CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 713

_id avocaad_2001_01
id avocaad_2001_01
authors Maria Musat
year 2001
title 3D Intelligent Representations for the Facility Management Practice
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary New field, growing very fast since the nineteen eighties, facility management takes care of our built environment. As owners and users together become more and more aware of the importance that healthy built environment has for their lives, the need for high quality tools to help them manage their buildings, throughout their transformations, are growing in demand. The market is overflowed with 2D applications assembled in different information systems that have no links one to another. Intranets, that offer direct links between alphanumerical and 2D graphical databases, are considered nowadays the top tools for facility management experts. Nevertheless the sophistication of this information systems, we should not forget the fact that built environment is always 3D. Therefore, the representations not only should be 3D as well, but also they should include some of the intelligence that builders and managers have, in order to ease their tasks during the life cycle of the buildings. Health and life of our built environment bases on the quality of the management process. However their importance was pointed in the first paragraph, there are yet no norms to intelligently describe our buildings as to take the most profit of their 3D representations. Both owners and managers seem to be impressed by accurate renderings of the building models. They seem to forget that behind these models, the useful information for the facility management is the appearance of the built environment. No intelligent applications have yet been developed based on this information. Our goal is to examine the facility management specific needs in information and to research and define a coherent norm that could intelligently describe 3D representations of complex buildings for this practice.
series AVOCAAD
email mmusat@sprint.ca
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 517e
authors Martens, B., Tschuppik, W.M. and Hohmann-Vogrin, A.
year 2001
title PRO_TECTURE: ARCHITECTONIC INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE UNCOVERED PAST
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 36-39
summary Pro_tecture is a neologism made up of “protection” und “architecture”. Protecture thus stands for an architectonic instrumentation serving the protection of archeological finds required both on account of natural destruction and involvement of mankind endangering the present state of excavation. The immediate risk potential regarding excavated antiquity set the stage for thorough examination of protective architecture demonstrated at the excavation site “Ek Balam” (Yucatan, Mexico). Due to the prominent location in the middle of a tourist area and its both scientific and artistic importance a suited solution was to be developed making for means of protection as well as of adequate presentation of the design work. In the framework of this contribution the results of a corresponding design studio on “pro_tecture” in the context of “Ek Balam” will be presented.
keywords Protective Architecture, Protection, Design Studio, Representation, Archeology
series SIGRADI
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 8d1a
authors Martens, Bob and Voigt, Andreas
year 2001
title Virtual and full-scale modeling: A collection of resources
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 201-204
summary In this paper the relationship between Virtual and Full-scale Mo-deling will be traced back. A number of publications supports the dis-semination of existing knowledge resp. experiences. Although a series of biannual EFA-Conferences (European Full-scale Modeling Association) produced a remarkable number of useful papers, the "scientific output" beyond this platform remained to be so far in the dust of gray literature. On the other hand the rapid growing interest for computer applications and tools rediscovered the working area of 1:1 simulation more or less the other way around. Although the term VR in the nineties was strongly occupied by computer-interfaces resp. -representations, soon the insight gained in importance that reality is by far more complex than some 10.000 polygons. Furthermore, some kind of unproductive competition resp. defense of good old modeling tra-ditions versus promising computer technology seemed to act as the main activity. However, the fusion of Virtual and Full-Scale Mo-de-ling could indefinitely serve as a promising field of research.
