CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 101 to 120 of 508

_id 42eb
authors Chastain, Th., Kalay, Y.E. and Peri, C.
year 2002
title Square peg in a round hole or horseless carriage? Reflections on the use of computing in architecture
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 237-248
summary We start with two paradigms that have been used to describe the relationship of computation methods and tools to the production of architecture. The first is that of forcing a square peg into a round hole –– implying that the use of a tool is misdirected, or at least poorly fits the processes that have traditionally been part of an architectural design practice. In doing so, the design practice suffers from the use of new technology. The other paradigm describes a state of transformation in relationship to new technology as a horseless carriage in which the process is described in obsolete and `backward' terms. The implication is that there is a lack of appreciation for the emerging potentials of technology to change our relationship with the task. The paper demonstrates these two paradigms through the invention of drawings in the 14th Century, which helped to define the profession of architecture. It then goes on to argue that modern computational tools follow the same paradigms, and like drawings, stand to bring profound changes to the profession of architecture as we know it.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 4e8c
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen and Flemming, Ulrich
year 2001
title Design space navigation in generative design systems
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 1-22
summary Generative design systems make it easier for designers to generate and explore design alternatives, but the amount of information generated during a design session can become very large. Intelligent navigation aids are needed if designers wish to access the information they generate with ease. We present a comprehensive approach to support information navigation in requirement-driven generative design systems, which gain their power form explicit representations of design requirements, which in turn add to the information generated by the system. Our approach takes into account studies dealing with human spatial cognition, wayfinding in physical environments, and information navigation in electronic media. We structure the information to be accessed in terms of a five-dimensional design space model that applies across generative design systems of the type considered here. The model structure supports basic generic navigation operations along its five dimensions. We validated the model in the context of the SEED-Layout system and used it to extend the built-in navigation tools of the system through novel ones, which we subjected to a limited usability study. The study suggests that these tools have promise and warrant further investigation.
series journal paper
email ujf@cmu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 6e0a
authors Craig, David Latch and Zimring, Craig
year 2002
title Support for collaborative design reasoning in shared virtual spaces
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 249-259
summary This paper discusses collaborative design, emphasizing the elaboration and transformations of a problem space, and the role that unstructured verbal communication and graphic communication can play in these processes. An asynchronous collaborative system, called the Immersive Discussion Tool (IDT), is introduced as a means for supporting productive design exchanges. IDT allows collaborators to reason about 3-D models over the Internet using view-dependent and view-independent diagrammatic marks, dynamic simulations, geometric design surrogates and text annotations. IDT relies on VRML to view the models, with an extensive Java-based interface driving the interactive behavior, including the construction and playback of graphical annotations, the management of threaded discussions, and the management of file input/output. The development and initial implementation of IDT has revealed the difficulty of constructing complex marks in a virtual 3-D space. Possible strategies for dealing with these problems are suggested.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ddssar0208
id ddssar0208
authors Cumming, Michael
year 2002
title A Bottom-Up Approach to Design Coordination
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The design industry like any other industry could benefit from process support for its practitioners. However, what constitutes legitimate process support for designers is a difficult research question. In order to support designers in their processes, first one needs to know what designers do. This is not only a question of knowing what designers do in general, but also what particular designers do in their own individual design practice. How to find out what designers do, that is, how to acquire knowledge abouttheir design processes, is also a difficult research question. Providing process support for designers is seen as a task, which cannot be divorced from design process acquisition. That is, one is unlikely to provideprocess support, without acquiring an understanding, what individual designers actually do, and conversely, one is unlikely to acquire an understanding of what designers do, without providing process support for designers. An application whose goal it is to provide both design process support for designers working in collaborative design teams, and also acquires a particular type of design process representationof design processes, is described.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ijac201412305
id ijac201412305
authors Davis, Daniel
year 2014
title Quantitatively Analysing Parametric Models
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 12 - no. 3, 307-320
summary Architectural practices regularly work with parametric models, yet almost nothing is known about the general properties of these models. We do not know how large a typical model is, or how complicated, or even what the typical parametric model does. These knowledge gaps are the focus of this article, which documents the first large-scale quantitative parametric model survey. In this paper three key quantitative metrics - dimensionality, size, and cyclomatic complexity - are applied to a collection of 2002 parametric models created by 575 designers. The results show that parametric models generally exhibit a number of strong correlations, which reveal a practice of parametric modelling that has as much to do with the management of data as it does with the modelling of geometry. These findings demonstrate the utility of software engineering metrics in the description and analysis of parametric models.
