Design)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 207-209
summary This article seeks to disclose part of the results obtained with the development of the master dissertation. (DUARTE [2], 2000) The several approach forms between the computers and the process teaching/learning of architectural design were investigated in this work, standing out, close moment the edict of MEC that regulated the introduction of the computers in the architecture schools in Brazil. Ten Brazilian schools of architecture were researched, through questionnaires and visits, in which four approach forms were detected, that were understood more deeply with a study of cases, highlighting: methods, supports, components and the teaching process and the design process built by the student.
series SIGRADI
email rovenir@uel.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 36f5
authors Burry, M., Burry, J. and Faulí, J.
year 2001
title Sagrada Família Rosassa: Global Computeraided Dialogue between Designer and Craftsperson (Overcoming Differences in Age, Time and Distance)
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 076-086
summary The rose window (‘rosassa’ in Catalan) recently completed between the two groups of towers that make up the Passion Façade of Gaudí’s Sagrada Família Church in Barcelona measures eight metres wide and thirty-five metres in height [Figure 1]. There were four phases to the design based in three distinct geographical locations. The design was undertaken on site, design description in Australia some eighteen thousand kilometres distant, stone-cutting a thousand kilometres distant in Galicia, with the completion of the window in March 2001. The entire undertaking was achieved within a timeframe of fifteen months from the first design sketch. Within this relatively short period, the entire team achieved a new marriage between architecture and construction, a broader relationship between time-honoured craft technique with high technology, and evidence of leading the way in trans-global collaboration via the Internet. Together the various members of the project team combined to demonstrate that the technical office on site at the Sagrada Família Church now has the capacity to use ‘just-in-time’ project management in order to increase efficiency. The processes and dialogues developed help transcend the tyranny of distance, the difficult relationship between traditional craft based technique and innovative digitally enhanced production methods, and the three generational age differences between the youngest and more senior team members.
keywords Digital Practice, Global Collaboration, Rapid Prototyping
series ACADIA
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 3287
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 2001
title Evolution of Digital Design Teaching: A Course as Microcosm for Educational Issues
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 20, pp. 13-17
summary Despite widespread use of computers in the architectural profession, computer use in architectural education remains uneven. The challenge to educators becomes apparent in examining the evolution of an introductory course. In four years, the teaching initiatives illuminate the crucial issues:* Content focus (what): computer techniques supporting design concepts, selection of design and communication applications / * Delivery techniques (how): - Organizing framework: staffing, course format - Teaching tools: web resources, online bulletin boards, online quizzes and gradebook. These efforts have produced gradual progress. Major successes include development of successful assignments and resources, balance of exercise types, and skill improvement through competency exams. On the other hand, addressing different skill levels, providing personal attention in an efficient way and overcoming equipment impediments remain a challenge. Outside the course, the overall curricular framework needs to be adjusted to prepare for and reinforce learning within the course. Results from initiatives inside and outside of the classroom are discussed.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 8862
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2001
title Net-based Architectural Design: The Difficult Path from the Presentation of Architectural Design in the World Wide Web to Teamwork in Virtual Planning Offices: A Field Report
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 371-375
summary In the last 18 months, students from the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) have undertaken six design projects as so-called Netzentwurf (“Net- Design”) studios in collaboration with different universities in Europe. These studios have used a web-based collaboration platform established at an independent web site and use didactical methods for web based design collaboration established over the past four years at ifib. A total of some 500 students have been involved in these projects and all have used the common platform to carry out their presentation and communication work.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Collaboration, CSCW, Architectural Graphics
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id avocaad_2001_15
id avocaad_2001_15
authors Henri Achten, Jos van Leeuwen
year 2001
title Scheming and Plotting your Way into Architectural Complexity
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, our ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Following the four waves of design methodology as distinguished by Cross (1984), we see changing architectural design attitudes with respect to complexity. Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, designers such as Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke embrace complexity and make it a focus in their design work. The computer is an indispensable instrument in this approach. The paper discusses the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and reflects in particular on the role of design representations in this discussion. It is advanced that a number of recent developments are based on an intensified use of design representations such as schema’s, diagrams, and interactive modelling techniques. Within the field of possibilities in this field, the authors discuss Feature-Based Modelling (FBM) as a formalism to represent knowledge of the design. It is demonstrated how the FBM approach can be used to describe graphic representations as used in design, and how other levels and kinds of design knowledge can be incorporated, in particular the less definite qualitative information in the early design phase. The discussion section concludes with an extrapolation of the current role of design representation in the design process, and advances a few positions on the advantage and disadvantage of this role in architectural design.