series CAADRIA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 3c71
authors Maver, Tom and Petric, Jelena
year 2001
title MEDIA in MEDIATION Prospects for Computer Assisted Design Participation
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 121-134 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary One of the most consistent, powerful and philosophical ideas which has run like a silk thread through the short and erratic history of the development of computer aided architectural design is that of user participation in the design decision-making process. It is not an idea with which the architectural profession is particularly comfortable but it is, the authors claim, one which is central to the professional ethic and, therefore, to be its ultimate survival. Design decision-making is, if addressed properly, a hugely, complex multi-variate, multi-person process on which precious little serious research has been focused. In the late 1960's the Design Methods Group in the USA and the Design Research Society in the UK formulated paper-based models of the design process and anticipated, in some regards with un-nerving accuracy, the way in which the application of information technologies would impinge beneficially on the process of design decision-making and, therefore, on the quality of the built environment. One concept expressed at that time was as follows: the application of computers to the modelling and prediction of the cost and performance behaviour of alternative design solutions allows subjective value judgements to be better informed and more explicitly audited, and that such subjective value judgements should be made by those most affected by them, i.e. the future owners and users of buildings. This paper is devoted to the critical re-examination of this concept, on the seminal research and development which has kept the notion alive over 30 years, and, how the current advances in multimedia, virtual reality and internet access make its ubiquitous adoption inevitable: in short, Media in Mediation.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/16 09:52

_id ga0122
id ga0122
authors Miranda Carranza, Pablo
year 2001
title Self-design and Ontogenetic evolution
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The context and long term goal of the project is to develop design environments in which the computer becomes an active and creative partner in the design process. To try to set-up a system that would enhance the design process by suggesting possibilities, has been preferredto an approach that emphasises optimisation and problem-solving.The work develops around the general concept of morphogenesis, the process of development of a system's form or structure. Besides the obvious example of embryological growth, biological evolution, learning, and societal development can also be considered as morphogenetic processes.The aim is to set a foundation from where latter work can develop in the study of how form unravels, and the implications and possibilities of the utilisation of such processes in design. Some basic principles are established, regarding the idea of Ontogenesis, the study of thedevelopment of organisms, and Epigenesis, the mode Ontogenesis operates.Drawing on D’Arcy Thompson’s ideas and inspired on the models and approaches developed in the recent field of Artificial Life, this work explores the possibilities of using a model based in bone accretion to develop structural systems. The mechanisms by which bone is able toadapt are relatively known and simple, and at the same time they address a sensible problem, such as it is the case of the static performance of a structure. This may seem contradictory with what was mentioned above regarding problem solving. The problem is anyway approached not with the intention of finding optimal solutions, but challenging and creativeones. It is not answers the computer should provide, but questions about the problematic of the design. It is in this context of “problem-worrying” (as opposed to problem solving) that the work has been carried.
series other
email pablom@interactiveinstitute.se
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c55e
authors Miranda, Pablo
year 2001
title Self-design and Ontogenetic evolution
source 4th International Conference on Generative Art, Politecnico di Milano University, Milan, Italy
summary The work develops around the general concept of morphogenesis, the process of development of a system's form or structure. Besides the obvious example of embryological growth, biological evolution, learning, and societal development can also be considered as morphogenetic processes. The aim is to set a foundation from where latter work can develop in the study of how form unravels, and the implications and possibilities of the utilisation of such processes in design. Some basic principles are established, regarding the idea of Ontogenesis, the study of the development of organisms, and Epigenesis, the mode Ontogenesis operates. Drawing on D'Arcy Thompson's ideas and inspired on the models and approaches developed in the recent field of Artificial Life, this work explores the possibilities of using a model based in bone accretion to develop structural systems. The mechanisms by which bone is able to adapt are relatively known and simple, and at the same time they address a sensible problem, such as it is the case of the static performance of a structure. The problem is anyway approached not with the intention of finding optimal solutions, but challenging and creative ones. It is not answers the computer should provide, but questions about the problematics of the design. It is in this context of 'problem-worrying' (as opposed to problem solving) that the work has been carried.
