CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 174f
authors Bakker, N.H.
year 2001
title Spatial Orientation in Virtual Environments
source Delft University of Technology
summary Recently, a growing interest can be detected in the application of Virtual Environment (VE) technology as an operator interface. VEs are three-dimensional computer-generated images that can be shown on a conventional monitor, on a large screen display, or on a head-mounted display. In order to use these three-dimensional interfaces for finding and retrieving information, the user must be able to spatially orient themselves. Different types of VE technology are available for navigating in these VEs, and different types of navigation can be enabled. A choice has to be made between the different options to enable good spatial orientation of the user. There are two main types of VE interfaces: an immersive interface that provides rich sensory feedback to the user when moving around in the VE, and a non-immersive interface that provides only visual feedback to the user when moving around in the VE. Furthermore, navigation through the VE can either be continuous providing fluent motion, or can be discontinuous which means that the viewpoint is displaced instantaneously over a large distance. To provide insight into the possible effects of these options a series of nine experiments was carried out. In the experiments the quality of spatial orientation behaviour of test subjects is measured while using the different types of interface and the different types of navigation. The results of the experiments indicate that immersive navigation improves the perception of displacement through the VE, which in turn aids the acquisition of spatial knowledge. However, as soon as the spatial layout of the VE is learned the two types of navigation interface do not lead to differences in spatial orientation performance. A discontinuous displacement leads to temporary disorientation, which will hinder the acquisition of spatial knowledge. The type of discontinuous displacements has an effect on the time needed for anticipation. The disorienting effects of a discontinuous displacement can be compensated for by enabling cognitive anticipation to the destination of the displacement. These results suggest that immersive navigation might only be beneficial for application domains in which new spatial layouts have to be learned every time or in domains where the primary users are novices. For instance, in training firemen to teach them the layout of new buildings with VE, or in using architectural walkthroughs in VE to show new building designs to potential buyers. Discontinuous movement should not be allowed when exploring a new environment. Once the environment is learned and if fast displacement is essential then discontinuous displacement should be preferred. In this case, the interface designer must make sure that information is provided about the destination of a discontinuous displacement.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4b30
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Mohd Fazidin, J.
year 2001
title ARMY WAR GAME SIMULATION (AWAS) system - Utilising architectural knowledge in virtual environments
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 435-438
summary This research briefly examines the importance of collaborative design in developing a multi-user, multi-tiered, networked and real-time information base system. Aspects such as navigation, interaction, communication, movements (objects or virtual camera), control, level of details, spatial design and virtual spaces will be explained to show their importance in the development of virtual world. This paper will further explore the aspects of collaborative design in the context of Army War Game Simulation System (AWAS). A generic collaborative design-based framework will be demonstrated to simulate the overall operations of a war in command-control structure of the force.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 8aef
authors Dave, Bharat
year 2001
title Immersive Modeling Environments
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 242-247
summary The paper describes development of a large-format panoramic display environment. Unlike the ‘window-on-the-world’ metaphor associated with small displays, immersive environments foster a sense of ‘being-in-the-world’. That raises a question: Which aspects of human-computer interaction and information perception scale up or change substantially from small displays to immersive environments? The paper first describes implementation of our display environment, projects being explored in it, and motivates a focused research agenda. Finally, the paper describes an experiment to study differences in spatial judgments by subjects while working in traditional and immersive environments.
keywords Immersive Modeling, Interaction, Perception, Information Abstractions, Navigation
series ACADIA
email b.dave@architecture.unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 89fe
authors Ferrar, Steve
year 2001
title The Nature of Non-Physical Space - Or how I learned to love cyberspace wherever it may be
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 208-213
summary More designers are concerned with the occupation of the virtual world, through immersive techniques, for example, than in using it as a means for conceptualising and theorising architectural space. The paper examines how architects think about space and how our consideration of nonphysical space might assist in spatial theory and in teaching. It also considers cyberspace fiction both in writing and film to see how it might help us think about space in a more liberating way. Architects and architectural teaching tends to focus on space as an element of construction rather than a theoretical proposition. By discussing imaginary spaces in greater depth we could encourage students to think about space and spatial concepts in a less rigid way. In particular the paper addresses the issues of interaction and transactions in these environments and how information is represented and accessed in an apparently threedimensional manner. In his book ‘Snow Crash’, Neil Stephenson deals with many ideas concerning not only architectural space but also universal space and its organisation in space and time. He uses metaphor in his depiction of the ultimate in information gathering and management. These are compelling ways in which to communicate ideas about threedimensional thinking, and information collection and management to students of architecture as well as helping architects with the theory and visualisation of non-physical space.
