CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 711

_id dbf3
authors Curcio, Esteban and Perera, Gonzalo
year 2001
title DEL MODELADO 3D AL PROTOTIPO INDUSTRIAL (From 3-D Modeling to the Industrial Prototype)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 77-79
summary From 3D modeling to industrial prototype Industrial Design first year students (UNLP), led by designers Esteban Curcio and Gonzalo Perera, presented OGU coffee table in the avant-garde furniture category in Salao Design Movelsul (Brasil, 1998). Description: As an extracurricular activity, students had to deal with production variables related in particular to automated technologies and its effect on product design, completing each piece 3D digital modeling and following the whole process from manufacturing through diffusion and marketing. Technologies: Models for aluminum smelting: CAD / CAM / CNC; Glass: CNC cut with diamond milling cutter; 1020 steel: Computerized laser cut.
series SIGRADI
email crimson@ciudad.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 4b5f
authors Pang, King Wah
year 2001
title A Process planning and Optimization System for Laminated Object Manufacturing Application
source Hong Kong University of Schience and Technology (People’s Republic of China)
summary Rapid Prototyping (RP) technologies have emerged as a powerful set of manufacturing technologies in recent years. While these technologies invariably provide tremendous time-savings over traditional methods of manufacture of design prototypes, many are still quite inefficient. This thesis examines two ideas; first, that these processes can be optimized greatly by using better process planning; second, that several of these RP technologies use similar core planning technologies for optimization. The first hypothesis is verified in this thesis by presenting an improved process planning system for one RP technology, Laminated Object Manufacturing (LOM). The framework proposes the use of computational geometry and optimization tools at two levels to reduce process time and material wastage. Geometric techniques are used for process planning at the 3D part level. A genetic algorithm (GA) based path optimization technique is used for path planning optimization at the layer level. The second observation led to the development of an open architecture planning system for a host of RP technologies. A test-bed software system is described in this thesis. Evaluation on the performance of the new methodology is also provided. The methodologies developed can work equally well with the current industry standard STL format for storing object CAD data as well as direct slice data computed from the exact solid model of a part.
keywords Industrial Engineering; Mechanical Engineering
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 8862
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2001
title Net-based Architectural Design: The Difficult Path from the Presentation of Architectural Design in the World Wide Web to Teamwork in Virtual Planning Offices: A Field Report
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 371-375
summary In the last 18 months, students from the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) have undertaken six design projects as so-called Netzentwurf (“Net- Design”) studios in collaboration with different universities in Europe. These studios have used a web-based collaboration platform established at an independent web site and use didactical methods for web based design collaboration established over the past four years at ifib. A total of some 500 students have been involved in these projects and all have used the common platform to carry out their presentation and communication work.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Collaboration, CSCW, Architectural Graphics
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id cfd8
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 2001
title Digital Fabrication Manufacturing Architecture in the Information Age
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 20, pp. 10-12
summary The basic premise of this graduate-level elective course, offered for the first time in the spring of 2001, is that the Information Age, like the Industrial Age before it, is challenging not only how we design buildings, but also how we manufacture and construct them. The guiding notion was that the generative and creative potential of digital media, together with manufacturing advances already attained in automotive, aerospace and shipbuilding industries, is opening up new dimensions in architectural design by allowing production and construction of very complex forms that were until recently very difficult and expensive to design, produce, and assemble using traditional construction technologies. The proposition was that the consequences of these changes are likely to be profound, as new digitally driven processes of design, fabrication and construction are increasingly challenging the historic relationship between architecture and its means of production.
