CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 714

_id 277f
authors Mabel, Fabiana
year 2001
title CIDADE ARTE: UM PROJETO VIRTUAL-DIGITAL (City Art: A Virtual-Digital Project)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 248-250
summary “Art city” is focus in analizing the traditional process of urban plan - using the highest tecnology - to propose an urban plan of the ocupation in the real and virtual space. The timing and space has transformed during this new way of representation. Allow the exposition of the elements in differents years and cultures , the change of objects and process, to receive and transmit information. Doesn’t represent a specific place; the elaboration depend the way we realize and how we deal with the propsing and inside the struture of navegation
series SIGRADI
email fabianamabel@ig.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id b044
authors Martin, Rodrigo Q.
year 2001
title LA INTEGRACIÓN DE LA COMPUTACIÓN EN LA ENSEÑANZA DE LA ARQUITECTURA (The Integration of the Computation in the Teaching of Architecture)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 229-232
summary Which are the questions to ask about integration of computer science and teaching Architecture? The use of a new tool may enhance the production of the different representations of the architectural object. But the insertion of a tool demands questioning about his real possibilities of use. The traditional language of space is composed with the constructive language : plans, sections, perspective ,etc. ; but the computer software that is used to design gives the possibility to represent space in several forms : inmersion, dynamic process, parametric deformations. Here appears the question, what is the new language? Which is the way to get to the center of architectural thought, the space. The computer representations and the modification processes of models are new dynamics of design, this has to be considered in the teaching of Architecture.
series SIGRADI
email rmartin@lauca.usach.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 2ab7
authors Ozcan, Oguzhan
year 2001
title Integration of Architectural Education in Teaching Interactive Media Design - A Course for Space Composition
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 245-248
summary In accordance with our design knowledge, the users’ expectations and the level of the technology reached, show us that interactive media design is not only an interactive environment which depends on two dimensional typographic composition any more. Spatial data has an important role in the formation of interactive media design (TUFTE 1995 p.38). From this point of view, the main factors of this issue are: (1) design of the storyboards, especially for gamedesign, that are made up of spatial perception, (2) the spatial organisations in which info-kiosks take place in public environment, (3) the relation between the screen and the organisation of space in interactive exhibition design. // When we consider the matter above, we understand that throughout the process of the curriculum of interactive media design for undergraduate education, only the traditional communication design and programming education is not sufficient enough, but architectural education must also take a part of this education in some degree. In this paper, as the theme of the considerations above, it is examined what kind of basic problems is to be faced in the integration of architectural education to that of the interactive media design and also the solution propositions formed for these problems.
keywords Interactive Media, Architecture, Education, Design
series eCAADe
email oozcan@yildiz.edu.tr
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ευ = good and άπτω = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner – potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique “touch” for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id avocaad_2001_12
id avocaad_2001_12
authors Pongratz, Perbellini
year 2001
title Intermedial Architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary A great part of our physical environment and existence is currently undergoing an epochal transformation from a solid to a liquid state on many layers of technological evolution. Optical phenomena and radical shifts in visuality, particularly manifest through media propagation are impacting on urban space in unpredictable ways. City - space is not only perceived as a physical place but also simultaneously inhabited as a virtual site. Both conditions form the hybrid of an urban realm, construed as surveillance, simulation, distraction and a relentless proliferation of information. Ultimately, all man-machine interfaces of hardware will be adequately infinitely machined. This process however will continue beyond the now experienced level of TV, video, cellular-phones and computers, incorporating interconnected surfaces of text, music and other kind of data. The surrounding sensorium will penetrate the phenomenological tissue of our nervous system to the extent that we are unconsciously fluidly interacting. Behavioral properties of matter and their smooth transmittal of visual, sound and tactile sensations, will provide an intellectual and sensual presence which renders space and its perception as being liquefied. Also the interrelation between the exterior and interior usage will be smooth and multidimensional, as the building’s envelopes are capable to alter their properties in response to contextual changes or movements. A redefinition of the disciplines of architecture and urban planning responds to the changes in cultural, social, political and economical milieus.
series AVOCAAD
email info@pongratz-perbellini.com
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4dd3
authors Reymen, Isabelle M.M.J.