series AVOCAAD
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id caadria2007_233
id caadria2007_233
authors Hoseini, Ali Ghaffarian; Rahinah Ibrahim
year 2007
title Using Social Network Analysis for Visualising Spatial Planning During Conceptual Design Phase
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Spatial diagramming exercises with clients are difficult when most clients are not able to visualize the end results of their requirements. This paper would like to introduce a computational tool—Social Network Analysis (SNA)—commonly used in the communications field to study relationships between people we believe can resolve this visualization problem. Our research intent is to affirm whether or not we can use SNA as a spatial planning tool during conceptual building design. We posit that since the nodes and structural relationships between the nodes may have similar architectural characteristics, the tool would enable architects to make changes by moving any spaces on a floor plan while safely maintaining their spatial relationships to other spaces. In this paper, we would like to develop a proof-of-concept model using an available SNA tool to facilitate spatial diagramming visualization during conceptual design phase. We tested the use of a SNA tool at four levels. The first level determined whether we could develop spatial relationship between functional spaces (such as the living room must be adjacent to the front entry). The second level is on setting priorities values for the different nodes and the linkages. The third level determined whether we could develop grouping relationship between several functional spaces that have a common characteristic (such as public versus private spaces) on one horizontal plane. The final fourth level determined whether we could develop multiple layers that are connected by one common connector (such as a staircase in a double-story house). Our models are validated intellectually by visual comparison between our model and another diagramming by Nooshin (2001) that was developed manually. We are most interested in the fourth level because complexity in the spatial diagramming exercises is caused by multi-layered spatial arrangements at the horizontal and vertical planes. We expect our study to provide us guidelines in developing a prototype for a spatial diagramming tool using SNA, which architects can use to resolve visualization problems when conducting the exercise with their clients.
series CAADRIA
email Ali_ghaffarian_hoseini@yahoo.com
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id 3c96
authors Kang, H., Anderson, S.D. and Clayton, M.J.
year 2001
title Web4D: Challenges and Practices for Construction Scheduling
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 132-141
summary Research has demonstrated that four-dimensional computer aided design (4D CAD), in which a three-dimensional (3D) CAD model is animated through time, is useful in helping professionals understand the construction schedule. However, cumbersome processes to update a 4D CAD model, which involve changing geometry representations, changing schedules and bar charts, linking the geometry to the scheduling information, and generating animations, may discourage professionals from using 4D CAD in actual construction projects. A software prototype implementing 4D CAD in a Web environment overcomes limitations of current 4D CAD tools. This software permits editing of the construction schedule over the Internet and shows the revised construction sequence visually on a Web browser using 3D computer graphics. This software is composed of a database on a server, Active Server Pages (ASP) scripts, and a Java applet that was developed using Java 3D Application Programming Interface (API) and Java JDBC. The Java applet retrieves the 4D model at the appropriate level of completion over the Internet and allows users to navigate around the model on the Web browser. Web4D visualization software can help professionals to expedite the schedule updating process by involving designers and constructors in collaborative decision- making.
