CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 509

_id fc4f
authors Lin, C.Y.
year 2002
title A Place Where People Are Free to Move: Exploring Dynamic Texture Mapping in Computer Graphic Systems
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 117-122
summary Recent studies, both collaborative design system and scenario scripting, attempt to explore further CG media. Corbusier pointed out that good architecture is a place where people can walk unrestrainedly and feel free in spirit. However, it is apparent that the human figures are still in animation, whereas they are free to move in the real world. The human figure always plays an important role in the development of design media. The objective of this paper is to develop a new design method using CG media and to study the process of dynamic human texture mapping within the CG. This research conducted a design experiment using computer as the sole design medium. The results show that the new design method not only altered the behavior of the designer, but also impacted design thinking cognition.
series CAADRIA
email gage@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id bb35
authors Paranandi, Murali
year 2002
title An Inquiry Into Computers in Design: When Cardboard Met Computer
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 329-337
summary This paper reflects on the experiences of teaching undergraduate design studios for past 4 years and presents a systematic investigation conducted in a classroom setting to further understand the role of computer in conceptual stages of design. A case study project inquiring the implications of using two different forms of media, namely cardboard and computer, for design development during conceptual stages is presented. Twelve novice designers were challenged to learn and use computers in a five-week design project. A conceptual framework for understanding the discovery and usefulness of computer in their design process was developed and tested. An analysis of the outcome indicated that computers played a positive role in student innovation, improving possibilities for discovery. It further revealed that the employing cardboard was useful in turning the abstract discoveries made by the computers into productive and useful design solutions. It also supported the notion that the novice designer’s use of photorealistic possibilities offered by computer visualization (rendering, animation) during conceptual stages of design had an effect of distraction rather than a design aid.
series CAADRIA
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 2d54
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, R.B. and Parker, Th.W.
year 2002
title Virtual construction of architecture using 3D CAD and simulation
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 227-235
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the student's experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students' awareness and ability in construction. These include: Virtual design–build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design–build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id e414
authors Lee, H.-L.
year 2002
title A Preliminary Study of Computerized Design Process and Methods
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 290-295
summary Graduate Institute of Architecture, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan The evolution of design media has kept a close relationship with the development of design methods in the history. Nowadays, different computer media have been used in different stages of the design process. It is to believe that computer media have great impact on the design process and methods. The objective of this paper is to realize the design process and methods when designers use computer modeling to tackle an architectural design problem. The methodologies are non- participant observation and retrospection. The findings of this research prove that media does contribute to the changes in design process and methods. Not only does its conclusion help to better understand properties of different media, but also benefit the development of computer media.
series eCAADe
email huilin@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 204eaea2001
id 204eaea2001
authors Niemann, T., Schmidt, A. and Reiss, S.
year 2002
title The Use of New Media Tools in Environmental Simulation
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary Urban design model simulations serve to let us envision the future environment. These models are important tools in planning processes and serve to democratize improve the comprehension of decision processes. Those affected and (often) laypeople help in the formulation of opinions. Not lastly, model simulations facilitate the evaluation of the quality of the future urban design spaces and allow for corrections in the optimization of designs. Model simulations can be created by the help of endoscopic techniques already well known to medicine. Nowadays, virtual simulations can, on the other hand, be entirely created on a computer through the use of suitable programs. At the present time a comparative investigation into the performance capabilities of analog and digital technologies is still pending. In a two-group comparative study, static analog and digital simulations were compared by using categorical scales to answer questions on urban design layout and living space quality. The results demonstrated that analog and digital simulations lead to similar value judgments. However, layout and living space quality in the analog simulations were given somewhat higher rankings, on average. A conclusive statement about the performance capabilities of analog or digital simulations in urban design processes is still premature. Future studies should take this context into consideration. Aside from the performance capabilities of a simulation, other aspects are also to be considered, such as the resource requirements for practical urban planning processes. At this time the use of analog simulations is often recommended. This is because the use of analog simulations brings similar results using fewer resources than digital simulations. To the observer, analog simulations retain a more natural quality. Now as before, models are often constructed during the performance of urban design projects, reducing even further the resource demands of an analog model, which in the end is reflected in the costs.
