CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 508

_id 192eaea2001
id 192eaea2001
authors Kardos, Peter
year 2002
title Perceptual Evaluation of the Spatial Manifestations of Urban Structures
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary The objective of this contribution is to bring to the attention of the community of experts in the field of architectural simulation the interdependence of the spatial manifestations of material components of urban environments and the phenomena of visual perception and imagination which we practically employ in education, professional design and which we also try to use in our contact with the clients. The way towards finding new qualities of urban environments should be dominated by our efforts to understand and perceive the urban structure as a real space-time manifestation, which is being mediated to the user also as a sensually experienced image (scene). Its atmosphere and informative content give impulses for an individualized reaction from various aspects. The content of the experience is multileveled and the sensorial effects of its iconic components can be precisely verified by means of simulation processes in temporal sequences. Taking these aspects as basis, we are developing methods, which would by taking determined conditions into consideration, broaden the spectrum of research, verification, or evaluation of the real spatial manifestations and interactive actions in situ as well as their possible anticipation and performance in laboratory conditions. Perceptual simulation is, together with the significance of experiencing and evaluating the urban environment in the eye-level horizon, a starting point of spatial model simulation methods as a supportive experimental creative and verification tool. The new information technologies and the creative technical cooperation of analog and digital iconic simulation systems create unconventional possibilities for exact recording of information and impulses for the complicated transformational process engaging more actively the community in their participation. Practice in teaching architectural design has verified
series EAEA
email kardos@fa.stuba.sk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id koshak_phd_dissertation
id koshak_phd_dissertation
authors Koshak, N.
year 2002
title OBJECT-ORIENTED DATA MODELING AND WAREHOUSING TO SUPPORT URBAN DESIGN
source Ph.D. Dissertation, School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University
summary All over the world, local authorities are moving towards managing and storing urban data in digital form. But the data storage devices used are heterogeneous and typically include relational database management systems (DBMS), GIS and CAD files. As a result, data are present in different locations on different platforms and under different schemas. This poses a problem for software applications meant to support decision-making in urban design that require input from more than one data source. This dissertation demonstrates how data warehousing—combined with object-oriented data modeling—is able to provide a general solution for this problem. Data warehousing is a technique initially developed for business applications, but is equally useful for urban design: The data warehouse constitutes a communication layer between the urban design applications and data sources. It makes the data available through a unified interface that hides the sources themselves and represents that data in terms of a general-purpose, preferably object-oriented, model. The dissertation also describes an implementation prototype of the data model and the data warehouse. The test case of this research is the city of Makkah in Saudi Arabia, which faces significant urban design and planning issues in connection with the pilgrimage (Hajj) that brings millions of visitors to the city every year.
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email n@cad-gis.com
last changed 2005/09/09 11:10

_id ddssup0209
id ddssup0209
authors Koshak, Nabeel and Flemming, Ulrich
year 2002
title Object-Oriented Data Modeling and Warehousing to Support Urban Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary All over the world, local authorities are moving towards managing and storing urban data in digital form. But the data storage devices used are heterogeneous and typically include relational database managementsystems (DBMS), GIS and CAD files. As a result, data are present in different locations on different platforms and under different schemas. This poses a problem for software applications meant to supportdecision-making in urban design that require input from more than one data source. We demonstrate in our paper how data warehousing—combined with object-oriented data modeling—is able to provide a general solution for this problem. Data warehousing is a technique initially developed for businessapplications, but is equally useful for urban design: The data warehouse constitutes a communication layer between the urban design applications and data sources. It makes the data available through a unified interface that hides the sources themselves and represents that data in terms of a general-purpose, preferably object-oriented, model. We also describe an implementation prototype that supports different applications. The City of Makkah in Saudi Arabia provides us with real-world data and a context to test our prototype.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 6cde
authors Liapi, Katherine A.
