CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 714

_id bfc8
authors Fukai, Dennis and Srinivasan, Ravi
year 2001
title PCIS Revisited: A Visual Database for Design and Construction
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 372-379
summary This paper presents research on a piece-based construction information system called PCIS(pronounced “pieces”) first published as a visual information concept at ACADIA’96, Tucson. After more than five years of development it has evolved into a multidimensional visual information system for design and construction. It includes a piece-based anatomical construction model layered according to a work breakdown structure; a dataTheater that surrounds the model as an index to plans, elevations, sections, and details; and a dataWorld with cameras fixed to the intersections of its latitudes and longitudes to add context and perspective. A standard services matrix (SSM) controls layer visibility and camera settings. PCIS can be “played” to access archived resources; support design development, analyze and resolve preconstruction conflicts, and coordinate construction activities. Current research will be used to demonstrate how PCIS might be valuable to increase the potential for technical cooperation, collaboration, and communication by literally aligning the points of view of architectural, engineering, and construction methodology.
keywords Construction, Pictorial, 3D/4D, Modeling, Database
series ACADIA
email dennis@insitebuilders.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 3847
authors Gattis, Merideth
year 2001
title Space as a Basis for Reasoning
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary We use space as a basis for reasoning whenever we use aspatial representation of a nonspatial concept to make decisions orinferences. From a psychological perspective, our tendency to create andreason fluidly from spatial models is somewhat surprising, becauseusing a spatial model to reason involves creating correspondencesbetween two semantically unrelated concepts: space, and something thatisn’t space, whether that be time, performance, or the desirability of anew job. Our proficiency in using space as a basis for reasoning reliesour abilities to detect similarities in the structures of very differentconcepts. In this paper I discuss two types of similarities between spaceand nonspatial concepts and describe how those similarities influencereasoning from spatial representations.
series other
email m.gattis@sheffield.ac.uk
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:16

_id 5de9
authors Gavin, Lesley
year 2001
title Online Learning in Multi-User Environments
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 59-64 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Over the last 2 years the MSc Virtual Environments course in the Bartlett School of Graduate Studies has used a 3-dimensional on-line multi-user environment to explore the possibilities for the architectural design of virtual environments. The 'Bartlett' virtual world is established as the environment where students undertake group design projects. After an initial computer based face-to-face workshop, students work from terminals at home and around the university. Using avatar representations of themselves, tutors and students meet in the on-line environment. The environment is used for student group discussions and demonstrations, tutorials and as the virtual 'site' for their design projects. The 'Bartlett' world is currently open to every internet user and so often has 'visitors'. These visitors often engage in discussions with the students resulting in interesting dynamics in the teaching pattern. This project has been very successful and is particularly popular with the students. Observations made over the 2 years the project has been running have resulted in interesting reflections on both the role of architectural design in virtual environments and the use of such environments to extend the pedagogical structure used in traditional studio teaching. This paper will review the educational experience gained by the project and propose the ideal software environment for further development. We are now examining similar types of environments currently on the market with a view to adapting them for use as a distance learning medium.
series other
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id f85d
authors Geraedts, Rob P and Pollalis, Spiro N.
year 2001
title Remote Teaching in Design Education - Educational and Organizational Issues and Experiences
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 305-310
summary The Department of Real Estate and Project Management (BMVB) of the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology has been working closely with Professor Spiro N. Pollalis of Harvard University, Graduate School of Design in Cambridge, USA since 1991. His case-based interactive seminars about the management of the design & construction process have been highly appreciated by many generations of students. In Spring 2000, Pollalis suggested to extend the scope of his involvement by introducing a remote teaching component, the subject of his research in the last few years. As Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the Design and Construction Industry is part of his lectures, it was appropriate to provide the students with a first hand experience on the subject. In the following experiment, the teacher would remain in his office at Harvard while the interactive work and discussion sessions with 130 students in a full lecture room would take place in Delft as planned. The consequences this experiment has had for the course, for the techniques and facilities used, how teachers and students experienced these, and which conclusions and recommendations can be made, are the topics of this paper.
keywords Remote Teaching, Design & Construction Education, And ICT
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id avocaad_2001_11
id avocaad_2001_11
authors Gernot Pittioni
year 2001
title Handling of Complex Projects As Engineering-Partner of Planning Groups
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The collaborative handling of design activities is a growing matter of present planning processes. Most planning partners in the meantime have agreed on using CAD-systems. The common use of the design information is a vital factor which enables us to handle complex problems.The instruments offered by the CAD-systems are performing on a very low level. Many intelligent features get lost by data-transfer. But experience shows that more obstacles are built up by ineffective and insufficient use of the CAD-system and their properties.Huge efforts have to be done in improving the knowledge and the handling abilities of many users. They often do not even know that they are not using their systems in an appropriate way. In fact looking only at the plotted results nobody would guess that the data sometimes are entirely worthless for common use. This only turns out when complex projects rely on timesaving common data use and the partners get stuck in endless difficulties trying to get some information out of badly organised project files.
series AVOCAAD
email g.pittioni@pittioni.de
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id b07d
authors Gero, J.S., Chase, S. and Rosenman, M. (Eds.)
year 2001
title CAADRIA 2001 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6 / Sydney 19-21 April 2001, 506 p.
summary Computer-aided architectural design research and teaching has a long history going back to the 1960s. However, the last ten years has seen a dramatic upsurge in activity brought about by factors such as the increasing use of CAD systems in practice, the increase in computer literacy generally and perhaps, equally importantly, the development and widespread use of the World Wide Web. The CAADRIA conference series provides a forum for the presentation and exchange of ideas and experiences in CAAD, particularly focussed on Asian research and teaching. This, the proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research and Teaching in Asia, presents 57 (31 long and 26 short) papers. The 57 papers were selected from the 114 submissions following a blind review of extended abstracts. Each submission was reviewed by two referees and the decision to accept was based on a committee's assessment of all the submissions. The final papers were assessed to determine if the reviewers' recommendations had been complied with. The authors of the selected papers represent 17 countries, making this an international as well as an Asian conference.
series CAADRIA
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 5607
authors Goldschmidt, Gabriela
year 2001
title Is a Figure-Concept Binary Argumentation Pattern Inherent in Visual Design Reasoning?
source J. S. Gero, B. Tversky and T. Purcell (eds), 2001, Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, II - Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Australia
summary This paper is based on the assumption that because designingis aimed at specifying configurations of entities, designers mustmanipulate forms and shapes and they must resort to visual reasoning todo so. Visual reasoning in designing is seen as the interplay betweenfigural and conceptual reasoning, such that the one supports andcontinues the other in order to arrive at a configuration that is valid interms of all the requirements it is to satisfy. We use protocol analysis toexplore the bond between conceptual and figural reasoning at two levelsof cognitive operation – that of the design move and that of theargument that is its building block. We conclude that the two modes ofreasoning are equi-present in designing; they describe a binary systemcharacterized by high frequency shifts between figure and concept.
series other
email gabig@techunix.technion.ac.il
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/vr01/
last changed 2003/05/02 09:16

