CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 683

_id 448f
authors De Vecchi, A., Colajanni, S., Corrao, R. and Marano, L.
year 2001
title M.I.C.R.A. - A WBI System to Manage Information for the Recovery of Ancient Buildings
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 61-66
summary In the field of Architecture and Building Construction is increasing the tendency to search information in the old construction handbooks to find more easily the best solutions to the recovery of ancient buildings: to make them easily accessible we are developing an “electronic handbook” by using the technologies related to Internet. The paper reports on M.I.C.R.A. (Manuale Informatizzato per la Codifica della Regola d’Arte), a WBI System able to allow different kind of users (from experts in the fields of Architecture and Building Construction to university students) to easily find the information stored in the old construction handbooks -edited since the 18th century and normally stored in different libraries around Europe- and to immediately compare them each other. The system information management and the data structuring are explained by describing the design strategies and the specific “research criteria” we have adopted to the development of the system.
keywords Web Knowledge Repository, Didactic Strategies, Information Accessibility, Information Management, Data Structuring
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id ea46
authors Colajanni B., Concialdi, S. and Pellitteri, G.
year 2001
title Construction or Deconstruction: Which is the Best Way to Learn Architecture?
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 299-304
summary The actual shift of the teaching methods from teacher-centred expository methods, to learner-centred exploratory ones. The educational goals are no more the construction of a solid theory knowledge from which the behaviour is driven. It is the acquisition of capabilities and skills directly related to the professional activity. The consequence is that the teacher has the task of endowing the student not only with a large amount of documentation but also with at least suggestions of the way to use it. One of these suggestions is the deconstruction (in a literal and not philosophical sense) as a way of investigating the structure of buildings. In a first phase in order to acquire, through generalisation a systematic knowledge of the way the parts of a building (their subsystems) contribute to the global architectural organism. In a second phase in order to explore buildings of special interest aiming at mastering their peculiar solutions. An example of this method is presented, limited to the spatial analysis only both for brevity sake and for particular difficulties presented.
keywords Deconstruction, Learn Architecture, Learning By Experience
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@unipa.it, concial@dpce.ing.unipa.it, pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id e6c5
authors Heintz, John L.
year 2001
title Coordinating virtual building design teams
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 65-76 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Most research in design project management support systems treats the subject as an isolated objective problem. The goals to be met are defined in terms of a supposed universal view of the project, and now outside concerns are taken into account. While such approaches, including project simulation, may yield excellent results, they ignore what, for many projects, are the real difficulties. Design projects are not isolated. All participants have other obligations that compete with the given project for attention and resources. The various participants in the design process have different goals. For these reasons it is proposed that design project management can be best facilitated by tools which assist the participating actors to share suitable management information in order to make better co-ordination possible, while allowing the resource balancing between projects to occur in private. Such a tool represents the design project management task as a negotiation task that spans both projects and firms; the management of one project is the management of all. The model of design collaboration upon which the Design Coordination System (DeCo) is built was developed from 1) a heuristic case study used to gain insight into the ways in which designers co-ordinate their efforts, and 2) the application of the theory of the social contract as developed by John Rawls to the problem of design project management. The key innovation in the DeCo system is the shaping of the project management system around existing practices of collaborative project design management and planning. DeCo takes advantage of how designers already co-ordinate their work with each other and resolve disputes over deadlines and time lines. The advantage of DeCo is that it formalises these existing practices in order to accommodate both the increasing co-ordination burden and the difficulties brought about by the internationalisation of design practice. DeCo, the design project management system proposed here, provides a representation, a communications protocol, and a game theoretical decision structure. The combination of these three units provides users with the ability to exchange structured pictures of the project as seen from the points of view of individual actors. Further, it suggests a mechanism based on a specific principle of fairness for arriving at mutually acceptable project plans. The DeCo system permits the users freedom to manage their design processes as they will, while providing a basic compatibility between practices of design team members which supports their collaborative efforts to co-ordinate their design work.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id db60
authors Af Klercker, J., Achten, H. and Verbeke, J.
year 2001
title AVOCAAD - A First Step Towards Distance Learning?
