CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 218

_id 7180
authors Therakomen, Preechaya
year 2001
title Mouse.class: Experiments for Exploring Dynamic Behaviors in Urban Places
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Urban space comprises not only physical forms - buildings, streets, plazas, trees, etc. – but also the people 'acting on them'. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our awareness of behavior and environment relationships, focusing on local movement at the individual level in a pedestrian environment. The thesis describes the experiment Mouse.class, as a concept demonstration model, which allows users to create a 2D-virtual environment for accommodating autonomous agents, Mouse, to explore (pedestrian) dynamic behavior in relation to (urban) space. The program uses multi-agent technology to construct an individual-based simulation in which each agent employs individual behaviors. The agents have abilities to navigate through the environment using a behavior rule set derived from a wide range of research – both theoretical and empirical approaches – on spatial behavior in small-scale urban space. These simulated individuals also have the ability to improvise their actions according to the situations they find themselves in. In the simulation, each agent reacts to the space configuration, to specific attractions in the environment, as well as to other mice. The local movement of an individual is, therefore, the result of the interaction of its visual perception, motivation, and social actions. The program then tracks each movement – path of use – revealing patterns that emerge from interactions among the components of the environment. The exploration seeks to develop a way urban designers think of 'space' as fluid processes and recognize that objects in the urban environment can have radically differing effects, depending on the circumstances and contexts in which they exist. Indeed, people are parts of the environment.
series thesis:MSc
email glaang@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 3386
authors Gavin, L., Keuppers, S., Mottram, C. and Penn, A.
year 2001
title Awareness Space in Distributed Social Networks
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 615-628
summary In the real work environment we are constantly aware of the presence and activity of others. We know when people are away from their desks, whether they are doing concentrated work, or whether they are available for interaction. We use this peripheral awareness of others to guide our interactions and social behaviour. However, when teams of workers are spatially separated we lose 'awareness' information and this severely inhibits interaction and information flow. The Theatre of Work (TOWER) aims to develop a virtual space to help create a sense of social awareness and presence to support distributed working. Presence, status and activity of other people are made visible in the theatre of work and allow one to build peripheral awareness of the current activity patterns of those who we do not share space with in reality. TOWER is developing a construction set to augment the workplace with synchronous as well as asynchronous awareness. Current, synchronous activity patterns and statuses are played out in a 3D virtual space through the use of symbolic acting. The environment itself however is automatically constructed on the basis of the organisation's information resources and is in effect an information space. Location of the symbolic actor in the environment can therefore represent the focus of that person's current activity. The environment itself evolves to reflect historic patterns of information use and exchange, and becomes an asynchronous representation of the past history of the organisation. A module that records specific episodes from the synchronous event cycle as a Docudrama forms an asynchronous information resource to give a history of team work and decision taking. The TOWER environment is displayed using a number of screen based and ambient display devices. Current status and activity events are supplied to the system using a range of sensors both in the real environment and in the information systems. The methodology has been established as a two-stage process. The 3D spatial environment will be automatically constructed or generated from some aspect of the pre-existing organisational structure or its information resources or usage patterns. The methodology must be extended to provide means for that structure to grow and evolve in the light of patterns of actual user behaviour in the TOWER space. We have developed a generative algorithm that uses a cell aggregation process to transcribe the information space into a 3d space. In stage 2 that space was analysed using space syntax methods (Hillier & Hanson, 1984; Hillier 1996) to allow the properties of permeability and intelligibility to be measured, and then these fed back into the generative algorithm. Finally, these same measures have been used to evaluate the spatialised behaviour that users of the TOWER space show, and will used to feed this back into the evolution of the space. The stage of transcription from information structure to 3d space through a generative algorithm is critical since it is this stage that allows neighbourhood relations to be created that are not present in the original information structure. It is these relations that could be expected to help increase social density.
