CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 507

_id 6d22
authors Bermudez, J., Agutter, J., Syroid, N., Lilly, B., Sharir, Y., Lopez, T., Westenskow, D. and Foresti, S.
year 2002
title Interfacing Virtual & Physical Spaces through the Body: The cyberPRINT Project
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 395-400
summary The cyberPRINT is a fully immersive, interactive virtual environment that is being generated in rea-timebased on physiological data readings of a human body. In other words, the cyberPRINT is based oncreating interfaces between physical and digital spaces and between biology and informationtechnologies. The cyberPRINT is also an event, wherein a performer is connected to the cyberPRINTgenerator to create a self-sustaining feedback mechanism. Although using the body to electronicallydrive music and media events is not new, most of these works have paid little or no attention to thepotential of interactive 3D virtual environments. Nor have they been so technologically advanced,interdisciplinary intensive (involving architecture, choreography, modern dance, music, bioengineering,medicine and computer science), or architecturally focused as the cyberPRINT.This project covers a wide and fertile territory that goes from the very technical and design oriented tothe very theoretical and interdisciplinary. This paper is intended to (1) expand what has been alreadypublished about this project (Bermudez et al 2000a) and (2) establish potential areas for discussionbefore and after the performance
series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 63c3
authors Burdi, Luciana
year 2002
title Evaluating the Use of a Web-Based Collaborative Interactive Digital Model (CollABITA) in Supporting the Urban Design Approval Process1
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, III.1-III.15
summary This research, after analyzing the Urban Development Approval Process in its functionalities and methodologies, is showing the key points at which the process might be supported by new computer technologies, and it establishes a web-based Collaborative Interactive Digital Model (CollABITA Model) that relates and facilitates the graphical representation of the urban design process with some elements of the methodological approach. The CollABITA Model will dramatically facilitate the idea of broadening public participation, and indirectly by this, also collaboration. This new web-based support tool, is focusing on how new Informative Computer Technologies can be used in order to have a more co-operative design process. By utilizing the enormous potential of Internet for informing the process, and software for visualizing its products, the Model will provide an effective support, which will be able to deliver information in various forms to the Designers, Developers, Decision Makers, Agencies and the final user (the Citizens). The Model is concerned with the big challenge of supporting the urban design approval process itself, by exploring different kind of visualizations and communication tools, rather than producing a guide for carrying out the design. CollABITA Model is based on the existent framework structure of the extranet tool already available. Then, more then those, CollABITA Model will try to solve, by adding technical and collaborative functionalities, those issues that are characteristics in the urban design process and that are not jet solved by using one of the software .
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email lburdi@gsd.harvard.edu
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/03/29 09:43

_id db00
authors Espina, Jane J.B.
year 2002
title Base de datos de la arquitectura moderna de la ciudad de Maracaibo 1920-1990 [Database of the Modern Architecture of the City of Maracaibo 1920-1990]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 133-139
summary Bases de datos, Sistemas y Redes 134The purpose of this report is to present the achievements obtained in the use of the technologies of information andcommunication in the architecture, by means of the construction of a database to register the information on the modernarchitecture of the city of Maracaibo from 1920 until 1990, in reference to the constructions located in 5 of Julio, Sectorand to the most outstanding planners for its work, by means of the representation of the same ones in digital format.The objective of this investigation it was to elaborate a database for the registration of the information on the modernarchitecture in the period 1920-1990 of Maracaibo, by means of the design of an automated tool to organize the it datesrelated with the buildings, parcels and planners of the city. The investigation was carried out considering three methodologicalmoments: a) Gathering and classification of the information of the buildings and planners of the modern architectureto elaborate the databases, b) Design of the databases for the organization of the information and c) Design ofthe consultations, information, reports and the beginning menu. For the prosecution of the data files were generated inprograms attended by such computer as: AutoCAD R14 and 2000, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and MicrosoftAccess 2000, CorelDRAW V9.0 and Corel PHOTOPAINT V9.0.The investigation is related with the work developed in the class of Graphic Calculation II, belonging to the Departmentof Communication of the School of Architecture of the Faculty of Architecture and Design of The University of the Zulia(FADLUZ), carried out from the year 1999, using part of the obtained information of the works of the students generatedby means of the CAD systems for the representation in three dimensions of constructions with historical relevance in themodern architecture of Maracaibo, which are classified in the work of The Other City, generating different types ofisometric views, perspectives, representations photorealistics, plants