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 269-274
summary In the industrial world knowledge is developed very fast. As most countries are depending on employees with a high level of knowledge and skills the term ”Life Long Learning” has been formulated and the concept is more and more accepted. Institutions of higher education are more and more involved in creating supplementary education more independent of time and place. Distance learning was originally carried out by ordinary mail, which was slow but might then have been the only solution for people in remote places. With the Internet and e-mail the distance-learning concept has got a far better tool, for instance better interaction facilities. Architects and engineers in practise are deeply involved in solving the problems of the present projects. Education which is independent of time and place must be of great interest to both parties. The AVOCAAD project has created an education model for students to meet the possibilities of CAAD. The education model can be used in a curriculum at a school as well as for distance learning. Among the possible experiences from it, the one concerning distance learning might be the most important future application of the system in architectural education. This paper sketches the pedagogical background and gives examples from other areas of knowledge, where distance learning is already in use. We will put the question how the AVOCAAD concept meets the experiences from distance learning.
keywords Distance Learning, Pedagogic, CAAD, E-Learning, AVOCAAD
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 12e3
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Che Zulkhairi, A. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title Interactive Storytelling and Its Role in the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 151-158
summary Projects of ever increasing complexity and size have incited the need for new and robust design methodologies and tools in an effort to manage complexity, lower costs, ascertain quality and reduce risk. Technology convergence through the growing availability of networked computers, rapid progress in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and information management have encouraged the undertaking of even more complex designs that demand high degrees of interaction, collaboration and the efficient sharing and dissemination of information. It is suggested that interactive storytelling and interactive design (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2001) techniques that use non-linear information mapping systems can be deployed to assist users as they navigate information that is structured to address localized needs as they arise. The design process is a collaborative effort that encompasses diverse knowledge disciplines and demands the management and utilization of available resources to satisfy the needs of a single or set of goals. It is thought that building industry specialists should work close together in an organised manner to solve design problems as they emerge and find alternatives when designs fall short. The design process involves the processing of dynamic and complex information, that can be anything from the amount of soil required to level lands - to the needs of specific lightings systems in operation theatres. Other important factors that affect the design process are related to costs and deadlines. This paper will demonstrate some of our early findings in several experiments to establish nonlinear storytelling. It will conclude with a recommendation for a plausible design of such a system based on experimental work that is currently being conducted and is reaching its final stages. The paper will lay the foundations of a possible path to implementation based on the concept of multi-path animation that is appropriate for structuring the design process as used in the building industry.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 837c
authors Ball, L.J., Lambell, N.J., Ormerod, Th.C., Slavin, S. and Mariani, John A.
year 2001
title Representing design rationale to support innovative design reuse: a minimalist approach
source Automation in Construction 10 (6) (2001) pp. 663-674
summary The reuse of previous design knowledge is a potentially important way to improve design efficiency. In practice, however, design reuse is plagued with difficulties, including those associated with the indexing, retrieval, understanding and modification of prior design knowledge. We propose that such difficulties can be ameliorated by employing insights deriving from design-rationale research concerning how best to represent and retrieve design information. We illustrate these insights by describing the development of a design-reuse system that maximizes the benefits of rationale capture and information retrieval whilst minimising the costs to the designer that might arise from disruption to natural design work.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 5ac1
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 2001
title On Developing Standards for the Creation of VR City Models
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 404-409
summary The paper is an inclusive summary of research work on creating VR city models carried out over the last six years in the UK and Greece aiming to put into discussion the guidelines/ rules developed by the author. The paper is structured in three sections referring to the main stages in terms of either technical expertise and problem solving or conceptual structuring of information: creation of 3D city models, CAAD versus VR in digital city modelling and finally utilizing digital city models. The expected outcome of the work presented is the establishment of a body of knowledge that will facilitate the development of standards and guidelines for the creation of city models. There are obvious advantages in having a compatible set of city 3D models. On the other hand, there are different rules to be followed and issues to be solved, according to the scale of the model, level of detail that is needed—all these rules relate to the projected use of the model.