series EAEA
email alexander.schmidt@uni-essen.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ga0227
id ga0227
authors Rafi, Ahmad
year 2002
title Creative Multimedia: The Commodity of the 21st Century
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The Digital Revolution has turned individuals, institutions, and businesses into a new form of collective wealth and prosperity. This revolution has effected a creativity burst that goes far beyond an increase in the number of those involved in design tasks and challenges, in both professional and amateur settings. The Internet in particular are not only distributing media but most importantly it is a reference platform in which ideas, talents and capabilities emerge and are refined, enhanced and perfected through the inspiring interplay of collaboration and competition. This paper briefly examines the relationship between art and science through the ages, discusses their recent re-convergence, and examines their current relationship via real world applications and productions. The study of such productions, their successes and the impact they have had in the marketplace based on designs and aesthetics instead of advanced technology appear to support the argument. It also highlights the need for accelerating this process and suggests that the re-convergence is a result of new technologies adopted by practitioners that include the effective visualisation and communication of ideas and concepts. These elements are widely found today in multimedia, which offers increased power and new abilities to both scientists and designers. This paper also highlights the need for the employment of emerging computer-based interactive technologies which will enhance the design process, better decision-making, increase the quality of communication and collaboration, lessen the errors and reduce the design cycles. A Multimedia Palette is proposed as a design platform to expose one's imagination, creative and innovative ideas, and provide a richer and more creative multimedia content design and development. Following encouraging first round results, an expanded version of the suggested platform has been experimented in the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University for the last 5 years, in integrating design and computer skills in the teaching and learning projects.
keywords creativity, re-convergence, Multimedia Palette, Creative Multimedia
series other
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ea19
authors Russell, Peter
year 2002
title Teaching Concurrent Engineering Using Intensive Interdisciplinary Robotic Workshops
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 361-368
summary The métier of architecture is, contrary to the myth of the single visionary architect, one of co-ordinated interdisciplinary teamwork. For students of architecture, this concept can be somewhat abstract without the chance for hands-on experience in working in such teams. The authors contend that this type of co-operation is better trained than taught. As a consequence, the authors have sought to create a pedagogical framework for training interdisciplinary work: Furthermore, by using assignments that call for concurrent engineering, the framework allows students to understand the complexities of integrated planning practices. The paper explains the methods and results of workshops carried out at two Universities over the past one and one-half years. Students are arranged in small teams of 3-5 students consisting optimally of architects, engineers and computer programmers. The assignment is to build and program a robot to successfully execute a prescribed set of objectives. The 10- day workshop is carried out as a competition in order to accelerate the development process and to focus the design work to a specific goal.
series CAADRIA
email russell@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 8585
authors Rügemer, Jörg
year 2002
title From Digital to Real Theoretical-digital architectural concepts and the realization of complex spatial forms
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 194-200
summary To summarize former experiences of design seminars of the past years, the paper describes how new thinking and development structures within a design process, in conjunction with digital design media, requires new approaches to the design process itself. Also required are new solutions in adequate, three-dimensional, haptic presentation methods (model making), in order to secure the physical control of the computer-generated data structures. Points of origin have been several student projects whose conception was based on the idea of the contradiction of a modern architectural approach with its inclination to industrialized parts and series. The promise of the computer based design and manufacturing process seemed to allow the realization of almost every imaginable architectural shape for the same costs as those in regular planning and manufacturing processes. The different projects explored both static modeling methods and dynamic computer- driven development and presentation techniques. The latest project touches the field of an algorithm-based design process. Finally a possible process chain from early design stage into a three-dimensional, physical model is described. Considering the resources and financial budgets at universities, the development of an efficient manufacturing process with effective interfaces will summarize the method and finalize the study process.