year 2001
title Improving design processes through structured reflection : a domain-independent approach
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary In the world of designing, three fields of attention can be recognised, namely design research, design practice, and design education. Gaps exist between these three fields. In this thesis about designing, the focus is on the gap between design research and design practice. Design practice includes many design disciplines and an increasing number of multidisciplinary teams. Main problems in design practice are the communication between designers with a different background and the integration and co-ordination of important aspects during a design process. By tackling these problems, the effectiveness and efficiency of design processes in practice can be improved. The study of similarities and differences between design processes in several design disciplines and the development of support for reflection on design processes are topics that can improve design practice and that deserve more attention in design research. The goal of my research is to decrease the gap between design research and design practice in order to improve design processes. Reflection on design processes can help designers to improve their design process, its results, and the designer’s proficiency: By reflecting explicitly on the current design situation and on the performed design activities, in a systematic way and on a regular basis, designers can plan next design activities that can be performed effectively and efficiently given the design goal at that moment. In this thesis, the combination of systematic and regular reflection is called structured reflection. To improve design processes in various design disciplines in practice, the study of similarities and differences between design processes in several disciplines can be useful. Similarities between design processes are the basis for domain-independent design knowledge (as distinguished from domain-specific design knowledge). To reach the goal of my research, I have chosen to combine, in a broad explorative study, the development of support for structured reflection on design processes and the development of domain-independent design knowledge. This thesis describes a domain-independent approach to improve design processes through structured reflection. My research process can be summarised as follows. I studied three design disciplines, namely architecture, mechanical engineering, and software engineering. To get input from design practice, I did qualitative empirical research: I performed twelve case studies in the three disciplines to inventory characteristics of design processes and I compared the cases for similarities and differences. The similarities, together with the results of a literature study, have been the basis for the development of domain-independent descriptive design knowledge. The developed descriptive knowledge, in turn, formed the basis for developing domain-independent prescriptive design knowledge. At the end of the project, I confronted all results with design practice to get feedback on the results in another empirical study and I performed a literature study to position the results in the design literature. My design philosophy and design frame are the descriptive results developed to answer the first research question, namely “How to describe design processes in a domain-independent way?”. My design philosophy is a set of domain-independent concepts and terms for describing a design process. The concepts and terms are based on an application of the general theory of state-transition systems to the context of designing; the concepts of state and state transition correspond to the main concepts of design situation and design activity in my design philosophy. The answer to the first research question given by the design philosophy is refined in a design frame: The design frame offers a means to structure the description of a design process in a domain-independent way. Major structuring concepts of the design frame are dimensions and subjects. I define three dimensions, namely level, perspective, and time. These dimensions define a three-dimensional space, called a positioning space, in which important aspects of design processes can be positioned. A positioning space must be defined for each subject, being the three parts of a design situation: the product being designed, the design process, and the design context. My design frame is a domain-independent structure formed by the combination of the three dimensions for each subject. My design method is the prescriptive result developed to answer the second research question, namely “How to support structured reflection on design processes in a domain-independent way?”. My design method is a domain-independent aid that offers designers support for reflecting on design processes in a structured way. Reflection on design processes is defined as an introspective contemplation on the designer’s perception of the design situation and on the remembered design activities. A reflection process is described as a process that consists of three steps that are called preparation, image forming, and conclusion drawing. The design method is based on two main concepts: The first concept is the systematic description and analysis of design situations and design activities by means of forms and checklists; only systematic support for the preparation step of a reflection process is developed. The second concept is the idea of design sessions, introduced to stimulate designers to reflect regularly during a design process. A design session is defined as a period of time during which one or more designers are working on a subtask of a certain design task, for example, one afternoon, a whole day, or a week. Both concepts are combined to support structured reflection on design processes. The complete design method consists of five steps for each design session, namely planning a design session, defining the subtask of the design session, reflecting at the beginning of a design session, designing during the core of a design session, and reflecting at the end of a design session. A prototype software tool, called ECHO, has been developed to explore the benefits of using a software system to facilitate the use of the design method. Together, the design philosophy and the design frame offer concepts, a vocabulary, and a structure to describe design processes in a domain-independent way. The design method is a first proposal of a method that supports structured reflection on design processes. My results are thus possible answers to the mentioned research questions and are starting points to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of design processes. Based on the feedback I collected, I am optimistic about the applicability of my results in design practice. By asking input from design practice and by developing results that are useful for design practice and that contribute to design research, I contribute to decrease the gap between design research and design practice. The most important recommendations for further research are to test all results extensively in design practice and to investigate how to apply the results in design education.