keywords Space: Virtual Reality, Cyberspace, Film, Literature
series eCAADe
email steve.ferrar@uce.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id d7d5
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2001
title Design communication in immersive virtual environments: An initial exploration
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 472-478
summary Using Virtual Environment (VE) to visualize ideas from the initial steps of design, the architect is challenged to deal with perception of space, solid and void, without translations to and from a two dimensional media. In this moment, we may expect new forms of design expression. The goal of our study was to identify how designers use and communicate early design ideas by using immersive three-dimensional VEs. We explored initial intentions of 3Dimmersive design schemes, textual descriptions and collaborations within immersive VE. We set-up a series of experiments including navigation- and perception-tasks, designing in immersive VE, transcription of design, remote communication between design partners and controlled observations. The paper describes these experiments. Finally we summarize observations from this research, for instance the simplicity to interconnect design-ideas cross platforms, conclude with possible future directions of our investigation, initiating a broader research including other disciplines.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Processes, Communication Methods, Preliminary Design, Evaluation
series eCAADe
email marcaurel@hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id 8c2d
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo García
year 2001
title PROJECTED SPACE: CHARACTERIZING THE “CYBRID ARCHITECTURE”.
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 285-287
summary The “cybrid architecture” has been defined like integration of physical and digital spaces. Based on the capability of electronic media to generate virtual environments (cyberspaces) which could be related to buildings. However, theoretical studies and contemporary works reveal a more complex relationship between media and constructions. Expressed in architectural characteristics that constitutes a new spatial quality, named here projected space. Hence the paper argues that “cybrid architecture” is not technological, but is a modification of conventional architectural space due to cultural evolution.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 88d3
id 88d3
authors Calderon, C., Cavazza., M
year 2001
title REACTIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS IN BUILDING DESIGN
source Proceedings: SCI 2001, The Fifth Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Orlando, Florida, USA, July 22 - 25, 2001. http://www.iiis.org/sci/
summary This paper presents the first prototype of a reconfigurable Virtual Environment (VE). The objective of the system is to link 3D Intelligent Virtual Environments to interactive planning systems. This type of system makes possible interactive solutions where the user refines a possible configuration and enables the system to generate a complete new solution enforcing all the design constraints, previously programmed. In this first prototype we link our constraint solver with the visualization engine so that the solution produced by the constraint solver is displayed in a VE.
keywords Intelligent, Reactive, Virtual Environment, Spatial configuration tasks
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:12

_id 196a
authors Charitos, D., Pehlivanidou-Liakata, A., Bourdakis, V. and Kavouras, M.
year 2001
title Time Based Media as a Means to Enhance Spatial Representations - Teaching case studies in Greece
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 233-238
summary This paper investigates the potential of time-based spatial representations as a means for enhancing our environmental perception – a tool for assessing and understanding space in the wider sense of the term. It attempts to document the way in which time-based representations of environments are addressed by architectural, planning and surveying education curricula in a number of related Departments in certain Greek Universities. More specifically, a report on the teaching practice and objectives of certain undergraduate and postgraduate courses, which deal with this issue in different ways, is made.
keywords Time-Based Media, Spatial Representations, Video, Virtual Reality, 3D Modelling
series eCAADe
email virtual@central.ntua.gr, deste@central.ntua.gr, v.bourdakis@prd.uth.gr, mkav@survey.ntua.gr
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 4e8c
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen and Flemming, Ulrich
year 2001
title Design space navigation in generative design systems
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 1-22
summary Generative design systems make it easier for designers to generate and explore design alternatives, but the amount of information generated during a design session can become very large. Intelligent navigation aids are needed if designers wish to access the information they generate with ease. We present a comprehensive approach to support information navigation in requirement-driven generative design systems, which gain their power form explicit representations of design requirements, which in turn add to the information generated by the system. Our approach takes into account studies dealing with human spatial cognition, wayfinding in physical environments, and information navigation in electronic media. We structure the information to be accessed in terms of a five-dimensional design space model that applies across generative design systems of the type considered here. The model structure supports basic generic navigation operations along its five dimensions. We validated the model in the context of the SEED-Layout system and used it to extend the built-in navigation tools of the system through novel ones, which we subjected to a limited usability study. The study suggests that these tools have promise and warrant further investigation.