series eCAADe
email joerg@ruegemer.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 864a
authors Senagala, Mahesh and Masden, Kenneth
year 2002
title Interrupted Interface - On the Cybernetics of Digital Design Process
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 168-172
summary From the viewpoint of Batesonian cybernetics, ‘conscious purpose’ and ‘artistic process’ are distinct ends of a spectrum of the functioning of ‘self’. The conceptual stage of the design process is essentially an artistic activity unencumbered with accuracy, dimensionality, scale, program or even tectonics, albeit all of these maybe tacitly present at the ‘back of a designer’s mind’. Artistic activities involve broad mental processes that are beneath the stratum of consciousness. By definition, consciousness is selective awareness; it is linear in execution and limited in its capability to synthesize complex parameters. One of the central questions of this paper is “if artistic process requires one to abandon, or relinquish conscious purpose at the time of the generation of the work of art, and if the early stages of artistic process is a result of a vast number of ‘unconscious’ forces and impulses, then how can the computer, which demands (and thus propagates) geometric precision, focused operation and rational execution, be part of that process?” This paper will explore how, cybernetically, the computer can be ‘coupled’ with ‘self’ (via a visual interface) and the artistic process. Three specially devised conceptual design exercises•namely BurrDesign, BlinDesign, and BlitzDesign•and three corresponding “interruptive” computer interface modifications were deployed in an introduction to digital media course. The results of this study are now under consideration for their effectiveness in promoting conceptual design using the computer, and how the ‘self’ might form a cybernetic whole with the machine. The findings could have implications in design pedagogy, informatics and interface design.
series eCAADe
email msenagala@satx.rr.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddssar0204
id ddssar0204
authors Asanowicz, A.
year 2002
title Evolution of Media for Early Design Stages
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In this paper the evolution of media used at early design stages will be considered. In traditional methods of searching and presenting the design idea, the basic tool used was the graphic representation. Implementation of new digital techniques in 60s - 70s focused on the mathematical way ofrepresentation. These methods were “not architect friendly” (lack of graphic representation traditionally used by architects). As a result, the development of methods for digital support of form searching was terminated. The computer was used as a tool for drafting. Creative usage of computers for form searching through sketching on the display was extremely difficult. The computer could be described as an “incompatible pencil”. Only in recent years can we see new efforts in this area ofdesign methodology. Thanks to new technical possibilities we have a new chance for changing the process of designing. New kinds of software and hardware let us use the computer not as a pen, but as a medium. In this paper different new ways of form searching will be considered (from very simple method as the scansketches to very complicated ones, such as the generic algorithms). At the end, the influence of new media on the process of design will be presented.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id 63c3
authors Burdi, Luciana
year 2002
title Evaluating the Use of a Web-Based Collaborative Interactive Digital Model (CollABITA) in Supporting the Urban Design Approval Process1
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, III.1-III.15
summary This research, after analyzing the Urban Development Approval Process in its functionalities and methodologies, is showing the key points at which the process might be supported by new computer technologies, and it establishes a web-based Collaborative Interactive Digital Model (CollABITA Model) that relates and facilitates the graphical representation of the urban design process with some elements of the methodological approach. The CollABITA Model will dramatically facilitate the idea of broadening public participation, and indirectly by this, also collaboration. This new web-based support tool, is focusing on how new Informative Computer Technologies can be used in order to have a more co-operative design process. By utilizing the enormous potential of Internet for informing the process, and software for visualizing its products, the Model will provide an effective support, which will be able to deliver information in various forms to the Designers, Developers, Decision Makers, Agencies and the final user (the Citizens). The Model is concerned with the big challenge of supporting the urban design approval process itself, by exploring different kind of visualizations and communication tools, rather than producing a guide for carrying out the design. CollABITA Model is based on the existent framework structure of the extranet tool already available. Then, more then those, CollABITA Model will try to solve, by adding technical and collaborative functionalities, those issues that are characteristics in the urban design process and that are not jet solved by using one of the software .
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email lburdi@gsd.harvard.edu
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/03/29 09:43

_id 82ac
authors Caldas, Luisa Gama and Norford, Leslie K.
year 2002
title A design optimization tool based on a genetic algorithm
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 173-184
summary Much interest has been recently devoted to generative processes in design. Advances in computational tools for design applications, coupled with techniques from the field of artificial intelligence, have lead to new possibilities in the way computers can inform and actively interact with the design process. In this paper, we use the concepts of generative and goal-oriented design to propose a computer tool that can help the designer to generate and evaluate certain aspects of a solution towards an optimized behavior of the final configuration. This work focuses mostly on those aspects related to the environmental performance of buildings. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are applied as a generative and search procedure to look for optimized design solutions in terms of thermal and lighting performance in a building. The GA is first used to generate possible design solutions, which are then evaluated in terms of lighting and thermal behavior using a detailed thermal analysis program (DOE2.1E). The results from the simulations are subsequently used to further guide the GA search towards finding low-energy solutions to the problem under study. Solutions can be visualized using an AutoLisp routine. The specific problem addressed in this study is the placing and sizing of windows in an office building. The same method is applicable to a wide range of design problems like the choice of construction materials, design of shading elements, or sizing of lighting and mechanical systems for buildings.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ad19
id ad19
authors Calderon, C., and Noble, R
year 2005
title BEYOND MODELLING: AVANT-GARDE COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS.