series thesis:PhD
email isabelle@win.tue.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id c0f5
authors Russell, Peter
year 2001
title Creating Place in the Virtual Design Studio
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 231-242
summary The current wave of attempts to create virtual design studios has demonstrated a wide range of didactical as well as computational models. Through work performed over the past year, an evolution of many of these concepts has been created which fosters a sense of place. This aspect of place has to do with identity and community rather than with form and space. Initial virtual design studio projects were often merely a digital pin-up board, which enabled distributed and asynchronous criticism and review. However, the web sites were more analogous to a directory than to the studio setting of an upper level design problem. The establishment of a truly distributed design studio in the past year, which involved design teams spread over three universities (not parallel to one another) led to the need for an independent place to share and discuss the student's work. Previous virtual design studios have also established web sites with communication facilities, but one was always alone with the information. In order to enhance this virtual design studio and to give it a sense of place, a studio platform that serves as a console for participants was developed. The console is a front end to a dynamic database which mediates information about the participants, their work, timetables and changes to the dynamic community. Through a logon mechanism, the presence of members is traceable and displayed. When a member logs onto the console, other members currently online are displayed to the participant. An online embedded talk function allows informal impromptu discussions to occur at a mouseclick, thus imitating ways similar to the traditional design studio setting. Personal profiles and consultation scheduling constitute the core services available. Use of the platform has proven to be well above expected levels. The students often used the platform as a meeting place to see what was going on and to co-ordinate further discussions using other forums (videoconferences, irc chats or simple telephone conversations. Surveys taken at the end of the semester show a strong affinity for the platform concept in conjunction with a general frustration in pursuing collaboration with low bandwidth communication channels.
keywords Virtual Environments, Virtual Design Studio, Internet Utilisation
series CAAD Futures
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 454f
authors Schultz, Margarita
year 2001
title CAMBIO DE PARADIGMA E INTERACTIVIDAD ARTÍSTICA. LOS NUEVOS MEDIOS DIGITALES (Change of Paradigm and Artistic Interactivity. The New Digital Means)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 240-242
summary Interactivity is a form in which the human being expands the self . Traditional causality contains a logic of previsible reactions; another type of causality takes place in virtual space. Digital art-works made for the Net have only a variable essence . A proposal promotes an answer and increases the meaning.Time in development is a key contributor to the process of interactivity in digital art-works, articulated with a non-forcible space. Hubert Reeves found out that the increase of interactions implies an enlargement of creativity in the universe. This is an argument to support interactivity in the digitalised creative intervention.
series SIGRADI
email Mschulz@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id e261
authors Voigt, Andreas
year 2001
title Configuration of the Urban Space as Virtual Experience
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 185-188
summary Configuration of the urban space and its space sections is significantly influenced by the securing and further development of the“city and building-up volume”. In the long run the building-up volume acts as the defined three-dimensional scope of reference andaction regarding constructional-spatial development, specifying the interaction between material three-dimensional elements and freeareas throughout the settled area. The present contribution deals with the required scale of performances regarding an adequatesimulation environment for recent and future challanges of urban development planning. Thus those possibilities are to be enhancedwhich turn the present city configuration (configuration of the urban space) into a virtual experience by integrating visions, utopiasand the future developments.
series other
email voigt@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:19

_id de98
authors Wong, C.-H. , Liu, Y.-T., Chen, S.-C., Chang, K.-W., Lai, T., Lee, H.L. and Chang, Y.-Y.
year 2001
title Is cyberspace a space? A preliminary exploration of the spatial phenomena in the internat
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 189-194
summary This study attempts to join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of ëëspaceíí, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space". As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in Internet space creation and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world and virtual world.
series CAADRIA
email aleppo@cc.NCTU.edu.tw
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 0c8b
authors Yang, Chien-Tse
year 2001
title Perspective and Visualization of Dynamic Spaces using VR techniques
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 479-484
summary By the perspective method, it is easy to produce many geometrical spatial forms. But through current computer media, we are able to control dynamic spaces. Under these circumstances, what type of role will traditional architectural elements play in this new era? This research investigates the different perceptions in various spaces. Afterward architectural elements are introduced and we test the effects on the perceptions of different spaces. Therefore the effectiveness of these elements is verified in different types of space.