series journal
last changed 2014/12/09 06:44

_id ddssup0205
id ddssup0205
authors Deguchi, A., Tabira, Y., Matsuura, H., Nakano, H. and Arima, T.
year 2002
title Integration System of Archaeological and Geographical Informationfor Planning in Historical Regions
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This study aims to construct the GIS for supporting the planning process and archaeological analysis in the historical regions by integrating geographical data and archaeological data on the sites with ruinsand remains in various period from ancient through medieval which had been buried and was recently excavated in geologic layers and mounds. First, for understanding the trends of environmental condition the excavated sites, we analyze the relationship between the site location and the condition ofgeography and natural environment by using the constructed system.Secondary, we develop the system to make it possible to browse and operate the information on the GIS through the internet. This web GIS constructed by us supports sharing the information on planning for preservation of historical sites among city planners, archaeologists and citizens, and serve as a tool for the collaboration and the coordination of urban development and historical preservation. Finally, as the application with the GIS, we show the results of case studies and point out the merits and effects about usage of the GIS for archaeological analysis as well as learning the local history.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2f17
authors Dokonal, W., Martens, B. and Plösch, R.
year 2002
title New Expectations: City Modeling in the Internet Age
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 97-100
summary The first part of this paper tries to give an overview over the different aspects of city modeling. After a short history on city models the paper starts with a categorization of the different “types” of city models. We try to explain the various aspects involved in the creation of a city model and the problem of maintaining a city model. Then the paper shows the example of two computer models of parts of the same European city which have been created in two different ways. The first version of this computer model tries to use as many automatic or semi automatic procedures as possible to create the model. In the paper examples of these differentprocedures are given - from the automatic creation of the buildings itself, its roofs, and the surrounding terrain to the automatic cleaning of texture photos of the façade. The second version shows a model, which has been done with just a few automatic procedures and a lot of human effort (mainly students). The paper describes the limitation of both techniques and tries to give an outlook towards the combination of these methods. We will also show the importance of internet techniques in the use and presentation of computer city models.
series SIGRADI
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, b.martens@tuwien.ac.at, ploesch@zid.tu-graz.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 88ea
authors Dzieglewska, Maja
year 2002
title Cityscan - A digital urban experience
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 201-203
summary CITYSCAN is a series of interactive city documentations produced with contemporary multimedia techniques. It is offered as an elective course offered at the Department of Architecture by Prof. Dr. Ludger Hovestadt at ETH Zurich. Digital processing of information, multimedia programs, interactive presentations, teamwork and visualisation, are objects of investigation. A dense global CITYSCAN map elaborated together with students is our long-term goal.
series eCAADe
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id f6d6
authors El Araby, Mostafa
year 2002
title Possibilities and Constraints of using Virtual Reality in Urban Design
source CORP 2002, Vienna, pp. 457-463
summary This study aims at exploring the rapid growth of the use of Virtual Reality techniques in the field of Urban Design. Currently, VirtualReality —the ultimate representation— and Virtual Environments are the most growing fields of information technology and have agreat media attention. This research discusses the possibilities and limitations of applying Virtual Reality (VR) technology inenvironmental simulations for urban design practice. There is evidence to suggest that the use of such technology will enhanceconceivable image of any proposed project at any urban setting for users, designers and clients. Therefore, city officials andadministrators (clients) and the public (users) can reach better decisions regarding proposed projects within their towns and cities.Specifically, this research structured in several interdependent parts: the first part is concerned with the definition of VR as well as abackground of its history and current achievements. Types and components of VR systems are described and traditional simulationtechniques are reviewd. In addition, a discussion of current attempts in incorporating VR in urban design disciplines are presented.This discussion raises the question of appropriateness of the VR techniques in urban design projects. An assesment of both potentialsand limitations of aplying this technique, i.e. VRML (Virtual Reality Modelling Language), are discussed. This study definespotentialities, constraints and problems of using this technique, and recommends future research efforts in the field of using theVirtual Reality as a medium for delivering real content for those interested in the design of the built environment.
