CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 121 to 140 of 714

_id 4ef3
authors Fortuzzi, A., Giangrande, A., Mirabelli, P. and Mortola, E.
year 2001
title Dynamic Urban Representation for Innovative Planning Methodologies
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 500-504
summary Some applications of hypermedia technology we developed trough the years to represent urban environment are reviewed. From the results the need for a change of paradigm rises. The strategy for a new system to develop is exposed, based on the assumption that: – the information does not pre-exist its representation; -– the process of cooperatively and competitively represent a situation causes its changing in the same time. -– no single actor will be able to represent the territory in its complexity; The question we need to answer is not what kind of technology we need to manage the information we have but the opposite: what kind of information we need for the technology we have. This information is not neutral nor automatically generalisable, thus, to implement a content based approach, a new system will be designed during a urban developing project.
keywords Urban Planning, Multimedia Urban Representation, Public Participation Support System, Internet GIS
series eCAADe
email fortuzzi@arch.uniroma3.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id f85d
authors Geraedts, Rob P and Pollalis, Spiro N.
year 2001
title Remote Teaching in Design Education - Educational and Organizational Issues and Experiences
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 305-310
summary The Department of Real Estate and Project Management (BMVB) of the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology has been working closely with Professor Spiro N. Pollalis of Harvard University, Graduate School of Design in Cambridge, USA since 1991. His case-based interactive seminars about the management of the design & construction process have been highly appreciated by many generations of students. In Spring 2000, Pollalis suggested to extend the scope of his involvement by introducing a remote teaching component, the subject of his research in the last few years. As Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the Design and Construction Industry is part of his lectures, it was appropriate to provide the students with a first hand experience on the subject. In the following experiment, the teacher would remain in his office at Harvard while the interactive work and discussion sessions with 130 students in a full lecture room would take place in Delft as planned. The consequences this experiment has had for the course, for the techniques and facilities used, how teachers and students experienced these, and which conclusions and recommendations can be made, are the topics of this paper.
keywords Remote Teaching, Design & Construction Education, And ICT
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 2004_444
id 2004_444
authors Ham, Jeremy J. and Dawson, Anthony
year 2004
title Managing Digital Resources for Design Education
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 444-450
summary This paper outlines the evolution of digital management systems used in the School of Architecture and building at Deakin University from 2001 to the present. These systems have been implemented to support a curriculum development programme in the design, construction and computing units. Two school-based information management systems are discussed in depth: low-tech network submission system and Bentley Systems Inc’s ProjectWise. Early experiences in using a universitybased system are also reported on. Lessons learnt from three years experience in managing digital resources for design education have informed the development of a growing digital culture in the architectural and construction management curricula. Whilst digital curriculum design and management systems supporting this curriculum have been developed effectively in this school, full optimization of IT to enhance design education is reliant on fundamental changes within traditional academic culture.
keywords Digital Management, Digital Curriculum, Design Education
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ae8a
authors Hanson, Gabriel Quinn
year 2001
title Connection & Transition, Exploring Place-Based Physical Environment in a Digital Media FirmPhysical Environment in a Digital Media Firm
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id ef9e
authors Harris, Robert
year 2001
title The Digital Sandbox: Integrating Design and Analysis in a new Earth-forming Tool
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
email rmharris@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id bb4f
authors He, Jie and Tsou Jin-Yeu
year 2001
title GIS-based Visual Perception Analysis of Urban Natural Landscape for Urban Planning Supporting: A Case Study of Jinzishan Hill Region
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 505-510
summary In this paper we present a GIS-based system prototype in evaluating visual perception quality of natural landscape within urban environment. Through a case study, we demonstrate the entire procedure which includes data modification, model making, viewshed and view sensibility analysis as well as design aiding presentation of this system. This system prototype offers a calculatable and visulizable technique to evaluate the visual quality of urban natural landscape in either actual situation or planning future. Furthermore, we collaborate with local professional organization in a real urban site study to preparing regional planning instruction items by means of this system.
keywords GIS, Urban Natural Landscape, Visual Perception, Viewshed, Jinzishan
series eCAADe
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk, jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id e6c5
authors Heintz, John L.