_id f8b3
authors Gross, M.D., Do, E.Y.-L. and Johnson, B.R.
year 2001
title The Design Amanuensis. An Instrument for Multimodal Design Capture and Playback
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 1-13
summary The Design Amanuensis supports design protocol analysis by capturing designers’ spoken and drawing actions and converting speech to text to construct a machine-readable multimedia document that can be replayed and searched for words spoken during the design session or for graphical configurations.
keywords Protocol Analysis, Recording, Design Process Research
series CAAD Futures
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 6fdc
authors Gross, Mark D.
year 2001
title FormWriter. A Little Programming Language for Generating Three-Dimensional Form Algorithmically
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 577-588
summary FormWriter is a simple and powerful programming language for generating three-dimensional geometry, intended for architectural designers with little programming experience to be able to generate three dimensional forms algorithmically without writing complex code. FormWriter’s main features include a unified coding and graphics environment providing immediate feedback and a “flying turtle” - a means of generating three dimensional data through differential geometry.
keywords Programming Language, Geometry, Form Generation
series CAAD Futures
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 3dd6
authors Guzmán Dumont, Guillermo and Hughes, Thomas
year 2001
title MATERIAL PRESENCE: SPATIAL POTENTIAL
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 september 2001, pp. 186-188
summary This paper describes two design studio projects with first year architecture students at the University of Nottingham. Originally, this exercise was aimed to introduce them to CAD drawing tools, but due to some particular characteristics of the brief, some unexpected results came to add an interesting value to their design learning process. From the exploration of a functional building typology through the digital construction of an iconic case study, it was developed a creative fabrication of absent architecture based on research, analysis and imagination. Then there was identified the most appropriate medium for communication of these defining characteristics. Unexpected focus on material considerations over spatial analysis, motivated a second exercise which used image manipulation, based on graphic source material and digital imaging of physical models.
series other
email gguzman@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2001/12/01 20:46

_id 100d
authors Hadikusumo, B.H.W. and Rowlinson, S.
year 2001
title Development of a virtually real construction site - design for safety
source CIDAC, Volume 3 Issue 2 May 2001
summary Interpreting two-dimensional drawings presents problems for builders since they are required to transfer these into three-dimensional mental images. Virtual Reality (VR) technology has several advantages. One is that it can be used to solve the problem of image transfer since VR supports a What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get object together with a binocular effect, improving users' visual sense. Another advantage of VR is the capability to present a real time dynamic simulation, which can be used to represent construction processes. By representing virtually real construction components and processes, users can walk through the virtual project. Using his/her safety knowledge, he/she can identify safety hazards inherent within the virtually real construction components and processes and determine the appropriate safety precautions to employ to make the virtual construction site safe.