year 2002
title Transformable Architecture Inspired by the Origami Art: Computer Visualization as a Tool for Form Exploration
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 381-388
summary Membrane packaging has been the main feature of the earliest prototypes of transformablearchitecture. Similar concepts of spatial transformation are encountered in the origami art where aplanar paper surface, after folding, transforms to a 3-dimentional object. The geometric configuration ofcreases on a sheet of paper before folding, as well as the topological properties of 3D origami papermodels, have been recently addressed, and can be used as a guide for the design of new forms.Because membranes in general can be considered surfaces of minimal thickness, principles of theorigami art and math can find applications in the conception and design of transformable membranestructures for architecture. This paper discusses how computer visualization can be used to explorethe potential application of ideas borrowed from the origami art in the conceptual design oftransformable structures. A two-case study that shows how origami math is integrated in the computervisualization of a potential architectural application is included. The same study also shows thatanimated simulations of the transformation process during folding can identify problems in the initialgeometric conception of an origami type structure, and can be used for further morphologicalexplorations.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 5c30
authors Linder, Mark and Clutter, McLain
year 2002
title Modeling Urban Spaces: GIS and CAD Compared
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 345-348
summary This research is producing digital cartographic models of the urban space of Rome, NY. Workingbetween two software packages for spatial visualization that are now ubiquitous in architecture (FormZ)and geography (ArcView), the project takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding howavailable data sources and modes of visualization enable or discourage particular understandings ofurban space. The project is designed specifically to work within, and develop, a critique of theconstraints of the two software packages. Rather than encouraging a deceptively smooth integration ofwhat may be fundamentally incommensurable forms of knowledge, this project begins with the premisethat vocabularies and conceptions of space vary considerably in various disciplines, as do the modes ofvisualization that each has developed to represent, document, examine, and produce space.
series ACADIA
email mdlinder@syr.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ddssar0223
id ddssar0223
authors Mahdavi, A, Suter G. and Ries, R.
year 2002
title A Representation Scheme for Integrated Building Performance Analysis
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper presents a representational scheme for integrated building performance analysis. The underlying research work was motivated by the need for seamless exchange of structured design information.A comprehensive and widely accepted industry standard suitable for exchanging design information among the various AEC (Architecture/Engineering/Construction) applications has yet to emerge. As a contribution to this on-going discussion, we present a specific approach to the integration problem in building product modeling. This approach can be viewed as pragmatic or bottom-up in the sense that itwas driven by the informational needs of related individual domains (particularly in the early stages of design) rather than by a quest for a universally applicable solution. In this paper, we describe a schemawhich emerged from the SEMPER effort, a multi-year project aimed at supporting detailed performance analysis for early design in the energy, life-cycle analysis, lighting, and thermal comfort domains. Thisschema relies on a representational division of labor between a shared building model, and various disciplinary (domain) models. Specifically, we present a documentation of the shared object model together with disciplinary models for the energy, light, acoustics, and life-cyle assessment domain.
keywords building product models, building performance, integration
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssup0213
id ddssup0213
authors Osaragi, Toshihiro
year 2002
title Classification Methods for Spatial Data Representation
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In the process of representing quantitative spatial data on a map, it is necessary to classify attribute values into some class divisions. When a number of classes are employed, the characteristics of spatial distribution of original data can be expressed faithfully. However, its legends might become rather complicated and the delicate color differences in the represented map would be difficult to distinguish. On the other hand, when employing a few classes, the information such as small vibrating factors or local peaks might be ignored; namely, much information of original data will be lost. Hence, we should discuss how many classes are necessary to represent spatial data. Furthermore, even if the same spatial data are represented using the same number of classes, we might obtain the quite different maps according to the choice of classification methods incorporated in existing geographic information systems. Namely, the characteristics of the original data might be overlooked, or there might be a risk of mistaking judgment, if we do not have enough knowledge about classification methods as well as the nature of original data. Hence, we should also discuss how the boundary value between each class should be set. In this paper, a new classification method using an evaluation function based on Akaike’s Information Criterion is proposed, and is applied to actual spatial data. Next, based on the consideration about its result, another classification method minimizing information loss of original data is proposed. Furthermore, numerical examples of its applications are achieved through the comparison with existing classification methods.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id bff9
authors Proctor, George (Ed.)