keywords Web4D, 4D CAD, 4D Visualization, Construction Schedule, Internet
series ACADIA
email juliankang@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 4cd0
authors Lee, Ming-Chun
year 2001
title SpaceMaker: A Symbol-based Three-dimensional Computer Modeling Tool for Early Schematic Development of the Architectural Design
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Designing architecture is an action of creating space. Architects start designing by making twodimensional (2-D) drawings in order to explore alternatives of spatial arrangement. However, architects are actually working with three-dimensional (3-D) space. They see 3-D space in their mind’s eye when making sketches in 2-D. It is thus valuable to help designers truly see 3-D space during designing. In addition, different spaces may have different functions and configurations of architectural components. Architects usually use text labels in their drawings to identify architectural concepts. They identify the function of space and remind themselves of the proposed configuration of architectural elements when labeling each space with a symbol. By recognizing the text label, it is possible to identify the architectural configuration of the space. Therefore, it is possible to create a 3-D modeling tool based on the recognition of labels in freehand sketches. This thesis introduces a symbol-based 3-D modeling tool – the SpaceMaker – that allows designers to make freehand floor-plan drawings to explore the initial concept of spatial layout and allows users to apply labels to identify different types of space. Finally, the program converts those floor plans into 3-D models according to the labels. In the SpaceMaker, a designer predefines a label by assigning it four boundary elements that encircle a space. When the designer draws the label in the sketch floor plan, the SpaceMaker then recognizes the label and constructs the space based on the defined boundary condition in a VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) format that enables the designer to view the 3-D space through a VRML enabled web browser.
series thesis:MSc
email mingchun@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 4f37
authors Mahalingam, Ganapathy
year 2001
title POCHE' - Polyhedral Objects Controlled by Heteromorphic Effectors
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 603-614
summary This paper takes the architectural concept of poche' and uses it to explore new possibilities in transforming polyhedra with effectors. In many computer-aided design systems, architectural entities are represented as well-formed polyhedra. Parameters and functions can be used to modify the forms of these polyhedra. For example, a cuboid can be transformed by changing its length, breadth and height, which are its parameters. In a more complex example, a polyhedron can be transformed by a set of user-defined functions, which control its vertices, edges and faces. These parameters and functions can further be embodied as effectors that control and transform the polyhedra in extremely complex ways. An effector is an entity, which has a transforming effect on another entity or system. An effector is more complex than a parameter or function. An effector can be a modelled as a virtual computer. Effectors can take on many roles that range from geometric transformation agents and constraints to performance criteria. The concept of the poche', made famous by Venturi is familiar to architects. The poche' is a device to mediate the differences between an interior and an exterior condition or between two interior conditions. In a poche', the role of the effector changes from being an agent that acts on a polyhedron from the outside, to an agent that acts as a mediator between an interior polyhedron and an exterior polyhedron, which represent interior and exterior environments respectively. This bi-directionality in the role of the effector allows a wide range of architectural responses to be modelled. The effector then becomes an interface in the true sense of the word. This concept will work best in a threedimensional or four-dimensional representational world but can be used effectively in a two-dimensional representational world as well. The application of this concept in design systems is explored with examples drawn from the work of the author, and practitioners who are using the concept of effectors in their work. A brief discussion of how this technique can evolve in the future is presented.
keywords Effectors, Abstract Machines, Design As Interface
series CAAD Futures
email Ganapathy_Mahalingam@ndsu.nodak.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 5166
authors Sass, Larry
year 2001
title Reconstructing Palladio’s Villas: A computational analysis of Palladio’s villa design and construction process
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 212-226
summary This project is ongoing research focused on finding a method of reconstruction, using computational devices to build, represent and evaluate Palladio’s un-built villas in three-dimensions. The first of The Four Books of Architecture contains text and images explaining Palladio’s design and construction systems in the form of rules. These rules were written for masons and craftsmen of the 16th century, offering one and two-dimensional data on each of Palladio’s villas, palaces and churches. The Four Books offers a general treatment of the villas; however, it is missing most of the physical construction data needed to execute a full reconstruction of an un-built building. Many architects and historians have attempted to reconstruct Palladio’s work in drawings, wooden models and computer imagery. This project presents a new method of reconstruction through the definition of construction rules, in addition to shape and proportional rules defined by previous scholars. In also uses 3D printing and texture mapped renderings as design tools. This study uses the Villa Trissino in Meledo as a test case for the process. The end product is a presentation of a method for reconstruction in the form of a three-dimensional analysis of Palladio’s design and construction rules. The goal is to recreate all 24 of the villas found in the Four Books with the same method and rules as a demonstration of qualitative and quantitative input and output from a computational device.