keywords Algorithmic Form Generation, Distributed Workgroups, Space Syntax
series CAAD Futures
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id avocaad_2001_06
id avocaad_2001_06
authors Giovanni De Paoli
year 2001
title Architectural design and procedural models - A radical change of language to design in architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The history of architecture and its teaching clearly reveal how representations of the image and drawing have changed over centuries. Today, computers are increasingly found at the desks of architecture professionals and students, but their usage remains restricted to technical functions and what is commonly known as CAD (computer-assisted design), in architecture is often simply the other CAD (computer-assisted drawing).This presentation deals with architectural design, particularly at its earliest stage. Our objective is to propose a model for describing the architectural concept that meets the needs of architects through software. Only then will they really be able to use computers as an aid to design by overcoming the obstacles that presently keep us from making full use of them.This has led me to propose an avenue of exploration that examines projection through an object’s properties, and a method of computer-assisted design that makes use of procedural models. These procedural models consist of geometric operators and operators that define the properties, characteristics and performance of a building — operators which I have termed “semantic”.This research fits into a paradigm that leads to representation of the building through functions that can be called with parameters and encapsuled in an algorithm, making it possible to create procedural models that assist with the design. This approach opens up a means of integrating the logos with the figurative representation where drawing is used instead of words to convey the architectural concept.The example of a procedural model shows how we can use a generic model to produce a volume model with all the characteristics belonging to the same family of objects. This type of model can serve not only to illustrate the result of a process, or to draw connections among buildings on the basis of their construction process, or to test the validity of a rule typical of a set of objects, but also to integrate, through a functional language, semantic operators which to date have been excluded from the initial design phase. This descriptive mechanism is extremely powerful in making it possible to establish relationships among the functions and properties of a building and the purpose of the architectural project.The scientific contribution of this research is to test the hypothesis that we can use computer tools to manipulate operators which enable the architect to reappropriate a complex design of the building, and open up new lines of investigation into integrating geometric and knowledge-based systems into a unified representation. The declarative approach for creating three-dimensional scenes fits into this perspective.It is now a matter of exploring the possibility of working on a “common morphology” shared by everyone involved in the design process by rewriting the functions or by converting the functions used for representation, or else through a functional dialect (language) that allows for dialectic relationships among all types of operators and the actions of the protagonists in the architectural design process.
series AVOCAAD
email Giovanni.De.Paoli@Umontreal.CA
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ae8a
authors Hanson, Gabriel Quinn
year 2001
title Connection & Transition, Exploring Place-Based Physical Environment in a Digital Media FirmPhysical Environment in a Digital Media Firm
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id ef9e
authors Harris, Robert
year 2001
title The Digital Sandbox: Integrating Design and Analysis in a new Earth-forming Tool
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
email rmharris@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 1a92
authors Mirabelli, Paolo
year 2001
title Public Cyberspace Planning and Design. Architect’s role in the construction of the virtual city
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 42-46
summary Architects need to consider ICT not as a tool for design but as a space to be designed. The relation between this space and the physical city must be driven from an impact to a positive and needed expansion of the urban space; an occasion to support and foster social integration and development. To achieve this, it is needed to put an effort in evolving both planning and design techniques as well as public policies for this mixed (physical/ digital) urban space. The references for doing it may be found more in the history of technology developments then in the technology itself, but a wide contribution from diverse disciplines is needed. How to do this, it’s mostly to be found out through projects, in which architects can play the fundamental role of planners that coordinate the activities of actors involved, while taking care of the public interest. Many cities are progressively losing the space devoted to foster solid social structures, so a relevant focus for projects may be aimed at the design of public cyberspace to recover the building of local social networks. A starting point could be found in the Community Networking movement, which architects could build upon, using their design skills in order to evolve this kind of spaces beyond the spontaneous and random phase. A wide range of issues are to be addressed: from needed public policies to accessibility that must be provided to anybody in order to avoid sharpening social alienation due to cultural, economical or physical reasons. An experiment is going to be carried out within a local development project promoted in Rome.