year 2001
title Coordinating virtual building design teams
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 65-76 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Most research in design project management support systems treats the subject as an isolated objective problem. The goals to be met are defined in terms of a supposed universal view of the project, and now outside concerns are taken into account. While such approaches, including project simulation, may yield excellent results, they ignore what, for many projects, are the real difficulties. Design projects are not isolated. All participants have other obligations that compete with the given project for attention and resources. The various participants in the design process have different goals. For these reasons it is proposed that design project management can be best facilitated by tools which assist the participating actors to share suitable management information in order to make better co-ordination possible, while allowing the resource balancing between projects to occur in private. Such a tool represents the design project management task as a negotiation task that spans both projects and firms; the management of one project is the management of all. The model of design collaboration upon which the Design Coordination System (DeCo) is built was developed from 1) a heuristic case study used to gain insight into the ways in which designers co-ordinate their efforts, and 2) the application of the theory of the social contract as developed by John Rawls to the problem of design project management. The key innovation in the DeCo system is the shaping of the project management system around existing practices of collaborative project design management and planning. DeCo takes advantage of how designers already co-ordinate their work with each other and resolve disputes over deadlines and time lines. The advantage of DeCo is that it formalises these existing practices in order to accommodate both the increasing co-ordination burden and the difficulties brought about by the internationalisation of design practice. DeCo, the design project management system proposed here, provides a representation, a communications protocol, and a game theoretical decision structure. The combination of these three units provides users with the ability to exchange structured pictures of the project as seen from the points of view of individual actors. Further, it suggests a mechanism based on a specific principle of fairness for arriving at mutually acceptable project plans. The DeCo system permits the users freedom to manage their design processes as they will, while providing a basic compatibility between practices of design team members which supports their collaborative efforts to co-ordinate their design work.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id avocaad_2001_15
id avocaad_2001_15
authors Henri Achten, Jos van Leeuwen
year 2001
title Scheming and Plotting your Way into Architectural Complexity
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, our ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Following the four waves of design methodology as distinguished by Cross (1984), we see changing architectural design attitudes with respect to complexity. Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, designers such as Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke embrace complexity and make it a focus in their design work. The computer is an indispensable instrument in this approach. The paper discusses the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and reflects in particular on the role of design representations in this discussion. It is advanced that a number of recent developments are based on an intensified use of design representations such as schema’s, diagrams, and interactive modelling techniques. Within the field of possibilities in this field, the authors discuss Feature-Based Modelling (FBM) as a formalism to represent knowledge of the design. It is demonstrated how the FBM approach can be used to describe graphic representations as used in design, and how other levels and kinds of design knowledge can be incorporated, in particular the less definite qualitative information in the early design phase. The discussion section concludes with an extrapolation of the current role of design representation in the design process, and advances a few positions on the advantage and disadvantage of this role in architectural design.
series AVOCAAD
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id f8e3
authors Hew, K.-P., Fisher, N. and Awbi, H.B.
year 2001
title Towards an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format for building and services design
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 459-476
summary The emerging technology in building product design using knowledge-based engineering (KBE), is currently exciting practitioners in the building construction industry. This paper investigates the use of KBE techniques and assesses the contribution this approach can make to the traditional design process. To do this, the investigation has developed an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format, for integrating 3D electronic prototypes with building services information for use in building design. This approach has been developed on the basis of an open framework and has been applied to the design of an airport terminal building and its plant room. Within the framework, the design process and the information needed, are divided into modules and represented in the form of 3D digital mock-up models (or electronic prototypes). Within the integrated system, an interface has been developed to facilitate the sharing of information with a thermal analysis software application, which contributes to the design process. In this paper, the methodology is discussed and its working system is illustrated and evaluated.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 8af6
authors Hoffmann, O., Stumptner, M. and Chalabi, T.
year 2001
title Tolerating Inconsistencies. The Distributed Perspectives Model
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 375-386
summary A new design model is presented. Information on the design is distributed over multiple self-contained design perspectives and translation functions between design perspectives. Inconsistencies between specifications in different design perspectives introduced by human designers are temporarily tolerated in order to support creative design processes. The implementation of a design support system currently under evaluation is outlined.
keywords CAD, Microstation, Artificial Intelligence, Creativity, Urban Design, Typology, Java, JATLite, JATLiteBean, Agent, JESS
series CAAD Futures
email oliver@hoffmann.org
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id a184
authors Johnson, Peter and Johnson, Hilary
year 2001
title Interaction, Collaboration and Communication: A Human-Computer Interaction Perspective
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 43-58 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This paper considers the problem of supporting collaborative information brokering. The aim is to develop information brokering environments based upon models of collaboration and supported by user interface designs through which user-user, user-agent and user-information interactions are effortless and effective.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 3c96
authors Kang, H., Anderson, S.D. and Clayton, M.J.