and facades, among others.In what concerns to the thematic of this investigation, previous antecedents are ignored in our environment, and beingthe first time that incorporates the digital graph applied to the work carried out by the architects of “The Other City, thegenesis of the oil city of Maracaibo” carried out in the year 1994; of there the value of this research the field of thearchitecture and computer science. To point out that databases exist in the architecture field fits and of the design, alsoweb sites with information has more than enough architects and architecture works (Montagu, 1999).In The University of the Zulia, specifically in the Faculty of Architecture and Design, they have been carried out twoworks related with the thematic one of database, specifically in the years 1995 and 1996, in the first one a system wasdesigned to visualize, to classify and to analyze from the architectural point of view some historical buildings of Maracaiboand in the second an automated system of documental information was generated on the goods properties built insidethe urban area of Maracaibo. In the world environment it stands out the first database developed in Argentina, it is the database of the Modern andContemporary Architecture “Datarq 2000” elaborated by the Prof. Arturo Montagú of the University of Buenos Aires. The general objective of this work it was the use of new technologies for the prosecution in Architecture and Design (MONTAGU, Ob.cit). In the database, he intends to incorporate a complementary methodology and alternative of use of the informationthat habitually is used in the teaching of the architecture. When concluding this investigation, it was achieved: 1) analysis of projects of modern architecture, of which some form part of the historical patrimony of Maracaibo; 2) organized registrations of type text: historical, formal, space and technical data, and graph: you plant, facades, perspectives, pictures, among other, of the Moments of the Architecture of the Modernity in the city, general data and more excellent characteristics of the constructions, and general data of the Planners with their more important works, besides information on the parcels where the constructions are located, 3)construction in digital format and development of representations photorealistics of architecture projects already built. It is excellent to highlight the importance in the use of the Technologies of Information and Communication in this investigation, since it will allow to incorporate to the means digital part of the information of the modern architecturalconstructions that characterized the city of Maracaibo at the end of the XX century, and that in the last decades they have suffered changes, some of them have disappeared, destroying leaves of the modern historical patrimony of the city; therefore, the necessity arises of to register and to systematize in digital format the graphic information of those constructions. Also, to demonstrate the importance of the use of the computer and of the computer science in the representation and compression of the buildings of the modern architecture, to inclination texts, images, mapping, models in 3D and information organized in databases, and the relevance of the work from the pedagogic point of view,since it will be able to be used in the dictation of computer science classes and history in the teaching of the University studies of third level, allowing the learning with the use in new ways of transmission of the knowledge starting from the visual information on the part of the students in the elaboration of models in three dimensions or electronic scalemodels, also of the modern architecture and in a future to serve as support material for virtual recoveries of some buildings that at the present time they don’t exist or they are almost destroyed. In synthesis, the investigation will allow to know and to register the architecture of Maracaibo in this last decade, which arises under the parameters of the modernity and that through its organization and visualization in digital format, it will allow to the students, professors and interested in knowing it in a quicker and more efficient way, constituting a contribution to theteaching in the history area and calculation. Also, it can be of a lot of utility for the development of future investigation projects related with the thematic one and restoration of buildings of the modernity in Maracaibo.
keywords database, digital format, modern architecture, model, mapping
series SIGRADI
email jacky@convergence.com.ve., jjespina@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id b7de
authors Flemming, Ulrich, Erhan, Halil and Ozkaya, Ipek
year 2002
title Object-Oriented Application Development in CAD: A Graduate Course
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 25-36
summary The programming languages typically offered by CAD systems for third-party application developerswere procedural or functional. A major shift is currently occurring in that new versions of commercialCAD software will support object-oriented programming languages for application development.Developers who wish to take advantage of this new kind of environment must undergo a considerablecognitive “retooling” and adopt new software engineering strategies. We describe a graduate coursethat aims at introducing students to effective object-oriented development strategies, especially usecase-driven development and the tools provided by the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Studentsgained experience with these tools by forming, together with the instructors, a single development teamwriting an application on top of MicroStation/J using JMDL as programming language. The paperdescribes the instructors’ experience with this approach.
series ACADIA
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/26 16:24

_id 71a0
authors Gasparski, Wojciech W.