keywords Cyberspace Design, Urban Planning, E-Society, Community Networking, Selfsustainable Local Development
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 11be
authors Ripper Kós, José
year 2001
title ICONES URBANOS: A CIDADE REVELADA A TRAVÉS DE MODELOS 3D (Urban Icons: The City Revealed Through 3D Models)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 19-21
summary This paper presents reflections raised during the research carried out at the Graduate Program of Urban Design (PROURB) of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Our research group investigate the city of Rio de Janeiro through an analysis of its main architectural and urban icons using hypertext based on 3D models. The distinguished works by Walter Benjamin and Rem Koolhaas about Paris and New York are examined for their relationship to the theme. The Ministry of Education Building and its site analysis are presented as the prototype for the investigation of the city history in the XX Century.
series SIGRADI
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id avocaad_2001_19
id avocaad_2001_19
authors Shen-Kai Tang, Yu-Tung Liu, Yu-Sheng Chung, Chi-Seng Chung
year 2001
title The visual harmony between new and old materials in the restoration of historical architecture: A study of computer simulation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the research of historical architecture restoration, scholars respectively focus on the field of architectural context and architectural archeology (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000) or on architecture construction and the procedure of restoration (Shi, 1988, 1989; Chiu, 1990). How to choose materials and cope with their durability becomes an important issue in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998).In the related research of the usage and durability of materials, some scholars deem that, instead of continuing the traditional ways that last for hundreds of years (that is to replace new materials with old ones), it might be better to keep the original materials (Dasser, 1990). However, unavoidably, some of the originals are much worn. Thus we have to first establish the standard of eliminating components, and secondly to replace identical or similar materials with the old components (Lee, 1990). After accomplishing the restoration, we often unexpectedly find out that the renewed historical building is too new that the sense of history is eliminated (Dasser, 1990; Fu, 1997). Actually this is the important factor that determines the accomplishment of restoration. In the past, some scholars find out that the contrast and conflict between new and old materials are contributed to the different time of manufacture and different coating, such as antiseptic, pattern, etc., which result in the discrepancy of the sense of visual perception (Lee, 1990; Fu, 1997; Dasser, 1990).In recent years, a number of researches and practice of computer technology have been done in the field of architectural design. We are able to proceed design communication more exactly by the application of some systematic softwares, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and so on (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The application of computer technology to the research of the preservation of historical architecture is comparatively late. Continually some researchers explore the procedure of restoration by computer simulation technology (Potier, 2000), or establish digital database of the investigation of historical architecture (Sasada, 2000; Wang, 1998). How to choose materials by the technology of computer simulation influences the sense of visual perception. Liu (2000) has a more complete result on visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) about the research of urban design projection. The main subjects of this research paper focuses on whether the technology of computer simulation can extenuate the conflict between new and old materials that imposed on visual perception.The objective of this paper is to propose a standard method of visual harmony effects for materials in historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example).There are five steps in this research: 1.Categorize the materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 2.Get new materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 3.According to the mixing amount of new and old materials, determinate their proportion of the building; mixing new and old materials in a certain way. 4.Assign the mixed materials to the computer model and proceed the simulation of lighting. 5.Make experts and the citizens to evaluate the accomplished computer model in order to propose the expected standard method.According to the experiment mentioned above, we first address a procedure of material simulation of the historical architecture restoration and then offer some suggestions of how to mix new and old materials.By this procedure of simulation, we offer a better view to control the restoration of historical architecture. And, the discrepancy and discordance by new and old materials can be released. Moreover, we thus avoid to reconstructing ¡§too new¡¨ historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 5b1e
authors Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 2001
title The concept of Carrying in Collaborative Virtual Environments
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 195-208 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Collaborative Architectural Design can take place within a virtual environment with a team of remote but virtually present people. However, in most virtual environments, the ability to perform actions is still limited to the availability of some interactive objects and a set of tools for the specific purposes of the system. As the interface of most systems is designed for unshared use, the graphic feedback signals are limited to local information about the state of objects and tools. If multiuser interaction is added to such Virtual Environments, many new possibilities and problems emerge. Users of shared applications should not only be informed about the state of local objects, tools and their own actions, they should also be made aware of what the other users undertake. Aspects, which are in daily life so obvious, should be restudied thoroughly for the application within Virtual Environments for Collaborative Design. Much research has to be undertaken in order to make such virtual places as intuitively interactive as ordinary shared working places. The 'concept of carrying', which is proposed and explained in this paper, is expected to become a useful metaphoric mechanism for solving several issues related to Spatial User Interfaces (SUI's) and Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE's). The visual feedback from 'carrying-events' should provide more mutual understanding about ongoing processes in shared applications and it should add a more 'natural' interface for processes concerning people, tools and content in virtual and digitally augmented environments. At the start of this paper some basic human action patterns for tasks on a 2Ddesktop are compared to tasks in a 3D-environment. These action patterns are checked for their implementation in Windows Icons Menus and Pointer (WIMP) interfaces and Virtual Reality systems. Carrying is focused upon as an important interactive event in Virtual Environments. Three carrying actions related to Collaborative Architectural Design are explained by means of prototypes in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). Finally the usefulness of a general carrying concept as part of a new Visual Language is considered. The research at hand is in its first exploring phases and draws from a running PhD research about SUI's for Context Related Architectural Design and from recent experiences in CVE's.