This hazard identification process can be better achieved if a guideline is provided. Therefore, a Design-For-Safety-Process (DFSP) guideline is developed to assist users to identify safety hazards as well as to recommend remedial safety measures. This paper discusses how virtual reality benefits the construction industry in terms of a design representation. In addition, important issues in developing virtually real construction components and processes as well as functions of virtual reality which are needed to support the DFSP are discussed.

series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 18:36

_id 2004_444
id 2004_444
authors Ham, Jeremy J. and Dawson, Anthony
year 2004
title Managing Digital Resources for Design Education
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 444-450
summary This paper outlines the evolution of digital management systems used in the School of Architecture and building at Deakin University from 2001 to the present. These systems have been implemented to support a curriculum development programme in the design, construction and computing units. Two school-based information management systems are discussed in depth: low-tech network submission system and Bentley Systems Inc’s ProjectWise. Early experiences in using a universitybased system are also reported on. Lessons learnt from three years experience in managing digital resources for design education have informed the development of a growing digital culture in the architectural and construction management curricula. Whilst digital curriculum design and management systems supporting this curriculum have been developed effectively in this school, full optimization of IT to enhance design education is reliant on fundamental changes within traditional academic culture.
keywords Digital Management, Digital Curriculum, Design Education
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 3bdb
authors Hanna, R. and Barber, T.
year 2001
title An inquiry into computers in design: attitude before-attitudes after
source Design Studies, 22(3), pp. 255-281
summary This paper reports on the findings of an empirical investigation into the use of the computer as the only design medium. A group of students took part in an experiment to design a studio for a graphic designer on the computer. Student attitudes towards the design process were assessed at two conditions: before using the computer and after using the computer. Prior to the experiment a literature search was carried out to explore some widely researched design issues such as sketching, design creativity, and computer-aided design. Consequently a number of design variables were identified, developed and then empirically tested. Data collection methods included questionnaires and observations. Statistical analysis of the responses confirms that using the computer has produced a statistically significant difference in attitudes to the design process variables.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id sigradi2009_903
id sigradi2009_903
authors Harris, Ana Lúcia Nogueira de Camargo
year 2009
title O Uso da Técnica dos "Planos em Série" com o Desenvolvimento da Computação Gráfica - Uma Experência Didática [The Use of the 'Serial Plan' Technique with the Development of the Computer Graphic - A Teaching Experience]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This paper is about comparative didactic experiences where the “Serial plan Technique” defined by Wong (1998), was applied in 2001 and 2008 which computer resources from that time. In 2001 this technique was applied with the help of AutoCAD for generation of the planifications, but in 2008 the appliances of AutoCAd and Sketch Up were used for the virtual construction of objects. The quality of the results showed a didactic potential and an increasement in the possible creative rhythm, mainly because the facility of the three-dimensional virtual visualization and because the speed in the physical execution of the created project.
keywords didactic experiences; serial plan technique; CAD; AutoCAD; Skecht Up
series SIGRADI
email luharris@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ef9e
authors Harris, Robert
year 2001
title The Digital Sandbox: Integrating Design and Analysis in a new Earth-forming Tool
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
email rmharris@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 943c
authors Hendricx, A. and Neuckermans, H.
year 2001
title The object model at the core of the IDEA+ design environment
source Beheshti, R. (ed), Advances in Building Informatics, Proceedings of the 8th EuropIA International Conference on the application of Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Image Processing to Architecture, Building Engineering & Civil Engineering, Delft, The Netherlands, April 25-27, 2001, pp. 113-125
summary This paper focuses on three different aspects in which the IDEA+ core model differs from many other product modelling research initiatives: the systematic approach in the construction of the model, the respect for the evolutionary nature of architectural design, and the use of actual and complete design cases to test the model. Key words: CAAD, product modelling, integrated design environment, MERODE 1 The IDEA+ project: towards an integrated design environment In spite of the extensive use of all kinds of hardware and software in the architectural offices, the use of computers still does not contribute essentially to better architecture. For the CAD packages on the one hand, they have proven to be an efficient alternative for the traditional drawing board. Yet they fail in the early conceptual stage of design where creativity and exploration play the leading role. For computational tests and analysis tools on the other hand, they can hardly handle the typical absence o
series other
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id f8e3
authors Hew, K.-P., Fisher, N. and Awbi, H.B.
year 2001
title Towards an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format for building and services design
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 459-476
