CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ecaade2007_114
id ecaade2007_114
authors Olmos, Francisco
year 2007
title Training Programs for Art and Design Learning in the Virtual Studio
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 639-646
summary Computers are very common drawing tools at university design studios but their potential as training tools in arts and design has not been explored in depth. In arts and design the learning process is based on ‘knowing in action’ (Schön 1983). Therefore, training is the keystone of the learning process in arts and design. This action takes the form of a reflective practice based on the manipulation of a media where each media has its own possibilities, its own limits in communicating design ideas or artistic concepts. With the introduction of digital media in the design studio, it is expected that reflective practices in design learning will experience a qualitative change. However, currently there is little understanding of how to use the digital and virtual media in a design studio as a learning tool (Szalapaj 2001), nor of the use of design training programs. In this paper the use of training programs in an experimental design course at a university level, is discussed. This experience was carried out as a PhD research experiment at the Faculty of Architecture and Arts of the Universidad de Los Andes in Merida, Venezuela. The training programs discussed here were designed for an eight week introductory design course in a virtual design studio. The programs were written in VRML and conceived as a virtual design training environment. Each program was designed for a specific design exercise, based on a learning strategy and an interactivity model proposed for object manipulation in design training. A comparative analysis of the data gathered from the course was made of training exercises done with a Cad program and with the training programs and crossing information with other sources. The experiment shows that the training programs, their learning strategy and the interactivity model proposed were successful in guiding the scope of the design exercises during the training process.
keywords E-learning, virtual studio, design training, virtual environment
series eCAADe
email f_olmos_2000@yahoo.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id 448f
authors De Vecchi, A., Colajanni, S., Corrao, R. and Marano, L.
year 2001
title M.I.C.R.A. - A WBI System to Manage Information for the Recovery of Ancient Buildings
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 61-66
summary In the field of Architecture and Building Construction is increasing the tendency to search information in the old construction handbooks to find more easily the best solutions to the recovery of ancient buildings: to make them easily accessible we are developing an “electronic handbook” by using the technologies related to Internet. The paper reports on M.I.C.R.A. (Manuale Informatizzato per la Codifica della Regola d’Arte), a WBI System able to allow different kind of users (from experts in the fields of Architecture and Building Construction to university students) to easily find the information stored in the old construction handbooks -edited since the 18th century and normally stored in different libraries around Europe- and to immediately compare them each other. The system information management and the data structuring are explained by describing the design strategies and the specific “research criteria” we have adopted to the development of the system.
keywords Web Knowledge Repository, Didactic Strategies, Information Accessibility, Information Management, Data Structuring
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id bb5f
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Mohd Fazidin, J.
year 2001
title Creating a City Administration System (CAS) using Virtual Reality in an Immersive Collaborative Environment (ICE)
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 449-453
summary Current problems in administration of a city are found to be decentralized and noninteractive for an effective city management. This usually will result in inconsistencies of decision-making, inefficient services and slow response to a particular action. City administration often spends more money, time and human resource because of these problems. This research demonstrates our research and development of creating a City Administration System (CAS) to solve the problems stated above. The task of the system is to use information, multimedia and graphical technologies to form a database in which the city administrators can monitor, understand and manage an entire city from a central location. The key technology behind the success of the overall system uses virtual reality and immersive collaborative environment (ICE). This system employs emerging computer based real-time interactive technologies that are expected to ensure effective decisionmaking process, improved communication, and collaboration, error reduction, (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2000) between multi disciplinary users and approaches. This multi perspective approach allows planners, engineers, urban designers, architects, local authorities, environmentalists and general public to search, understand, process and anticipate the impact of a particular situation in the new city. It is hoped that the CAS will benefit city administrators to give them a tool that gives them the ability to understand, plan, and manage the business of running the city.
keywords City Administration System (CAS), Virtual Reality, Immersive Collaborative Environment (ICE), Database
series eCAADe
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my, fazidin@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id af65
authors Akleman, E., Chen, J. and Sirinivasan, V.