year 2002
title ACADIA 2002 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X / Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, 446 p.
summary The 2002 ACADIA conference finds digital tec_nology ubiquitous as the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture moves into its third decade. The organization of ACADIA is on the threshold of restating its mission. After 20 years, many of the organization’s initial objectives have been achieved. ACADIA members have been instrumental in the development of design software, and in bringing computers and digital technology into architectural practice and design school curriculum. At first, ACADIAns faced the debate over the appropriateness and utility of digital technology in the disciplines of architecture, planning and building science. Today the use of computers and information technology is widely accepted by architects and CAAD and digital technology have brought profound change to design practice. The debate in ACADIA has long since moved from "should we use this technology" to "how", "for what" and "why". Now that many practitioners, learning institutions and professional organizations have taken up the call, ACADIA must restate its mission, if it wishes to remain “distinct”. This does not mean that the work of ACADIA is complete. Much remains to be done and much more needs to be improved. ACADIA’s Mission Statement places particular focus on “education and the software, hardware and pedagogy involved in education.” And “(t)he organization is also committed to the research and development of computer aides that enhance design creativity, and that aim at contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” These are the areas that continue to evolve, grow and provide for ACADIA’s continued relevance. The ACADIA 2002 conference theme reflects the state of digital technology’s application to the discipline, as much as it refers to ACADIA’s future. With the general acceptance of digital technology and CAAD, we have arrived at a place where the work of great interest and relevance lies in the space between what is digital and what is analog. The environments of real space and cyberspace have in a very short time become so intertwined that the space between real and virtual (not to be confused with reality and fantasy) is becoming indistinguishable. You cannot eat, travel, use public utilities, bank, shop, vacation or recreate without at the very least coming into contact with or passing through information space. The landscape between these two environments has become a cultural phenomenon for those societies with access to the Internet and information networks. And while the computer and World Wide Web have empowered individuals, the collective impact of the technology holds all the potential and problems that similarly emerged in other technology induced landscapes. Consider this last point in the context of ACADIA’s stated mission to “enhance design creativity while contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” And you can see why many of the 260 initial submissions to this conference were in the area of design artifacts and design methodology, providing evidence that ACADIA’s mission remains relevant and in accord with the trends of research and professional creative activity.
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 2c14
authors Sharji, E.A., Hussain, H. and Ahmad, R.E.
year 2002
title Electronic Gallery : Case Study of A New Design Approach in Malaysia
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 370-373
summary A building comprises of more than the skin and the structural works. It is the soul that comes in the form of SPACE that is intriguing and provokes the mind. To be able to experience a building relies heavily on the spatial concept and internal lay out. How one is captured right from entering the entrance and through the layering of space, of horizontal and vertical planes and finally the euphoria, or depressed feeling that concludes the tour depending on the feeling intended (Miller, 1995). The common norm at present celebrates the outer skin and grandeur of facades. Not many include the hidden grids and fragmentation that can lead to a surprisingly good form AND space. Thus a number of them fail, in the sense of a sensuous building. ‘The circulation path can be conceived as the perceptual thread that links the spaces of a building or any series of interior or exterior spaces, together. Since we move in TIME, through SEQUENCE of SPACES, we experience a space in relation to where we’ve been, and where we anticipate going’ (Ching, 1979). This research intends to study and analyze the unconventional electronic gallery or ‘e-gallery’ as a versatile hybrid container. The focus of the research will be on documenting spaces in the e-gallery, bringing to light the unlimited possibilities that can take place in such a space.
series eCAADe
email elyna.amir@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ddssar0227
id ddssar0227
authors Tomlinson, James D. and Holmes, Michael V.
