CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 714

_id d00c
authors Kós, José Ripper
year 2001
title Modeling the City History
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 436-441
summary This paper explores the idea that 3D city models integrated with hypermedia systems can facilitate the sense of belonging to a place. 3D models are powerful tools for buildings and urban space analysis as artifacts, which synthesize men’s reality and aspirations. As such, combined with hypermedia resources, they can strengthen the spectator’s actual experience in the analyzed space. The focus of the investigation is 3D models constructed to represent and analyze city evolution. The experience of developing the models of Latin American cities – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Havana, Cuba – developed at PROURB (Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro) is explained with an overview of its methodology.
keywords 3D City Model, Hypermedia, Sense Of Place, City Evolution, Latin America
series eCAADe
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ascaad2004_paper12
id ascaad2004_paper12
authors Al-Qawasmi, Jamal
year 2004
title Reflections on e-Design: The e-Studio Experience
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The influence of digital media and information technology on architectural design education and practice is increasingly evident. The practice and learning of architecture is increasingly aided by and dependant on digital media. Digital technologies not only provide new production methods, but also expand our abilities to create, explore, manipulate and compose space. In contemporary design education, there is a continuous demand to deliver new skills in digital media and to rethink architectural design education in the light of the new developments in digital technology. During the academic years 2001-2003, I had the chance to lead the efforts to promote an effective use of digital media for design education at Department of Architecture, Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST). Architectural curriculum at JUST dedicated much time for teaching computing skills. However, in this curriculum, digital media was taught in the form of "software use" education. In this context, digital media is perceived and used mainly as a presentation tool. Furthermore, Computer Aided Architectural Design and architectural design are taught in separate courses without interactions between the two.
series ASCAAD
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id avocaad_2001_18
id avocaad_2001_18
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 2001
title The End of Methodology - Towards New Integration
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The present paper is devoted to the deliberation on the genesis and development of designing from the point of view of the potential use of computers in the process. Moreover, it also presents the great hopes which were connected with the use of the systematic designing methods in the 1960’s, as well as the great disappointment resulting from the lack of concrete results. At this time a great deal of attention was paid to the process of design as a branch of a wider process of problem-solving. Many people believed that the intuitive methods of design traditionally used by architects were incapable of dealing with the complexity of the problems to be solved. Therefore, the basic problem was the definition of a vertical structure of the designing process, which would make it possible to optimise each process of architectural design. The studies of design methodology directed at the codification of the norms of actions have not brought about any solutions which could be commonly accepted, as the efforts to present the designing process as a formally logical one and one that is not internally “uncontrary” from the mathematical point of view, were doomed to fail. Moreover, the difficulties connected with the use of the computer in designing were caused by the lack of a graphic interface, which is so very characteristic of an architect’s workshop. In result, the methodology ceased to be the main area of the architect’s interest and efforts were focused on facilitating the method of the designer’s communication with the computer. New tools were created, which enabled both the automatic generation of diversity and the creation of forms on the basis of genetic algorithms, as well as the presentation of the obtained results in the form of rendering, animation and VRML. This was the end of the general methodology of designing and the beginning of a number of methods solving the partial problems of computer-supported design. The present situation can be described with the words of Ian Stewart as a “chaotic run in all directions”. An immediate need for new integration is felt. Cyber-real space could be a solution to the problem. C-R-S is not a virtual reality understood as an unreal world. Whilst VR could be indeed treated as a sort of an illusion, C-R-S is a much more realistic being, defining the area in which the creative activities are taking place. The architect gains the possibility of having a direct contact with the form he or she is creating. Direct design enables one to creatively use the computer technology in the designing process. The intelligent system of recognising speech, integrated with the system of virtual reality, will allow to create an environment for the designer – computer communication which will be most natural to the person. The elimination of this obstacle will facilitate the integration of the new methods into one designing environment. The theoretical assumptions of such an environment are described in the present paper.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_10
id avocaad_2001_10
authors Bige Tunçer, Rudi Stouffs, Sevil Sariyildiz
year 2001
title Facilitating the complexity of architectural analyses
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary It is common practice for architecture students to collect documents on prominent buildings relevant to their design task in the early stage of design. While practitioners can rely on a body of design experience of their own, during the process of a new design, students can only draw from the examples of success and failure from other architects. In the past, such precedent based learning was implicit in the master-apprentice relationship common in the educational system. Nowadays academics commonly no longer have the possibility to maintain an extensive design practice, and instead introduce important outside precedents to the students. Thus, the study of important historical precedents or designs plays an important role in design instruction and in the students’ design processes. While there is no doubt that the most effective outcome of such a study would be achieved when the student does entire the study herself, students also benefit from a collaboration with peers, where they form groups to do an analysis of various