series journal paper
email ujf@cmu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 04f2
authors Cimerman, Benjamin
year 2001
title Clients, architects, houses and computers: Experiment and reflection on new roles and relationships in design
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 100-109
summary This paper reports on recent work that focused on the potential impact of standard computer technology on the relationship between client and architect in the context of residential design. A study of software applications a client could use to develop and evaluate ideas exposed the dearth of software available for the design of spatial complexity by individuals without advanced computer skills, and led to the design of a specific piece of software we call “Space Modeler.” It was prototyped using off-the-shelf virtual reality technology, and tested by a group of freshmen students. The paper discusses the specificities of the software and provides analysis and reflection based on the results of the test, both in terms of design artifacts and users’ comments. The paper concludes that the evolution of the interface to electronic environments is a matter of interest for those concerned with rethinking the training, role and activity of the architect. In the near future prospective homeowners may be able to experience and experiment with the space of their home before it is built. How can the profession embrace new information technology developments and appropriate them for the benefits of society at large?
keywords Design Software, Design Participation, Visualization, Simulation
series ACADIA
email cimerb@rpi.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id afe6
authors Funkhouser, Thomas
year 2001
title Modeling acoustics in virtual environments using the uniform theory of diffraction
source Siggraph 2001
summary Realistic modeling of reverberant sound in 3D virtual worlds provides users with important cues for localizing sound sources and understanding spatial properties of the environment. Unfortunately, current geometric acoustic modeling systems do not accurately simulate reverberant sound. Instead, they model only direct transmission and specular reflection, while diffraction is either ignored or modeled through statistical approximation. However, diffraction is important for correct interpretation of acoustic environments, especially when the direct path between sound source and receiver is occluded. The Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) extends geometrical acoustics with diffraction phenomena: illuminated edges become secondary sources of diffracted rays that in turn may propagate through the environment. In this paper, we propose an efficient way for computing the acoustical effect of diffraction paths using the UTD for deriving secondary diffracted rays and associated diffraction coefficients. Our main contributions are: 1) a beam tracing method for enumerating sequences of diffracting edges efficiently and without aliasing in densely occluded polyhedral environments; 2) a practical approximation to the simulated sound field in which diffraction is considered only in shadow regions; and 3) a real-time auralization system demonstrating that diffraction dramatically improves the quality of spatialized sound in virtual environments.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 880b
authors Kruijff, Ernst and Donath, Dirk
year 2001
title Supporting Shared Architectural Understanding
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 143-152 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This article describes how architects can use the strengths of an immersive or semi-immersive virtual environment to create a shared understanding about a design problem. Virtual environments can allow the strong shared understanding under particular circumstances within a collaborative design set-up. The authors will describe which particular factors of shared understanding could be supported within a virtual environment, and which kind of requirements this poses on the virtual environment itself, and the technology which generates the environment. Specifically focused is at how one can create a common understanding of the spatial construction and meaning of a preliminary design idea. Therefore, a major focus is at the transfer of spatial knowledge about architectural space.
series other
email caad@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 705c
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2001
title Implementing The First Virtual Environment Design Studio
source Architectural Education for the Asian Century, Proceedings of the 1st ACAE Conference on Architectural Education, Milton Tan, editor, Centre for Advanced Studies in Architecture, National University of Singapore, pp. 157-166
summary Since 1993 schools of architecture all over the world conduct in various forms of Virtual Design Studio (VDS). They have become an established part of teaching design within the digital realm. They vary in task and structure; are purely text-based or include various forms of interactive; synchronous or asynchronous collaboration. However; ‘virtual’ always refers to the method of communication and exchange of design and ideas. Students have never designed within immersive virtuality. This paper describes the first successful attempt to conduct a Joint Design Studio; which uses Virtual Environment (VE) as tool of design and communication between the remote partners. This first VeDS focused on how architectural students make use of this particular different approach to design within immersive three-dimensional VEs. For example; the students created 3D-immersive design proposals; explored dependencies to textual description of initial intentions and communicated between local and remote team-partners in immersive VE as well as text-based communication-channels. The paper subsequently describes the VeDS; its set-up; realization and outcome. We discuss frameworks and factors influencing how architectural students communicate their proposals in immersive VeDS; and how this new approach of design studio enables new forms of design expressions.