year 2001
title An Interactive Shape Modeling System for Robust Design of Functional 3D Shapes
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 248-257
summary In Architecture, it is essential to design functional and topologically complicated 3D shapes (i.e. shapes with many holes, columns and handles). In this paper, we present a robust and interactive system for the design of functional and topologically complicated 3D shapes. Users of our system can easily change topology (i.e. they can create and delete holes and handles, connect and disconnect surfaces). Our system also provide smoothing operations (subdivision schemes) to create smooth surfaces. Moreover, the system provides automatic texture mapping during topology and smoothing operations. We also present new design approaches with the new modeling system. The new design approaches include blending surfaces, construction of crusts and opening holes on these crusts.
keywords Modeling, Shape Design, Sculpting, Computer Aided Geometric Design
series ACADIA
email ergun@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 9d10
authors Anders, Peter and Livingstone, Daniel
year 2001
title STARS: Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 350-355
summary Since October 2000 the authors have operated a laboratory, the Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System (STARS), for exploring telepresence in the domestic environment. The authors, an artist and an architect, are conducting a series of experiments to test their hypotheses concerning mixed reality and supportive environments. This paper describes these hypotheses, the purpose and construction of the lab, and preliminary results from the ongoing collaboration.
keywords Mixed Reality, Cybrid, Art, Cyberspace, CAiiA-STAR
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id f95f
authors Angulo, A.H., Davidson, R.J. and Vásquez de Velasco, G.P.
year 2001
title Digital Visualization in the Teaching of Cognitive Visualization
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 292-301
summary Professional design offices claim that our graduates have difficulties with their free-hand perspective drawing skills. This fact, which has become obvious over the last 5 years, is parallel to a clear tendency towards the use of 3-dimensional digital imagery in the projects of our students. Frequently, faculty tends to blame the computer for the shortcomings of our students in the use of traditional media, yet there is no clear evidence on the source of the blame. At a more fundamental level, the visualization skills of our students are questioned. This paper will explain how faculty teaching design communication techniques, with traditional and digital media, are working together in the development of a teaching methodology that makes use of computers in support of our student’s training on cognitive visualization skills, namely; “The Third-Eye Method”. The paper describes the Third-Eye Method as an alternative to traditional methods. As evidence of the benefits offered by the Third-Eye Method, the paper presents the results of testing it against traditional methods among freshman students. At the end, the paper draws as conclusion that computers are not the main source of the problem but a potential solution.
keywords Pedagogy, Visualization, Media
series ACADIA
email Vasquez@taz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 7501
authors Apley, Julie
year 2001
title A Virtual Reconstruction: Isthmia Roman Bath
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 410-411
summary The Isthmia Roman Bath is located in Greece overlooking a great ravine on the Isthmus of Corinth. It was in use during the 2nd through the 4th centuries. I have created a 3D VRML walkthrough of the ancient bath. This interdisciplinary project utilizes the research of an archaeologist, architect, and art historian. Because the researchers live in different locations, it made sense to use the Internet as a research tool. When clicking on the numbers on the home page, you can see the process that I went through to model the Roman Bath. After seeing the images, the researchers were able to visualize their research, reply to questions, and re-evaluate their findings. VRML promises an accessible, highly visual, and interactive representation of difficult to see data, opening up new ways of presenting research. It is possible to walk within the bath by clicking on the Virtual Reconstruction link. When in the "Entrance view", click on the vase to see a map of the ruin. There are three places within the project that link to the existing excavated site. Links are also available to walk outside. The project runs best on Windows NT using Netscape. You must have the plug-ins for Cosmoplayer (VRML) and Quicktime (movie). Because the VRML plug-in doesn't work as well on a Mac, it is possible that you may only be able to view the images and movie from the project.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ef4b
authors Babalola, Olubi and Eastman, Charles
year 2001
title Semantic Interpretation of Architectural Drawings
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 166-179
summary The paper reviews the needs and issues of automatically interpreting architectural drawings into building model representations. It distinguishes between recognition and semantic interpretation and reviews the steps involved in developing such a conversion capability, referring to the relevant literature and concepts. It identifies two potentially useful components, neither of which has received attention. One is the development of a syntactically defined drafting language. The other is a strategy for interpreting the semantic content of architectural drawings, based on the analogy of natural language interpretation
keywords Semantic Interpretation, Drawing Understanding
series ACADIA
email olubi.babalola@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0f18
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2001
title A Digital Design Coach for Young Designers
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 330-335
summary The present use of digital media in architectural practice and education is primarily focused on representation, communication of ideas and production. Designers, however, still use pencil and paper to assist the early conception of ideas. Recently, research into providing digital tools for designers to use in conceptual designing has focused on enhancing or assisting the designer. Rarely has the computer been regarded as a potential teaching tool for design skills. Based on previous work by the author about visual thinking and the justification for a digital design assistant, the intention of this paper is to illustrate to the reader the feasibility of a digital design coach. Reference is made to recent advances in research about design computability. In particular, research by Mark Gross and Ellen Do with respect to their Electronic Cocktail Napkin project is used as a basis on which to determine what such a digital coach may look and feel like.