keywords Ontogenesis; Bone Accretion; Self-designed Structures; Problem-worrying
series other
email pablom@interactiveinstitute.se
last changed 2003/03/24 15:47

_id 7491
authors Oxman, Rivka and Streich, Bernd
year 2001
title Digital Media and Design Didactics in Visual Cognition
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 186-191
summary The cognitive properties of design learning have rarely been the subject of design education. Irrespective of the specific design domain, traditional educational models in design education are based upon the evaluation of the product of designing rather than on what might be considered a learning increment. Lately we have developed the concept of cognitive learning tasks as learning increments in design education and propose that digital media constitute the basis of uniquely powerful learning technologies. The research described in this paper addresses the confluence of cognitive learning tasks as a pedagogical approach in design education, its potential relationship to digital media in order to develop a digital design didactics, and the relationship of these developments in design education to current practices of digital design generation. In this paper, we focus on the cognitive aspects of visual cognition in design learning. An example in the domain of architectural design is illustrated.
keywords Design Learning, Cognitive Design, Visual Cognition, Design Thinking, Design Generation
series eCAADe
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 1b3f
authors Papanikolaou, Maria
year 2001
title Respace: A virtual environment for rethinking about space
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 391-400
summary ReSpace is a teaching module, which entices students in a playful way to work with computers and motivates them to think more deeply about the abstract idea of space. The goal of ReSpace is to enhance the concept of space by augmenting its content with additional levels of information like statements about emotions, by referring to senses, delineating impressions or telling stories and inducing memories. ReSpace takes advantage of the possibilities offered by virtual environments in the transfer of information and suggests space as a metaphor for the communication of ideas, knowledge and experiences about space. In this paper the module ReSpace taught by the author is described. Its central theme is the representation and communication of oneís notion, perception, and interpretation of space with the help of a 3D, interactive, virtual, environment. http://alterego.arch.ethz.ch
series CAADRIA
email papan@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id 33e9
authors Paranandi, Murali
year 2001
title Computer-Aided Daylight Simulation - A Hybrid Approach to Recording and Exploring Ideas
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 534-539
summary Accuracy and facility for iterative exploration are two of the most appealing promises of computer use in architectural design. In this paper, we discuss daylighting visualization, a very important aspect of the architectural design process, where computers do not yet fulfill these promises. We initiated a project to understand the reasons for this and to develop methods to deal with it in architectural design education. We report our work in progress, which combines creative thinking with scientific procedures to resolve the bottlenecks in computer graphics technologies making them suitable for design exploration. Our strategy seeks to fill the gaps in the science of photo realistic visualization with time tested physical modeling techniques. We present some of our student work based on this strategy.
keywords Photorealism, Rendering, Daylighting Design, Visualization, Simulation, Scale (Physical) Models, Design Education
series eCAADe
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 0407
authors Peng, C., Chang, D.C., Blundell Jones, P. and Lawson, B.
year 2001
title Dynamic Retrieval in an Urban Contextual Databank System using Java-CGI Communications. Development of the SUCoD Prototype
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 89-102
summary This paper presents our current development of the Sheffield Urban Contextual Databank (SUCoD) prototype that provides users with a Webbased interface for dynamic retrieval of architectural and urban contextual information of the city of Sheffield. In comparison with past attempts of building Virtual Cities accessible over the Internet, we have experimented with a different system architecture capable of generating VRML models and other related documents on the fly according to users' requests. Through working examples, we describe our methods of implementing the data communications between Java applets and Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts. The SUCoD prototype has been developed to explore and demonstrate how user centred dynamic retrieval of urban contextual information can be supported, which we consider a user requirement of primary importance in its future use for collaborative design and research relating to the city of Sheffield.
keywords Urban Contextual Databank, Dynamic Retrieval, Java, Common Gateway Interface, VRML, HTML, Virtual Cities
series CAAD Futures
email c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 2905
authors Pereira, Gilberto Corso
year 2001
title Urban Information Visualization - The Salvador project
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 517-521
summary Before popularity of GIS a map is a tool with two basic functions - storage of spatial data and presentation of spatial information. Now, a digital database store spatial data and cartographic visualization is how spatial information usually is presented. Recent technological development applied to visualization area can increase analyse and interpretation capacity of professionals concern with urban planning, design and management. In other hand, many professionals and students involved with urban studies are not familiar with GIS software and this can limit casual users to access urban databases. One solution is to build software that allows direct visualization of spatial information based in users needs and knowledge. The project discussed in this paper introduces a computer application structured like a hypermedia atlas using concepts from cartographic modelling. The city of Salvador is represented by a model based in a combination of maps, and others images. User composes visualization.