year 2001
title Web4D: Challenges and Practices for Construction Scheduling
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 132-141
summary Research has demonstrated that four-dimensional computer aided design (4D CAD), in which a three-dimensional (3D) CAD model is animated through time, is useful in helping professionals understand the construction schedule. However, cumbersome processes to update a 4D CAD model, which involve changing geometry representations, changing schedules and bar charts, linking the geometry to the scheduling information, and generating animations, may discourage professionals from using 4D CAD in actual construction projects. A software prototype implementing 4D CAD in a Web environment overcomes limitations of current 4D CAD tools. This software permits editing of the construction schedule over the Internet and shows the revised construction sequence visually on a Web browser using 3D computer graphics. This software is composed of a database on a server, Active Server Pages (ASP) scripts, and a Java applet that was developed using Java 3D Application Programming Interface (API) and Java JDBC. The Java applet retrieves the 4D model at the appropriate level of completion over the Internet and allows users to navigate around the model on the Web browser. Web4D visualization software can help professionals to expedite the schedule updating process by involving designers and constructors in collaborative decision- making.
keywords Web4D, 4D CAD, 4D Visualization, Construction Schedule, Internet
series ACADIA
email juliankang@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id e515
authors Kieferle, Joachim and Wössner, Uwe
year 2001
title Showing the invisible - Seven rules for a new approach of using immersive virtual reality in architecture
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 376-381
summary Virtual reality, especially in a CAVE environment can be used in different ways. In architecture up to now it is mainly used to visualize planned or ancient buildings. Based on the information approach, on the approach that VR can be used not only to show the visual appearance of things but also information, which might be invisible in real world, seven rules are set up. The rules have been applied in university courses as testbed and verified in commercial projects.
keywords Virtual Reality, Information, Cognition, Space, Collaboration
series eCAADe
email woessner@hlrs.de
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 3322
authors Klinger, Kevin R.
year 2001
title Making Digital Architecture: Historical, Formal, and Structural Implications of Computer Controlled Fabrication and Expressive Form
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 239-244
summary Digital output from computer modeling represents a significant new method for visualization and fabrication of architecture. The ability to move directly from three-dimensional modeling to real three-dimensional output challenges the need for traditional means of representation such as plan, section, etc. Moreover, the necessity for conversion of architectural intentions into a code (construction documents, shop drawings, etc.) to be translated by the contractor will also be tested with these new potentials in fabrication. This subjugation of traditional forms of representation and fabrication has serious implications for architectural design process and production. The intention of this paper is to scrutinize underlying issues inherent in a design process of developing architectural solutions using the computer both as a tool for threedimensional visualization as well as for guiding three-dimensional fabrication. Precedent of historic expressive architectural form (seen through the lens of fabrication) will be presented to lay the foundation for the examination of new fabrication techniques and structural concerns for computer generated expressive forms. A series of rapid prototype studies from a digital architecture seminar will also be analyzed to outline the need for developing visualization/fabrication process ideas and research into methods for making digital architecture.
keywords Expressive Form, Digital Visualization, Digital Fabrication, Rapid Prototyping, Five-Axis Milling
series eCAADe
email krklinger@bsu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 25b2
authors Kosasih, Sahrika
year 2001
title The Research on the Relevance of the Computer Applications - Experiences from Indonesia
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 282-287
summary Although CAD subject still is a subsidiary subject, there has been higher interest of students in the subject. Of 300 students at Department of Architecture, 50 students take the subject every semester. The research on the relevance of the computer application can be carried out thanking to the establishment of a CAD laboratory as a supporting facility of the Department of Architecture which was established in 1999 through QUE Program (Quality Undergraduate Educative) granted by the World Bank in undergraduate program proposal selection in Indonesia. It can therefore be identified how well students can improve their talents and skills in design subject. The laboratory is used not only in educational activities, it is also used to develop the computer application in design especially 2D and 3D design and the perspective drawing presentation.
series eCAADe
email abahsk@yexa.eng.ui.ac.id
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 17ba
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2001
title Fuzzy Modeling of Floor Plan Layout
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 314-321
summary Fuzzy modeling provides methods and techniques for qualifying and quantifying imprecise and uncertain information. The main advantages of fuzzy design representation are fluency, abstraction and continuity, at a level similar to that of analogue techniques, as well as the possibility of local autonomy, i.e. segmentation of a representation into self-regulating and cooperating components. The paper investigates the applicability of fuzziness to digital architectural sketching of floor plan layouts. Based on an analysis of the paradigmatic dimension in analogue floor plan sketches three alternative forms are proposed: (1) Canonical objects with tolerances, (2) objects described by minimal and maximal values, and (3) point sets which decompose the form of an object into a number of discrete, autonomous particles that describe the object by their position and spatial or structural relationships.