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 81b8
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 2001
title Digital Fabrication: Manufacturing Architecture in the Information Age
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 268-278
summary This paper addresses the recent digital technological advances in design and fabrication and the unprecedented opportunities they created for architectural design and production practices. It investigates the implications of new digital design and fabrication processes enabled by the use of rapid prototyping (RP) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technologies, which offer the production of small-scale models and full-scale building components directly from 3D digital models. It also addresses the development of repetitive non-standardized building systems through digitally controlled variation and serial differentiation, i.e. mass-customization, in contrast to the industrial-age paradigms of prefabrication and mass production. The paper also examines the implications of the recent developments in the architectural application of the latest digital design and fabrication technologies, which offer alternatives to the established understandings of architectural design and production processes and their material and economic constraints. Such critical examination should lead to a revised understanding of the historic relationship between architecture and its means of production.
keywords Digital Fabrication, Computer-Aided Manufacturing, Digital Construction
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id ga0109
id ga0109
authors Lewis, Chak Chan
year 2001
title Defects Defined by Form Making Method for Improving Generative Design System
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolutionary-based Generative Design System (GDS) is generally designed for industrial designers during the early stage of conceptual design. Although “additive” Rapid Prototyping (RP) methods are commonly applied for the physical realization, grown Surfaces Object (SO) created from these GDS still has room to be considered to a combined workable volume,especially for the more complex design. The inarticulate processes from GDS to Generative Production System (GPS) are linking up with different aspects and contexts as well as the conventional Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/RP integration, which has been conducted for along time. There are design constraints existing between 3D SO in industry design representation and feasible 3D production solution. Perception to object designing with knowledge is limited at SO forming by incomplete interpretations. Meanwhile, it is difficult to discern the problemsof incomplete object generation as hidden illegal design occurred from time to time because of the design constraints, despite the completion of the design representation. It has led to some of the invalidity of surface feature at the end. The reconstruction of the RP process ofthe SO pre-processing procedure can help to clarify these defects with thickness requirement in generative production. The aim of this paper is to verify an effective generative design strategy as a possibility ofimplementing method(s) or tool. They will be built within a surface-oriented GDS by mapping a valid object directly accepted by any RP system without any influence on generative object creating. Through the involvement of Form Making processes of RP from selected instants with their solid phenomena, evidences are used for defending this viewpoint.Throughout the process, generative design method and CAD method have been utilized for the creation of virtual form. The 3D printer and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology with “trial and error” method were employed in the RP processes.
series other
email chakchan@smartonebroadband.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 71e2
authors Shelbourn, M., Aouad, G. and Hoxley, M.
year 2001
title Multimedia in construction education: new dimensions
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 265-274
summary The use of multimedia for educational purposes has generated considerable discussion in recent years. This paper discusses a number of different ways in which multimedia can be used in the construction industry. Learning from other industries, particularly manufacturing is essential as multimedia has been explored and exploited by such industries. The first half of the paper demonstrates how multimedia can be used to aid learning and training in the construction sector and in disseminating research results to an industrial audience. The second part demonstrates how multimedia can be used as an interface to complex integrated database systems using virtual reality (VR) technologies. These can be used in a laboratory environment to train industrialists and students to use integrated systems, a topic of great importance and traditionally known to be difficult to understand. The work presented here builds upon research undertaken at the University of Salford in the UK through the use of case studies and findings generated from workshops attended by industrial collaborators who are interested in improving the ways in which information is delivered in the construction sector through multimedia capabilities.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 7add
authors Zahnan, Lena
year 2001
title Computer-aided Design-based Project Management Model
source Concordia University (Canada)
summary The construction industry is one that is fragmented by nature. In current practice, information is exchanged between the designers and contractors in the form of paper documents such as drawings, bills of material and specifications. Information is lost and errors are made during the forward and backward exchange of the design-construction information and constructability knowledge between the design professionals, cost estimators and contractors. Despite the technological developments in IT, the industry has been slow in adopting change in its processes. Computer Integrated Construction (CIC) strives to bridge the gaps of information by integrating the tools and processes within the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industries. This thesis proposes an integrated methodology across the design and construction functions supported by available CAD technologies. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a prototype software application named “CAD-B PM” that allows the user to integrate the CAD design with a central database that is a repository of project information. Productivity and cost estimates are generated within the database and are further integrated to a scheduling application for project planning and control. The prototype system provides a unique solution where the project information is openly shared between the applications in a dynamic environment through the use of Open Database Connectivity (ODBC).