year 2002
title Digital Representational Tools Impact on the Design Decision Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper presents two pilot studies that explore the impact of virtual reality representations on the evaluative judgements of trained designers and design students. These projects are intended to explore several aspects of spatial perception as impacted by the representational media in an attempt to identify the potential impact of this media on the development of design solutions. The participants were exposed todifferent representational media and modes of representation or simulation: traditional “physical media” (plan, elevations, and model), physical place and projected computer generated media including flat screen animation and hemispherical corrected animation for display on the VisionDome. The 4-meter VisionDome is an immersive, multi-user, single projection virtual reality environment. The results of theseefforts potentially indicate that when trained designers view a simulation of a space their perception of the space is, to some degree, affected by the representational media. The walk-through mode emphasized theperceptual differences between traditional and computer generated representations. A low level of detail in a computer-generated “walk-through” simulation provides perceptual elements, which allow the viewer todevelop an understanding of the spatial relationships of the design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ga0208
id ga0208
authors Wang, Xu and Lau, Siu Yu
year 2002
title Pursuing New Urban Living Environment In The New Millennium: Projecting The Future Of High-Rise And High Density Living In Hong Kong
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary High-rise and high density living is a way of life for most of the 6.7 Million population of Hong Kong. The merits and demerits affiliated with Hong Kong’s compact urban form continues to attract academic deliberations and debates over the acceptability of such urban form as an alternative to urban sprawl for future city and urban life-style. This paper traces the development and causes for Hong Kong’s high-rise and high-density urban form over the past fifty years or so, and focuses its discussions on the pros and cons of high-rise living based on subjective user survey in late 2001 and early 2002. Because of an articulated land shortage, acute topography, escalating population growth, and shortage of time, Hong Kong government and planners have little options left but to adopt vertical development, resulted in a densely and mixed use urban habitat packed with closely built high-rise residences and commercial buildings. From the survey, it is clear that mixed and intensive land use, high quality of living and recreation infrastructure, efficient public transportation network, and segregation of pedestrian and traffic can facilitate the performance of compact urban form. In addition, most of Hong Kong families have been accustomed to high-rise living pattern and the disadvantages such living pattern might cause on its resident’s social communication and children education are readily ignored by most of the people. Based on the analysis of current living situation and development trends in Hong Kong, new pattern of future city form is conceived to be a likely applicable development way in a coastal city with such high density as Hong Kong in the next 50 years. Design countermeasures are presented in this paper to suggest ways of alleviating the pressure of the forever-increasing house requirements in Hong Kong. high-density, high-rise, compact city, social acceptance, life-style.
keywords high-density, high-rise, compact city, social acceptance, life-style
series other
email wangxc@hkusua.hku.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddssar0203
id ddssar0203
authors Alkass, Sabah and Jrade, Ahmad
year 2002
title A Web-Based Virtual Reality Model for Preliminary Estimates of Hi-Rise Building Projects
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Cost estimating of a construction project at its early stage is considered to be very important task since it will be used as a base to commit or otherwise not to commit funds to that project. Preparation of a reliableand realistic preliminary estimate to aid the decision makers to commit funds for a specific project is a complicated assignment. Traditional methods and operations produced unsatisfactory aid due to lack ofaccuracy especially in the pre-design stage of a project. This participates in the increase of percentage of bankruptcy in the construction industry, which has dramatically climbed up and ranked as 15 percent of thewhole bankruptcies claimed in Canada (Statistic Canada 1998). This paper presents a methodology for developing and a Web-based model to automate preliminary cost estimates for hi-rise buildings. This is achieved by integrating a database with design drawings in a Virtual Reality (VR) environment. The model will automatically generate preliminary estimates after modifying a 3D CAD drawing. It provides the user the option to visualize and simulate the drawing and its cost data through VR environment. Having done that, it will allow owners, architects and cost engineers to view a constructed building project, change its geometric objects and shapes, and accordingly generate a new conceptual cost estimate.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade2013_111
id ecaade2013_111
authors Androutsopoulou, Eirini
year 2013
title Urban Body Mutations through the Use of the Network Configuration
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 1, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 275-281
wos WOS:000340635300028
summary Taking as a starting point the hypotheses that the urban body is a self-adapted ecology made of material and non-material components (Bateson, 1972), relationships between elements are examined in an attempt to destabilize the static division of matter and idea and to inquire into those relationships that determine the structural coupling (Maturana, 2002) between body and environment, as well as the constitution of the body itself. Contemporary technology is used in order to trace these alterations and the urban body is examined as a network configuration. The importance of the methodology adopted by the current research lies in the fact that social and economic factors merge with spatial characteristics, allowing for a visualization and re-interpretation of the urban body mutations based on self-adapted reconfigurations and for a prediction of the structural alterations made possible through the reconfiguration of the synaptic forces between elements.