keywords Visualization, Hypermedia, GIS, Urban Information, Digital Atlas
series eCAADe
email corso@ufba.br
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id bec6
authors Petric, J., Ucelli, G. and Conti, G.
year 2001
title Educating the Virtual Architect
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 388-393
summary This paper elaborates and illustrates an educational experiment in which students were asked to develop their design in the virtual environment and at the same time evaluate the process and the product. Starting from a general overview on the VRML 97 technology the workshop offered an opportunity to students to enhance their curricula with new tools through experimenting and interacting with their design spaces. Students’ designs were tested and critically discussed in a fully immersive VR environment offering them new stimuli for both designing and enriching their learning experience. Students were finally asked to present their projects in a fully interactive VR environment. The outcomes of the experiment, and the challenging question it raises about the nature of reality and virtuality – technical, pedagogical and even ethical – offer a contribution to the debate on the concept of an “Ideal Digital Design Curriculum”.
keywords Virtual Environment, Immersive Design, Interactivity, Behaviours
series eCAADe
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 76ea
authors Petzold, F., Thurow, T. and Donath, D.
year 2001
title Planing relevant survey of buildings - starting point in the revitalization process of existing buildings - requirements, concepts, prototypes and visions
source Abstract Book CIPA 2001 International Symposium, Potsdam 2001, pp. 58
summary Future tasks for the building trade in Germany will be more and more a combination of the fields of revitalization and new building projects. Prerequisite for computer-aided planing for existing buildings is both, the use of onsite computer-aided measurement and the integration of all specialists involved in the building process. Existing approaches for this problem are not yet satisfying. The aim of this research project is twofold: to design a practice-relevant software concept and to develop various prototypic systems, for a structured way of capturing and organizing building-related information about existing buildings in digital form. The research is oriented towards existing buildings, in particular residential and commercial buildings. This project is a special branch of SFB524. The project is founded by "Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft (DFG)".
series other
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2003/02/26 17:58

_id 4dd3
authors Reymen, Isabelle M.M.J.
year 2001
title Improving design processes through structured reflection : a domain-independent approach
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary In the world of designing, three fields of attention can be recognised, namely design research, design practice, and design education. Gaps exist between these three fields. In this thesis about designing, the focus is on the gap between design research and design practice. Design practice includes many design disciplines and an increasing number of multidisciplinary teams. Main problems in design practice are the communication between designers with a different background and the integration and co-ordination of important aspects during a design process. By tackling these problems, the effectiveness and efficiency of design processes in practice can be improved. The study of similarities and differences between design processes in several design disciplines and the development of support for reflection on design processes are topics that can improve design practice and that deserve more attention in design research. The goal of my research is to decrease the gap between design research and design practice in order to improve design processes. Reflection on design processes can help designers to improve their design process, its results, and the designer’s proficiency: By reflecting explicitly on the current design situation and on the performed design activities, in a systematic way and on a regular basis, designers can plan next design activities that can be performed effectively and efficiently given the design goal at that moment. In this thesis, the combination of systematic and regular reflection is called structured reflection. To improve design processes in various design disciplines in practice, the study of similarities and differences between design processes in several disciplines can be useful. Similarities between design processes are the basis for domain-independent design knowledge (as distinguished from domain-specific design knowledge). To reach the goal of my research, I have chosen to combine, in a broad explorative study, the development of support for structured reflection on design processes and the development of domain-independent design knowledge. This thesis describes a domain-independent approach to improve design processes through structured reflection. My research process can be summarised as follows. I studied three design disciplines, namely architecture, mechanical engineering, and software engineering. To get input from design practice, I did qualitative empirical research: I performed twelve case studies in the three disciplines to inventory characteristics of design processes and I compared the cases for similarities and differences. The similarities, together with the results of a literature study, have been the basis for the development of domain-independent descriptive design knowledge. The developed descriptive knowledge, in turn, formed the basis for developing domain-independent prescriptive design knowledge. At the end of the project, I confronted all results with design practice to get feedback on the results in another empirical study and I performed a literature study to position the results in the design literature. My design philosophy and design frame are the descriptive results developed to answer the first research question, namely “How to describe design processes in a domain-independent way?”