aspects of a same building or over a group of buildings. By integrating the respective results into a common, extensible, library, students can draw upon other results for comparisons and relationships between different aspects or buildings. The complexity this introduces is best supported in a computer medium.The Web offers many examples of architectural analyses on a wide variety of subjects. Commonly, these analyses consist of a collection of documents, categorized and hyperlinked to support navigation through the information space. More sophisticated examples rely on a database for storage and management of the data, and offer a more complex categorization of the information entities and their relationships. These studies present effective ways of accessing and browsing information, however, it is precluded within these analyses to distinguish and relate different components within the project documents. If enabled, instead, this would offer a richer information structure presenting new ways of accessing, viewing, and interpreting this information. Hereto, documents can be decomposed by content. This implies both expanding the document structure, replacing document entities by detailed substructures, and augmenting the structure’s relatedness with content information. The relationships between the resulting components make the documents inherently related by content.We propose a methodology to integrate project documents into a single model, and present an application for the presentation of architectural analyses in an educational setting. This approach provides the students with a simple interface and mechanisms for the presentation of an analysis of design precedents, and possibly their own designs. Since all the information is integrated within a single environment, students will benefit from each others’ studies, and can draw new conclusions across analyses and presentations from their peers.
series AVOCAAD
email b.tuncer@bk.tudelft.nl, I.s.sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl, r.stouffs@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id da3a
authors Borges Sanches, Thais and Leão de Amorim, Arivaldo
year 2001
title AVALIAÇÃO DO USO DA SIMULAÇÃO COMPUTACIONAL EM PROJETOS DE ILUMINAÇÃO ARTIFICIAL (Evaluation of the Use of Computer Simulation for Artificial Illumination Projects)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 95-97
summary This paper tries to evaluate the quantitative e qualitative aspects of the uses of the computational simulation for the analysis of enclosed environments light designs, and its feasibility in teaching in Architectural and Urbanism courses. The importance of this paper is associated with the determining of the illumination levels and its effects. Simulations were made with the Lightscape software in a specific room and their results were compared with the experimental measurements taken in that place. From this comparison it was possible to make the analysis of the software characteristics and to evaluate the advantages or disadvantages of its uses. The results confirm its feasibility as a tool for illumination simulation and its adequate uses in the teaching of environmental comfort. The good correlation achieved in visual effects derived from the lighting design and also the information of values related to illuminance and luminance for the simulated space support this affirmative.
series SIGRADI
email alamorim@ufba.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 9633
authors Bridges, Alan and Charitos, Dimitrios
year 2001
title The impact of form on movement within virtual environments
source Automation in Construction 10 (5) (2001) pp. 589-596
summary This paper reports some results from a research project investigating users' experience of space and movement in a virtual environment (VE).
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 0277
authors Brusilovsky, P.
year 2001
title Adaptive hypermedia
source User modelling and User-Adapted Interaction, volume 11, pp. 87-110, Kluwer
summary Hypertext/hypermedia systems and user-model-based adaptive systems in the areas of learning and information retrieval have for a long time been considered as two mutually exclusive approaches to information access. Adaptive systems tailor information to the user and may guide the user in the information space to present the most relevant material, taking into account a model of the user's goals, interests and preferences. Hypermedia systems, on the other hand, are `user neutral': they provide the user with the tools and the freedom to explore an information space by browsing through a complex network of information nodes. Adaptive hypertext and hypermedia systems attempt to bridge the gap between these two approaches. Adaptation of hypermedia systems to each individual user is increasingly needed. With the growing size, complexity and heterogeneity of current hypermedia systems, such as the World Wide Web, it becomes virtually impossible to impose guidelines on authors concerning the overall organization of hypermedia information. The networks therefore become so complex and unstructured that the existing navigational tools are no longer powerful enough to provide orientation on where to search for the needed information. It is also not possible to identify appropriate pre-defined paths or subnets for users with certain goals and knowledge backgrounds since the user community of hypermedia systems is usually quite inhomogeneous. This is particularly true for Web-based applications which are expected to be used by a much greater variety of users than any earlier standalone application. A possible remedy for the negative effects of the traditional `one-size-fits-all' approach in the development of hypermedia systems is to equip them with the ability to adapt to the needs of their individual users. A possible way of achieving adaptivity is by modeling the users and tailoring the system's interactions to their goals, tasks and interests. In this sense, the notion of adaptive hypertext/hypermedia comes naturally to denote a hypertext or hypermedia system which reflects some features of the user and/or characteristics of his system usage in a user model, and utilizes this model in order to adapt various behavioral aspects of the system to the user. This book is the first comprehensive publication on adaptive hypertext and hypermedia. It is oriented towards researchers and practitioners in the fields of hypertext and hypermedia, information systems, andpersonalized systems. It is also an important resource for the numerous developers of Web-based applications. The design decisions, adaptation methods, and experience presented in this book are a unique source of ideas and techniques for developing more usable and more intelligent Web-based systems suitable for a great variety of users. The practitioners will find it important that many of the adaptation techniques presented in this book have proved to be efficient and are ready to be used in various applications.