keywords Mutation; urban body; visualization techniques; network; data manipulation.
series eCAADe
email iandroutsopoulou@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ddssup0202
id ddssup0202
authors Antoni, J.P.
year 2002
title Urban Sprawl Modelling: Combining Models to Make Decision
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Urban sprawl is frequently associated with the idea of an unsuitable development, leading to increasing economic, social and environmental problems. Moreover, its control is difficult because multiple patterns (concerning numerous traditional urban planning fields) overlap. In order to understand the sprawl process and to manage its consequences, it must be simplified. The construction of a decision making tool appears then interesting. The GIS-based tool presented here is being developed incollaboration between the urban planning agency of Belfort and the laboratory of geography of Strasbourg. It requires three steps: 1. quantification of the sprawl (how much areas are involved in theurban sprawl process?); 2. location of the sprawl (where are the areas defined in the first step?); 3. differentiation of the sprawl (what are the areas located in the second step?). Of course, the successionof the three stages makes the use of the complete model more complex. So, a global ergonomic user interface is being developed within the GIS, allowing to modify each parameter and to play easily numerous simulations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id f321
authors Ataman, Osman and Bermudez, Julio
year 2002
title ACADIA'99: media effect on architectural design
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 131-134
summary The idea of this conference arose from various discussions between us in various different places. We decided to put a proposal together for both positions—Technical Chairs and Site Organizers. This was unprecedented and we were anxious. We really wanted to run this conference and run it in Salt Lake City. Our theme AMedia and Design ProcessB was a timely topic and both of us were working on and around it. We thought it was interesting and challenging to define the terms and to establish the relationships between architecture, representation and media. In fact, all throughout the history of architecture, representation, media and design have been recognized to have a close relationship. Interpretations as to what exactly this relationship is or means have been subject to debate, disagreement and change along the ages. Whereas much has been said about the dialectics between representation and design, little has been elaborated on the relationship between media and design. Perhaps, it is not until now, surrounded by all kinds of media at the turn of the millennium, as Johnson argues, that we have enough context to be able to see and address the relationship between media and human activities with some degree of perspective.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 2044
authors Barros, Diana Rodríguez and Mandagaran, María
year 2002
title Sistemas Hipermediales y descentramiento temático [Hyper medial Systems and thematic decentralized]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 190-192
summary Hipermedia lead to a non- linear organization of information, where the user decides the path to follow and the relations among the different information blocks. They constitute starting points for establishing both social and sin gu lar “sense genealogies”. Sense production by means of mutimedia access and the resignifying of information correspond, within the Theory of Science Didactics, to the concept of thematic decentering. This concept refers to fl exibility and transference modes, opposed toseg men ta tion and which enable to explore, approach and relate different topics and complexities. It is supposed to generate more cultivated individuals by broadly linking science, technology and art. Within this theoretic frame work, the work presents the de vel op ment of a hipermedium on the Villa Victoria Cultural Center, which aims at a didactic treat ment of cultural spaces as object of knowl edge.
series SIGRADI
email dibarros@mdp.edu.ar, mmandagaran@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 077a
authors Boucard, D., Huot, S., Colin, Ch., Hégron, G. and Siret, D.