. My design philosophy is a set of domain-independent concepts and terms for describing a design process. The concepts and terms are based on an application of the general theory of state-transition systems to the context of designing; the concepts of state and state transition correspond to the main concepts of design situation and design activity in my design philosophy. The answer to the first research question given by the design philosophy is refined in a design frame: The design frame offers a means to structure the description of a design process in a domain-independent way. Major structuring concepts of the design frame are dimensions and subjects. I define three dimensions, namely level, perspective, and time. These dimensions define a three-dimensional space, called a positioning space, in which important aspects of design processes can be positioned. A positioning space must be defined for each subject, being the three parts of a design situation: the product being designed, the design process, and the design context. My design frame is a domain-independent structure formed by the combination of the three dimensions for each subject. My design method is the prescriptive result developed to answer the second research question, namely “How to support structured reflection on design processes in a domain-independent way?”. My design method is a domain-independent aid that offers designers support for reflecting on design processes in a structured way. Reflection on design processes is defined as an introspective contemplation on the designer’s perception of the design situation and on the remembered design activities. A reflection process is described as a process that consists of three steps that are called preparation, image forming, and conclusion drawing. The design method is based on two main concepts: The first concept is the systematic description and analysis of design situations and design activities by means of forms and checklists; only systematic support for the preparation step of a reflection process is developed. The second concept is the idea of design sessions, introduced to stimulate designers to reflect regularly during a design process. A design session is defined as a period of time during which one or more designers are working on a subtask of a certain design task, for example, one afternoon, a whole day, or a week. Both concepts are combined to support structured reflection on design processes. The complete design method consists of five steps for each design session, namely planning a design session, defining the subtask of the design session, reflecting at the beginning of a design session, designing during the core of a design session, and reflecting at the end of a design session. A prototype software tool, called ECHO, has been developed to explore the benefits of using a software system to facilitate the use of the design method. Together, the design philosophy and the design frame offer concepts, a vocabulary, and a structure to describe design processes in a domain-independent way. The design method is a first proposal of a method that supports structured reflection on design processes. My results are thus possible answers to the mentioned research questions and are starting points to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of design processes. Based on the feedback I collected, I am optimistic about the applicability of my results in design practice. By asking input from design practice and by developing results that are useful for design practice and that contribute to design research, I contribute to decrease the gap between design research and design practice. The most important recommendations for further research are to test all results extensively in design practice and to investigate how to apply the results in design education.
series thesis:PhD
email isabelle@win.tue.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 0767
authors Ries, Robert and Mahdavi, Ardeshir
year 2001
title Evaluation of Design Performance through Regional Environmental Simulation
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 629-642
summary Computational building simulation tools have historically viewed buildings as artefacts isolated and disconnected from their contexts. At most, the external environmental conditions have been viewed as outside influences or stressors encapsulated in, for example, weather files for energy simulation or sky models for lighting simulation. In the field of environmental assessment, life cycle analysis (LCA) has followed a similar path of isolating the artefact under analysis from its context. Modeling the building artefact as a participant in multiple contexts over time so that the interactions and dependencies between the regions and the building can be adequately explored in the design process requires support for the modeling of regional areas, as well as the artefact and the related life cycle processes. Using computational design and evaluation tools can provide the computing capability required for effective design decision support. This paper presents the implementation of the affordance impact assessment method and the regional environmental simulation in Ecologue. Ecologue is the computational tool for life cycle environmental impact assessment in the SEMPER integrated building design and simulation system. Ecologue contains a building model and an environmental model. The building model is automatically derived from the shared building model of the SEMPER system. The environmental model is a combination of a representation of the processes and emissions occurring in the life cycle of buildings and an impact assessment model. The impact assessment model is a combination of a context model of the physical characteristics of a region and a sub-regional fate and transport model based on the fugacity concept.