keywords Palladio, Computer Modeling, 3D Printing, Computer Rendering
series ACADIA
email lsass@sbra.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id a2bb
authors Shih, Shen-Guan and Huang, Wei-Lung
year 2001
title Toward the integration of spatial and temporal information for Building Construction
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 47-60
summary Building construction is a kind of complex process that integrates activities regarding design, materials, personnel and equipments. Information systems that describe building construction need to represent both the spatial information of the building design and the temporal information of construction plan. We classify four levels of integration for spatiotemporal information in building construction. We consider that the classification is important for the guidance of our research for that it distinguishes levels of complexity and applicability of data models that integrates spatiotemporal information. A prototype system is developed and tested for providing us a means to gain more insights to the problem.
keywords Building Construction, Project Modelling, Representation
series CAAD Futures
email sgshih@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 68f0
id 68f0
authors Talbott K, Snyder G and Dicker J
year 2006
title Design + Virtual Modeling: Course Integration on a Large Scale
source Marjanovic I and Robinson C (eds) Intersections: Design Education and Other Fields of Inquiry, Proceedings of the 22nd National Conference on the Beginning Design Student, Ames, Iowa, April 2006, 309-313
summary Starting in 2001 a group of faculty at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee School of Architecture and Urban Planning undertook a three year effort to integrate introductory studio with introductory computer-aided design. Each year 160 incoming sophomores begin their first design studio. They also receive a laptop computer and begin concurrent enrollment in an introductory computer course entitled Virtual Modeling. Students participate in studio projects, computer assignments, hand drawing tutorials, computer tutorials, studio course lectures and computer course lectures. This takes the dedicated effort of four faculty members and five graduate teaching assistants. The goals of this paper are 1) to describe the evolution of this large-scale integration effort, 2) to identify key success factors, and 3) to describe the impact on our students’ beginning design education. The paper provides a balanced perspective by discussing both benefits and challenges. It begins with more concrete information and moves gradually into deeper issues.
keywords pedagogy, design studio, collaboration, curriculum
series other
type normal paper
email ktalbott@uwm.edu
last changed 2006/08/13 04:49

_id 2dba
id 2dba
authors Tasli, S
year 2001
title WHAT DOES COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN OFFER FOR PRODUCING LIVABLE BUILDINGS IN THE 21ST CENTURY?
source Proceedings of the Livable Environments and Architecture International Congress (LIVENARCH 2001). July 4-7, 2001, Trabzon, Turkey, pp. 278-282.
summary Designing livable buildings has always been a major concern for architects but they are often criticized on account of failing in this aim. However, this is not only due to the ignorance of the designers, but also of the complexity of the factors that are essential to design but difficult to incorporate the design process. Buildings are shaped and occupied under several dynamically changing conditions and paper-based media and conventional Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools are inefficient in representing them. This paper aims to discuss the changing role of digital media for architectural design in response to the increasing complexity of design processes. Some proposals, supported by recent technological innovations, are suggested for the future and they are compared with the conventional uses of CAD. It is claimed that in the 21st century, the main advantage of using computers will be to dynamically simulate buildings in time in highly visualized virtual environments to evaluate the future performance of proposed designs. The design model will not only look as if it were real, but it will also “behave” as if it were real so as to provide dynamic and intelligent response. The two key technologies for the development of such modeling, virtual reality and object-oriented programming are addressed and four promising application areas for near future (evaluation of user-building interaction, visualization of environmental factors, construction scheduling, and combined CAD-GIS) are discussed. Some important considerations for the development of dynamically simulated virtual models are analyzed and suggestions are made for further research.

keywords Architectural Design, Dynamic Simulation, and Virtual Environments
series other
type normal paper
email suletasli@gmail.com
last changed 2005/12/01 15:02

_id d911
authors Verbeke, Johan and Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2001
title A Future Focus on Collaborative Design
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 98-103
summary In this paper, we will report on the experiences and insights discussed during a workshop of the Special Interest Group on Collaborative Architectural Design. Participants from 12 universities and four firms (for architecture, engineering, consultancy and software) brainstormed and discussed on multidisciplinary simultaneous collaborative design and exchanged their ideas on the subject. The effort of the diverse participants covered theoretical, social and technical issues of collaborative architectural design. The topic of the workshop was explored by means of paper presentations, software tests, experiments, different types of brainstorm sessions and the formulation of future scenarios. The combination of junior and senior researchers of each university proved to be fruitful and inspiring for the discussions. As an outcome of these activities a framework for future research in the field will be presented. Special focus will be on the aspects of communication language, communication behavior, communication environment, goals and roles in the context of collaborative design. The name {ACCOLADE} is an acronym of Architectural Collaborative Design. The name brings a number of different words together in a group. E.g. {England, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, ...}. The meaning of the word in English is ‘a mark of honour’ and the French meaning of the word is a ‘solemn embrace’. It also refers to the multi-disciplinary design process. These connotations can be useful for a collaboration project in which many different people and parties plan to make a joint design effort.