series other
email peterb@mail.sis.pitt.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 04f2
authors Cimerman, Benjamin
year 2001
title Clients, architects, houses and computers: Experiment and reflection on new roles and relationships in design
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 100-109
summary This paper reports on recent work that focused on the potential impact of standard computer technology on the relationship between client and architect in the context of residential design. A study of software applications a client could use to develop and evaluate ideas exposed the dearth of software available for the design of spatial complexity by individuals without advanced computer skills, and led to the design of a specific piece of software we call “Space Modeler.” It was prototyped using off-the-shelf virtual reality technology, and tested by a group of freshmen students. The paper discusses the specificities of the software and provides analysis and reflection based on the results of the test, both in terms of design artifacts and users’ comments. The paper concludes that the evolution of the interface to electronic environments is a matter of interest for those concerned with rethinking the training, role and activity of the architect. In the near future prospective homeowners may be able to experience and experiment with the space of their home before it is built. How can the profession embrace new information technology developments and appropriate them for the benefits of society at large?
keywords Design Software, Design Participation, Visualization, Simulation
series ACADIA
email cimerb@rpi.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 51a0
authors Conti, G., Ucelli, G. and Maver, T.
year 2001
title JCAD-VR: Java Collaborative Architectural Design Tool in Virtual Reality - A Java3D based scalable framework for real-time, multiplatform VR environments
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 454-459
summary This paper proposes a framework that provides the architect with a tool that uses Virtual Reality (VR) as part of the design path. It offers the possibility to deploy a system capable of assisting the design profession during the early stages of the design process. This way VR becomes the means for a new experience where the architect can, free from constraints of the 2D world, create and manipulate the space she/he is designing. The idea upon which JCAD-VR is being built is that all the users present in the virtual world have to be able to share the same virtual environment in a “transparent fashion” where the user interface, instead of the traditional menu/windows based layout, it is part of the virtual world itself. The aim is to provide the designer with a tool for creating 3D-shapes in a shared VR environment, thus allowing the design to be shared as it evolves.
keywords Collaborative Design, Virtual Reality, Java 3D, Distributed Environment
series eCAADe
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 5c22
authors Durmisevic, S., Ciftcioglu, Ö. and Sariyildiz, S.
year 2001
title Quantifying the Qualitative Design Aspects
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 111-116
summary Architecture is a mixture of art and technique. This implies that the architect deals not only with engineering aspects that can be easily quantified and thereafter processed, but deals with aesthetics as well which is in first place qualitative and therefore rather difficult to estimate and numerically represent. As an example, in such cases, these ‘qualitative quantities’ are expressed in linguistic form which should be somehow expressed in numerical form in order to treat such data by powerful and conclusive numerical analysis methods. Expressions such as: bright colour, light room, large space are some of these examples. These expressions are fuzzy concepts whose actual interpretation is hidden and all of them together attach a qualitative value to a certain space. To deal with such information the emerging technologies of the last decade can provide an important aid. One of them is the soft computing technology that can deal with such soft data. In this paper, based on the case studies, we explain the potential of using soft computing techniques.
keywords Qualitative Design Data, Information Processing, Soft Computing, Knowledge Modeling, Neuro-Fuzzy Network
series eCAADe
email I.S.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 4a53
authors Faltings, Boi
year 2001
title Qualitative Spatial Reasoning Based on Algebraic Topology
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary Several formalisms have been proposed for qualitativereasoning about regions and their topological relations in space. Theseformalisms, based on pairwise relations, do not allow sufficientlypowerful inferences to be used for spatial reasoning tasks such asplanning a collision-free path. In this paper, I show how consideringrelations between region triples, much more powerful reasoningtechniques become possible. I show in particular that in twodimensions, purely topological reasoning is sufficient to compute aminimal place graph which represents all minimal and maximal regioncombinations, as well as all minimal paths between them. I illustratehow this could be applied to motion planning, showing that in spite ofits qualitative nature, the formalism is powerful enough to solveproblems of practical interest.