keywords Environmental Simulation, Design Decision Support, Life Cycle Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email robries@pitt.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id c0f5
authors Russell, Peter
year 2001
title Creating Place in the Virtual Design Studio
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 231-242
summary The current wave of attempts to create virtual design studios has demonstrated a wide range of didactical as well as computational models. Through work performed over the past year, an evolution of many of these concepts has been created which fosters a sense of place. This aspect of place has to do with identity and community rather than with form and space. Initial virtual design studio projects were often merely a digital pin-up board, which enabled distributed and asynchronous criticism and review. However, the web sites were more analogous to a directory than to the studio setting of an upper level design problem. The establishment of a truly distributed design studio in the past year, which involved design teams spread over three universities (not parallel to one another) led to the need for an independent place to share and discuss the student's work. Previous virtual design studios have also established web sites with communication facilities, but one was always alone with the information. In order to enhance this virtual design studio and to give it a sense of place, a studio platform that serves as a console for participants was developed. The console is a front end to a dynamic database which mediates information about the participants, their work, timetables and changes to the dynamic community. Through a logon mechanism, the presence of members is traceable and displayed. When a member logs onto the console, other members currently online are displayed to the participant. An online embedded talk function allows informal impromptu discussions to occur at a mouseclick, thus imitating ways similar to the traditional design studio setting. Personal profiles and consultation scheduling constitute the core services available. Use of the platform has proven to be well above expected levels. The students often used the platform as a meeting place to see what was going on and to co-ordinate further discussions using other forums (videoconferences, irc chats or simple telephone conversations. Surveys taken at the end of the semester show a strong affinity for the platform concept in conjunction with a general frustration in pursuing collaboration with low bandwidth communication channels.
keywords Virtual Environments, Virtual Design Studio, Internet Utilisation
series CAAD Futures
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ac8e
authors Schiller, Inge and Ferschin, Peter
year 2001
title Planning.under.ground a concept and three dimensional visualization as part of the planning process of the underground city labin, croatia
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 211-214
summary Urban agglomerations in the world metropolis demand new solutions to face the economical, social, ecological and physicalproblems. Many ideas concentrate mainly to above ground to either vertical and/or horizontal extension in the cities, with higherskyskrapers or even cities in the ocean.But what about using underground space?Fighting with the attributes of unpleasent surrounding, images of darkness, dampness and sickness, a lot of people don‘t feelsympathy for living underground. But the concept to live in depth, caves, catacombs or even cities below the surface is pretty old.Supported by literary and mystic traditions like travel to the underworld, a vision is initiated, to think more about these possibilitiesand a new direction of thinking for planners. The advantages of using the underground are obvious. In metropolitan cities inNetherlands, Israel or Japan, which have to face growing population, agricultural as well as open green spaces have to be protected.With the immense population growth, costs of land use increase and the climate in the cities deteriorates.The transfer of the essential utilization below ground surface can help to reduce the visual impacts of big cities, as well as preserveand create open green spaces and change the image of modern cities.Especially in Japan there is an increasing interest in going underground. The idea to build a whole city in an abandoned coalminehowever is new.In this specific case, the underground city is planned to be realized 200m below the surface in the abandoned tunnels of the formercoalmine in Labin, Croatia. An underground city with all the amenities of a city above ground, but with a completely new characterand atmosphere, which could be just artificially created above ground. Realized under the city of Labin, which has to fight against thehighest unemployment rate in the whole region of Istria.The visualization methods used in this project do not aim to communicate a detailed concept, but tend towards a virtual travelthrough a city in a mine, with its qualities, possibilities as well as limitations which will lead to a completely new direction ofcreating ideas for planning.