keywords Digital City Models, 3D Modelling, Virtual Reality, Urban Planning
series eCAADe
email v.bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0f49
authors Burry, M., Coulson, J., Preston, J. and Rutherford, E.
year 2001
title Computer-aided design decision support: interfacing knowledge and information
source Automation in Construction 10 (2) (2001) pp. 203-215
summary Computer-aided design decision support has proved to be an elusive and intangible project for many researchers as they seek to encapsulate information and knowledge-based systems as useful multifunctional data structures. Definitions of `knowledge', `information', `facts', and `data' become semantic footballs in the struggle to identify what designers actually do, and what level of support would suit them best, and how that support might be offered. The Construction Primer is a database-drivable interactive multimedia environment that provides readily updated access to many levels of information aimed to suit students and practitioners alike. This is hardly a novelty in itself. The innovative interface and metadata structures, however, combine with the willingness of national building control legislators, standards authorities, materials producers, building research organisations, and specification services to make the Construction Primer a versatile design decision support vehicle. It is both compatible with most working methodologies while remaining reasonably future-proof. This paper describes the structure of the project and highlights the importance of sound planning and strict adhesion to library-standard metadata protocols as a means to avoid the support becoming too specific or too paradigmatic.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 80f7
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A. and Novembri, G.
year 2001
title Knowledge-based System to Support Architectural Design - Intelligent objects, project net-constraints, collaborative work
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 80-85
summary The architectural design business is marked by a progressive increase in operators all cooperating towards the realization of building structures and complex infrastructures (Jenckes, 1997). This type of design implies the simultaneous activity of specialists in different fields, often working a considerable distance apart, on increasingly distributed design studies. Collaborative Architectural Design comprises a vast field of studies that embraces also these sectors and problems. To mention but a few: communication among operators in the building and design sector; design process system logic architecture; conceptual structure of the building organism; building component representation; conflict identification and management; sharing of knowledge; and also, user interface; global evaluation of solutions adopted; IT definition of objects; inter-object communication (in the IT sense). The point of view of the research is that of the designers of the architectural artefact (Simon, 1996); its focus consists of the relations among the various design operators and among the latter and the information exchanged: the Building Objects. Its primary research goal is thus the conceptual structure of the building organism for the purpose of managing conflicts and developing possible methods of resolving them.
keywords Keywords. Collaborative Design, Architectural And Building Knowledge, Distributed Knowledge Bases, Information Management, Multidisciplinarity
series eCAADe
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 7ffb
authors Ciftcioglu, Özer and Durmisevic, Sanja
year 2001
title Knowledge management by information mining
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 533-545
summary Novel information mining method dealing with soft computing is described. By this method, in the first step, receptive fields of design information are identified so that connections among various design aspects are structured. By means of this, complex relationships among various design aspects are modeled with a paradigm, which is non-parametric and generic. In the second step, the structured connections between various pairs of aspects are graded according to the relevancy to each other. This is accomplished by means of sensitivity analysis, which is a computational tool operating on the model established and based on a concept measuring the degree of dependencies between pairs of quantities. The degree of relationships among various design aspects so determined enables one to select the most important independent aspects in the context of design or decision-making process. The paper deals with the description of the method and presents an architectural case study where numerical and as well as non-numerical (linguistic) design information are treated together, demonstrating a ranked or elective information employment which can be of great value for possible design intervention during reconstruction.
keywords Knowledge Management, Information Mining, Sensitivity Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email ciftciog@mail.bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 158e
authors De Vries, B., Van Leeuwen, J. and Achten, H. (Eds.)
year 2001
title Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2001
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, 814 p.
summary CAAD Futures is a bi-annual conference that aims to promote the advancement of computer-aided architectural design in the service of those concerned with the quality of the built environment. The conferences are organized under the auspices of the CAAD Futures Foundation, which has its secretariat at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands.