keywords Architecture, Collaboration, Design
series eCAADe
email johan.verbeke@archb.sintlucas.wenk.be, m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4a53
authors Faltings, Boi
year 2001
title Qualitative Spatial Reasoning Based on Algebraic Topology
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary Several formalisms have been proposed for qualitativereasoning about regions and their topological relations in space. Theseformalisms, based on pairwise relations, do not allow sufficientlypowerful inferences to be used for spatial reasoning tasks such asplanning a collision-free path. In this paper, I show how consideringrelations between region triples, much more powerful reasoningtechniques become possible. I show in particular that in twodimensions, purely topological reasoning is sufficient to compute aminimal place graph which represents all minimal and maximal regioncombinations, as well as all minimal paths between them. I illustratehow this could be applied to motion planning, showing that in spite ofits qualitative nature, the formalism is powerful enough to solveproblems of practical interest.
series other
email faltings@iconomic.com
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:14

_id avocaad_2001_13
id avocaad_2001_13
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Modeling irregular and complex forms
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Computational technologies provide arguably the first real opportunity architectural design has had for a comprehensive description of built form. With the advent of affordable computer-aided design systems (including drafting, modeling, visualization and simulation tools), architects believe they can be in full control of geometric aspects and, through these, of a wide spectrum of other aspects that are implicit or explicit in the geometric representation. This belief is based primarily on the efficiency and effectiveness of computer systems, ranging from the richness and adaptability of geometric primitives to the utility of geometric representations in simulations of climatic aspects. Such capabilities support attempts to design and construct more irregular or otherwise complex forms. These fall under two main categories: (1) parsing of irregularity into elementary components, and (2) correlation of the form of a building with complex geometric structures.The first category takes advantage of the compactness and flexibility of computational representations in order to analyse the form of a design into basic elements, usually elementary geometric primitives. These are either arranged into simple, unconstrained configurations or related to each other by relationships that define e.g. parametric relative positioning or Boolean combinations. In both cases the result is a reduction of local complexity and an increase of implicit or explicit relationships, including the possibility of hierarchical structures.The second category attempts to correlate built form with constraints that derive usually from construction but can also be morphological. The correlation determines the applicability of complex geometric structures (minimally ruled surfaces) to the description of a design. The product of this application is generally variable in quality, depending upon the designer's grounding in geometry and his ability to integrate constraints from different aspects in the definition of the design's geometry.Both categories represent a potential leap forward but are also equally hampered by the rigidity of the implementation mechanisms upon which they rely heavily. The paper proposes an approach to making these mechanisms subordinate to the cognitive and technical aspects of architectural thinking through fuzzy modeling. This way of modeling involves a combination of (a) canonical forms, (b) tolerances around canonical forms and positions, (c) minimal and maximal values, (d) fuzzy boundaries, and (e) plastic interaction between elements based on the dual principles of local intelligence and autonomy. Fuzzy models come therefore closer to the intuitive manners of sketching, while facilitating transition to precise and complex forms. The paper presents two applications of fuzzy modeling. The first concerns the generation of schematic building layouts, including adaptive control of programmatic requirements. The second is a system for designing stairs that can adapt themselves to changes in their immediate environment through a fuzzy definition of geometric and topological parametrization.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 7c56
authors Alvarado, R.G., Parra Marquez, J.C. and Vildosola, G.V.
year 2001
title Qualitative contribution of a vr-system to architectural design: Why we failed?
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 423-427
summary The paper exposes the development of a Virtual-Reality system for modeling timber structures, and evaluations with students about its contribution to the architectural project.
series CAADRIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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