keywords Perspective, Conventional/Computer Media, Dynamic Spaces, VR
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 403f
authors Clark, Steve and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2001
title The Role of Place in Designing a Learner Centred Virtual Learning Environment
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 187-200
summary There are numerous approaches and tools for creating a virtual learning environment. The most common approach is to provide a repository of learning materials on a network to facilitate the distribution of the course content and to supplement this material with communications software such as email and bulletin boards. In this paper we highlight the role of place in creating a learning experience and its relevance to current learning theories. Architectural design becomes an important consideration when virtual learning environments are considered places. We present a framework for guiding the development of virtual learning environments that shows how place and design can combine with learning theories and technology. Finally, we draw on our experience in developing a virtual campus and virtual design studios to demonstrate how place and design can be the basis for virtual learning environments.
keywords Virtual Place, Virtual Learning Environments, Design Studio
series CAAD Futures
email stevec@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:23

_id 37e5
authors Cruickshank, G., Paterson, I. and Natanson, L.
year 2001
title A CREATIVE CURRICULUM: PUTTING TECHNOLOGY IN ITS PLACE
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 218-220
summary The accessibility of 3D Modelling software presents challenges in the delivery of education aimed at developing creativity. Despite opening up innovative avenues of artistic possibility, computer technologies are essentially two-dimensional, hard to master and may restrict creativity itself. This paper describes a curriculum designed to develop creativity within an Electronic Arts programme. A student-centred, experiential learning approach was taken, which challenged students to set personal objectives within set project constraints. Formal critique sessions allowed students to develop a critical perspective. Conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of the approach to other non-artistic areas.
series SIGRADI
email I.Paterson@tay.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id f85d
authors Geraedts, Rob P and Pollalis, Spiro N.
year 2001
title Remote Teaching in Design Education - Educational and Organizational Issues and Experiences
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 305-310
summary The Department of Real Estate and Project Management (BMVB) of the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology has been working closely with Professor Spiro N. Pollalis of Harvard University, Graduate School of Design in Cambridge, USA since 1991. His case-based interactive seminars about the management of the design & construction process have been highly appreciated by many generations of students. In Spring 2000, Pollalis suggested to extend the scope of his involvement by introducing a remote teaching component, the subject of his research in the last few years. As Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the Design and Construction Industry is part of his lectures, it was appropriate to provide the students with a first hand experience on the subject. In the following experiment, the teacher would remain in his office at Harvard while the interactive work and discussion sessions with 130 students in a full lecture room would take place in Delft as planned. The consequences this experiment has had for the course, for the techniques and facilities used, how teachers and students experienced these, and which conclusions and recommendations can be made, are the topics of this paper.
keywords Remote Teaching, Design & Construction Education, And ICT
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 37b4
authors Gu, N. and Maher, M.L.
year 2001
title Architectural design of a virtual campus
source Y-T. Liu (ed.), Defining Digital Architecture, Dialogue, pp. 158-161
summary The design of a virtual campus, while considering the role of technology in education, also can be influenced by the of place that more traditional architectural design provides. This approach need not result in a virtual campus that looks like a physical building, the main concept is to intricately link learning with an experience in a place with other people.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id bf54
authors Vásquez De Velasco, Guillermo
year 2002
title The Computer is to Blame - The Disruptive Potential of a CAD Curriculum in an Architecture / Curriculum
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 50-54
summary In 2001 “DesignIntelligence” and the “Almanac of Architecture and Design” conducted a survey in which they interviewed over 800 leading U.S. architecture firms. The fundamental question was: “In your firm’s hiring experience within the past five years, which schools do you feel have best prepared students for the architecture profession?” This survey produces one of the most respected rankings of schools of architecture in the U.S., but in addition to that critical question, the survey gathers data on a number of additional parameters that are of fundamental importance on why some schools are doing better than others. If we compare current figures with figures of previous years we see that our students are improving in their computer skills at the same time that they are loosing ground in other skills and fields of knowledge. For a non-inquisitive mind the reason is simple: “Our students are too busy working on the computer and are failing to put attention to other important stuff”. This paper makes an attempt to understand the problem from a fair perspective and highlight ways in which our growth in the field of CAD, and the pervasive presence of computer technology in our classrooms, can be used to enhance our teaching / learning capabilities in fields that are currently failing to achieve excellence.