series other
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id c176
authors Jain, R.
year 2001
title Digital Experience
source Communications of the ACM, 44(3), pp. 38-40
summary We experience our physical environment through our natural senses of sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. Combined with the models of the world each of us develops through learning, they allow us to experience and function in the physical and social worlds. The history of civilization follows the development of our understanding of experience" and how to share it with our fellow humans immediately, as well as with those who will follow in future generations (see the Symbolic Timeline). Experience is fundamental to human existence. The desire to share it will continue to be the motivating factor in the development of exciting multimedia technology in the foreseeable future. Data is observed facts or measurements; information is derived from data in a specific context. Experience is the direct observation or participation in an event. A look at history reveals how human society has evolved into an information society and is on its way to being an experience society. "
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ga0106
id ga0106
authors Soddu, Celestino
year 2001
title Generative Natural Flux
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary I believe to interpret the thought of all the participants to this fourth conference on Generative Art affirming that generative art is a deep creative experience and, somehow, visionary too. This experience, in fact, anticipates the possible evolution of the fields proper of humancreativeness, rediscovering paths and approaches to ideation that have been proper of one of the most fertile moments of the human history and culture as Renaissance. In this paper I would like to deal with some aspects, and also some different approaches of generative creativeness. In particular, the importance to use specific reading keys, bothsubjective and objective, the possibility to reach concrete and feasible design results entering a complex figuration of possible incoming worlds. In other terms, to reach projects directly interfaceable with productive reality. Lastly, I will evaluate if and how it is possible andprofitable to use the random factor in evolutionary processes, investigating on the differences that the use of such factor involves in the creative and design experience and the quality of the obtainable results.But how can we define generative creativeness?
series other
email celestino.soddu@generativeart.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 70cc
authors Witten, I.H. and Frank, E.
year 2000
title Data Mining - Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques with JAVA Implementations
source Morgan Kaufmann
summary Witten and Frank's textbook was one of two books that I used for a data mining class in the Fall of 2001. The book covers all major methods of data mining that produce a knowledge representation as output. Knowledge representation is hereby understood as a representation that can be studied, understood, and interpreted by human beings, at least in principle. Thus, neural networks and genetic algorithms are excluded from the topics of this textbook. We need to say "can be understood in principle" because a large decision tree or a large rule set may be as hard to interpret as a neural network. The book first develops the basic machine learning and data mining methods. These include decision trees, classification and association rules, support vector machines, instance-based learning, Naive Bayes classifiers, clustering, and numeric prediction based on linear regression, regression trees, and model trees. It then goes deeper into evaluation and implementation issues. Next it moves on to deeper coverage of issues such as attribute selection, discretization, data cleansing, and combinations of multiple models (bagging, boosting, and stacking). The final chapter deals with advanced topics such as visual machine learning, text mining, and Web mining.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ga0132
id ga0132
authors Abe, Yoshiyuki
year 2001
title Beyond the math visualization - Geometrica and Stochastica
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Mathematically controlled imaging process provides attractive results because of its infinite scaling capabilities with some other elements that contribute to the visualization. Its global/local and precise manipulation of parameters holds potential for realizing an unpredictable horizon of imagery. When it meets the artist's taste, this method could be a strong enough system of creation, and I have been producing images using the surfaces of hyperbolic paraboloid. On the other hand, a method absolutely free from the geometric parameter manipulation is possible with a stochastic process [1]. Like the technique of pendulum in photography, while its production rate of acceptable result is very low, its potential of generating a strong visual message is also very attractive. It is possible to set stochastic elements at any stage of the process, and conditional probability on those elements, or the hierarchy of probability management characterizes the probability distribution. Math space has no light. No gravity. No color on the math surfaces. And the math equation providesonly the boundary in 3D or higher mathematical dimensions. The fact means that artists can keep artistic reality with their unique tastes in colors on the surface and light sources, and this is the most important element of the math based imaging. Being able to give artists' own choice of colors and that the artist may take only right ones from the results of a stochastic process guarantee the motif and aesthetics of artist could be reflected onto the work.