keywords Industrial Engineering
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id avocaad_2001_14
id avocaad_2001_14
authors Adam Jakimowicz
year 2001
title Non-Linear Postrationalisation: Architectural Values Emergence in a Teamwork Interpretation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The paper presents the outcomes of the experiment being conducted at the Faculty of Architecture in Bialystok, which derives form three main sources: a new course of architectural composition by computer modelling, developed and conducted in Bialystok postrationalisation as a formulation platform for new architectural values and theories, applied by e.g. Bernard Tschumi the idea of new values emergence resulting form a teamwork, when placed in an appropriate environment; It is assumed that the work performed first intuitively, can be later seriously interpreted, and to some extent rationalised, verbalised, described. With no doubt we can state, that in creative parts of architectural activities, very often decision are taken intuitively (form design). So this ‘procedure’ of postrationalisation of intuitively undertaken efforts and results seems to be very important –when trying to explain ideas. This kind of activity is also very important during the first years of architectural education. In case of this experiment, the students’ works from the course of architectural composition are taken as a base and subjects for interpretation, and values research. However, when at first, individual works are being interpreted by their authors, at the latter stage, the teams are to be formed. The aim of the teamwork is to present individual works, analyse them, find common value(s), and represent it (them) in an appropriate, creative way. The ideal environment to perform this work is hypertext based internet, because the non-linearity of team interpretations is unavoidable. On the other hand, the digital input data (computer models) is a very appropriate initial material to be used for hypermedia development. The experiment is to analyse the specific of the following: the self-influence of the group on the individual work ‘qualification’, mutual influence of the team members on their own work interpretation, the influence of the digital non-linear environment on the final outcome definition. The added value of hypertext in architectural groupwork digital performance shall be examined and described. A new value of individualised, though group based, non-linearity of expression will be presented and concluded.
series AVOCAAD
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 22ec
authors Bechthold, Martin
year 2001
title Complex shapes in wood: Computer-aided design and manufacture of wood-sandwich roof shells
source Harvard University
summary Computer-Aided-Design, Engineering and Manufacturing (CAD/CAE/CAM) technology has changed the way consumer products, automobiles or airplanes are designed and made. The emerging applications for CAD/CAE/CAM technology in architecture, and the way this technology impacts how we design and construct the built environment, are yet unclear. This thesis investigates the relation between advanced digital design tools and the making of physical objects by focusing on an exemplary architectural element—wooden roof shells. The research objective is to expand the scope of architectural design through the application of CAD/CAE/CAM technology rather than to use this technology to streamline existing processes. The thesis develops a specific technical solution that allows the design and manufacture of new types of wooden roof shells. These are complexly shaped multifunctional construction elements that are manufactured off-site. Based on the close connection between digital design tools and the new Computer-Numerically-Controlled manufacturing process the author proposes a theoretical model of shared digital environments for collaborative design in architecture. The proposed manufacturing process treats wood as a modern composite material. Thin wood strips and foams combine into structural sandwich panels that can then be joined into a roof shell. The geometrically complex panels are generated by a combination of subtractive Computer-Numerically-Controlled machining processes and manual work. Infrastructure elements can be embedded into the sandwich build-up in order to enhance the functionality of the roof as a building envelope. Numerical tools are proposed that allow the determination of manufacturing-related parameters in the digital design environment. These inform the architectural and structural design in the early design phases. The digital collaborative design environment is based on a shared parametric solid model and an associated database. This collectively owned, feature-based design model is employed throughout the design and manufacturing process and constitutes the means of concurrent design coordination of all participants. The new manufacturing process for wood/foam sandwich shells is verified by designing and manufacturing prototypes. Design guidelines and a cost estimation are presented as the practical basis for architects and engineers to incorporate new types of roof shells into architectural projects.