year 2002
title Designer’s Responsibility: Methodological and Ethical Dimensions
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 10-011
summary A designer is anybody who designs, where ‘to design’ - from Latin designare - means ‘to mark out’. Those who design professionally are professional designers, i. e. who „see and seek value in new designs“. Seeing an seeking might be done in two ways: narrower or broader. According to the approach characteristic for design-methodological reductionism those things which are designed are considered the designed objects. In this approach the designer’s task is limited to narrowly understood artifacts like buildings, bridges, machines, devices etc. The relation between a designed object and the reminder of the world is of a secondary consideration or ignored even. The postponed consequences are of physical, social, psychological, and economical nature. Systemic design methodology is different. It describes that ‘what is designed’ in terms of an object of design, a system (a whole) separated from the ‘rest of the world’ to an extent that can minimise a negative ‘immunological effect’. The object of design is a spectem is used. An independently developed programming language entitled NQC (Not Quite C) is used to program the robots. The students are initially given three lectures dealing with robotics in general, methods of locomotion and state based programming principles. Small workshops and discussions about ways of tackling the assigned problem followed these lectures. The work of Rechtin is shown wherein the methodology of “architecting” combines heuristics, hierarchies and intuition to reach design solution spaces. The students are then allowed to form teams whereby they must include members from each faculty. The students are also responsible for forming committees to collectively make decisions about the competitions. The committees decide general attributes of the robots such as size (Constructors Committee) as well as the rules for the competition (Race Committee). The Communication Committee was entrusted to develop a communication protocol (using Infrared transmitters) and the Code Committee decided whuse. Once producing and teaching good science is the main tasks of scholars, those among the scholars who are involved in design science are responsible not only for producing good design science but also for educating designers as reflective practitioners conscious of what every designer should know about objects of design and ethics related to the profession.
series eCAADe
email wgaspars@ifispan.waw.pl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ga0213
id ga0213
authors Herr, Christiane M.
year 2002
title Generative Architectural Design and Complexity Theory
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary During the past decades, complexity theory has evolved as a new discipline that provides a broad scientific perspective towards dynamic real-life phenomena, challenging the classical linear worldview as well as simple cause-and-effect-style Newtonian physics. For architects, the advent of this new science offers the challenge as well as the chance to reconsider common design approaches and to invent new strategies based on the new paradigms. The actual application of complexity theory to architectural design, however, results in a fundamental dilemma: How can a reflective, ultimately retrospective body of thought (complexity theory) be applied to prospective design challenges (architecture)? Being part of a current MArch thesis project, the proposed paper focuses on this general dilemma between architectural design and complexity theory and discusses actual as well as potential future generative architectural design approaches involving complexity theory. Generative design strategies commonly apply algorithmic methods and formalisms, which can conveniently produce and deal with high levels of complexity. Complexity describes general properties of a system and can be further dissected into several modes: epistemic, ontological and functional complexity. This taxonomy offers insights into generative design applications, which have mostly focused on a limited set of complexity modes. Besides complexity generated by sheer numbers, aspects like functional or hierarchical complexity offer further perspectives on generative systems, processes and output. Considering these aspects of complexity theory, future challenges to generative architectural design can be predicted.
series other
email candyhk@hkusua.hku.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ec93
authors Lee, Alpha W.K.
year 2002
title From Simulation to Stimulation - Stimulative Design Computing Learning and Teaching Environment Based on Multiple Representations
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 207-212
summary Design computing is an interdisciplinary field that centers on the intersection of design, computer science, and cognitive science. These multi-dimensional faces of this new paradigm necessitate a mutual understanding of computing and design as a whole, which are usually conceived as separate stages of computer-mediated design. This paper explores the use of multiple representations in stimulative design computing learning and teaching environment. This paper starts with an overview of computer-mediated collaborative learning, multiple representations and learner-centered design. Then issues related to the methodology in implementing the system are discussed. Agent models and prototype of the above computer-mediated collaborative learning system are constructed. The research is under progress.