source I Jornadas de Investigacion en Construccion, Madrid, 2-4 June, 2005.
summary If the result of computer innovations can be interpreted as an emerging “difference” in the quality of constructed space, then in order to truly understand what future applications may be regarding architecture at present, we should look at what advanced functions are available in the process of designing forms and space (DeLuca and Nardini, 2002). Recently the so called parametric approach, a technique for describing a large class of designs with a small description in programming code, has become a focus of attention in architectural computing. In this paper, we reflect on the current use of parametric tools using real case studies as well as our own proof of concept parametric programmes and report on how the avant-garde computer techniques may help to increase the quality of residential building.
keywords Building Quality, Parametric Design
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:42

_id aef6
authors Chang, David C. and Szalapaj, Peter
year 2002
title Making Sense of Presenting Design Ideas through Animated Form
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 560-563
summary This paper describes both conventional and computational ways of expressing and exploring design concepts with the use of models. We explain the role and function of the model in the design process, and investigate the ways in which models become reflections and representations of architects’ design thinking. We compare and contrast the physical properties of conventional models with those of three-dimensional computer models, and the corresponding processes of model creation, model development, and model modification. The paper includes a brief overview of commonly used forms of computer representations often encountered in Computer Aided Design applications. Whatever the visual richness of computer models in virtual environments can be, we believe that, just as in the use of conventional two-dimensional architectural drawings, computational presentations of architectural design concepts have their own conventions of use. This paper addresses the need to more accurately understand these conventions of using computer models for the representation of architectural design concepts. Therefore, we will illustrate the more dynamic qualities of computer models, which have the potential to allow designers to escape from the restrictions and constraints of physical form. In particular, we demonstrate these qualities in the context of architectural presentations in the medium of computer animation. These new forms of expression of design thoughts and ideas go beyond mere model making, and move more towards scenemaking and storytelling. The latter represents new methods of expression within computational environments for architects and designers.
series eCAADe
email d.chang@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ddssup0205
id ddssup0205
authors Deguchi, A., Tabira, Y., Matsuura, H., Nakano, H. and Arima, T.
year 2002
title Integration System of Archaeological and Geographical Informationfor Planning in Historical Regions
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This study aims to construct the GIS for supporting the planning process and archaeological analysis in the historical regions by integrating geographical data and archaeological data on the sites with ruinsand remains in various period from ancient through medieval which had been buried and was recently excavated in geologic layers and mounds. First, for understanding the trends of environmental condition the excavated sites, we analyze the relationship between the site location and the condition ofgeography and natural environment by using the constructed system.Secondary, we develop the system to make it possible to browse and operate the information on the GIS through the internet. This web GIS constructed by us supports sharing the information on planning for preservation of historical sites among city planners, archaeologists and citizens, and serve as a tool for the collaboration and the coordination of urban development and historical preservation. Finally, as the application with the GIS, we show the results of case studies and point out the merits and effects about usage of the GIS for archaeological analysis as well as learning the local history.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2a84
authors Donath, D. Hansen, St. and Richter, K.
year 2002
title Architectural Window - Computer networks as planning and integration tools
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 302-305
summary As building projects become increasingly more complex, the number of project participants increases as does their spatial distribution. An effective decentralised work process and co-operation is of increasing importance. The global computer network, the internet, has great potential and recent times have seen the development of a variety of techniques in this field. The project proposal described here is based upon this approach and also takes it a step further. A specific analysis of the subject and the subsequent identification of potential approaches formed the basis for an architectural application that brings the architect in contact with other project participants using the internet as a powerful yet simple and easy to use medium. The project is currently (2002) undergoing practice tests and academic investigation and is installed on a freely-accessible server.
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

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