summary The emerging technology in building product design using knowledge-based engineering (KBE), is currently exciting practitioners in the building construction industry. This paper investigates the use of KBE techniques and assesses the contribution this approach can make to the traditional design process. To do this, the investigation has developed an integrated set of design tools based on a common data format, for integrating 3D electronic prototypes with building services information for use in building design. This approach has been developed on the basis of an open framework and has been applied to the design of an airport terminal building and its plant room. Within the framework, the design process and the information needed, are divided into modules and represented in the form of 3D digital mock-up models (or electronic prototypes). Within the integrated system, an interface has been developed to facilitate the sharing of information with a thermal analysis software application, which contributes to the design process. In this paper, the methodology is discussed and its working system is illustrated and evaluated.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id e9b1
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2001
title Destination: Practice – Towards a maintenance contract for the architect’s degree
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 090-099
summary Addressing the subject of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) in architectural design, we present a Web-based design assistant for student- and professional architects called DYNAMO. Its main objective is to initiate and nurture the life-long process of learning from (design) experience as suggested by CBR’s cognitive model. Rather than adopting this model as such, DYNAMO extrapolates it beyond the individual by stimulating and intensifying several modes of interaction. One mode – the focus of this paper – concerns the interaction between the realm of design education and the world of practice. DYNAMO offers a platform for exchanging design efforts and insights, in the form of cases, between both parties, which perfectly chimes with the current tendency towards life-long learning and continuing education. Just like our university advises graduates to ‘Take a maintenance contract with your degree’, architecture schools may encourage recently qualified architects to subscribe to DYNAMO. To what extent the tool can fulfill this role of maintenance contract is discussed at the end of the paper, which reports on how DYNAMO was used and appreciated by professional architects at different levels of expertise.
keywords Case-Based Reasoning, Web-Based Learning, Digital Repositories
series ACADIA
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 8599
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2001
title Baptism of fire of a Web-based design assistant
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 111-124
summary DYNAMO – a Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line – is a Web-based design assistant to support architectural design education. The tool is conceived as an (inter-)active workhouse rather than a passive warehouse: it is interactively developed by and actively develops its users' design knowledge. Its most important feature is not merely that it presents students with design cases, but that those cases trigger in-depth explorations, stimulate reflection and prime discussions between students, design teachers and professional architects. Whereas previous papers have focused on the theoretical ideas behind DYNAMO and on how Web-technology enabled us to translate these ideas into a working prototype, this paper reports on the prototype's baptism of fire in a 4th year design studio. It describes the setting and procedure of the baptism, the participation of the studio teaching staff, and the reactions and appreciation of the students. Based on students' responses to a questionnaire and observations of the tool in use, we investigated whether DYNAMO succeeded in engaging students and what factors stimulated/hampered this engagement. Despite the prototype nature of the system, students were noticeably enthusiastic about the tool. Moreover, DYNAMO turned out to be fairly 'democratic', in the sense that it did not seem to privilege students with private access to or prior knowledge of computer technology. However, the responses to the questionnaire raise questions about the nature of students' engagement. Three factors revealed themselves as major obstacles to student (inter-)action: lack of time, lack of encouragement by the teachers and lack of studio equipment. Although these obstacles may not relate directly to DYNAMO itself, they might have prevented the tool from functioning the way it was originally meant to. The paper concludes with lessons learned for the future of DYNAMO and, more in general, of ICT in architectural design education.
keywords Design Studios, Utilization Of Internet, Design Support, Case-Based Design
series CAAD Futures
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 668b
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2001
title End, means and method - Three roles of design(ing) technology in design research
source Digital Creativity, Volume 12, No. 2, 2001 (ISSN 1462-6268), pp. 103-105
summary This article explores an approach to design research in which the development of design technology plays a key role. It presents the author's Ph.D. research on the role of cases in architectural design. The research aimed at investigating the applicability of Case-Based Design (CBD) to the domain of architecture. To this end, the author adopted and confronted different stakeholder perspectives, one of which is that of CBD technology developer. By consequence, a considerable part of the research covers the design, implementation and evaluation of a CBD tool to support architects/designers. The research did not have a strictly instrumental aim, but wanted to provide insights for the field of architectural design on both a theoretical and a technological level. While the tool itself aimed at providing architects with valuable design support, making the tool was used as a method to develop a better understanding of current CBD technology. Moreover, the resulting tool turned out to be an effective means to examine the role and impact of cases in architectural design. Rather than reporting on the outcome of the research, the main objective of the article is to make a methodological reflection on the possibilities and limitations of this approach.
keywords Design Research, Architectural Design, CAAD, Case-Based Design
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/11/14 07:38

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