keywords Virtual Environment; Remote Collaboration; Design Evaluation; Spatial Understanding
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 5b1e
authors Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2001
title The concept of Carrying in Collaborative Virtual Environments
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 195-208 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Collaborative Architectural Design can take place within a virtual environment with a team of remote but virtually present people. However, in most virtual environments, the ability to perform actions is still limited to the availability of some interactive objects and a set of tools for the specific purposes of the system. As the interface of most systems is designed for unshared use, the graphic feedback signals are limited to local information about the state of objects and tools. If multiuser interaction is added to such Virtual Environments, many new possibilities and problems emerge. Users of shared applications should not only be informed about the state of local objects, tools and their own actions, they should also be made aware of what the other users undertake. Aspects, which are in daily life so obvious, should be restudied thoroughly for the application within Virtual Environments for Collaborative Design. Much research has to be undertaken in order to make such virtual places as intuitively interactive as ordinary shared working places. The 'concept of carrying', which is proposed and explained in this paper, is expected to become a useful metaphoric mechanism for solving several issues related to Spatial User Interfaces (SUI's) and Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE's). The visual feedback from 'carrying-events' should provide more mutual understanding about ongoing processes in shared applications and it should add a more 'natural' interface for processes concerning people, tools and content in virtual and digitally augmented environments. At the start of this paper some basic human action patterns for tasks on a 2Ddesktop are compared to tasks in a 3D-environment. These action patterns are checked for their implementation in Windows Icons Menus and Pointer (WIMP) interfaces and Virtual Reality systems. Carrying is focused upon as an important interactive event in Virtual Environments. Three carrying actions related to Collaborative Architectural Design are explained by means of prototypes in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). Finally the usefulness of a general carrying concept as part of a new Visual Language is considered. The research at hand is in its first exploring phases and draws from a running PhD research about SUI's for Context Related Architectural Design and from recent experiences in CVE's.
series other
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id viswa
id viswa
authors Viswanadha,Kameshwari
year 2001
title Digital Charrette: A Web Based Tool to Supplement the Admission Procedure to Graduate Architectural Degree Programs
source Texas A&M University
summary The NAAB (National Architectural Accrediting Board Inc.), as an evaluator of architectural education in the United States has established both graduate architectural curriculum criteria and student performance criteria expected to be fulfilled by the student at the time of graduation. To fulfill these standards set by the NAAB, the graduate selection committees of architecture schools require the ability to predict graduate design studio performance of the applicants. The high percentage of international applicants suggests the necessity of a standardized evaluation tool.

This research presents a standardized web based testing environment titled Digital Charrete‚ that would contribute towards the fair evaluation of applicants to graduate architectural degree programs. Spatial ability is related to Design and Visualization skills‚, a part of the NAAB criteria, and also associated with design studio performance of architecture students. The Digital Charrette is a VRML environment within which spatial exercises are administered. It is designed to supplement the current admission procedure, and would enable the selection of students with greater potential to perform well in graduate architectural design studios. This research is also an attempt to understand the implications of using virtual three-dimensional environments for such testing purposes. The ability of this web based tool to predict student performance in architectural design studios is investigated. Finally, the user reactions to testing in a virtual three-dimensional environment and timed tasks are included in this study.

Analysis of the results showed that the test takers thought the Digital Charrette was a good evaluator of their spatial ability. The study population showed a preference for paper-based media in the pre-task analysis. A huge percentage of the study population found the Digital Charrette Śfun to do‚ and Śchallenging‚. The major drawback of this study was that the VRML environment was unable to render itself for testing purposes in a way that the medium would not hinder the test takers‚ performance. This may also be considered a cause for a relatively smaller percentage of success amongst test takers. The study population however unanimously considered the concept of the Digital Charrette, i.e. testing in virtual environments, significant to evaluation of architecture students.