This volume provides state-of-the-art articles in the following areas: capturing design, information modelling, CBR techniques, Virtual Reality, CAAD education, (hyper) media, design evaluation, design systems development, collaboration, generation, design representation, knowledge management, form programming, simulation, architectural analysis, and urban design.

series CAAD Futures
email B.d.Vries@tue.nl
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/2001
last changed 2003/04/02 08:52

_id 7eb9
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Martens, Bob
year 2001
title A Working Session on 3-D City Modeling
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 417-422
summary On the occasion of a presentation on a city model for Graz at the eCAADe-conference in Weimar (2000), some attendees informed us about their previous work in this field and the idea of preparing a working session with collegues involved in 3-D city modeling was born. During the initial phase of research for this eCAADe conference activity it turned out that a large number of city models has been created in the course of time for different reasons resp. purposes. Therefore a rich variety in the production of city models can be noticed. This working session on 3-D city modeling brings together experts focusing on different aspects concerning the creation and use of city models, such as data input, data structure, data storage and data quality. Also the definition of a perspective on the future of 3-D city modeling can be regarded as an important topic. In this paper a rough overview on the different submissions will be presented. Furthermore three blitz statements are incorporated as time was too short to produce a full paper. Both with the individual contributions as with this overview paper it is intended to present a knowledge-base to this working field. Finally, the start for a growing bibliography was made in order to support future work in this area.
keywords Urban Modeling, 3-D Modeling, Collaboration, City Information, Model Adaptation
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tugraz.at
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 5c22
authors Durmisevic, S., Ciftcioglu, Ö. and Sariyildiz, S.
year 2001
title Quantifying the Qualitative Design Aspects
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 111-116
summary Architecture is a mixture of art and technique. This implies that the architect deals not only with engineering aspects that can be easily quantified and thereafter processed, but deals with aesthetics as well which is in first place qualitative and therefore rather difficult to estimate and numerically represent. As an example, in such cases, these ‘qualitative quantities’ are expressed in linguistic form which should be somehow expressed in numerical form in order to treat such data by powerful and conclusive numerical analysis methods. Expressions such as: bright colour, light room, large space are some of these examples. These expressions are fuzzy concepts whose actual interpretation is hidden and all of them together attach a qualitative value to a certain space. To deal with such information the emerging technologies of the last decade can provide an important aid. One of them is the soft computing technology that can deal with such soft data. In this paper, based on the case studies, we explain the potential of using soft computing techniques.
keywords Qualitative Design Data, Information Processing, Soft Computing, Knowledge Modeling, Neuro-Fuzzy Network
series eCAADe
email I.S.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id f1c4
authors Holmgren, S., Rüdiger, B. and Tournay, B.
year 2001
title The 3D-City Model – A New Space
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 430-435
summary We have worked with the construction and use of 3D city models for about ten years. This work has given us valuable experience concerning model methodology. In addition to this collection of knowledge, our perception of the concept of city models has changed radically. In order to explain this shift in paradigms we begin by describing some of the concrete models we have made, showing the relationship between model structure (methodology and content) and model use. We also describe the projects we are working on at present in order to illustrate new ideas concerning the potential development of 3D city models.
keywords Digital 3D City Model, Urban Regeneration, Participatory Design, On Line Community
series eCAADe
email steen.holmgren@karch.dk, bjarne.rudiger@karch.dk, bruno.tournay@karch.dk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 0c14
authors Huang, Ching-Hui
year 2001
title A Preliminary Study of Spatializing Cyberspace - A Cognitive Approach
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 511-516
summary The purpose of this study is to reveal some aspects of the spatial nature of cyberspace by applying a cognitive approach, which is to decode cyberspatial cognition generated from the spatial experiences of an architectural designer. Two types of cities, the physical and the virtual, are compared in order to further realize the spatial knowledge of cyberspace. The results of this research indicate that understanding spatial characteristics of virtual environment can base upon investigating cognitive sketches. In addition, architectural designers might benefit from the findings of this study.