keywords Design Education, Protocol Analysis, CADD, Sketching
series ACADIA
email rohan.bailey@vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 837c
authors Ball, L.J., Lambell, N.J., Ormerod, Th.C., Slavin, S. and Mariani, John A.
year 2001
title Representing design rationale to support innovative design reuse: a minimalist approach
source Automation in Construction 10 (6) (2001) pp. 663-674
summary The reuse of previous design knowledge is a potentially important way to improve design efficiency. In practice, however, design reuse is plagued with difficulties, including those associated with the indexing, retrieval, understanding and modification of prior design knowledge. We propose that such difficulties can be ameliorated by employing insights deriving from design-rationale research concerning how best to represent and retrieve design information. We illustrate these insights by describing the development of a design-reuse system that maximizes the benefits of rationale capture and information retrieval whilst minimising the costs to the designer that might arise from disruption to natural design work.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id cf2003_m_040
id cf2003_m_040
authors BAY, Joo-Hwa
year 2003
title Making Rebuttals Available Digitally for Minimising Biases in Mental Judgements
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 147-156
summary The problem of heuristic biases (illusions) discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) that can lead to errors in judgement by human designers, when they use precedent knowledge presented graphically (Bay 2001). A Cognitive framework of belief, goal, and decision, and a framework of representation of architectural knowledge by Tzonis are used to map out the problem of heuristic biases in the human mind. These are used to discuss what aspects of knowledge can be presented explicitly and digitally to users to make rebuttal more available for human thinking at the cognitive level. The discussion is applicable to both inductive and analytic digital knowledge systems that use precedent knowledge. This discussion is targeted directly at means of addressing bias in the human mind using digital means. The problem of human bias in machine learning and generalisation are discussed in a different paper, and the problems of international or non-intentional machine bias are not part of discussion in this paper.
keywords analogy, bias, design thinking, environmental design, heuristics
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/22 06:26

_id 1b10
id 1b10
authors Bay, Joo-Hwa
year 2001
title Cognitive Biases - The case of tropical architecture
source Delft University of Technology
summary This dissertation investigates, i) How cognitive biases (or illusions) may lead to errors in design thinking, ii) Why architects use architectural precedents as heuristics despite such possible errors, and iii) Develops a design tool that can overcome this type of errors through the introduction of a rebuttal mechanism. The mechanism controls biases and improves accuracy in architectural thinking. // The research method applied is interdisciplinary. It employs knowledge from cognitive science, environmental engineering, and architectural theory. The case study approach is also used. The investigation is made in the case of tropical architecture. The investigation of architectural biases draws from work by A. Tversky and D. Kahneman in 1982 on “Heuristics and biases”. According to Tversky and Kahneman, the use of heuristics of representativeness (based on similarity) and availability (based on ease of recall and imaginability) for judgement of probability can result in cognitive biases of illusions of validity and biases due to imaginability respectively. This theory can be used analogically to understand how errors arise in the judgement of environmental behaviour anticipated from various spatial configurations, leading to designs with dysfunctional performances when built. Incomplete information, limited time, and human mental resources make design thinking in practice difficult and impossible to solve. It is not possible to analyse all possible alternative solutions, multiple contingencies, and multiple conflicting demands, as doing so will lead to combinatorial explosion. One of the ways to cope with the difficult design problem is to use precedents as heuristic devices, as shortcuts in design thinking, and at the risk of errors. This is done with analogical, pre-parametric, and qualitative means of thinking, without quantitative calculations. Heuristics can be efficient and reasonably effective, but may not always be good enough or even correct, because they can have associated cognitive biases that lead to errors. Several debiasing strategies are discussed, and one possibility is to introduce a rebuttal mechanism to refocus the designer’s thinking on the negative and opposite outcomes in his judgements, in order to debias these illusions. The research is carried out within the framework of design theory developed by the Design Knowledge System Research Centre, TUDelft. This strategy is tested with an experiment. The results show that the introduction of a rebuttal mechanism can debias and improve design judgements substantially in environmental control. The tool developed has possible applications in design practice and education, and in particular, in the designing of sustainable environments.