keywords Architectural Education
series thesis:MSc
email vkameshwari@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/12/06 07:18

_id 8d5c
authors Wall, S. and Harwin, W.
year 2001
title Interaction of Visual and Haptic Information in Simulated Environments: Texture Perception
source Brewster, S., Smith, R. (eds.) Haptic humancomputer interaction : First International Workshop, Glasgow, UK, August31 - September 1, 2000 : Proceedings. Hong Kong: Springer
summary This paper describes experiments relating to the perception of the roughness of simulated surfaces via the haptic and visual senses. Subjects used a magnitude estimation technique to judge the roughness of "virtual gratings" presented via a PHANToM haptic interface device, and a standard visual display unit. It was shown that under haptic perception, subjects tended to perceive roughness as decreasing with increased grating period, though this relationship was not always statistically significant. Under visual exploration, the exact relationship between spatial period and perceived roughness was less well defined, though linear regressions provided a reliable approximation to individual subjects' estimates.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 0f2b
authors Brown, Andre G.P. and Knight, Michael W.
year 2001
title NAVRgate: Gateways to architectural virtual reality - A review and thought on future directions
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 195-198
summary A core element in the success of a virtual environment is the ease and appropriateness of the navigation process. Navigation is a two part process which consists of a facility for enabling movement [Locomotion] and sensory input to aid the navigator in finding they way around [Cognition]. Our work has focussed on Navigation in Virtual Environments for Architecture and that work is summarised here.
series CAADRIA
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 887c
authors Knight, Michael and Brown, André
year 2001
title Towards a natural and appropriate Architectural Virtual Reality: the nAVRgate project. Past, present, future
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 139-149
summary The lure of virtual environments is strong and the apparent potential is enticing. But questions of how Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues should be handled and married with best practice in Human-Human Interaction (HHI) remains largely unresolved. How should architectural images and ideas be most appropriately represented, and how should designers interact and react through this computer mediated medium? Whilst there is never likely to be unanimity in answer to such questions, we can develop new ideas and new systems, test them, report on them and invite comment. The nature and novelty of virtual environments is such that refinements and innovations are likely to come from a variety of sources and in a variety of ways. The work described here explains the evolution and current plans for the development of a particular approach that has been developed and refined by the authors. Low-cost, effective and appropriate are the key words that have driven the developments behind the evolving nAVRgate system that has arisen from this work, and that is described here.
keywords Virtual Environments, Navigation, Interaction, Perception
series CAAD Futures
email mknight@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 9de9
authors Laakso, Mikko
year 2001
title Practical Navigation in Virtual Architectural Environments
source Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland
summary The interest towards virtual reality (VR) and virtual environments (VE) is growing all the time. The applications being developed for VE run a wide spectrum, from games to business planning. This thesis concentrates on navigation in virtual architectural environments, movement in worlds that are very similar to our own. Navigation in a virtual world should be practical, intuitive and simple. Unfortunately, it is very often far from that - for some reason the usability issues in VEs have been usually left with little attention. Currently it is easy for a user to get lost and disoriented when traveling in a VE. This situation must change, navigating through virtual environments can no longer be considered a task reserved for the experts only. 3D-worlds and architectural applications for the common user require new, intuitive interface techniques. This thesis addresses issues related to both physical and cognitive aspects of navigation as well as theoretical models that bind them together. In the technology survey of this thesis, the virtual environment technology is presented. Different visual display systems, new input devices and some 3D user interface design aspects are described. The literature survey section discusses the main issues concerning navigation theory. The two parts of navigation, travel and wayfinding, are described in detail. The major challenges are discussed and some solutions and various research results are presented. A major part of the thesis consists of the description of HCNav, a new navigation system developed by the author. The system was constructed for use in the virtual room at Helsinki University of Technology. The purpose of HCNav is to provide a very intuitive and practical navigation interface. Three new experimental input devices, namely custom wand, data glove and speech recognition system, were tested. Another important part of the work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCNav system. A usability test was conducted to determine if the use of HCNav was actually improving navigation performance. Twelve subjects participated in a test where HCNav was compared with a traditional navigation software used previously in the virtual room. The experiment setup has been described and the results analyzed. The results are promising and show that the navigation methods adopted in HCNav are clearly better.
keywords Virtual Environments, Navigation, Usability
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 02bb
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2001
title THREE-D MAZE: GETTING LOST IN VIRTUAL REALITY
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 145-147
summary Virtual Environments (VE) influence design processes increasingly. We investigate the outcome of creation, interpretation and communication of architectural design, by using a three-dimensional (3D) maze together with text-based communication in a series of collaborative design experiments. The goal of our study was to identify how designers use and communicate design ideas by using VEs versa conventional methods of two-dimensional representations such as paper and pen. We developed a 3D-maze tool and set-up a series of experiments, including navigation- and perception-challenges, transcription of design, remote communication between design partners and controlled observations. We discuss how architects collaborate with partners and communicate their proposals in VE compared to actions in paper environments.
series SIGRADI
email marcaurel@hku.hk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

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