keywords Cyberspace, Physical City, Virtual City, Cyberspatial Cognition
series eCAADe
email chuang@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id avocaad_2001_22
id avocaad_2001_22
authors Jos van Leeuwen, Joran Jessurun
year 2001
title XML for Flexibility an Extensibility of Design Information Models
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The VR-DIS research programme aims at the development of a Virtual Reality – Design Information System. This is a design and decision support system for collaborative design that provides a VR interface for the interaction with both the geometric representation of a design and the non-geometric information concerning the design throughout the design process. The major part of the research programme focuses on early stages of design. The programme is carried out by a large number of researchers from a variety of disciplines in the domain of construction and architecture, including architectural design, building physics, structural design, construction management, etc.Management of design information is at the core of this design and decision support system. Much effort in the development of the system has been and still is dedicated to the underlying theory for information management and its implementation in an Application Programming Interface (API) that the various modules of the system use. The theory is based on a so-called Feature-based modelling approach and is described in the PhD thesis by [first author, 1999] and in [first author et al., 2000a]. This information modelling approach provides three major capabilities: (1) it allows for extensibility of conceptual schemas, which is used to enable a designer to define new typologies to model with; (2) it supports sharing of conceptual schemas, called type-libraries; and (3) it provides a high level of flexibility that offers the designer the opportunity to easily reuse design information and to model information constructs that are not foreseen in any existing typologies. The latter aspect involves the capability to expand information entities in a model with relationships and properties that are not typologically defined but applicable to a particular design situation only; this helps the designer to represent the actual design concepts more accurately.The functional design of the information modelling system is based on a three-layered framework. In the bottom layer, the actual design data is stored in so-called Feature Instances. The middle layer defines the typologies of these instances in so-called Feature Types. The top layer is called the meta-layer because it provides the class definitions for both the Types layer and the Instances layer; both Feature Types and Feature Instances are objects of the classes defined in the top layer. This top layer ensures that types can be defined on the fly and that instances can be created from these types, as well as expanded with non-typological properties and relationships while still conforming to the information structures laid out in the meta-layer.The VR-DIS system consists of a growing number of modules for different kinds of functionality in relation with the design task. These modules access the design information through the API that implements the meta-layer of the framework. This API has previously been implemented using an Object-Oriented Database (OODB), but this implementation had a number of disadvantages. The dependency of the OODB, a commercial software library, was considered the most problematic. Not only are licenses of the OODB library rather expensive, also the fact that this library is not common technology that can easily be shared among a wide range of applications, including existing applications, reduces its suitability for a system with the aforementioned specifications. In addition, the OODB approach required a relatively large effort to implement the desired functionality. It lacked adequate support to generate unique identifications for worldwide information sources that were understandable for human interpretation. This strongly limited the capabilities of the system to share conceptual schemas.The approach that is currently being implemented for the core of the VR-DIS system is based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML). Rather than implementing the meta-layer of the framework into classes of Feature Types and Feature Instances, this level of meta-definitions is provided in a document type definition (DTD). The DTD is complemented with a set of rules that are implemented into a parser API, based on the Document Object Model (DOM). The advantages of the XML approach for the modelling framework are immediate. Type-libraries distributed through Internet are now supported through the mechanisms of namespaces and XLink. The implementation of the API is no longer dependent of a particular database system. This provides much more flexibility in the implementation of the various modules of the VR-DIS system. Being based on the (supposed to become) standard of XML the implementation is much more versatile in its future usage, specifically in a distributed, Internet-based environment.These immediate advantages of the XML approach opened the door to a wide range of applications that are and will be developed on top of the VR-DIS core. Examples of these are the VR-based 3D sketching module [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; the VR-based information-modelling tool that allows the management and manipulation of information models for design in a VR environment [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; and a design-knowledge capturing module that is now under development [first author et al., 2000a and 2000b]. The latter module aims to assist the designer in the recognition and utilisation of existing and new typologies in a design situation. The replacement of the OODB implementation of the API by the XML implementation enables these modules to use distributed Feature databases through Internet, without many changes to their own code, and without the loss of the flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas that are implemented as part of the API. Research in the near future will result in Internet-based applications that support designers in the utilisation of distributed libraries of product-information, design-knowledge, case-bases, etc.The paper roughly follows the outline of the abstract, starting with an introduction to the VR-DIS project, its objectives, and the developed theory of the Feature-modelling framework that forms the core of it. It briefly discusses the necessity of schema evolution, flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas, and how these capabilities have been addressed in the framework. The major part of the paper describes how the previously mentioned aspects of the framework are implemented in the XML-based approach, providing details on the so-called meta-layer, its definition in the DTD, and the parser rules that complement it. The impact of the XML approach on the functionality of the VR-DIS modules and the system as a whole is demonstrated by a discussion of these modules and scenarios of their usage for design tasks. The paper is concluded with an overview of future work on the sharing of Internet-based design information and design knowledge.