keywords Representation, Sketching, Floor Plan, Fuzziness
series ACADIA
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id ga0103
id ga0103
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2001
title Information and termination
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The issue of termination has recently re-emerged as a result of new approaches to design generation, which link termination to user intervention. The similarities between this approach to termination and the conventional creative artistic process suggest that the product of thegenerative system is amenable to analysis in terms of well-formedness. A formal measure of well-formedness could be employed as an automatic termination trigger. The paper proposes that such a measure can be derived from structural information theory. By applying thecompression of structural information theory to meaningful principles of a design world we derive a consistent, universal description of the design result at any given state. This description expresses the correlation of the design with its formal constraints, as well as the general perception of the design’s patterns. The combination of the amount of structuralinformation in the design’s code and the presence of specific (sub)patterns in the same code arguably provide the triggers for termination of a generative process.
keywords a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 7c0e
authors Koutamanis, Alexander and Den Hartog, Peter
year 2001
title Simulation and representation. Learning from airflow analyses in buildings
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 657-666
summary The simulation of environmental aspects is a current priority in design research and practice. The availability of relatively efficient and reliable simulation systems and the emphasis on environmental aspects throughout a building’s lifecycle combine to stimulate exploration of aspects such as lighting and air quality by computational means. Nevertheless, a frequent complaint is that the addition of such simulations makes design information processing timeconsuming and cumbersome, thereby increasing uncertainty and indecision. Therefore, it is imperative that simulation is integrated in the strategies and tools normally used by the digitally-minded architect. In this respect a central issue is the relations between the simulation and the design representation used as connecting tissue for the whole design environment. Input of design information in the simulation means identification of relevant objects, aspects, parts and properties of these objects, as well as relationships between objects. The explicit description of objects such as spaces, doors and windows in the design representation allows for ready extraction of relevant information, including automatic recognition of relationships such as adjacency between a window and a space. The addition of information specific to the airflow analysis was resolved by the extension of the representation to cover front-end service components such as inlets and outlets and general properties (annotations) such as activities accommodated in a space and the primary choice of cooling and heating subsystems. The design representation is also the obvious target for the output of the simulation (feedback). Visualization of airflow in terms of the resulting voxels makes effortless and enjoyable viewing but merely allowing the visualization to coexist with the representation of spaces and building elements does not provide design guidance. One way of achieving that is by treating spaces not as integral entities but as containers of relevant surfaces. These surfaces determine the adaptive subdivision of the space and function as attractors for voxel clustering.
keywords Simulation, Representation, Visualization
series CAAD Futures
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 554e
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2001
title 3 x 2 Approaches to Design Management
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 220-225
summary Following the arguably successful introduction of building, project and real estate management to traditional architectural areas, design management is emerging as the new hot issue. One of the main arguments for it is the alleged low performance of the architect in the face of the technical complexity and operational intricacy that characterizes current design problems. In this respect, management is seen as the missing link in the architect’s methodical and operational framework. The paper suggests that this link derives more from the constraints of the domain and its subject matter rather than a management perspective. Design management refers to two main dimensions of architectural design, these of design method and of design subject. With respect to the first dimension we distinguish between three main categories: proscriptive, prescriptive and descriptive approaches. In the second dimension the distinction is between the coordination of the design process and that of the design product. The 3x2 matrix defined by these two dimensions stresses the significance of descriptive approaches for the informatization of the representation and communication of the design product. In this framework design information management emerges as an applied area of (computational) design theory that facilitates the amphidrome development of a design, i.e. not only from brief to postoccupancy but also from detail, case and precedent to design idea and solution, as well as the identification and management of critical moments, i.e. moments characterized by convergence of activities and hence extensive and intensive communication.
keywords Method, Management, Descriptive, Informatization
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id f683
authors Lerner, P., Méndez, R. and Pimentel, D.
year 2001
title EL WEB SITE DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE BUENOS AIRES: IMAGEN INSTITUCIONAL, DISEÑO E IMPLEMENTACIÓN. (The Web Site of the University of Buenos Aires: Institutional Image, Design and Implementation)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 127-130
summary The present work constitutes a description of the design and implementation process for the new University of Buenos Aires’s Internet Website. The developed stages and the establishment of the institutional subjects generated a system able to support the growth of a variable information structure. Our intention was to complement two instances: to represent the University like an institution and to incorporate services for the user. The dialogue between the two instances generated an architecture of information with an almost fixed content and another one totally variable, that allows the natural growth of the thematics and opens the doors towards the self-manage of content.
series SIGRADI
email webmaster@uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

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