series other
email inge.schiller@gmx.net
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:18

_id ga0106
id ga0106
authors Soddu, Celestino
year 2001
title Generative Natural Flux
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary I believe to interpret the thought of all the participants to this fourth conference on Generative Art affirming that generative art is a deep creative experience and, somehow, visionary too. This experience, in fact, anticipates the possible evolution of the fields proper of humancreativeness, rediscovering paths and approaches to ideation that have been proper of one of the most fertile moments of the human history and culture as Renaissance. In this paper I would like to deal with some aspects, and also some different approaches of generative creativeness. In particular, the importance to use specific reading keys, bothsubjective and objective, the possibility to reach concrete and feasible design results entering a complex figuration of possible incoming worlds. In other terms, to reach projects directly interfaceable with productive reality. Lastly, I will evaluate if and how it is possible andprofitable to use the random factor in evolutionary processes, investigating on the differences that the use of such factor involves in the creative and design experience and the quality of the obtainable results.But how can we define generative creativeness?
series other
email celestino.soddu@generativeart.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id avocaad_2001_07
id avocaad_2001_07
authors Stefan Wrona, Adam Gorczyca
year 2001
title Complexity in Architecture - How CAAD can be involved to Deal with it. - "Duality"
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary “Complexity “ is for us a very ambigous notion. It may be understood in two contexts.1.Thorough solution of a problem.Complexity means full recognition of design area, followed by appropriate work. That work must be thorough and interdisciplinary – if necessary, separated to different co-operatives. These trade designers reqiure a branch coordination and – the most important- all of them must have a „common denominator”. Such as a proper CAAD platform and office standards. That will reduce costs of changes, improve an interplay between designers and somtimes enable to face up a new challenge.Nowadays architects are no longer “solitary” individualists working alone – they must concern a team – they become a member, a part of a huge design machine. “Import/export”, compatibility, interplay – these words must appear and we have to put a stress on them. How to organize work for different trade-designers? How to join in common database architectural design ,engineering design, HVAC design, electricity design, technology design, computer network design and all other trades ?...A key to solve this range of problems is in good work organization. Universal prescription does not exist, but some evergreen rules can be observed. We are going to present a scheme of work in CAAD application ALLPLAN FT v.16 with a Group manager , which starts to conquest polish market and is widely spread in Germany. “Golden rules” of ALLPLAN FT There is one database – it is placed on server. It includes all projects. There is a well-developed office standard. It must be created at the beginning of collaboration, although it is possible to improve it later. It consist of hatches, fonts, symbols, macros, materials, pen-widths, and – the most important –layers . A layer set – predefined structure divided into functional groups – e.g. drafting, text, dimensioning, architecture, HVAC, engineering, urban design, etc.That stucture is a part of an office standard – all workers use a relevant part of it. No name duplicates, no misunderstandings... If however design extends, and a new group of layers is required, it can be easily added, e.g. computer networks, fireguard systems. Administrator of ALLPLAN network defines different users and gives them different permitions of access. For example – an electrician will be able to draft on layer “electricity”, but he won’t modify anything at layer “architecture – walls”, and he won’t even see a layer “engineering- slabs”, because he doesn’t need it..At the same time our electrician will be able to see , how architect moves some walls and how HVAC moved and started to cross with his wires. Every user is able to see relevant changes, after they are saved by author. Two different users can not access at the same time the same file. That excludes inconsistent or overlapping changes . All users operate on a 3D model. While putting some data into a model, they must remember about a “Z” coordinate at work-storey. But at the same time all create a fully-integrated, synchronous database, which can be used later for bills of quantities, specifications, and – of course – for visuaisation. That method can be described as “model-centric”. To simplify complex structure of architectural object -ALLPLAN offers files. Usually one file means one storey, but at special designs it might become a functional part of a storey, or whatever you wish. Files connected with layers easy enable to separate certain structural elements, e.g. if we want to glance only at concrete slabs and columns in the building – we will turn on all files with “layer filter” – “slabs” and “columns”. ALLPLAN is of course one of possible solutions. We described it , because