series AVOCAAD
email J.P.v.Leeuwen@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 16dd
authors Leclercq, Pierre P.
year 2001
title Programming and Assisted Sketching. Graphic and Parametric Integration in Architectural Design
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 15-31
summary In this paper, we present our latest research related to the concept of a sketchinterface. After describing our vision of computer assisted design and the conditions necessary for its effective implementation, an original data model is presented, which covers different levels of representation and is grounded in a database of implicit information. We then describe our software prototype, which exploits the potentials of the digital sketch, in order to demonstrate how our ideas are pertinent and the feasibility of three kinds of applications. In particular, we argue in favor of using an architectural software program in relation to the sketch within the same computer assisted environment at an early stage in the design process.
keywords Design , Architectural Models, Implicit Knowledge Management, Sketch Interface
series CAAD Futures
email alpha@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 561c
authors Martínez, A.C., Vigo, L., Aljadeff, C., Brigante, A., Asín, R., Buaca, C. and Rubbo, S.
year 2001
title INCORPORACIÓN DE MEDIOS DIGITALES A LA ENSEÑANZA DE UN TALLER DE PROYECTO TRADICIONAL (Incorporation of Digital Media in the Teaching of a Traditional Design Studio)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 176-178
summary This is a research project in progress sponsored by the Universidad de Belgrano; it is to be completed by the end of 2001. The work comprises the observation of design processes done by students using manual and digital means following the same phases (study of the context and program, parti alternatives, fixation of a general scheme, formal and material development). Each of these phases is tackled by students according to their preferences, availability of equipment and degree of training in the use of digital media. An evident drawback for students is that the possiblities of testing design alternatives are reduced because of low expertise in representation. It is our intention to develop know-how about the use of this mixture of media in the most appropriate way for a design assignment, like the one we have for the use of graphic representations, study models, etc. We should be able to describe in detail the relations between traditional and digital representation considering both as means for reaching a more complete knowledge of the object we are designing. Thus we can evaluate the possibilities of articulation between both systems and the best way to exploit these relations for didactical ends.
series SIGRADI
email alcoronam@sinectis.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 2ab7
authors Ozcan, Oguzhan
year 2001
title Integration of Architectural Education in Teaching Interactive Media Design - A Course for Space Composition
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 245-248
summary In accordance with our design knowledge, the users’ expectations and the level of the technology reached, show us that interactive media design is not only an interactive environment which depends on two dimensional typographic composition any more. Spatial data has an important role in the formation of interactive media design (TUFTE 1995 p.38). From this point of view, the main factors of this issue are: (1) design of the storyboards, especially for gamedesign, that are made up of spatial perception, (2) the spatial organisations in which info-kiosks take place in public environment, (3) the relation between the screen and the organisation of space in interactive exhibition design. // When we consider the matter above, we understand that throughout the process of the curriculum of interactive media design for undergraduate education, only the traditional communication design and programming education is not sufficient enough, but architectural education must also take a part of this education in some degree. In this paper, as the theme of the considerations above, it is examined what kind of basic problems is to be faced in the integration of architectural education to that of the interactive media design and also the solution propositions formed for these problems.