series other
email y.abe@ieee.org
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id avocaad_2001_14
id avocaad_2001_14
authors Adam Jakimowicz
year 2001
title Non-Linear Postrationalisation: Architectural Values Emergence in a Teamwork Interpretation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The paper presents the outcomes of the experiment being conducted at the Faculty of Architecture in Bialystok, which derives form three main sources: a new course of architectural composition by computer modelling, developed and conducted in Bialystok postrationalisation as a formulation platform for new architectural values and theories, applied by e.g. Bernard Tschumi the idea of new values emergence resulting form a teamwork, when placed in an appropriate environment; It is assumed that the work performed first intuitively, can be later seriously interpreted, and to some extent rationalised, verbalised, described. With no doubt we can state, that in creative parts of architectural activities, very often decision are taken intuitively (form design). So this ‘procedure’ of postrationalisation of intuitively undertaken efforts and results seems to be very important –when trying to explain ideas. This kind of activity is also very important during the first years of architectural education. In case of this experiment, the students’ works from the course of architectural composition are taken as a base and subjects for interpretation, and values research. However, when at first, individual works are being interpreted by their authors, at the latter stage, the teams are to be formed. The aim of the teamwork is to present individual works, analyse them, find common value(s), and represent it (them) in an appropriate, creative way. The ideal environment to perform this work is hypertext based internet, because the non-linearity of team interpretations is unavoidable. On the other hand, the digital input data (computer models) is a very appropriate initial material to be used for hypermedia development. The experiment is to analyse the specific of the following: the self-influence of the group on the individual work ‘qualification’, mutual influence of the team members on their own work interpretation, the influence of the digital non-linear environment on the final outcome definition. The added value of hypertext in architectural groupwork digital performance shall be examined and described. A new value of individualised, though group based, non-linearity of expression will be presented and concluded.
series AVOCAAD
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4b30
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Mohd Fazidin, J.
year 2001
title ARMY WAR GAME SIMULATION (AWAS) system - Utilising architectural knowledge in virtual environments
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 435-438
summary This research briefly examines the importance of collaborative design in developing a multi-user, multi-tiered, networked and real-time information base system. Aspects such as navigation, interaction, communication, movements (objects or virtual camera), control, level of details, spatial design and virtual spaces will be explained to show their importance in the development of virtual world. This paper will further explore the aspects of collaborative design in the context of Army War Game Simulation System (AWAS). A generic collaborative design-based framework will be demonstrated to simulate the overall operations of a war in command-control structure of the force.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id avocaad_2001_13
id avocaad_2001_13
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Modeling irregular and complex forms
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Computational technologies provide arguably the first real opportunity architectural design has had for a comprehensive description of built form. With the advent of affordable computer-aided design systems (including drafting, modeling, visualization and simulation tools), architects believe they can be in full control of geometric aspects and, through these, of a wide spectrum of other aspects that are implicit or explicit in the geometric representation. This belief is based primarily on the efficiency and effectiveness of computer systems, ranging from the richness and adaptability of geometric primitives to the utility of geometric representations in simulations of climatic aspects. Such capabilities support attempts to design and construct more irregular or otherwise complex forms. These fall under two main categories: (1) parsing of irregularity into elementary components, and (2) correlation of the form of a building with complex geometric structures.The first category takes advantage of the compactness and flexibility of computational representations in order to analyse the form of a design into basic elements, usually elementary geometric primitives. These are either arranged into simple, unconstrained configurations or related to each other by relationships that define e.g. parametric relative positioning or Boolean combinations. In both cases the result is a reduction of local complexity and an increase of implicit or explicit relationships, including the possibility of