series other
email faltings@iconomic.com
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:14

_id 6a37
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 13-23
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies ina tightly structured framework for the integration of Environmental Control Systems (ECS) principles intoa third year design studio. An interchangeable use of digital media and physical material enabledarchitectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement.The principles that provide the foundation for integrative strategies between a design studio and buildingtechnology course spring from the Bauhaus tradition where a systematic approach to craftsmanship andvisual perception is emphasized. Focusing particularly on color, light, texture and materials, Josef Albersexplored the assemblage of found objects, transforming these materials into unexpected dynamiccompositions. Moholy-Nagy developed a technique called the photogram or camera-less photograph torecord the temporal movements of light. Wassily Kandinsky developed a method of analytical drawingthat breaks a still life composition into diagrammatic forces to express tension and geometry. Theseschematic diagrams provide a method for students to examine and analyze the implications of elementplacements in space (Bermudez, Neiman 1997). Gyorgy Kepes's Language of Vision provides a primerfor learning basic design principles. Kepes argued that the perception of a visual image needs aprocess of organization. According to Kepes, the experience of an image is "a creative act ofintegration". All of these principles provide the framework for the studio investigation.The quarter started with a series of intense short workshops that used an interchangeable use of digitaland physical media to focus on ECS topics such as day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary tolead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration.In integrating ECS components with the design studio, an nine-step methodology was established toprovide students with a compelling and tangible framework for design:Examples of student work will be presented for the two times this course was offered (2001/02) to showhow exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series ACADIA
email tfowler@calpoly.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 3847
authors Gattis, Merideth
year 2001
title Space as a Basis for Reasoning
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary We use space as a basis for reasoning whenever we use aspatial representation of a nonspatial concept to make decisions orinferences. From a psychological perspective, our tendency to create andreason fluidly from spatial models is somewhat surprising, becauseusing a spatial model to reason involves creating correspondencesbetween two semantically unrelated concepts: space, and something thatisn’t space, whether that be time, performance, or the desirability of anew job. Our proficiency in using space as a basis for reasoning reliesour abilities to detect similarities in the structures of very differentconcepts. In this paper I discuss two types of similarities between spaceand nonspatial concepts and describe how those similarities influencereasoning from spatial representations.
series other
email m.gattis@sheffield.ac.uk
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:16

_id f1c4
authors Holmgren, S., Rüdiger, B. and Tournay, B.
year 2001
title The 3D-City Model – A New Space
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 430-435
summary We have worked with the construction and use of 3D city models for about ten years. This work has given us valuable experience concerning model methodology. In addition to this collection of knowledge, our perception of the concept of city models has changed radically. In order to explain this shift in paradigms we begin by describing some of the concrete models we have made, showing the relationship between model structure (methodology and content) and model use. We also describe the projects we are working on at present in order to illustrate new ideas concerning the potential development of 3D city models.
keywords Digital 3D City Model, Urban Regeneration, Participatory Design, On Line Community
series eCAADe
email steen.holmgren@karch.dk, bjarne.rudiger@karch.dk, bruno.tournay@karch.dk
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id a40c
authors Inkinen, Tommi
year 2001
title A city revised: representing or recreating the urban space as a polygon experience – a discussion of the case of virtual Turku
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 351-354
summary The Internet has provided a new means to represent urban space. The development of modelling languages,like VRML, has given us the tools to recreate urban locations on the net. In this paper, the virtual image ofTurku, a city located in Southwest Finland is discussed. My approach is twofold. Firstly, I focus on the‘official’ city web-page and its two dimensional textual appearance. This constitutes the essence of virtualcity as ‘public’ project. Secondly, there is a challenging new field that combines aspects from computersciences, urban studies and Internet research. This refers to three-dimensional city models that are used torepresent an exact copy of the material space of cities. The analysis is based on interpretation of interviewsand contents of the two site structures. The following conclusions are proposed. The mission of a virtualpublic city is twofold: it is a local project, purposed to build a new and efficient medium to connect theadministration and citizens; and it is also a global/national project, a medium of advertising and givingknowledge of the tourist possibilities and attractions. On the other hand, the private virtual city project isbased on potential future incomes. It is a means of gaining profit via expanding possibilities provided by ecommerce.