keywords Interactive Media, Architecture, Education, Design
series eCAADe
email oozcan@yildiz.edu.tr
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 7134
authors Penttilä, Hannu (Ed.)
year 2001
title Architectural Information Management [Conference Proceedings]
source 19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1 / Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, 578 p.
summary Several common phrases, such as “information society” or “virtual reality” point out the fact that information technology, digital tools and numerous different services via various communication networks have become crucially important factors of our western lifestyle and living environment. The trends of the society reflects naturally the working environments of the construction field, architectural discipline being amongst them. It is almost inconceivable to even imagine an architect without computer-based tools anymore. This evolutional development process has, from historical perspective, only recently started. The process is constantly evolving and rapidly increasing our possibilities to use and enjoy these modern digital fruits. The sometimes unpredictable and rapid changes in our working environment should make architects nervous about the impacts of the changes. All those delicate methods and collective traditions of the several thousand year architectural discipline(!), just simply cannot be transferred into the digital realm in a few decades. Researchers and teachers should very carefully, but still open mindedly, critically explore, analyse and adjust the so-called “modern technology” into the world of architecture, construction, design, planning – and education. We are not just “endusers”, It is we, in fact, who should define what, where and how are we willing to use it(IT). The value of information is constantly growing in our society, and in the future it will evidently be even more so. The value of information is quite hard to define with measurable or agreed concepts, but information evidently contains value-factors. The information which the architects are creating, modifying and manipulating, contains essential and valuable core data concerning the whole built environment of our society. It affects the physical surroundings of our society, in which we will be living for decades – hence, the information has a historical basis. The architectural core information also very strongly affects the quality of life of our fellow citizens – consequently, it has deep social meaning. The essentials of architectural information relies on the tradition of centuries – hence, it clearly has acknowledged cultural values, which are also extremely difficult to quantify. So how could architectural information be described? The information covers a wide range of heterogeneous concepts, items, values, methods, tools, materials, true facts, rumours, intuition and knowledge, plus a multitude of yet undefined or unpredictable factors, which still have to be watched and prepared for. Since the information deals with common and general subjects, it should also be described with common and general concepts. On the other hand as the information is also concerned with the minutiae of specific projects, the architectural information should also be described with well identified and unique entities. With our digital tools we handle all information – including architectural – more and more digitally. We have to handle and manipulate information currently as digital data, which could be understood the ”raw material” of architectural information. Digital data becomes valuable information, when some kind of meaning or purpose to somebody can be attributed to it. In the early gloomy days of ”digital architecture” in the 1960’s and 1970’s, researchers tried to describe architectural artefacts and even design process mathematically. The details of architectural information were quite difficult to describe with binary alphanumeric information of main-frame machines. The architects’ tools development then led to a trend where architects could better represent and visualize the design objects digitally. The widespread and common use of 2D-drawing and 3D-modelling tools is still a very strong trend within our discipline. In fact it is “the way” the majority of architectural information is managed today. During the last 15–20 years, so-called conceptual modelling or product data modelling, done in various technical and construction field research units worldwide, has from one viewpoint clarified the basis and essence of architectural information. Hence, it’s not only CAD-software application development, but also elementary and theoretical research that gives us valuable help to survive among the ever growing seas of terabits of data in the future to come. Architectural information is something that simply cannot be described just with DWG-drawings or dummy scanned photographs any more. Although drawings and photos may contain very important bits of architectural documentation, we need ntimes more “complexity layers”, concepts and tools to manage and understand the essence of architectural information today. A proper way to manage the data we are working with, has to cover the whole architectural discipline. The methods and tools also have to be valid and flexible for several decades in the future.
keywords Information Management & Data Structuring, Education & Curricula, Modeling & City Planning
series eCAADe
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
more http://www.hut.fi/events/ecaade/
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

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