we use it in our workshop. It seems to be stretchy enough to face up every demand and ever-increasing complexity of current projects. The essence of the matter, however, is not a name or version of application – it is a set of features, we mentioned above, which allows to deal with EVERY project. The number of solutions is infinite.2. Increasing difficulties during design process. It may be associated with more and more installations inside of new buildings, especially some “high-tech” examples. The number of these installations increases as well as their complexity. Now buildings are full of sensors, video-screens, computer networks, safety-guard systems... Difficulties are connected with some trends in contemporary architecture, for example an organic architecture, which conceives “morphed” shapes, “moving” surfaces, “soft” solids. This direction is specially supported by modelling or CAD applications. Sometimes it is good – they allow to realize all imaginations, but often they lead to produce “unbuildable” forms, which can exist only in virtual world.Obstacles appear, when we design huge cubatures with “dense” functional scheme. Multi-purposed objects, exhibition halls, olimpic stadium at Sydney – all of them have to be stretchy, even if it requires sliding thousands pound concrete blocks! Requirements were never so high.The last reason, why designs become so complex is obvious - intensifying changes due to specific requirements of clients/developers.We could say “ signum tempori” – everything gets more and more complicated , people have to become specialists, to face up new technology. But how CAAD can help us with it? How?! We have already answered that question. Sometimes CAAD is the only way to imagine and sketch something, to visualize something, to compute a construction , to prepare a simulation... So that human must “only” interprete ready solutions. Sometimes CAAD help us to notify a problem. It works exactly in the same way, as spy-glasses does. For example – without a real-time visualization we we would have never realised (until finished!) some strange interference of solids, which have occured in the upper roof part of our new appartment-house.ConclusionsTemporary CAAD is an integral part of design process – not only as a tool, but sometimes as an inspiration. It helps to organize our work, to define problems, to filter relevant elements and to render our visions. It becomes an integral part of our senses – and that will be a real complexity in architecture...
series AVOCAAD
email wrona@arch.pw.edu.pl, adamg0r@poczta.onet.pl, adamgorczyca@poland.com
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 5b1e
authors Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2001
title The concept of Carrying in Collaborative Virtual Environments
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 195-208 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Collaborative Architectural Design can take place within a virtual environment with a team of remote but virtually present people. However, in most virtual environments, the ability to perform actions is still limited to the availability of some interactive objects and a set of tools for the specific purposes of the system. As the interface of most systems is designed for unshared use, the graphic feedback signals are limited to local information about the state of objects and tools. If multiuser interaction is added to such Virtual Environments, many new possibilities and problems emerge. Users of shared applications should not only be informed about the state of local objects, tools and their own actions, they should also be made aware of what the other users undertake. Aspects, which are in daily life so obvious, should be restudied thoroughly for the application within Virtual Environments for Collaborative Design. Much research has to be undertaken in order to make such virtual places as intuitively interactive as ordinary shared working places. The 'concept of carrying', which is proposed and explained in this paper, is expected to become a useful metaphoric mechanism for solving several issues related to Spatial User Interfaces (SUI's) and Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE's). The visual feedback from 'carrying-events' should provide more mutual understanding about ongoing processes in shared applications and it should add a more 'natural' interface for processes concerning people, tools and content in virtual and digitally augmented environments. At the start of this paper some basic human action patterns for tasks on a 2Ddesktop are compared to tasks in a 3D-environment. These action patterns are checked for their implementation in Windows Icons Menus and Pointer (WIMP) interfaces and Virtual Reality systems. Carrying is focused upon as an important interactive event in Virtual Environments. Three carrying actions related to Collaborative Architectural Design are explained by means of prototypes in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). Finally the usefulness of a general carrying concept as part of a new Visual Language is considered. The research at hand is in its first exploring phases and draws from a running PhD research about SUI's for Context Related Architectural Design and from recent experiences in CVE's.
series other
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

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