keywords Design bias; Design knowledge; Design rebuttal; Design Precedent; Pre-parametric design; Tropical architecture; Sustainability
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email philipjhbay@gmail.com
last changed 2006/05/28 05:42

_id 36f5
authors Burry, M., Burry, J. and Faulí, J.
year 2001
title Sagrada Família Rosassa: Global Computeraided Dialogue between Designer and Craftsperson (Overcoming Differences in Age, Time and Distance)
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 076-086
summary The rose window (‘rosassa’ in Catalan) recently completed between the two groups of towers that make up the Passion Façade of Gaudí’s Sagrada Família Church in Barcelona measures eight metres wide and thirty-five metres in height [Figure 1]. There were four phases to the design based in three distinct geographical locations. The design was undertaken on site, design description in Australia some eighteen thousand kilometres distant, stone-cutting a thousand kilometres distant in Galicia, with the completion of the window in March 2001. The entire undertaking was achieved within a timeframe of fifteen months from the first design sketch. Within this relatively short period, the entire team achieved a new marriage between architecture and construction, a broader relationship between time-honoured craft technique with high technology, and evidence of leading the way in trans-global collaboration via the Internet. Together the various members of the project team combined to demonstrate that the technical office on site at the Sagrada Família Church now has the capacity to use ‘just-in-time’ project management in order to increase efficiency. The processes and dialogues developed help transcend the tyranny of distance, the difficult relationship between traditional craft based technique and innovative digitally enhanced production methods, and the three generational age differences between the youngest and more senior team members.
keywords Digital Practice, Global Collaboration, Rapid Prototyping
series ACADIA
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id ga0107
id ga0107
authors Ceccato, Cristiano
year 2001
title Integration: Master [Planner | Programmer | Builder]
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The development of modern computer-based design systems and advanced manufacturing methods have progressed to the point where the promise of mass-customisation and the establishment of the ‘designer as integrator’ are being realised: the former implies that designers can now act as creators of systems which produce infinite possibilities, and the latterthat the convergence of designer and manufacturer, through common technologies, is enabling a reunification between design and construction processes. This paper discusses the symbiotic relationships of these paradigms within design research, practice and their commercialimplications, and the significance of the integration of new design tools and production methods for architects and designers.
series other
email cc@asyncc.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id adaa
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen and Pat-Yak Lee, Edwin
year 2001
title Depicting Daylighting: Types of Multiple Image Display
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 282-291
summary This study looks at how interior daylighting can be understood through Web page representations. It examines how image size, sequence vs. simultaneity and interaction mode affect legibility. We formatted a set of daylighting images into different presentations using still images, animations and Quicktime Virtual Reality (QTVR). Querying architectural designers about the formats allowed us to identify usability issues, refine the alternatives, and characterize their attributes. Viewers generally preferred interactive selection of a single large image from multiple thumbnails over two or more smaller still, animated or interactive views. Smaller multiple images allow perusal of the range of lighting conditions and identification of situations for more detailed study. By rating and graphing interface, image and usability characteristics, we illustrate how photorealistic, symbolic and analytical images complement each other. We found that combining complementary representations in simultaneously or in sequence provides greatest legibility.
keywords Digital Media, Representation, Daylighting
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id b0be
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen
year 2001
title Ensuring Usability of CAAD Systems. A Hybrid Approach
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 361-374
summary Many CAAD software prototypes today are developed with the aim to bring research results closer to practice. This paper describes a hybrid approach that integrates an Object-Oriented Software Engineering (OOSE) methodology with a usability analysis methodology—GOMS. This approach is examined through two case studies and has shown promising results. It enables CAAD system developers to be aware of usability issues and conduct usability evaluation as early as the analysis phase of the software development process. Consequently, this may improve the quality of CAAD software systems as well as ensure the usability of the systems.
keywords Usability Evaluation, GOMS Analysis, Usability Engineering, Object-Oriented Software Engineering
series CAAD Futures
email schien@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 8a8c
authors Choi, J.W., Kwon, D.-Y. and Lee, H.-S.