series CAADRIA
email alpha@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 998d
authors Lee, Alpha Wai Keung
year 2002
title Design Computing Education Software Development Integration of Scaffolding Strategies and Multiple Representations
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 140-143
summary Design Computing is an interdisciplinary field that centres on the intersection of design, computer science and linguistics. This multidimensional face of the new paradigm of design computing necessitates a mutual understanding of computing and designs as a whole, which are usually, conceived as separated stages of computed-mediated design. Based on cognitive and computational approach, with the integration of scaffolding strategies and multiple representations, an interactive and real-time design computing learning system is constructed. By interactively manipulating the various attributes, codes, parameters and digital media contents in a distributed system, learners are gradually exposed to the mutual relationship of representational digital multimedia and the underlining programming syntax in a collaborative environment. The author attempted the use of game programming technology in the development of the above system to support design learning and research in understanding design activities. The aim is to identify the design process that if taught well would address the core goals of design education.
series eCAADe
email alpha@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ga0216
id ga0216
authors Manzolli, J. and Lindner, F. and Carrilho ,F.
year 2002
title Constructing Distributed Fretted Instruments for the Web
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary In this article, we present a new computer based music instrument for distributed performance on the Web. It was named “Cordas Virtuais” and we took advantage of the recent Java2 implementation to create a general model for fretted-string instruments using class abstractions. There is a heavy usage of JAVA Objected Oriented inheritance to encapsulate gestures derived from fretted string instruments using parameters such as string tuning, group of strings, hand gestures, rhythmic patterns, fingering and alike, that carry each a set of attributes and properties. We call this kind of new musical application as Distributed Musical Instrument (DMI). As an applet, Cordas runs in any browser supporting the current Java Virtual Machine (JVM) across the Web. We describe the concept of PlayStyle that was created to define styles of fingering on the strings. In the implementation we have two class-groups: the left hand and the right hand gestures. The left-hand classes control pitch changes or chords, and a right hand control the rhythm, dynamics, micro-rhythms and rhythmic patterns. A Co-ordination Matrix controls real time changes on left-hand movements. This matrix generates chord orbits that are equivalent to the traditional chord cadences. Finally, to show the potential of Cordas, we presented four musical examples in which a set of fretted instruments varying from the Classical Guitar to the Chinese Pipa were simulated.
keywords MIDI, Java2, interactive music, fretted instruments, real time
series other
email jonatas@nics.unicamp.br
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id cb9f
authors Paterson, Inga and Natanson, Louis
year 2002
title Context, Practice and Technique in the Development of a Creative Curriculum
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 39-42
summary This paper explores ideas in relation to the design and delivery of a university level curriculum aimed at producing computer artists. Theessential principle is that the organisation of the film industry is a useful paradigm, and that the paradigm can be used as a tool in the designand delivery of this kind of curriculum. The education of graduates destined for the “new media” industries is complex. A particular problemis to achieve balance between development of technological skills on the one hand and artistic and creative development on the other. The challenge for educators is that many students are motivated by acquiring technical expertise and may not realise the importance of artistic and creative development. Comparisons with the world of film are used to address the problem of balance. The background to this approach is discussed and some preliminary results, in terms of student attitudinal change, are described.
series SIGRADI
email I.Paterson@Abertay.ac.uk, L.Natanson@Abertay.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id ga0227
id ga0227
authors Rafi, Ahmad
year 2002
title Creative Multimedia: The Commodity of the 21st Century
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The Digital Revolution has turned individuals, institutions, and businesses into a new form of collective wealth and prosperity. This revolution has effected a creativity burst that goes far beyond an increase in the number of those involved in design tasks and challenges, in both professional and amateur settings. The Internet in particular are not only distributing media but most importantly it is a reference platform in which ideas, talents and capabilities emerge and are refined, enhanced and perfected through the inspiring interplay of collaboration and competition. This paper briefly examines the relationship between art and science through the ages, discusses their recent re-convergence, and examines their current relationship via real world applications and productions. The study of such productions, their successes and the impact they have had in the marketplace based on designs and aesthetics instead of advanced technology appear to support the argument. It also highlights the need for accelerating this process and suggests that the re-convergence is a result of new technologies adopted by practitioners that include the effective visualisation and communication of ideas and concepts. These elements are widely found today in multimedia, which offers increased power and new abilities to both scientists and designers. This paper also highlights the need for the employment of emerging computer-based interactive technologies which will enhance the design process, better decision-making, increase the quality of communication and collaboration, lessen the errors and reduce the design cycles. A Multimedia Palette is proposed as a design platform to expose one's imagination, creative and innovative ideas, and provide a richer and more creative multimedia content design and development. Following encouraging first round results, an expanded version of the suggested platform has been experimented in the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University for the last 5 years, in integrating design and computer skills in the teaching and learning projects.