series other
email melaraby@aueu.ac.ae
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/12/19 11:19

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 1df8
authors Fedeski, M. and Sidawi, B.
year 2002
title The Management of Internet Use, in UK Architectural Practices
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 357-364
summary The architectural profession has been slow to adopt new innovations in such areas as buildingtechnology, management, and CAD, as earlier research has shown. The Internet presents a particularchallenge. With even greater changes to the Internet expected in the near future, it is timely to ask howthe profession is adapting.Field research conducted by the author has found shortcomings in the way that architects use Internettechnology in the U.K. These involve the decisions to adopt the Internet, the management of its dailyuse, and forward planning for future adaptation. U.K. architects under-use the services available, andexperience problems with the services they do use. Their resultant dissatisfaction with what the Internetcan offer leads to a reluctance to adopt and use further Internet services.This paper discusses one aspect of that research, which is how architects are managing Internetresources in their practices. It argues that many of the difficulties that architects have are related topractice management. The paper presents these under the headings of the knowledge and attitude ofthe staff, and the decisions made by practice managers. The paper highlights features that needattention from practices and from the architects who guide them.
series ACADIA
email fedeski@cardiff.ac.uk
last changed 2002/11/15 18:20

_id 6a37
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 13-23
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies ina tightly structured framework for the integration of Environmental Control Systems (ECS) principles intoa third year design studio. An interchangeable use of digital media and physical material enabledarchitectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement.The principles that provide the foundation for integrative strategies between a design studio and buildingtechnology course spring from the Bauhaus tradition where a systematic approach to craftsmanship andvisual perception is emphasized. Focusing particularly on color, light, texture and materials, Josef Albersexplored the assemblage of found objects, transforming these materials into unexpected dynamiccompositions. Moholy-Nagy developed a technique called the photogram or camera-less photograph torecord the temporal movements of light. Wassily Kandinsky developed a method of analytical drawingthat breaks a still life composition into diagrammatic forces to express tension and geometry. Theseschematic diagrams provide a method for students to examine and analyze the implications of elementplacements in space (Bermudez, Neiman 1997). Gyorgy Kepes's Language of Vision provides a primerfor learning basic design principles. Kepes argued that the perception of a visual image needs aprocess of organization. According to Kepes, the experience of an image is "a creative act ofintegration". All of these principles provide the framework for the studio investigation.The quarter started with a series of intense short workshops that used an interchangeable use of digitaland physical media to focus on ECS topics such as day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary tolead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration.In integrating ECS components with the design studio, an nine-step methodology was established toprovide students with a compelling and tangible framework for design:Examples of student work will be presented for the two times this course was offered (2001/02) to showhow exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series ACADIA
email tfowler@calpoly.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ae2a
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 24-27
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies interchangeably in a tightly structured framework for the integration of environmental control systems (ECS) principles into a third year design studio. An eight-step methodology enabled architectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement. The principles that provide the foundation for these integrative strategies between a design studio and building technology course, spring from a systematic approach that follows the tradition of the Bauhaus principles (e.g., Albers, Moholy-Nagy, Kandinsky and Kepes) of craftsmanship and visual perception.A series of intense short workshops focused on day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary to lead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration. Examples of student work and their feedback on this methodology process will show how the exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series SIGRADI
email tfowler@calpoly.edu, bmuller@calpoly.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ddssar0211
id ddssar0211
authors Fröst, Peter
year 2002
title Interactive Tools for Collaborative Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Today’s rapidly changing society is continuously developing towards an increased demand for multistakeholder knowledge and influence in the architectural planning and design process. Accordingly, we are working with developing and setting up a partner engaged collaborative design process. It includes active collaboration between users, external partners and designers, and visualizations in conceptual design and scenario building. My research is focusing on integrating visualization technology in theseprocesses by application of digital tools. We have developed a working prototype for an interactive design tool. The prototype is an extremely “easy to use” digital modeling tool called “ForeSite Designer.” With this tool one builds one’s own spatial environment with elements on a 2D surface.With one command the 2D layout is exported to a lit-up 3D/Virtual Reality world in the computer game “Half-Life”. ForeSite Designer has lately been used in a series of workshops together with external users. In these processes ForeSite Designer has played a crucial role as an arena of building spatially arranged concepts of future environments. The results show that it works, and, importantly, promotes a collaborative engagement among the users.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2205