year 2001
title DesignBUF: Exploring and Extending 2D Boolean Set Operations with Multiple Modes in the Early Design Phase
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 589-602
summary Boolean set operations have been a powerful design function set for any CAD systems including 2D and 3D domains. Their capacity to provide even more powerful design tools have not, however, been fully explored in the 2D system. The purpose of this study is to further explore 2D Boolean set operations with multiple modes, which include a pick mode, a wait mode, a drag-and-drop mode, and a draw-and-action mode. We develop a prototype design tool, called DesignBUF. It introduces a new concept of “design object buffer,” an intermediate design zone in which a designer freely sketches his/her design with design objects in a brainstorming fashion since valuable design ideas are ephemeral? and the designer needs to generate design schemes rapidly before the ideas disappear or are forgotten. After finishing such fast brainstorming processes, especially in the early design phase, the designer gets a stable and refined form of a floor plan, which in turn becomes a well structured form to maintain building and design information systematically. Therefore, the designer keeps switching back and forth between the “design object buffer” and structured floor plans. We believe that this dual working memory will not only increase system flexibility, but also reduce computation with unnecessarily complex design objects. This study also develops a robust algorithm to transform the intermediate design objects into a well-structured floor plan. In fact, the algorithm is also used for the extended Boolean set operations described above. A structured floor plan can also be transformed into non-structured forms. Research issues for future development are also identified at the end of the paper.
keywords Design Buffer, Extended Boolean Set Operations, Structured Floor Plan.
series CAAD Futures
email jchoi@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 04f2
authors Cimerman, Benjamin
year 2001
title Clients, architects, houses and computers: Experiment and reflection on new roles and relationships in design
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 100-109
summary This paper reports on recent work that focused on the potential impact of standard computer technology on the relationship between client and architect in the context of residential design. A study of software applications a client could use to develop and evaluate ideas exposed the dearth of software available for the design of spatial complexity by individuals without advanced computer skills, and led to the design of a specific piece of software we call “Space Modeler.” It was prototyped using off-the-shelf virtual reality technology, and tested by a group of freshmen students. The paper discusses the specificities of the software and provides analysis and reflection based on the results of the test, both in terms of design artifacts and users’ comments. The paper concludes that the evolution of the interface to electronic environments is a matter of interest for those concerned with rethinking the training, role and activity of the architect. In the near future prospective homeowners may be able to experience and experiment with the space of their home before it is built. How can the profession embrace new information technology developments and appropriate them for the benefits of society at large?
keywords Design Software, Design Participation, Visualization, Simulation
series ACADIA
email cimerb@rpi.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 5d15
authors Clayton, M.J., Song, Y., Han, K., Darapureddy, K., Al-Kahaweh, H. and Soh, I.
year 2001
title Data for Reflection: Monitoring the Use of Web-Based Design Aids
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 142-152
summary Web technology provides a new way of generating information about design processes. By monitoring student use of Web-based design aids, it is possible to collect empirical, quantitative evidence regarding the time and sequence of activities in design. The research team has undertaken several software development projects to explore these concepts. In one project, students can use a Web browser running alongside CAD software to access a cost database and evaluate their designs. In a second project, students use a browser to record their time expenditures. They can better document, plan and predict their time needs for a project and better manage their efforts. In a third project, students record the rationale supporting their design decisions. The information is stored in databases and HTML files and is hyperlinked into the CAD software. Each tool provides facilities to record key information about transactions. Interactions are documented with student identification, time of activity, and kind of activity. The databases of empirical information tracking student activity are a unique substantiation of design process that can feed back into teaching and the creation of ever better design tools.
keywords Design Methods, Empirical, Web, Cost Estimating, Time Management
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 208d
authors Cooper, D., Pridmore, T.P. and Taylor, N.
year 2001
title Assessment of a camera pose algorithm using images of brick sewers
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 527-540
summary Further developments in an ongoing multi-disciplinary research programme concerning the automation of sewer surveys are reported. Previous papers have suggested a theoretical model for use in establishing a frame of reference for closed circuit television (CCTV) camera images of non-man-entry (NME) brick sewers, in order to enable quantitative observations to be automatically acquired employing computer vision techniques. Herein is discussed a simulation testing strategy designed to determine the model's predictive accuracy and thereby assess the corresponding assumptions made. Test results are presented which display robust model characteristics. Further developments are then considered in the context of in-service practice.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

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