series other
email toalin@utu.fi
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:18

_id 1af4
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Marx, John
year 2001
title Architecture and the Internet: Designing Places in Cyberspace
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 230-241
summary Cyberspace, as the information space is called, has become accessible in the past decade through the World Wide Web. And although it can only be experienced through the mediation of computers, it is quickly becoming an alternative stage for everyday economic, cultural, and other human activities. As such, there is a potential and a need to design it according to place-like principles. Making places for human inhabitation is, of course, what architects, landscape architects, town planners, and interior designers have been doing in physical space for thousands of years. It is curious, therefore, that Cyberspace designers have not capitalized on the theories, experiences, and practices that have been guiding physical place-making. Rather, they have adopted the woefully inadequate ‘document metaphor’: instead of ‘web-places’ we find ‘web-pages.’ 3D environments that closely mimic physical space are not much better suited for making Cyber-places: they are, by and large, devoid of essential characteristics that make a ‘place’ different from a mere ‘space,’ and only rarely are they sensitive to, and take advantage of, the peculiarities of Cyberspace. We believe that this state of affairs is temporary, characteristic of early adoption stages of new technologies. As the Web matures, and as it assumes more fully its role as a space rather than as means of communication, there will be a growing need to design it according to place-making principles rather than document-making ones. By looking at physical architecture as a case study and metaphor for organizing space into meaningful places, this paper explores the possibility of organizing Cyberspace into spatial settings that not only afford social interaction, but, like physical places, also embody and express cultural values. At the same time, because Cyberspace lacks materiality, is free from physical constraints, and because it can only be ‘inhabited’ by proxy, these ‘places’ may not necessarily resemble their physical counterparts.
keywords Place, Internet, Cyberspace
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id c8ce
authors Keefe, D., Acevedo, D., Moscovich, T., Laidlaw, D., and La Viola, J.
year 2001
title CavePainting: A Fully Immersive 3D Artistic Medium and Interactive Experience
source Proceedings of the 2001 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, March 2001
summary CavePainting is an artistic medium that uses a 3D analog of 2D brush strokes to create 3D works of art in a fully immersive Cave environment. Physical props and gestures are used to provide an intuitive interface for artists who may not be familiar with virtual reality. The system is designed to take advantage of the 8 ft. x 8 ft. x 8 ft. space in which the artist works. CavePainting enables the artist to create a new type of art and provides a novel approach to viewing this art after it has been created. In this paper, we describe Cave- Painting's 3D brush strokes, color pickers, artwork viewing mode, and interface.We also present several works of art created using the system along with feedback from artists. Artists are excited about this form of art and the gestural, full-body experience of creating it.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 5060
authors Lira, Roberto O. and Vidal, Claudia G.
year 2001
title APLICACIÓN DE HERRAMIENTAS DE GRAFICA DIGITAL AL DESARROLLO URBANO REGIONAL: EXPERIENCIA DEL LABORATORIO DE ESTUDIOS URBANOS (Application of Digital Graphic Tools in the Development of Regional Urbanism: The Experience of the Laboratory of Urban Studies)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 325-327
summary Today it is known that the knowledge and the territory administration requires a modern systems of calculation that spatially order and processes this information. For this, the Laboratory of Urban Studies (LUS), is dedicated to the study of the space distribution phenomenon, by means of computational graph technology. The present work has the objective to present the LUS experience in the application of two tools of digital graph to the urban regional development: using the Systems of Geographical Information (SGI) in the integral evaluation of natural risks in the city of Concepción and the application of Animation 3D in the design of “Avenida Los Plátanos” in the University of Bío-Bío.
series SIGRADI
email rlira@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id a64e
authors Liu, Yu-Tung
year 2001
title Spatial Representation of Design Thinking in Virtual Space
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary “Space” has long been an important concept in architecture;and architectural spaces and forms have been continuously evolved dueto the appearance of new concepts of space. Since the invention ofInternet, new spaces have been created through the computer. Tounderstand how human beings in the digital age experience these newvirtual spaces, and to discover the implications of the possible newconcepts of space into the physical architectural world, this paperdiscusses the nature of virtual spaces by examining the verbal and visualelements involved in the creation of a sense of virtual spaces. All theverbal and visual elements of virtual spaces discovered through ourexperiments and interviews are presented. It is found that the three coreelements of both verbally and visually constructed virtual spaces are:movements, interactions, and acoustic effects. In addition, a comparisonbetween verbally and visually constructed spaces, and between physicaland virtual spaces are explored. Finally, further studies related to therole of digital media in the construction of a sense of space aresuggested at the end of this paper.
series other
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:15

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