keywords creativity, re-convergence, Multimedia Palette, Creative Multimedia
series other
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 7400
authors Rizal, H. and Ahmad Rafi, M.E.
year 2002
title The Impact of Internet Enabled Computer Aided Design (iCAD) in Construction Industry
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 085-92
summary The advent of the Internet has opened up and given, particularly, the developing countries and the world in general, a transformation into collective intelligence (Levy, 1998) societies linked to digital communication (Rafi, 2001). Apart from large corporations, the rapid evolution of border-less communication has also synergise between the art and science expertise to form low-cost internet-based networks that have become multi-million dollar companies within a short period of time (e.g. Linux) (Rafi, 2001). In the context of architectural designs and construction industries, the birth of Internet-based CAD (iCAD) solutions has offered a new dimension to architectural practice. The function of CAD has expanded as a tool to communicate and collaborate as well as to better control all phases of the architectural practices. This paper will review the current available iCAD tools and explore the possible utilisation of iCAD in architectural practices. The opportunities for modifying current professional practice standards to best use iCAD will be rationalised as well as the elements in ensuring the effectiveness of iCAD implementation. The final component of the paper will be an evaluation framework to measure the value of iCAD in an architectural practice. The framework will become an early platform for an architectural practice to decide and plan their future in utilising and applying iCAD in the most efficient way.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email rizalhusin@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/09/29 05:18

_id 1992
authors Russell, Peter
year 2002
title Using Higher Level Programming in Interdisciplinary teams as a means of training for Concurrent Engineering
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 14-19
summary The paper explains a didactical method for training students that has been run three times to date. The premise of the course is to combine students from different faculties into interdisciplinary teams. These teams then have a complex problem to resolve within an extremely short time span. In light of recent works from Joy and Kurzweil, the theme Robotics was chosen as an exercise that is timely, interesting and related, but not central to the studies of the various faculties. In groups of 3 to 5, students from faculties of architecture, computer science and mechanical engineering are entrusted to design, build and program a robot which must successfully execute a prescribed set of actions in a competitive atmosphere. The entire course lasts ten days and culminates with the competitive evaluation. The robots must navigate a labyrinth, communicate with on another and be able to cover longer distances with some speed. In order to simplify the resources available to the students, the Lego Mindstorms Robotic syshed backgrounds instaed of synthetic ones. The combination of digitally produced (scanned) sperical images together with the use of HDR open a wide range of new implementation in the field of architecture, especially in combining synthetic elements in existing buildings, e.g. new interior elements in an existing historical museum).ural presentations in the medium of computer animation. These new forms of expression of design thoughts and ideas go beyond mere model making, and move more towards scenemaking and storytelling. The latter represents new methods of expression within computational environments for architects and designers.its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosg and programming a winning robot. These differences became apparent early in the sessions and each group had to find ways to communicate their ideas and to collectively develop them by building on the strengths of each team member.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2013/02/04 06:17

_id e679
authors Seichter, H., Donath, D. and Petzold, F.
year 2002
title TAP – The Architectural Playground - C++ framework for scalable distributed collaborative architectural virtual environments
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 422-426
summary Architecture is built information (Schmitt, 1999). Architects have the task of restructuring and translating information into buildable designs. The beginning of the design process where the briefing is transformed into an idea is a crucial phase in the design process. It is where the architect makes decisions which influence the rest of the design development process (Vries et al., 1998). It is at this stage where most information is unstructured but has to be integrated into a broad context. This is where TAP is positioned – to support the architect in finding solutions through the creation of spatially structured information sets without impairing thereby the creative development. We want to enrich the inspiration of an architect with a new kind of information design. A further aspect is workflow in a distributed process where the architect’s work becomes one aspect of a decentralised working patterns. The software supports collaborative work with models, sketches and text messages within an uniform surface. The representations of the various media are connected and combined with each other and the user is free to combine them according to his or her needs.
series eCAADe
email hartmut.seichter@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 8e9c
authors Sosnov, A., Macé, P. and Hégron, G.