keywords Architecture; Agriculture; Wood Technology; Design and Decorative Arts
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 81ba
authors Bilda, Zafer
year 2001
title Designers‚ Cognition in Traditional versus Digital Media during Conceptual Design
source Bilkent University Ankara Turkey
summary Designers depend on representations to externalize their design thoughts. External representations are usually in the form of sketches (referred to as traditional media) in architectural design during the conceptual design. There are also attempts to integrate the use of digital representations into the conceptual design in order to construct a digital design medium. This thesis aims at gaining an insight on designers’ cognitive processes while sketching in digital versus traditional media. The analysis of cognitive processes of designers based on their protocols is necessary to reveal their design behavior in both media. An experiment was designed employing six interior architects (at Bilkent University) solving an interior space planning problem by changing the design media they work with. In order to encode the design behavior, a coding scheme was utilized so that inspecting both the design activity and the responses to media transition was possible in terms of primitive cognitive actions of designers. The analyses of the coding scheme constituents, which are namely segmentation and cognitive action categories enabled a comparative study demonstrating the effect of the use of different media in conceptual design phase. The results depicted that traditional media had advantages over the digital media such as supporting perception of visual-spatial features, and organizational relations of the design, production of alternative solutions and better conception of the design problem. These results also emerged implications for the computer aid in architectural design to support the conceptual phase of the design process. 
keywords Design Cognition; Protocol Analysis; Sketching; Digital Media
series thesis:MSc
email demirkan@bilkent.edu.tr
last changed 2003/05/01 18:14

_id 2006_000
id 2006_000
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris (eds.)
year 2006
title Communicating Space(s)
source 24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-5-9], Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, 914 p.
summary The theme of this conference builds on and investigates the pre-existing and endlessly unfolding relationship between two domains of scientific inquiry: Architecture, urban design and planning, environmental design, geography and Social theory, media and communication studies, political science, cultural studies and social anthropology. Architectural design involves communication and could thus be partly considered a communicational activity. Designers (or not) see architectural designs, implicitly, as carriers of information and symbolic content; similarly buildings and urban environments have been “read” and interpreted by many (usu- ally not architects) as cultural texts. At the same time, social and cultural studies have studied buildings and cities, as contexts for social and cultural activities and life in general, from their mundane expression of “everyday life” (Highmore, 2001) to elite expressions of artistic creativity and performance. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) support both of these levels of scientific inquiry in many ways. Most importantly however, ICTs need design studies, architectural and visual design, social and cultural studies in their quest to create aesthetically pleasing, ergonomically efficient and functional ICT sys- tems; this need for interdisciplinarity is best articulated by the low quality of most on-line content and applica- tions published on the web.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email vas@uth.gr
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2006/08/16 16:55

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 9e0d
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Martens, Bob
year 2002
title Round Table Session on “3D-City-Modeling”
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 610-613
summary According to eCAADe’s mission, the exchange and collaboration within the area of computer aided architectural design education and research, while respecting the pedagogical and administrative approaches in the different schools and countries, can be regarded as a core activity. On the occasion of eCAADe 2001 in Helsinki a working session on the topic “3D-City-Modeling” was held, in which a varietybundle of papers was presented. The eCAADe 2002 round table session on “3D-City-Modeling” is opening up for an intensive discussion on a number of goals which were elaborated by a working group in Helsinki.
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tugraz.at
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 3f21
authors Donath, D., Lömker, T.M. and Richter, K.
year 2001
title Boundary debates: Extensions from analog to digital spaces
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 241-249
summary Our research focuses on the evaluation of digital space and its prospective use as a functional space for future architectural planning tasks. Through the existence of digital technologies the authors consider that architects will have to expose themselves to new - planning tasks, which are not comparable to traditional architectural duties. This requires us to rethink architectural terms and their meaning in digital space. It demands us to extend the borders within which we think, work and design. The paper presents exemplary projects that demonstrate the applicability and added value of these mergers as an extension of solid architectural buildings. Focus is laid onto digital architecture that either extends its analog counterpart by providing functionality that does not exist in the "real" world or which doesn¥t have an analog counterpart at all. The paper aims at the definition of new tasks for architects to be developed. It describes methods and strategies architects have to be aware of to be capable to offer an extended field of activity. Finally it presents exemplary projects which show the possible added value clients could gain from buildings to be established as mergers of analog and digital spaces.
series CAADRIA
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2007/11/27 07:22

_id d960
authors Ekholm, Anders
year 2001
title Activity objects in CAD-programs for building design. A prototype program implementation
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 61-74
summary In the early stages of the building design process, during the programming and the proposal stages, both user activities and the building are in focus for the designer. In spite of this, today’s CAD programs give no support for management of information about user activities in the building. This paper discusses the requirements on modelling user activities in the context of building design and presents a prototype software. The prototype is developed as an add-on to the architectural design software ArchiCAD.