year 2002
title An Image-based and Knowledge-based System for Efficient Architectural and Urban Modeling
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 229-238
summary In this paper, we present two user-centered systems aiming at making easier the modeling ofarchitectural and urban scenes by using two different but complementary approaches. The first oneMArINa, an image-based modeler, allows the user to reconstruct urban scenes from one or moregraphical documents. This method focuses more on reconstructing models and is more dedicated tothe production of 3D sketches. The second modeler, MArCo is a knowledge-based modelercontaining the know-from and know-how on classical architecture. It allows the user to modelclassical architectural scenes verifying automatically all the domain rules. Finally, we show howMArINa and MArCo can cooperate providing the user a tool combining efficiently their respectivecapabilities.
series ACADIA
email Didier.Boucard@emn.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id b13d
authors Broek, J.J., Horváth, I., Smit, B. de, Lennings, A.F., Rusák, Z. and Vergeest, J.S.M.
year 2002
title Free-form thick layer object manufacturing technology for large-sized physical models
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 335-347
summary Large-sized free-form objects of different materials are widely used in various industrial applications. Currently, layered rapid prototyping technologies are not suitable for the fabrication of this kind of objects, due to the necessity of a large number of layers and the limitations in size. This paper reports a novel approach of layered manufacturing that is more appropriate for the fabrication of these large objects. A method of thick-layered object manufacturing is presented, which is based on a higher order approximation of the shape and application of a flexible curved cutting tool. The method allows the production of physical prototypes, which need little or no finishing. In order to meet the designer's intend, as closely as possible, some feasible system characteristics are introduced. The process is ordered in a sequential way and provides a highly automated process. A hierarchical decomposition of the CAD geometry takes place into components, segments, layers and sectors, based on morphological analysis. This method enables the manufacturing and the re-assembly of the parts to produce the physical prototypes without affecting the requested functionality. Due to the possibility of obtaining multiple solutions in the physical model, much attention must be paid to the efficiency of the process.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id d5e1
authors Bugajska, Malgorzata Maria
year 2002
title Spatial Visualization of abstract Information: A Classification Model for Visual Spatial Design Guidelines in the Digital Domain
source Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich
summary Visualization of abstract information refers to the design of graphical representations of information that has no simple relation to known concrete or physical forms. Designing visualizations of abstract information requires proposing visual representation for often a large body of data pants. determining a meaningful structure for the complex relations among them and suggesting a method for Interacting with this body of data. Spatial perception plays an Important role for cognitive processing when interacting with abstract information, slice spatially-organized Information can be accessed and operated on rapidly and effortlessly, especially when a spatial arrangement reveals the conceptual organization of Information.

This thesis focuses on aspects of the spatial visual design of abstract information presented as computer-generated. dynamic and interactive images accessible through flat displays. The process of spatial visualization design is shaped by various factors including interactive, perceptual, navigational as well as organizational and metaphorical aspects and as such requires an interdisciplinary approach. Therefore, in researching spatial visual design. it is crucial to use methods facilitating the process of sharing competencies among different disciplines.

In this thesis, we introduce a new classification model accommodating features important in designing effective spatial visualizations of abstract information. To enhance the effectiveness of spatial visualization, this model offers a holistic approach in classifiying spatial Visualization features. As part of the model, we analyze properties already used in architectural representation and other visual design disciplines for spatial presentations as well as investigate their potential usage in digital domains of abstract information. The process of spatial visualization In the digital environment is mostly based on the practical experience of a designer. and therefore the majority of spatial design know-how is heuristic in nature. Based on this assumption, we present a set of guidelines addressing the general problem of spatial design.

The Spalial Design Classificahon Model, Visual Spatial Properties and Spatial Design Guidelines build an extendable infrastructure which becomes a first step towards augmenting the quality of spatial information design- We propose to use this infrastructure as a general blueprint for structuring the exchange of expertise in Interdisciplinary problem-solving processes.

series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/05/15 10:22

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