year 2002
title Semi-metric formal 3D reconstruction from perspective sketches
source Proceedings of International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), pp. 285-294, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
summary We present a new approach for accurate and fast reconstruction of 3D models from hand-drawn perspective sketches and imposed geometric constraints. A distinctive feature of the approach is the decomposition of the reconstruction process into the stages of correction of the 2D sketch and elevation of the 3D model. All 3D constraints that describe the spatial structure of the model are strictly satisfied, while preferences that describe the model projection are treated in relaxed manner. The constraints are subdivided into the projective, affine and metric ones and expressed in algebraic form by using the Grassmann-Cayley algebra. The constraints are resolved one by another following the order of their types by using the local propagation methods. The preferences allow to apply linear approximations and to systematically use formal methods.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 6fff
authors Talvittie, Juha
year 2002
title The Influence of Information and Communication Technology on Spatial Development and Planning
source CORP 2002, Vienna, pp. 453-456
summary We live in an era of rapid change moving towards the information/knowledge/network society. eCity, eRegion, eCountry, eEuropeand the like are targets of many authorities round the world. One of the driving forces of this development is the new information andcommunication technology, ICT. This technology has developed rapidly during the last 20 years and the pace of development of newtools and applications is intense.The microprocessor, personal computer, mobile phone, e-mail, Internet, WWW and a number of software are good examples of ICT.The use of these tools is growing continuously and rapidly. The productivity of industries and effectiveness of services haveincreased. Civil society has found new ways of networking. Individuals have easy access to information around the world. Mobileand wireless communication is becoming commonplace.One aspect of ICT has been rarely discussed and that is: will ICT affect spatial development. During the agrarian era rural areas werethe focus of life, during the industrial era urbanisation took place. Railways and roads shaped spatial structures. Moderntelecommunications can be seen not only as a new way to behave but also as new kind of traffic. New ICT is not limited by location;it affects place and distance as the determinants of location. Thus it can be predicted that ICT as an essential element of informationsociety will reshape in the long run current regional, urban and rural structures and create new spatial forms for urban and rural life.Although there is still only little empirical evidence about n_w spatial development tendencies, a number of scientists have describedthese changes and illustrated what could happen. Land use planners should be aware of these development tendencies and beprepared for the new challenges they are facing.
series other
email juha.talvitie@kolumbus.fi
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:13

_id 394e
authors Tosello, María Elena
year 2002
title El Ambiente Digital Vacío y Multiplicidad [The digital and empty atmosphere, and multiplicity]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 43-46
summary Although some authors sustain that postmodern culture, and particularly science, is in conflict with myths, from another perspective certain concepts, which come from philosophy, are still supporting cultural phenomenons that comes from new sciences, and particularly, from the new technological impact. The following concepts are brief comments about big themes, that will take us closer to delineating the actual cultural character, and to defining a few fundamental philosophical questions which are useful to the purposes of this article. The principal ideas of this paper come from applying philosophical concepts to the new design processes that involve digital media. After establishing the main hypothesis, the demonstration will be developed through the extensive explanation of concepts such as rhizome, emptiness and simulacra, and the characteristics that link them to digital environment, objects and processes.
series SIGRADI
email mtosello@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id ddssup0219
id ddssup0219
authors Van der Waerden, P., Van de Voort, R. and Da Silva, A.N.R.
year 2002
title Studying Pedestrian Movements in Central Shopping and Business Areas with a Dedicated Geographical Information System
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper pays attention to pedestrians’ route choice behaviour in central shopping and business areas, and the various ways this behaviour can be investigated. One of the tools available to carry out this kind of analysis is currently offered by the GIS-software TransCAD. This dedicated GIS software offers a route system routine that is suitable to store and examine in details pedestrians’ movements. In order to deeply explore the potential of these tools, they are used to investigate pedestrians’ movements in the central shopping and business area of Montreal (Canada). More than 360 individual routes have been entered in the route system. These observed routes were compared with (shortest path) routes generated by TransCAD using different network settings. The first network was based on the length of links. A second network was based on both the length of links and the fact that a link was an underground link or not. The final network was based on the length of links in combination with several characteristics of the links (such as presence of shops, presence of restaurants, presence of offices, and located in Old Montreal). The investigation shows that it is very easy to generate alternative routes based on different network settings. The routes generated with the network based on several characteristics of the network links correspond best with the observed routes. This network is used to generate routes after some planning measures (opening of new network links and renewal of some existing network links) are implemented. The result of this exercise is presented in a map.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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