keywords CAD, User Activity Modelling, Building Design, Building Product Modelling, Building Brief Development, Space Function Program
series CAAD Futures
email Anders.Ekholm@caad.lth.se
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id c596
authors Ekholm, Anders
year 2001
title Modelling of User Activities in Building Design
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 67-72
summary Architects manage not only information about the building but also about the user organisation. Therefore, information systems for architectural design must be able to handle both building and organisational data. The paper describes architectural design as a creative problem solving process, and presents a recently developed prototype application for user activity modelling built as an add-on to ArchiCAD.
keywords Architectural Design, Problem Solving, User Activity Modelling, Model Based CAD
series eCAADe
email anders.ekholm@caad.lth.se
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id cf2007_585
id cf2007_585
authors Fischer, Thomas
year 2007
title Enablement or Restriction? On supporting others in making (sense of things)
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / 978-1-4020-6527-9] Sydney (Australia) 11–13 July 2007, pp. 585-598
summary In this paper I present and reflect upon a five-year investigation of designing digital tools for designing in the area of architectural space grid structures. I understand design as a novelty and knowledge generating conversational process as described by Pask (see Scott 2001) and Glanville (2000). Furthermore, I regard making design tools as a design task in itself, rendering this paper a reflection on designing for designing. This paper gives a report on observations I made during the toolmaking study, and subsequently contextualizes these observations using second-order cybernetic theory. This reflection focuses on different relationships between observers and systems, on conditions under which observers construct knowledge and on limits of supporting others in this activity.
series CAAD Futures
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2007/07/06 10:47

_id 3386
authors Gavin, L., Keuppers, S., Mottram, C. and Penn, A.
year 2001
title Awareness Space in Distributed Social Networks
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 615-628
summary In the real work environment we are constantly aware of the presence and activity of others. We know when people are away from their desks, whether they are doing concentrated work, or whether they are available for interaction. We use this peripheral awareness of others to guide our interactions and social behaviour. However, when teams of workers are spatially separated we lose 'awareness' information and this severely inhibits interaction and information flow. The Theatre of Work (TOWER) aims to develop a virtual space to help create a sense of social awareness and presence to support distributed working. Presence, status and activity of other people are made visible in the theatre of work and allow one to build peripheral awareness of the current activity patterns of those who we do not share space with in reality. TOWER is developing a construction set to augment the workplace with synchronous as well as asynchronous awareness. Current, synchronous activity patterns and statuses are played out in a 3D virtual space through the use of symbolic acting. The environment itself however is automatically constructed on the basis of the organisation's information resources and is in effect an information space. Location of the symbolic actor in the environment can therefore represent the focus of that person's current activity. The environment itself evolves to reflect historic patterns of information use and exchange, and becomes an asynchronous representation of the past history of the organisation. A module that records specific episodes from the synchronous event cycle as a Docudrama forms an asynchronous information resource to give a history of team work and decision taking. The TOWER environment is displayed using a number of screen based and ambient display devices. Current status and activity events are supplied to the system using a range of sensors both in the real environment and in the information systems. The methodology has been established as a two-stage process. The 3D spatial environment will be automatically constructed or generated from some aspect of the pre-existing organisational structure or its information resources or usage patterns. The methodology must be extended to provide means for that structure to grow and evolve in the light of patterns of actual user behaviour in the TOWER space. We have developed a generative algorithm that uses a cell aggregation process to transcribe the information space into a 3d space. In stage 2 that space was analysed using space syntax methods (Hillier & Hanson, 1984; Hillier 1996) to allow the properties of permeability and intelligibility to be measured, and then these fed back into the generative algorithm. Finally, these same measures have been used to evaluate the spatialised behaviour that users of the TOWER space show, and will used to feed this back into the evolution of the space. The stage of transcription from information structure to 3d space through a generative algorithm is critical since it is this stage that allows neighbourhood relations to be created that are not present in the original information structure. It is these relations that could be expected to help increase social density.
keywords Algorithmic Form Generation, Distributed Workgroups, Space Syntax
series CAAD Futures
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

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