hierarchical structures.The second category attempts to correlate built form with constraints that derive usually from construction but can also be morphological. The correlation determines the applicability of complex geometric structures (minimally ruled surfaces) to the description of a design. The product of this application is generally variable in quality, depending upon the designer's grounding in geometry and his ability to integrate constraints from different aspects in the definition of the design's geometry.Both categories represent a potential leap forward but are also equally hampered by the rigidity of the implementation mechanisms upon which they rely heavily. The paper proposes an approach to making these mechanisms subordinate to the cognitive and technical aspects of architectural thinking through fuzzy modeling. This way of modeling involves a combination of (a) canonical forms, (b) tolerances around canonical forms and positions, (c) minimal and maximal values, (d) fuzzy boundaries, and (e) plastic interaction between elements based on the dual principles of local intelligence and autonomy. Fuzzy models come therefore closer to the intuitive manners of sketching, while facilitating transition to precise and complex forms. The paper presents two applications of fuzzy modeling. The first concerns the generation of schematic building layouts, including adaptive control of programmatic requirements. The second is a system for designing stairs that can adapt themselves to changes in their immediate environment through a fuzzy definition of geometric and topological parametrization.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 9d10
authors Anders, Peter and Livingstone, Daniel
year 2001
title STARS: Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 350-355
summary Since October 2000 the authors have operated a laboratory, the Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System (STARS), for exploring telepresence in the domestic environment. The authors, an artist and an architect, are conducting a series of experiments to test their hypotheses concerning mixed reality and supportive environments. This paper describes these hypotheses, the purpose and construction of the lab, and preliminary results from the ongoing collaboration.
keywords Mixed Reality, Cybrid, Art, Cyberspace, CAiiA-STAR
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id f95f
authors Angulo, A.H., Davidson, R.J. and Vásquez de Velasco, G.P.
year 2001
title Digital Visualization in the Teaching of Cognitive Visualization
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 292-301
summary Professional design offices claim that our graduates have difficulties with their free-hand perspective drawing skills. This fact, which has become obvious over the last 5 years, is parallel to a clear tendency towards the use of 3-dimensional digital imagery in the projects of our students. Frequently, faculty tends to blame the computer for the shortcomings of our students in the use of traditional media, yet there is no clear evidence on the source of the blame. At a more fundamental level, the visualization skills of our students are questioned. This paper will explain how faculty teaching design communication techniques, with traditional and digital media, are working together in the development of a teaching methodology that makes use of computers in support of our student’s training on cognitive visualization skills, namely; “The Third-Eye Method”. The paper describes the Third-Eye Method as an alternative to traditional methods. As evidence of the benefits offered by the Third-Eye Method, the paper presents the results of testing it against traditional methods among freshman students. At the end, the paper draws as conclusion that computers are not the main source of the problem but a potential solution.
keywords Pedagogy, Visualization, Media
series ACADIA
email Vasquez@taz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ga0118
id ga0118
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2001
title Learning and Contamination in Virtual Worlds
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories whereto explore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tool to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]. The combination of these concepts with robotics technology or with immersive-interactive 3D environments (virtual reality) are changing quickly well known paradigms like digital life, manmachineinterface, virtual world. The virtual world metaphor becomes interesting when the artificial beings can develop some form of learning, increasing their performances, adaptation, and developing the ability to exchange information with human visitors. In this sense the evolution enhances the creative power and meaningful of these environments, and human visitors experience an emotion of a shift from a simplified simulation of the reality to a real immersion into an imaginary life. We may think that these realization are the first sparks of a new form of life: simulated for the soft-alife thinkers, real for the hard-alife thinkers, or a simple imaginary vision for the artists.
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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