series eCAADe
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ga0132
id ga0132
authors Abe, Yoshiyuki
year 2001
title Beyond the math visualization - Geometrica and Stochastica
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Mathematically controlled imaging process provides attractive results because of its infinite scaling capabilities with some other elements that contribute to the visualization. Its global/local and precise manipulation of parameters holds potential for realizing an unpredictable horizon of imagery. When it meets the artist's taste, this method could be a strong enough system of creation, and I have been producing images using the surfaces of hyperbolic paraboloid. On the other hand, a method absolutely free from the geometric parameter manipulation is possible with a stochastic process [1]. Like the technique of pendulum in photography, while its production rate of acceptable result is very low, its potential of generating a strong visual message is also very attractive. It is possible to set stochastic elements at any stage of the process, and conditional probability on those elements, or the hierarchy of probability management characterizes the probability distribution. Math space has no light. No gravity. No color on the math surfaces. And the math equation providesonly the boundary in 3D or higher mathematical dimensions. The fact means that artists can keep artistic reality with their unique tastes in colors on the surface and light sources, and this is the most important element of the math based imaging. Being able to give artists' own choice of colors and that the artist may take only right ones from the results of a stochastic process guarantee the motif and aesthetics of artist could be reflected onto the work.
series other
email y.abe@ieee.org
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id avocaad_2001_05
id avocaad_2001_05
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Analysis and the descriptive approach
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The rise of consciousness concerning the quality of working and living conditions has been a permanent though frequently underplayed theme in architecture and building since the reconstruction period. It has led to an explosive growth of programmatic requirements on building behaviour and performance, thus also stimulating the development of design analysis. The first stage of development was characterized by the evolution of prescriptive systems. These reversed the structure of pre-existing proscriptive systems into sequences of known steps that should be taken in order to achieve adequate results. Prescriptive systems complemented rather than replaced proscriptive ones, thereby creating an uncertain mixture of orthodoxy and orthopraxy that failed to provide design guidance for improving design performance and quality.The second stage in the development of design analysis focuses on descriptive methods and techniques for analyzing and supporting evaluation. Technologies such as simulation and scientific visualization are employed so as to produce detailed, accurate and reliable projections of building behaviour and performance. These projections can be correlated into a comprehensive and coherent description of a building using representations of form as information carriers. In these representations feedback and interaction assume a visual character that fits both design attitudes and lay perception of the built environment, but on the basis of a quantitative background that justifies, verifies and refines design actions. Descriptive analysis is currently the most promising direction for confronting and resolving design complexity. It provides the designer with useful insights into the causes and effects of various design problems but frequently comes short of providing clear design guidance for two main reasons: (1) it adds substantial amounts of information to the already unmanageable loads the designer must handle, and (2) it may provide incoherent cues for the further development of a design. Consequently the descriptive approach to analysis is always in danger of been supplanted by abstract decision making.One way of providing the desired design guidance is to complement the connection of descriptive analyses to representations of form (and from there to synthesis) with two interface components. The first is a memory component, implemented as case-bases of precedent designs. These designs encapsulate integrated design information that can be matched to the design in hand in terms of form, function and performance. Comparison between precedents with a known performance and a new design facilitate identification of design aspects that need be improved, as well as of wider formal and functional consequences. The second component is an adaptive generative system capable of guiding exploration of these aspects, both in the precedents and the new design. The aim of this system is to provide feedback from analysis to synthesis. By exploring the scope of the analysis and the applicability of the conclusions to more designs, the designer generates a coherent and consistent collection of partial solutions that explore a relevant solution space. Development of the first component, the design case-bases, is no trivial task. Transformability in the representation of cases and flexible classification in a database are critical to the identification and treatment of a design aspect. Nevertheless, the state of the art in case-based reasoning and the extensive corpus of analysed designs provide the essential building blocks. The second component, the adaptive generative system, poses more questions. Existing generative techniques do not possess the necessary richness or multidimensionality. Moreover, it is imperative that the designer plays a more active role in the control of the process than merely tweaking local variables. At the same time, the system should prevent that redesigning degenerates into a blind trial-and-error enumeration of possibilities. Guided empirical design research arguably provides the means for the evolutionary development of the second component.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8c2d
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo García
year 2001
title PROJECTED SPACE: CHARACTERIZING THE “CYBRID ARCHITECTURE”.
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 285-287
summary The “cybrid architecture” has been defined like integration of physical and digital spaces. Based on the capability of electronic media to generate virtual environments (cyberspaces) which could be related to buildings. However, theoretical studies and contemporary works reveal a more complex relationship between media and constructions. Expressed in architectural characteristics that constitutes a new spatial quality, named here projected space. Hence the paper argues that “cybrid architecture” is not technological, but is a modification of conventional architectural space due to cultural evolution.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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