authors Gabriel, Gerard Cesar and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2002
title Coding and modelling communication in architectural collaborative design
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 199-211
summary Although there has been some research done on collaborative face-to-face (FTF) and video-conferencing sessions involving architects, little is known about the effects these different media have on collaborative design in general and on collaborative communication and design representation in particular. In this paper, we argue that successful computer-mediated collaborative design (CMCD) does not necessarily mean emulating close-proximity environments. In order to investigate this view, we carried out experiments examining the effect and significance of different communication channels in collaborative sessions between architects. The experiments were conducted in different environments and classified into three categories. The first category is FTF. The second, CMCD sessions with full communication channels, CMCD-a. The third category was conducted also through CMCD sessions but with limited communication channels, CMCD-b. A custom coding scheme is developed using data, external and theoretically derived coding categories as a base. Examples of how the proposed coding scheme works are given from all three categories of experiments. The coding scheme provides the basis for modelling and understanding communication in collaborative design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id e641
authors Gero, John S. and Jupp, Julie R.
year 2002
title Measuring the Information Content of Architectural Plans
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 155-158
summary This paper describes and develops a preliminary approach to the measurement of the information content of two-dimensional design drawings. We utilise a general method for extracting information from an encoded string of symbols as a canonical representation of architectural plans. The information content of each drawing or set of drawings is determined by measuring its entropy. We present two classes of qualitative representation of shape and space. The first uses a qualitative representation of the outline of shapes in the drawing. The second uses a qualitative representation of the spaces described in the drawing. We describe the preliminary implementation of the method to a time-evolution of two formally described design styles, Romanesque and Gothic cathedral plans.
series SIGRADI
email {john, jupp_j} @arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id bca4
authors Glaser, D., Warfield, R., Carrier, K., Lam, A., Yong, Y.,Canny, J., Ubbelohde, M. and Do, E.
year 2002
title Multi-Resolution Sky Visualization: Daylight Design and Design Tools
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 251-261
summary This paper describes how building designers make sense of the sky and modern visualizationtechniques for representing them. The dialectic approach addresses technological innovation withrespect to existing social practices. This is done for two reasons—to illustrate where practices are andhow they can be extended with innovative technologies. It is shown that building designers maintainvarious levels of expertise for managing daylight design. Visualization prototypes are introduced alsowith different degrees of precision. The paper concludes with implications for the development ofdesign tools and use by building designers.
series ACADIA
email dcg@cs.berkeley.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id d65c
authors Glymph, J., Shelden, D., Ceccato, C., Mussel, J. and Schober, H.
year 2002
title A Parametric Strategy for Freeform Glass Structures Using Quadrilateral Planar Facets
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 303-321
summary The design and construction of freeform glass roofing structures is generally accomplished through theuse of either planar triangular glass facets or curved (formed) glass panes. This paper describesongoing research on the constructability of such structures using planar quadrilateral glass facets for theJerusalem Museum of Tolerance project by Gehry Partners, in collaboration with Schlaich Bergermann& Partners, engineers. The challenge here lies not only in the development of a geometric strategy forgenerating quadrilateral planar facet solutions, but also in the fact that said solutions must closely matchthe designs created initially in physical model form by the architects.We describe a simple but robust geometric method for achieving the structure by incorporating thenecessary geometric principles into a computational parametric framework using the CATIA Version 5system. This generative system consists of a hierarchical set of geometric ‘control elements’, that drivethe design toward constructible configurations. Optimization techniques for approximating the generatedstructural shape to the original created by the designers are also described. The paper presents theunderlying geometric principles to the strategy and the resulting computational approach.
series ACADIA
email cc@asyncc.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4this is page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9show page 10... show page 25HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_256609 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002